Myskania Announces—Results of Spring Elections

advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1941
PAGE I
State College
Myskania Announces—Results of Spring Elections
fDlsquallfied
Major-Minor
Plan
•.Disqualified—Elected
In class
•Cundliiiite for
revote
Boldface
Elected
President
Vote 1
Miller, Vincent
Passow,
Harry
Tlbbetts,
Balph
Blanks
Vice-President
Uora, H a r r y
Lynch,
Howard
Portley,
James'
Taylor, Bryant
Viiiiun, D o n
Blanks
Secretary
Bishop, Frank
Forrest,
William
Hordman,
Katherine
Kilcy, B e r t r a m
LutInter, Pntrlcltt
Snow,
Earle
Blanks
N8FA
Representative
Buckninu,
Jean
Huyck,
Dorothy
Leonard, Robert
Vote 8
202
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320
325
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85
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Vote 3
Votel
McCann, Mary
Ott,
Shirley
Siegel, Shirley
Singer, Harold
Blanks
MAA
Representative
Bombard, Owen
llrauner, Henry
Dickson, 'William
Hansen, Frank
Blanks
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Carlson, J u n e
Klrs'henliliim,
Mildred
Losnrdo,
Ciiriiiullnii
McOrntli,
Mary
Murphy,
Philip
Welsbluiu, Sophie
Blanks
50
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Vote 2
V o t e :i
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Vice-President
Oaylord, Murjorie
ltyerson,
Jeanette
Stiller, Alfred
Walratii, Glenn
W'llsou, K a t h r y u
Blanks
143
President
Bniilt, .lack
Feeney,
TIIOIIIUM
Kunss,
George
Taylor,
Bryani
Blanks
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27
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Vice-President
Bunion. Betty
I''iax, A n t l l t i r
Muttlco, Mildred
Levill, J o s e p h
Blanks
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143
MAA
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Hunt, H u r r y
Flax. A r t h u r
F i n x, Leo
G u r b c r , .Morris
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Hansen,
Frank
Leonard, Robert
Blanks
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Publicity
Hobday,
Blanks
Director
Arthur
Publicity
Director
KIIKIIIIIIII, S h i r l e y
Jewell,
Alma
Rich, Miirllyiiiie
Blanks
143
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Rlasiar,
Emily
Bomhiii'il,
(iwen
D a v i s , l.enoi'ii
Lynch,
Howard
Stern,
Rose
Swaiison,
Clifford
Blanks
143
Representatives
to
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Marsillo,
Nicholas
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.Ionian,
Harrison
Tybrinr,
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S e l i u l l z , Villi Vllel
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Publicity
Director
(ileason,
Robert
HiirdcNty,
Georgia
Meilolialll,
Helen
Blanks
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181
Treasurer
Blylhe,
Russell
Carlson, J u n e
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F.rlisioin, G e o r g e .
M c N I f f , .Mury
Soilerlinil,
Arthur
Terho, Allan
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27
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R e p r e s e n t a t i v e to
Blumel,
Herman
Brueker, Helen
Illgglns, Josepli
Mltrshllll, Verne
Mould, John
Skolsk.v,
Bernard
S m i t h , J a n e t I,
Slllll.ll, J a n e t li
Wurlz, Harry
Blanks
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WAA
MumiKer
Doiimim,
Mary
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Townseiid,
Dorothy
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In Near Future
Tapping did not end at noon
on Moving-TJp Day for Ed Holstein, tenth member of the new
Myskania, for Ed was tapped
again during the day but as
Ed Holstein, alias John Doe.
At exactly 12 noon he turned
to face the cheering crowd which
jammed Page Auditorium, and
then mysteriously disappeared.
Kidnapped? No, for Ed was
scheduled to appear at the corner
of State and Pearl streets at
12:10 as John Doe in a contest
sponsored by the Strand Theatre
and Times Union in connection
with the new picture "Meet John
Doe." In all, Ed handed out $25
in prizes and 25 passes to passers-by who recognized him. Thus
Holstein has taken his place with
Kusak and Murray, State's gifts
to the American theatre.
The College Catalogue for the
years 1941-1942, 1942-43 will be off
the presses shortly and its appearance will clear up the questions
and rumors about new regulations
and courses which have been affected by the five-year plan.
Certain regulations in the requirements for the bachelor's degree
have undergone changes. In the
work of major or minor departments
"C" is the minimum passing grade.
There is to be an exception to this
rule: When passed by the head of
the department concerned and approved by the dean of the College a
grade of "D" may be balanced by a
grade of "B" or better earned in a
similar course or in an advanced
course that is based on the course The names of the Counsellors of
the Women's Freshman Camp,
failed.
which will be held September 12, 13,
Ruling on Incompletes
14, at Camp Van Schoonhoven on
A new regulation will be that n Burden Lake, were released this
student who receives an incomplete week by the office of Miss Sara
in any course shall remove the in- Tod DeLaney, Dean of Women.
complete the following semester. If They are as follows: Armede Black,
not, the incomplete becomes an "E." Feme Grenier, Anita Holm, Mary
There is also an addition to the Irving, Shirley Kyle, Kay Peterson,
requirements for admission: Funds Katherine Richards, Ruth Rockavailable in an amount sufficient to castle, Jeannette Ryerson, Jean
maintain the student in college Sears, Jane Williams, Kay Wilson,
without the necessity for outside juniors; Gloria Cammarota, Doroemployment to a degree that is thy Cox, Lenora
Davis, Jane
dangerous to the student's health Greenmun, Lois Hafley, Dorothy
or to scholastic accomplishment.
Huyck, Jean McAllister, Shirley
In the section on residence is a Mosher, Verna Snyder, sophomores;
new clause stating that freshmen Edith Beard, Patricia Carroll, Mary
men are required to live at Sayles Domann, Kay Doran, Kathryn
Hall or Thomas More House unless Herdman, Theodora Jay, Leda LaPatricia Latimer, Osnif Seragranted special permission by the Salle,
bian, Dorothea
Simmons,
and
Dean of Students to live elsewhere. Nancy Wilcox, freshmen.
New Biology Classes
Camp Director, Susan Wing, '42,
A number of courses have been
eliminated, and others have been will be assisted by Mildred Mattice,
added to the curriculum. In some '43, Assistant Director, and Winicases a course appears under a new fred Jones, '43, Treasurer.
This year's program for Freshname or a new head.
man camp places more emphasis on
Courses in elementary physiology discussion groups, which will conand taxonomy (identification of vas- sider college activities. Also included
cular plants), have been added to are the candlelight service, fashion
the biology department. The Eng- show, skits, and song contests. Miss
lish department will offer a course Sara Tod DeLaney, Dean of
on the contemporary American Women, states that applications for
novel 1 closed to majors and minors camp thus far are normal for this
in English) and a four hour course time of year, and in spite of the
on the poetry of Keats and Shelley. reduction in the number of incomItalian has been completely dropped ing students, the usual attendance
from the curriculum.
is expected.
DeLaney Reveals
New Counsellors
Prepares for Two-Year Leave
188
511
41-43 Catalogue
Hohtein Leaves Page
To 'Meet John Doe'
Cornell Calls Another A s Hardy
I
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181
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Secretary
BaIril, E u n i c e
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Capel, Charles
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Doriin, Kity
Frank,
Theresa
Loucks,
Robert
.
Shoemaker,
Fred
Blanks
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Bu nl h u m ,
Jane
Bishop,
Frank
Hove, ( i c r l r u i l c
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Enslow,
Mary
Freilerlek,
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Snyiler,
Gilhorl
White,
Robert
Blanks
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College to Issue
Book W i l l Clear Up Questions
About Curriculum Changes;
Many Revisions Included
3(1
181
Hill
143
President
Asliwoi'th,
Harold
Beyer,
Frederick
Carroll,
Pntriclii
Combs,
Robert
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Blanks
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148
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Caclilllo,
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125
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finer,
Winifred
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Dorothy
Kyle, Shirley
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Voting,
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Kill
MAA
Representatives
Dickson,
William
tiruves,
Leslie
Marotlo, Carl
Selfert,
Robert
Blanks
Cheerleaders
Utter, W i n i f r e d
Brooks,
Dorothy
Cox, D o r o t h y
Diiiginan,
Ilarley
Dorrance,
William
Flux,
Arthur
llufley,
Lois
Marchella,
Peter
O'Connor, Thomas
Papo,
Vincent
'I'eln, E s l h e r
Toopfer, Kolfe
White, Robert
Blanks
152
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•Secretary
Buckmuu,
Jean
Ciiinmiiriit.ii,
Gloria
Met IIIIO, M a r y
Mother, Shirley
Ott, Shirley
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Jean
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Vote 2
Songlender
Class of 1944
Vote
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Secretary
lluuslntlter, J u n e
Kecler, Ruth
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Student Association
Cox, D o r o t h y
Dingiuan,
Hurley
Hirsh,
Ira
Snow,
Kitrlo
Southwlck, Jane
Swain,
Mildred
Blanks
Class of 1943
Class of 1942
President
Brauncr, Henry
(irlffin,
Leo
Merritt, Paul
7
Breuuig, Marjorie
Caiiel, Charles
3
Music
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Representative
Alley,
Trace
218*
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ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, MAX 23, 1941
z-443
Student Association
Amidst the turmoil of hammering, shouting and sound effects was
Mr. William G. Hardy perched unsteadily on a high ladder, putting the
finishing touches on the tenement
for the Street Scene production. "I'll
talk to you up here and no place
else," he answered when he was
questioned.
Mr. Hardy, who was born In Cleveland in 1910, went to school at Brown
University, and succeeded in obtaining a position there alter graduating.
Later he worked at various stations,
writing, directing, and acting in commercial productions. He also helped
to broadcast children's programs
and even "advice to the lovelorn."
At one time lie wrote short plays for
Irene Rich, well-known star of many
moving-pictures. These plays advertised grape juice. When asked If
he ever tried the product himself, he
nodded and said, "Yes, but It's too
expensive." While working on the
radio, he met the woman who later
became his wife. She happened to
be directing a production of David
Copperfield in which he played a
part. They have been married eight
years and have two children, a boy
and a girl.
After three and a half years of
radio work, he came to Stale, which
he considers an "exceptionally fine
place." Realizing that there are
many opportunities In radio, he says,
"I'm as famous now as I ever want
to be." Incidentally, he likes teaching better than radio work. He
believes that the speech of the students is rather bad. When asked
what he likes best about the college,
he replied smilingly, "the girls of the
student body I"
In his spare time he plays tennis,
builds furniture for his children, and
reads and collects limericks. Mr.
Louis C. Jones and he together own
a collection of limericks, many of
which Mr. Hardy admits ure not fit
to quote. He also likes to sing In the
bath tub, but there only.*
Mr. Hardy believes he will like
Cornell, for he considers it one of the
best of the Eastern colleges for the
study he wishes to pursue, Although
a great deal of his time will be spent
In studying for his degree in rhetoric,
he will teach speech work to the
Cornell students,
Mr. Hardy is noted for his sympathetic understanding of student
problems. He is known as a regular
guy. As one of the students expressed it, "Hardy understands,"
•
'Street Scene' Performance
Annual Alumni
Triumph of Acting, Directing Day to Precede
•
KATHRYN I. WILSON, recently
tapped member of Myskania, who
is starring In Advanced Dramatic's
Street Scene in the role of central
love interest.
State to Introduce
New NYA rrogram
June 7 Fixed as New Deadline
For Fall A i d Applications
AH students who wish to obtain
NYA aid for next year must have
their names and summer addresses
in the office of the Dean of Women
before June 7. No grants can be
made before fall since no definite
allotment of funds has been made
to State College, Miss DeLaney announced.
During the summer those students
who have filed requests for aid will
be sent application blanks which
must be filled out and returned to
the Dean of Women's office before
September 2. By doing this, it is believed that the student will be able
to estimate his resources and expenses for the year more definitely.
Any student who discovers during
the summer that he will need aid
to continue in school may write to
the Dean of Women for an application blank. A student who has
worked on N. Y. A. in the past does
not automatically receive a grant.
Greek Councils Name
.oming /ear s Head;
Interfraternity and Intersorority
Councils have climaxed their year's
activities by the disclosure of officers for 1941-1942 and the awarding
of the Interfraternity Cup to Kappa
Beta.
The officers of Interfraternity
Council for next year are as follows:
President Maxson Reeves, '42; VicePresident, Leo Griffin, '42; Secretary, M. Joseph Levin, '43; Treasurer,
Bob Leonard, '43.
Bertha Petit, '41, President of Intersorority Council, disclosed the
following officers of Council for
next year: President, Jean Sears, '42,
Beta Zeta; Vice President, Ruth
Freeman, '42, Pi Alpha Tim; Secretary, Doris Sturtsse, '42, Phi Delta;
Treasurer, Hazel MucCombw, '42,
Sigma Alpha.
Pedagogue — Important
All students who paid their student
tax before March 1 should get their
Peds either today or Monday. The
Peds were ordered March 1 according to the number of full and half
taxes paid at that date. Those people are receiving priority. After
Monday the books will be given out
to any person who has paid a tax,
There may be a shortage, so it Is
advisable to get yours at once!
by Rattray and Hertel
The meager audience that saw
last night's performance of Street
Scene witnessed a presentation that
was a tribute to the directing ability
of Miss Agnes Futterer. Faced with
the stupendous task of coaching
fifty-six actors in a play which depends for its powerful theme upon
the life-like portrayal of each character, Miss Futterer inspired in her
cast a dynamic performance.
The curtain opened last night to
display a typical East side brownstone house. Throughout the entire
first act, the audience remained
tense as the cast presented a vivid
picture of tenement life. The characters played by Tom Vassillew,
Anna Cattuti, Tom Augustine, Kay
Wilson, and Paul Barselou were
among the best acted that have been
seen in many a month.
Elmer Rice can be well proud of
the skillful development of his tragic
story of a wife whose jealous husband
discovered that another man was
providing her with the kindness
which he had failed to supply. The
play, however, is much more than
the conventional triangle; it is a
many-faceted accusation of human
nature.
The minor actors were invaluable
in their depicting of slum environment. The little touches proved the
excellence of the direction and
caused Street Scene to be a play
worth seeing.
Some criticisms are in order. The
portrayal of age was rather poor in
the case of Jordan and Keeler
Miller's poetic interpretation of his
part was not adequate. The raucus
horn in the sound effects should have
been squelched during the more dramatic moments.
A word of praise should be spoken
about the work of William G. Hardy
and the Stagecraft class. The set
they created is one of the best that
has ever been seen at State College
Alumni Will Dedicate
Completed Dormitory
The official dedication of Sayles
Hall will take place on Alumni Day,
Saturday, June 14, in the gymnasium of the building. Miss Minnie
B. Scotland, Assistant Professor of
Biology, is general chairman of the
dedication program.
Selections by the State College
Chorus, under the direction of Dr,
T. F. H. Candlyn, Assistant Professor of Music, will begin the program. Following this W. Earle
Sutherland, '19, President of the
Alumni Association, will announce
that the two residence halls will
henceforth be known as Pierce and
Sayles Halls. Dr. Harry W. Hastings, Professor of English, will conduct the formal dedication.
Work on Sayles Hall Is nearing
completion. The roof Is on, and the
room partitions are being formed.
The rooms themselves are beginning
t.o be defined. Plans for grading
and planting are under way and
contributions toward landscaping are
being accepted.
Installation of Officers
Will Highlight Assembly
The main feature of today's assembly will be the installation of the
incoming officers of the Student Association. Merrill Walrath, '41, retiring president, will turn over his gavel
to the newly-elected president, Ralph
Tlbbetts, '42.
The amendment to the constitution
which was introduced by Robert
Ague, '41, in the Muy 2 assembly will
bo voted upon. This amendment provides that the president of the
graduate class from the time of Jts
incorporation In 1943-44 will be entitled to membership on Student
Council.
Another feature of the assembly
will be a treasurer's report by Mr.
Edward L. Cooper, Treasurer of the
Student Board of Finance.
Commencement
Class Day Activities Planned
As Pre-Graduation Program;
Hertel to Read History
The State College commencement
weekend will begin with the Alumni
Association's annual Alumni Day
on June 14. The events of the day
include the alumni luncheon and
the President's reception at Pierce
Hall.
In the evening, the Class Day activities of the class of 1941 will start
at 8:30 P. M. with the welcoming
speech by Roy McCreary, President
of the Senior class. The Class History will be read by Robert Hertel.
Dennis Hannan will present the
Class Poem, with Catherine O'Brien
reading the Class Prophecy. Climaxing the program is the traditional
torchlight ceremony in front of
Draper Hall.
Clausen To Speak
On Sunday, June 15, the annual
Baccalaureate service will be conducted at. 2:30 P, M. in Page Hall,
Classes End Thursday Noon
Classes will not meet Thursday
afternoon, May 29, according to an
announcement from the Office of
the Dean. This time has been set
aside for students who wish to consult faculty members on scholastic
questions. The faculty members will
be in their offices from 1:30 to 3:30
P. M„ May 29.
Dr. Bernard Chancellor Clausen,
Pastor of the First Baptist Church,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, will deliver the Baccalaureate sermon.
The invocation and benediction are
to be given by the Rev. William
Cahill, of Albany. The State Choral
Society will sing at the ceremonies.
Senior Breakfast will take place
on Monday, June 16, at 8:30 A. M„
under the chairmanship of John A.
Murray with Dennis Hannan acting
as toaslmaster for the occasion and
Dr. Donnal V. Smith, of the Social
Studies department, as the principal speaker,
Hill Commencement Speaker
The annual Commencement exercises are to be held in Page
Hall at 10 A. M.
Principal
speaker at the ceremonies is Dr.
Clyde Milton Hill, Professor of Secondary Education at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
Members of Sigma Laudis will distribute the degrees conferred on the
graduating class by the Board of
Trustees In behalf of the Regents
of the State of New York. The newlytapped Myskania will usher.
Highlight of Commencement evening will be the annual Senior Ball at
10 P. M„ under the chairmanship of
Robert Hertel, vice-president of the
Senior class. Hertel is assisted by
the following committee heads:
Glenn Clark, music; Catherine O'Brien, arrangements; Bertha Petit,
bids; and Paul Grattan, publicity.
Service Club Alters NameBecomes Epsilon Tau Omega
Service Fraternity changed Its
name at the lust meeting of the year
yesterday. As 11 result of committee
reseorch by Benson Tybrlng, '42,
President, Robert Lnurer, '43, VicePresident, and Robert Bunn, '42, the
organization became known as
Epsilon Tau Omega. Further results of the meeting were the adoption of award keys, a banner of blue
and gold, and the announcement as
honorary members and advisors the
following faculty; Dr, Robert Rlenow, Mr. Paul O. Bulger, Dr. J.
Allan Hicks, Dr. Watt Stewart, and
Mr, Louis 0. Jones.
„jgjm
'
' ' ' " "f*K&&
m
PA0E1
High Finances
25th
STATE COLLEGE NEWS Ytar
Transition and Tympani
Vol. XXV ,
Prlilny, May 23
No, 28
Member
Distributor
Associated Collegiate Frets
Collegiate Digest
The undergraduate newspaper of the New York State College for Teachers published every Friday of the college
year by the NEWS Board for the Student Association.
Phones: Office, r»-o:ra; Dorrando, :i-284«; Holstcln, 4-IRI73;
Ornnwalcl, 3-0538
Entered as second class matter Albany, N. Y., postoffice.
RIPHIHNTIO
FOR NATIONAL ADVIRTieiNO • »
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
4 2 0 MADISON AV«,
NEW YOHK, N. Y.
CHICAGO • BOtroN • LOt A M U M • SAN FHASCISCO
The News Board
WILLIAM R. DORRANCE
EDWIN J . HOLSTEIN
A. HARRY PA8SOW
MADELINE GRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFORRE8T
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL MITCHELL
MURIEL SCOVELL
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
CO-EDITORS-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING
EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All communications should be addressed to the editor and
must be signed. Names will be withheld upon request.
The STATE COLLEGE NEWS assumes no responsibility
for opinions expressed In its columns' or communications,
as such expressions do not necessarily relloct Its view.
Shall the Show Go On?
It is u n f o r t u n a t e t h a t t h i s c o l u m n s h o u l d w r i t e
finis t o t h e y e a r on a d i s c o r d a n t n o t e . B u t c e r t a i n l y
t h e s t u n t s of M o v i n g - U p D a y w e r e p r o v o c a t i o n for
d i s c o r d . As a whole t h e y were d e p l o r a b l e , w i t h s o m e
e x c e p t i o n s . T h e s o p h o m o r e s t u n t w a s excellent; t h e
f r e s h m a n s t u n t was good in s p o t s ; n o t h i n g r e d e e m i n g
c a n b e said for t h e offerings of t h e J u n i o r s a n d
S e n i o r s . T h e s t u n t s of t h e l a t t e r t w o r e e k e d .
P a r e n t s a n d g u e s t s a s s e m b l e d from all over t h e
s t a t e t o see t h e college on t h e d a y on which it p r i d e s
itself on being a t its best. I t is a s h a m e t h a t t h e y
s h o u l d h a v e been subjected t o t h e w o r s t . M o r e t h a n
o n e g u e s t resented t h e i m p o s i t i o n of s p e n d i n g a h o t
a f t e r n o o n in a n o v e r - h u m i d a u d i t o r i u m w a t c h i n g a
succession of h a l f - d r a m a t i z e d i n a n i t i e s .
Blame?
T h a t is i m m a t e r i a l . A s t u n t d i r e c t o r
c a n n o t b e e x p e c t e d to revive a w a n i n g j u n i o r o r
senior class spirit.
T h e u n d e r c l a s s s t u n t s were
good ( i n c o m p a r i s o n ) b e c a u s e t h e F r e s h m e n a n d
S o p h o m o r e s h a v e sufficient r i v a l r y s p i r i t t o p r o d u c e
s o m e t h i n g fairly d e c e n t .
If u p p e r c l a s s s t u n t s c a n n o t b e m a d e p r e s e n t a b l e ,
t h e y s h o u l d n o t be p r e s e n t e d . E l i m i n a t i o n of such
b o o b y prizes a s t h e j u n i o r s a n d s e n i o r s pulled from
t h e g r a b b a g F r i d a y will n e v e r seriously h u r t
M o v i n g - U p D a y ceremonies. A d r a m a t i c s p r o d u c tion o r a s y m p h o n y c o n c e r t which does j u s t i c e to
t h e t a l e n t of t h e college m i g h t even b e s u b s t i t u t e d
t o s h a r e a place on t h e p r o g r a m with t h e freshman
a n d s o p h o m o r e rivalry s t u n t s .
If t h i s a n d last y e a r ' s s t u n t s a r e a n y criterion,
t h e u p p e r c l a s s m e n will lay a n o t h e r egg n e x t M o v i n g U p D a y . So w h y not a c t before t h e c u r t a i n goes
up again?
Peace and the Pedagogue
P a r d o n me, m a y I borrow y o u r p e n ? " " I ' m sorry,
b u t I h a v e a class this p e r i o d . " T h e s e p h r a s e s d o
n o t d e n o t e a n increase in t h e s t u d y i n g h a b i t s of
t h e .students because of t h e slow b u t sure a p p r o a c h
of t h e finals.
T h e s e u t t e r a n c e s a r e caused b y a
s e e m i n g l y trivial event. W h a t ? W h y , t h e Pedagogue
of c o u r s e .
It is difficult to become a n n o y e d a t t h e e p i d e m i c
of I'ed signing, b u t it is a n u i s a n c e . Bevies of imp r e s s i o n a b l e u n d e r c l a s s m e n h o p e for k i n d recognition from M y s k a n i a , t h e a l l - p o w e r f u l - can ten
h u m a n beings t h i n k of h u n d r e d s of c h a r m i n g p h r a s e s
a t a split s e c o n d ' s notice?
C a n Seniors a l r e a d y
s a d d e n e d b y t h e a p p r o a c h i n g e n d of their college
c a r e e r s t a k e pleasure in e x p r e s s i n g t h a t feeling In
b l a c k a n d w h i l e ? W e ' r e all h u m a n
let's a p p r e c i a t e
t h a t s a m e t h i n g in o t h e r s . T a k e it e a s y w i t h t h o s e
Peds.
No Pseudo Stuff
T h e N t f w s B o a r d h a s received a c o m m u n i c a t i o n
c o m m e n t i n g on some of its r e c e n t decisions. T h e
w r i t e r signed only t h e fictitious n a m e , M a r y j o n i c k ,
—fictitious because neither the Directory nor t h e
R e g i s t r a r ' s r e c o r d s reveal it. T h e policy of t h e
Ntfvvs in r e g a r d t o c o m m u n i c a t i o n s is c l e a r l y s t a l e d
in t h e m a s t h e a d a b o v e . If t h e w r i t e r will reveal
h i s o r h e r i d e n t i t y , t h e N t f w s will p r i n t t h e c o m munication a n d withhold the n a m e . T r u e names
m u s t b e used w i t h all c o m m u n i c a t i o n s ,
SEB Placement
The Commtntitater
EiUbllihcd May, 1916
BylhtCltii oM918
R H E CLASS OF 1941 -160,000 ^STRONG-WILL START TO EARM
u
IM JUNE/
• • • •
29 BILLION DOLLARS
EACH GRADUATE WILL EARN APPROXIMATELY ^191,000
BEFORE RETIRING OF OLD AGE IN l?Sl • ' • •
Now Is The Time!
• Communication •
O n e S e p e t e m b e r d a y in 1 9 3 7 , B e t t y H a y f o r d ,
P r e s i d e n t of t h e C l a s s of 1 9 3 9 , s t o o d o n t h e s t a g e
of P a g e H a l l a n d u t t e r e d a few w o r d s of g r e e t i n g
t o t h e t h r e e h u n d r e d high school a d o l e s c e n t s w h o
composed t h e n e w l y - f o r m e d C l a s s of 1 9 4 1 . . . .
In t w o weeks, t h e m a j o r i t y of t h e p e o p l e in this
g r o u p will g a t h e r once m o r e , t h i s t i m e t o b e g r a d u a t e d . T h e y a r e still t h e s a m e g r o u p , t h e C l a s s of
1941, b u t t h e y a r e far from being t h e s a m e p e o p l e .
W h e n t h e y a r r i v e d , m o s t of t h e m h a d n e v e r seen
each o t h e r before. T h e y c a m e from h i g h s c h o o l s all
over t h e s t a t e . T h e y h a d n o t h i n g in c o m m o n e x c e p t
t h e p r o s p e c t of s p e n d i n g t h e i r n e x t four y e a r s
t o g e t h e r here a t S t a t e College.
T h e t h r e e h u n d r e d t h a t g a t h e r e d t h a t first d a y
t h r e e a n d a half y e a r s a g o were j u s t a l i t t l e m o r e
more than adolescents.
T h e y h a d c o m e here for a n y o n e of s e v e r a l reasons. Some of t h e m h a d h o n e s t l y c o m e t o p r e p a r e
for a life of t e a c h i n g . Some h a d c o m e t o get a
college degree. M a n y h a d c o m e j u s t t o m a r k t i m e
because t h e y did n o t know w h a t else t o d o .
W h e n t h e y look back n o w , it seems n o t h i n g short
of m i r a c u l o u s to (hem h o w fast four y e a r s h a v e
p a s s e d . T o m a n y it seems j u s t y e s t e r Passing:
d a y t h a t t h e y h a d stood a n d looked a t
Of Years
D r a p e r Hall for t h e first t i m e . It is
Rapid
h a r d for t h e m to realize t h a t t w o y e a r s
h a v e passed since they h a d p a r t i c i p a t e d in r i v a l r y ,
t h a t a y e a r h a d passed since t h e y w e r e j u n i o r s on
Moving-Up Day.
T h e most difficult t h i n g for t h e m to realize is t h a t
it is almost all o v e r — t h a t only t h r e e m o r e weeks
remain until t h e sixteen y e a r a c a d e m i c i n t e r l u d e
is e n d e d .
T h e r e a r e v e r y few seniors w h o c a n s a y p r e c i s e l y
w h a t t h e y h a v e gained in e x c h a n g e for four y e a r s .
M o s t of them h a v e a t t h e e n d of their college exp e r i e n c e a little more k n o w l e d g e , a little m o r e experience, a little m o r e disillusionment, a n d a very
little m o r e w i s d o m .
T h e m a j o r i t y find t h a t t h e y a r e m e n a n d w o m e n ,
possessed of all t h e formal e d u c a t i o n t h a t t h e y will
ever h a v e , closing o n e c h a p t e r of life a n d s t a r t i n g
another.
To T h e Editor:
T h e B a n d plague must be m e t I non-profit agency m i g h t well be
H e r e a t State, a s well a s in t h e formed in New York City with colneighboring colleges, of R P I , Union, leges throughout t h e country coopSage, a n d Skklmore, I have noticed erating. T h e idea is worth considevidences of disgust aimed a t n u m - ering."
erous, unscrupulous agents. T h e U n - As a solution S t u d e n t Council
ion College Crmcordienxix
of M a y should appoint a commission to con18 r e p r i n t e d in toto the
Comment- sider the situation, d r a f t a p r o g r a m ,
:|:
*
Hi
*
stater
of the STATU COU.KIIE Nrcw.s, and
act,1 Consideration
is n o t
which several weeks ago c o n d e m n e d enough! Concrete action should a n d
C a n y o u imagine t h e S t a t e College S y m p h o n y
the practices of a g e n t s who negoti- must be taken. S t a t e College a s s u m ate with dance committees a n d final- ed t h e lead in a t t a c k i n g this s i t u a - O r c h e s t r a p l a y i n g t h e Russian Sailor's Dunce w i t h ly force them to accept outfits to tion, a n d I a n d m a n y others feel o u t t y m p a n i ? N o one can. T y m p a n i a r e a n a b s o l u t e
which they do not agree because of t h a t it is definitely capable of con- Orchestra e s s c n l ' a ' t o anY s y m p h o n y o r c h e s t r a .
contract obligations a n d pressure of tinuing this leadership. B u t the time i n Need of ^ o r t n r e e y e a r s o u r s y m p h o n y h a s
time. As a r e m e d y t h e
Comment- is now! At least ground work c a n be
borrowed a set of t y m p a n i from A l b a n y
stater stated, " P e r h a p s some e n t e r - laid before definite action is t a k e n Tympani
prising college students in this dis- next fall. We will n o t be alone. I n H i g h School. N o w t h a t it h a s r e a c h e d
trict might form a n agency a n d do stead we will bo backed a n d rein- its m a t u r i t y it is time t h a t it h a d its own t y m p a n i .
themselves a n d the district colleges forced by other colleges t h r o u g h o u t
T h e fact t h a t M u s i c Council h a s h a d a v e r y suca good t u r n . " T h e
Oonoordiensia t h e stale a n d nation.
agreed, " T h e idea is appealing. A
cessful y e a r a n d is in a position to finance t h e p u r Agent Hater.
c h a s e of a s e t of t y m p a n i m a k e s this t h e t i m e t o a c t .
M u s i c Council s a v e d $ 4 0 0 this y e a r b y n o t h a v i n g
an expensive assisting a r t i s t a t its c o n c e r t s .
This
m o n e y which is still a t the disposal of M u s i c C o u n c i l
should be s p e n t for t h e p r i m a r y r e q u i s i t e of t h e
o r c h e s t r a , t y m p a n i . T h e s e t y m p a n i c a n s e r v e a s I he
initial nucleus of a future reservoir of i n s t r u m e n t s .
Rises
This /ear
Stinard Plans Travel Tour
After Retirement In June
by Shirley Slegcl
4
I n t h e two meetings of t h e SEB
t h i s week, it was learned t h a t there
Any illusions you m a y have cherhave been forty more placements ished about r e t i r e m e n t being t h e
this year t h a n t h e r e were last year. beginning cf a glorified "loaf" a r e
So far, those to receive teaching po- about to be disrupted.
sitions a r e : fifty-nine experienced
Here is a m a n who in three weeks
people, forty inexperienced seniors, will leave the S t a t e College faculty
seven inexperienced graduates from after 28 years' membership—and i n other colleges, a n d twenty-seven stead of looking forward to a n exState graduates.
tended siesta, he h a s set u p t e n t a Yesterday all senior men and tive plans for travel in t h e Western
g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t s , especially those hemisphere, compilation of a family
who have been drafted, were asked genealogy and renewal of intimacy
to keep In touch with t h e Employ- with his cellar workshop.
ment Bureau.
Jesse Floyd Stinard, head of the
Registration in t h e S E B was ex- Spanish department, admits his recplained to t h e juniors during a reations a r e hangovers from youth.
meeting T u e s d a y afternoon.
A native New Yorker (Tioga CounT h e latest list of seniors to secure ty i, he began traveling in earnest
teaching jobs for t h e year 1941-42 shortly after graduation from Brown
include t h e following:
University (A.B.) a n d P e n n State
Iris B a r n e t t , '41, Adams; Isa- i A.M. i His initial teaching contact
bel Burgin, '41, Saugerties; Pauline ! carried him in 1901 on t h e " S , S.
Byra, '41, Boonville; Iva Daetwyler, | T h o m a s " lo the Philippine Islands.
'41, Galville; M a t t h e w
Gadziola,
Many a Slate College class h a s
'41, G r a n d Gorge; Bcrnice Gates. laughed with Senor S t i n a r d over
'41, Utica; P r a n c e s Hoffman, '41, his experiences with t h e little
Margaretville; H e r m a n Kleine, '41, brown-skinned pupils, a n d sobered
Worcester, Mass.; Helen Lasher. al his vivid recollections of a chol'41, Leedlowville; Cathrine Mar- era plague.
cloy, '41, Webster; Virginia MesWhile stationed in the Philipchutt, '41, N. Y. Tile Co.; Dorothy pines, he used lo enjoy walking
Mix, '41, Fells Mills; Anne Murberg, '41, G e r m a n t o w n ;
Clarence
Olsen, '41, G o s h e n ; Helen Pitman.
*1, G e r m a n t o w n ; Belly Pritcharcl,
'41, M c G r a w ; F r a n c e s Rinni. '41.
Homer;
Gerald
Saddlemire, '41.
Margaretville;
Catherine
Shafer,
'41, Scio; Shirley Van Valkenburg.
'41, J o h n s t o w n ; Ethel Williams. '41,
Utica.
To find a n idea t h a t is different * important social affairs
to the
from nil previous ideas, to find a t r e a t m e n t of Hop a n d Inlerfraway lo present these "different" t e m i t y Ball, a t the a m o u n t of blank
ideas—that is the problem which white space on each page, a t t h e
confronted H l p p a r c h u s when ho terse, almost minute description of
wrote his first history a n d which each activity, a n d a t t h e inclusion
confronted Keillor Bull a n d t h e of Informal photos of certain groups
Pedagogue Staff when they planned to t h e exclusion of o t h e r equally
this year's book. Faced with w h a t prominent people. P e r h a p s this l a t w a s considered the "host" Pad by ter point may have been accidental,
far, t h e staff this year struggled but extreme caution should be used
and used quantities of grey m a t t e r if true representation of s t u d e n t life
to produce the "bettor" Pad, W h e t h - Is being sought. Wo have always
er they succeeded or not is a m u t - felt t h a t tho Pad w a s u cross-section photo of S t a t e life, a n d t h a t it
ter of Individual opinion.
should not be a s a m p l i n g of it few
T h e purpose behind t h e yearbook groups,
deserves
commendation
for its
T h e stylo of writing h a s m a i n t a i n idealism a n d its application of a n
abstract term in concrete pictures. ed a light, snappy flavor which is
Wo would say t h a t they achieved reminiscent of t h e dotted versions
this purpose only partially. T h e of last year.
spirit of friendliness which c h a r a c It was u n f o r t u n a t e t h a t finances
terized t h e activities of tills year did not allow t h e completion of a
as opposed to last year's h a r s h u p - snapshot section after Queen Duff's
roar, was quite apropos a n d , wo picture, for there Is a noticeable
hope, will servo a s a h a r b i n g e r of | absence of Intimate s n a p s .
tho future,
A smaller book, a p h o t o g r a p h y
T h e m a k e - u p causes us to wish unsurpassed, a m a k e u p too e x t r a v a wo wore Hollywood press agents, b e - g a n t in regards to space, a successcause
"excellent,"
"outstanding," ful theme—all these make u p t h e
"superior," "distinctive," seem so '41 Pod, W h a t e v e r criticisms a r e
Weak In describing it. T h e use of m a d e about it will ultimately v a n the h a n d s a n d thu r e m a r k a b l e ish, a n d wo will dash as eagerly a s
p h o t o g r a p h y impresses us with Its you, wltli poised pen to our nearest
professional expertness.
friend a n d await t h e Inked sentiT h e r e a r e those who will grumble m e n t which will m a k e t h o Pad t h a t
a t t h e placement of senior pictures, final success—a fund of h a p p y
a t t h e subordination of our more memories.
-O-
Morris
trips in J a p a n , one of t h e loveliest
countries i n t h e Orient. E n route
back t o America in 1904, h e took a
"short c u t " t h r o u g h t h e Suez Canal.
C o n s t a n t companion o n t h e trips
has been h i s wife, t h e former M a r garet D. Ickes of Iowa, whom h e
married September 4, 1912. A year
after h i s marriage, h e transferred
to S t a t e from Cornell College, Iowa,
teaching G e r m a n a n d English.
As for t h e genealogy, a long time
ago h e t r a n s l a t e d t h e G e r m a n d i a lect of a letter describing t h e arrival
of his ancestors in New York i n
1730.
A small group of daguerro-types
and a m b e r p r i n t s is to be t h e n u c leus of a p h o t o g r a p h album collection of t h e family—which is r e m i n d er t h a t Senor S t i n a r d is a p h o t o g r a p h e r i n h i s own right. His other
chief hobby is woodworking.
Diner
H. Monette, P r o p ,
-oFresh
Hot Turkey
Sandwich
40c
YOUR COLLEGE F L O R I S T
Ontario
Every
Six
Hours
H a m b u r g Special
F . F . P o t a t o e s & Cold Slaw
20c
Spaghetti
25c
COMPLETE DINNERS DAILY F R O M 40c to 65c
EMIL J. NAGENGAST
Corner
Pastries
—PLENTY O F
PARKING
a t Benson St.
234 C e n t r a l A v e .
SPACE
W E
C
Albany, N. Y.
NEVER
»-OSE
TRADE AT
YOUR
COLLEGE
HABERDASHER
DRINK
cSNAPPY
SPRING
ADAM
FUN-damentals
MEN'S
SHOP
STYLES
MANHATTAN
*"yr««
£?JA
m
SHIRTS
HATS
117 S. P E A R L
f o r y o u r Summer
2 2 1 CENTRAL AVE,
Good Food in A Friendly,
Comfortable Atmosphere
at Quail
Conning the Campus
-The Critic-
PAGE J
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1941
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 83,1941
The Weekly Bulletin
IIKAVS
OKI'ICI,;
riiilrriri'lliluiiles
lli'Sll'llIK
In ivKlMrr fur xIIiniin-r Hussion work, Mini Hoiihiiiniiros
ivlin wish in i-uni|iii!le tlwlr
|il'iiirriims for Hill l'_' IUUHI
maid' ;i (> I p i > I u 1111, • n t - In iln
iltTI
if Iln- It-nlsir.ii- I'mI'oimullHiiun
wiili
Dean
Ni'lsun,
Appoint nii-iil s :
MoriiliiiTH:
MIMllI A.M. lu IL'MKI I'.M,
-' :!HI I'.M. hi •1:1111 I'.M.
H (J A
Tho SCA
Inturuolloifliiio
I'liiifori'i
will In- JirM m
Kllvor Hay, I,alii- (limriro,
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« • • W i l l i 7 H ' ITIIIT
•
NIW » « I K
latin foul Sled, General Manager
.—MM—fif———TIT—SimWttM
1 M „ , i m
beneath a white pique
print
'kerchief.
6.95
The, Playtime
Shop—Seooild
Floor
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 83,1941
#A«4
State to Play
Pratt at Home
In Final Game
Sophs Seek Revenge
For.Softball Defeat
The bitterness of defeat! The
sweetness of revenge!
The former pulled the poor
sophs down into the depths of
despair and hopes of the latter is
helping to sustain them through
Hamilton Defeats State Twice;
the week until Wednesday at
3:30 in back of the library.
Lou of Eight Regulars Will
In other words, the sophomore
Weaken Next Year's Team
women, through their manager
have challenged the
The Pedagogues will engage Pratt Win Jones,
babes to another Softball
Institute tomorrow in their final frosh
encounter to try to erase the disbaseball game of the season. The grace
caused by the frosh victory
contest will be played on the home of 21-11,
in their previous condiamond at Ridgefield Park at 4:30 test.
P.M.
Rivalry may be decided, but
Pratt defeated State at Brooklyn the sophs still have the spirit!
earlier in the year by a 10 to 5 score. It ought to be good.
According to manager Lou Greenspan, "This game should tell a different story from the first. Balls
that hit the fence down there will be
long outfield flies at Ridgefield Park.
If we can get consistent pitching we
should win."
The Statesmen played their poorest
game of the season last Friday when
they lost to Hamilton College, 11 to Potter Club came through yester0. Hamilton's moundsman, Young, day to score its sixth straight victory
struck out twelve men and allowed and trounced KB, 12-5, in the game
which all but decided the league
only one hit.
championship. EEP needs but one
The Statesmen lost a second game victory today over the weak Gophers
—their fifth straight for the season- to clinch the loop title and finish the
to Hamilton last Wednesday, 13 to 4. season with a clean slate.
With two away in the second frame
Hamilton went to work on Bob Bob Seifert pitched very effectively
Leonard and banged out eight runs. and was never in trouble. The turnAfter that Leonard pitched four ing point came early in the game as
scoreless innings, but the game was Ed Reed broke a 2-2 tie with a double. After that KB's usually tight
already on ice.
defense faltered and EEP romped to
Eight of the men playing tomorrow victory.
will be lost to next year's team. Captain Larry Balog, Walt Daniels, Vince College House broke into the winGillen and Les Gerdts have played ning column yesterday with a close
varsity ball for three or four years victory over KDR, 11-10. In other
and will be greatly missed. Hal contests Potter swamped the RamDuffey, Van Ellis, Pete Stanger, and blers and KB outclassed KDR. The
Charlie Bennett nave been with the Gophers dropped their third convarsity a shorter time but will be secutive game to KDR, while SLS
won an easy one from the Ramblers,
just as hard to replace.
23-4.
EEP Beats KB
In Deciding Tilt
IGOIN H0M7...J
Then send your baggage to ye old homestead by RAILWAY EXPRESS and take your
train with peace of mind. We call and
deliver at no extra charge within our
regular vehicle limits in all cities and
principal towns. Service is fast, economical— and sure as shootin'! Just phone
Ycnolam's
Yenolab
-C.T.M,
We've seen countless
friendships
transcending fraternity line. There
should be more.
With these parting words, Jim
Maloney, former pilot of this column, made his reluctant exit.
We, who slide in behind his desk
know only too well, that ours is a
big order to fill. We don't expect
to spout sensational material. Our
interest is, of course, sports. If we
can do just a little toward furthering interest in State College sports;
not only an active interest, but a
clean fine, healthy unprejudiced a t titude, then we'll feel that our contribution will register more than a
"No Sale."
It was with this in mind that we
saw fit to re-print the leading lines
cf this column. Such unbiased
words are too valuable to be forgotten. Let us hope their message will
always be foremost in the mind of
every athlete at State.
In the Hamilton game last week,
visiting pitcher Young was well on
the way toward carving his initials
on the doorhandle to baseball's Hall
of Fame, when Les Gerdts stepped
up to the plate and—you guessed
it— he got the only hit of the
game!
C. P. LOWRY
Budget Fail* to Stop * Tennis Team Near
.
State's Chess Squad
Close of Schedule
So it's economy you're looking
for. Here's one group in which
it will be hard to find economical
faults. Its none other than our
famous Chess Club.
During the past year the club
operated on a limited budget of
$150. The varsity team, while
compiling a record of 13 wins, 4
losses, and 2 draws, did a little
traveling. It journed over 2500
miles to points in New England,
New Jersey, New York City, West
Point, Hamilton and terminated
the season with a trip to Washington and Annapolis.
State's tennis team will round out
its 1941 schedule when it plays three
games within the next six days.
The netmen will swing into action
against a strong St. Peter's squad in
the first of the three matches this
afternoon at Ridgefield. Siena will
offer the opposition tomorrow afternoon. This match will also be played
at home.
The lone remaining game is a r e turn match with RPI at Troy next
Wednesday. The Engineers upset
the applecart, 6-3, in their meeting
last Saturday.
However, the tennis team came
back strong to score its second vicW A A Re-Elections Next Fall tory of the season over Connecticut
State, 6-3, last Tuesday on the home
Re-elections for three WAA of- court. This brings the team's record
fices will have to take place next to three wins and two losses to date.
fall since three women were elected
to two offices each. Class managers
MADISON
for 1942 and 1943, and class repreSHOE REBUILDERS
sentative for 1944 are the offices to
be filled. The persons elected to
807 Madison Avenue
these positions were: Mary Susan
You Pick Up Your Phone
Wing, new vice-president; Winifred j
We Pick Up Your Shoes
Jones, treasurer elect; and Kit
8-2230
Herdman, next year's secretary. 8-2239
G E O R G E D. J E O N E Y , P R O P .
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