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/
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1941
PAGE 4
•^^^mm^mm
•mr
Girls Seek Freedom
Before Final Exams
Annual Playday to Feature
Rivalry and Soccer Games
Men's Softball Contest W i l l Be Main Event of Outing
A t Tomorrow's Festivities in McKown's Grove,Dickson and Forrest Head Soccer Squads
Moloney's
Baloney
J.R.M.
Orchids this week should be
T h e third annual WAA-MAA Playday will begin a t 2 P . M . showered down upon the brainy
tomorrow at McKown's Grove. Co-chairmen K a y Peterson a n d Bill brows of the chessmen, recent conDickson, juniors, have prepared a full program which will carry querors of Colgate and champions
over into the evening. T h e highlight of the affair will be the rivalry of the Upper Hudson Valley Chess
League by virtue of that conquest.
Softball game between the frosh and sophomore men at 3 P . M . T h i s The 15-inch silver cup which accompanies the championship is a
match will give the freshmen a n $
tangible symbol of the great strides
opportunity to gain a lead of one
which the pawnpushers have made
half point, since the score now Tennis Team Faces
in their relatively brief existence
stands 14-11 % in favor of the sophoState.
mores.
Norwich, St. Peter's at Plans
made by the chess club for
An additional two points were
next year would indicate that the
garnered by the class of '43 Tuesday afternoon when they succeeded Will Play Connecticut May 14; boys are aiming for even greater
strides in the future. A complete
in pulling the frosh over the line
Squad Wins Over Cortland
reorganization of the club, from
twice in a tug-of-war. The winners
which the team stems, has been
used the same tactics which brought
With one victory under their effected with the intention of "dethem success in their contest with belts, the members of the tennis
the present juniors last year. The team are looking forward to a n mocratizing" the setup. More a t girls' Softball rivalry game which active weekend. The team will en- tractive meeting programs will be
was also scheduled for tomorrow gage Norwich College on the Ridge- the theme for next year, accordhas been postponed until Monday I field courts this afternoon at 2:30 ing to a spokesman of the organizaafternoon. The triumphant team and will journey to Jersey City to tion, and it is hoped that this rewill receive three points for this play St. Peter's College tomorrow. form will draw more non-team
member chess enthusiasts to the
match.
A match is scheduled at Connecti- get-togethers. Features intended to
Exhibition Soccer Game
cut State next Wednesday.
spark the meetings include tenA special exhibition soccer game Norwich has just completed a second matches (in which the parhas been planned to introduce the trip through the New England ticipants are allowed ten seconds
sport to those who never have seen states and should be in top playing to move) and instruction for anythe game played. Bill Dickson and form for today's match. St. Peter's one wanting to learn the game.
Bill Forrest will lead two six-man regularly plays high-ranking metroAffairs of the chess club and
squads. Dickson is a veteran of the politan outfits.
team for next year will be in the
Central New York State Soccer The team won its opening match hands of Chess Council to be comCircuit, while Forrest boasts three against Cortland State Saturday by posed of: Art Fox, club president
years of varsity experience in high a 6 to 3 score. The results:
and team correspondent, Jim Gilschool.
Single*, Keusky over Hiclicrt, ()-», 0-3; lan, vice-president and team manaBesides these two feature attrac- Uriuincr over MIIZIIIII, l»-7, <!-»; I'enr- ger; Roy Sommers, tournament
over I'liflpH, <!-M, U-0; Stulimlllor director; Jim Wahler, radio chess
tions, there will be other contests NIIII
Smith, 0-SJ, 8-10, fl-i»i Jones over
Gil Corbin, recording
in the afternoon—girls and boys' over
McOee, (l-:t. 0-21 Book over Woerten- director;
soccer kick, baseball throw, and dj-ke, a-2, 0-'i. Doubles, Kli'liort-Mimilii secretary; George Erbsteln, publiother field day contests. Every type over Ki'Hsliy-I'earson, 3-0, 0-1, 0-2; city director; and Clarence Oarr,
Sniilli-IKr.iniicr
over
1']|C'1|>N-Stulllilil- program director.
of sports equipment such as soft- ler,
0-1, 0-»; Hlatz-Llquort over JOIII-Nballs and bats, badminton sets, Kock, 0-3, li-4.
The oil situation in Iraq is inand horseshoes will be available for
significant in comparison with a peuse.
troleum crisis here at State which
Bonfire Planned
has just been brought to our attention. We understand that a cerIn the evening there will be a State Chess Squad
tain automobile (?) used in transbig bonfire under the pines where
Outclasses Colgate porting; the members of the tennis
hot dogs and marshmallows may be
squad to Cortland last Saturday
roasted, followed by dancing to the
music of a vie in the Goblet danc- A determined State College chess consumed some eighteen quarts of
ing hall.
team gained sweet revenge last Sun- oil in the process. We would sugThere will be no charge for Play- day when they swamped a Col- gest that Messrs. Agne and Smith
day, since everyone may get out to gate squad to win the Upper Hud- remove the above mentioned mathe Grove via the Western Avenue son Valley Chess League champion- chine from the highways at once
bus and everyone should bring his ship and the cup that goes with it. in the interests of national defense.
Why not look at the '41 models,
own supper. Hot dogs and soft
Playing in top form, ,the States- gentlemen? They're not bad.
drinks will be sold at the Grove.
men defeated the Red Raiders by a
Miss Peterson and Dickson will be 5-0 score. Jim Gillan broke all
assisted by Arnie Ellerin, rivalry, known records at State by checkand Owen Bombard and Win Jones, mating his opponent In six moves. FOR S T A T E C O L L E G E B O W L E R S
sports equipment,
This weekend the chess team will
make its longest trip when it jourWing to Direct Frosh Camp
neys to Washington to play Georgetown and then swings over to AnMary Susan Wing, '42, has been napolis to tackle the Navy.
selected Women's Freshman Camp
director for next fall. The information was released today by Madalyn
WESTERN A N D Q U A I L
Beers, '41. Mildred Mattice, '43, will
be assistant director, and Winifred
Jones, '43, treasurer. Camp counsellor applications must be filled out in
F R O M 9 : 0 0 A . M , T O 6 : 0 0 P. M.
Dean DeLaney's office by noon
Monday.
Gals—do you want to get set
for the coming exams? Come on
out to Camp Johnston at Chatham to rest and relax at the
annual WAA spring weekend the
Saturday and Sunday
after
Moving-Up Day.
What's in store? There'll be
plenty of food, fun and frolic for
all, and what's more, you can fulfill the final requirements for
your Lotta-Bunkers credit. This
is your last chance this year to
refresh yourself in the country,
so don't miss it! Sign up on
the WAA bulletin board by Wednesday.
KB and EEP Lead
Intramural Softbal
Teams Have Perfect Record:
Gophers in Second Place
With the softball schedule almost
at half-mark, KB and EEP are making the league race a two team affair
by compiling a record of three wins
and no losses apiece.
The Gophers won by forfeit last
Friday, but were swamped by KB,
28-3, slipping into second spot. Potter eked out a victory over SLS and
then defeated CH to keep pace with
Kappa Beta, who smothered the
Ramblers on Monday.
Softball Standings
tv
Kii|i|>a
SERVICE
A
2
1
>
1
0
0
0 1.000
1 .801
1 .null
" .333
2 .333
2 .000
8 .000
L
0 ( W
Coach G. Elliott Hatfield's baseball outfit will leave promptly at 7
A. M. tomorrow for their second
contest of the current season, booked
with Coach "Clip" McKillop's Pratt
Institute lads on the latter's field
in Bayridge, Brooklyn.
The Statesmen will be out In a n
effort to avenge themselves of two
defeats handed them by the metropolitan nine last year. On their last
trek to the city, the locals lost by
a very close margin.
Pratt Unpredictable
It would require a lot of conjecture to make a prediction concerning the probable results of tomorrow's game. Coach McKillop's
boys lost to Stevens Tech by a score
of 3-2; and came back strong the
following game to shower Upsala,
30-7.
On Wednesday, May 14, the State
dlamondeers will play their return
game with RPI. The game will be
played in Troy because of an agreement to the effect made with the
Engineers, but it will represent the
"home" game for State in their
bookings with the Rensselaer team.
Lost First Game
Last Wednesday the local squad
bussed over to RPI and were shaded
by the Engineers, 9-6.
Although the Trojans had the long
end of the final tally, the State team
outhit its opponents. Rensselaer
garnered most of its runs on free
passes Issued by Van Ellis.
Larry Balog, team captain, pilfered a couple of sacks at a critical
point in the game. Vince Gillen
came through in regular style, getting two for three and scored on
both occasions. Summary:
.000 051 0 0 I) 1
.103 005 x 0 5 1
STATU
Kl'l .
Butteries! Slide, Ellis mill Daniels;
KIM, Nye, .Misullii, Klolno, 11111I lleeht.
DIAL 5-1913
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WHEN YOU GO TO COLLEGE
At the
ANNEX
Take advantage
of the "College Special"
and
ROUND TRIP
J KAN H A R P E R
COAT S
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CSNAPPYSZP 8
J17 8 . PEARL
Those spuciul school and collucjo fail tickets, wilh Ihelr liberal extended rulurn limits, are immensely popular wilh students and teachers. When you are ready to 0 ° to school this Fall, buy one. You may
use the return coupon to Iravul homo at Christmas. There are alto
reduced round trip Pullman rules In connection with these "College
Special" tickets. The ticket agent In your own homo town, or any
railroad passe-rigor representative can give you full details regarding return limits, slop over priviloQes, prices, etc,
On Hale Only at
MANHATTAN SHIRTS
ADAM HATS
CREAM
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SPRING STYLES
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WMMmM
2 2 1 CENTRAL AVE.
Albany, N. Y.
tl**>'*""n+
4/±
*
State College
ALBANY, NEW YORK, THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1941
z-443
D & A to Secure
Tax Exemption
For M a y Play
Appropriation from 1942 Budget
W i l l Meet Probable Deficit
From Spring Production
The financial situation facing the
Dramatics and Arts Council was
partially alleviated this week when
the group secured tax exemption
for Street Scene, the annual spring
production of the Advanced Dramatics class, which is being sponsored by the council. This action
was secured by the efforts of Dorothea Maclsaac, '42, and Earle Snow,
'44, who arranged an appointment
with Mr. Hofflinger of the Internal
Revenue Department, which resulted in the granting of exemption on
the grounds of the educational value
of the presentation.
Moving-Up
Directions
Students will iiBM'mblo nt HtHO
A. M. Tile St-niiirN will meet in the
Ifotniiilii,
tin*
Jiniinr'N,
en tin*
i>i'ilh(.vl|. between Drtinar 11ml Hurtled, the HojtltnmureH, In H I I H I I ' I I Ir.v
the Annex, rind the Freshmen, tit
the door to the I'llliliriitimiH olt'iee.
'rtri' SenlorH w i l l sit in the eenter
HiM'liini of the lllilili t'lniir; till' illlllitii'N, mi the main floor, right, with
the remainder in the nii'/./.iiiiiiii' nf
llii* hitleonyi (lie Siipheinori'H, in the
mtiiii fleer left, with the reiniliiidrl'
in the iiie/'/.iinini' 11111I tin- left *<><•lion ef llii* Imlriin.v ; mill the Freshmen, in Hie eenter mill right. M'l'tiuiiN of the hnlenn.Y.
The Hophomoren 1111 the iiinin
flour w i l l move to tile left uisle mill
«o lliiNtilirs vln tho left stiiiri'itNi',
m-ciipyiiiK tlie int'zzniiini' mill right
siM'tion of the hitleotiy, Those H|isfuirs will mint' down vltt the right
stllirense mill nt'i'tlpy I hit Heel Inn
lielilmi
t i n ' Juniors en the right.
Tin 1 remulnder in the Imleony will
move down to the mezziiiilne. The
Keillors will move left oeeunying
thf Hi't'tion vitettted by tlit" Hondomores, The reiniiintler will ueeupy
t h f extreme left of t h f eenter section. The Juniors tin t h f iiinin floor
will move
to t l i f Iffl iintl oeeupy
sents viifiitt'd by t h f Keillors, Those
upstolrs lire to route down vitl the
right stnirfiihf 11111I oeeupy t h f right
section of tin* nut In
floor. T h f
Kreshtiieii w i l l move I f f l , occupying
t l i f left null center sections of the
Imleony proper.
Concert Heads
Night's Activity
Juniors, Seniors W i l l Attend
Pre-Moving-Up Banquets,Rivalry Slated (or 7:30
A swing Concert, the senior and
junior class banquets, and two
rivalry events will hold the spotlight of pre-Moving-Up Day activities tonight.
Highlight of the evening will be
the Debate Council sponsored concert of Bill Grattan's Swing Orchestra in Page Hall at 8:30 P. M.
John F. Gardephe, '41, will officiate
as master-of-ceremonies. Sixteen selections have been scheduled, including a variety of novel arrangements
and solos.
Classes to Banquet
Members of the Class of 1941 will
assemble at 6 P. M. at Herbert's,
Madison Avenue, for their tradi
tional banquet. Toastmistress will be
Catharine O'Bryan, and Dr. Donnal V. Smith, Professor of Social
Studies, and Dr. Henry L. Sisk, assistant professor of Education, will
deliver short speeches. Grace Sussner is in charge of the general arrangements.
Herbert's will also be the scene
of the junior class banquet which is
scheduled for 5:30 P. M, William
R. Dorrance will be master-of-ceremonies, and Dr. Robert Reinow, In •
slntctor In Social Studies, and Dr.
CS£±
VOL. XXV, NO. 26
State Awaits Disclosure
New Myskania, Officers
Classes to Gather Tomorrow in Page for Moving-Up
Exercises A s Climax of Extra-Curricular Year;
Class Stunts, Sing, Dancing Also Planned
by ANDREW TAKAS
With Moving-Up Day, the most eventful clay of the year, scheduled
for tomorrow, the .student body of Stale College today waits in suspense for the tradition-dictated ceremonies and long-withheld announcements that it is to bring. The exercises of Moving-Up Day,
which provide one of the most colorful sights to be seen on the State
campus, are of major interest to the entire student body, climaxing,
as they do, the entire extra-curricular year. On Moving-Up Day, the
results of virtually all the important*•elections and appointments are an- Immediately after the song, the
nounced, the new Myskania is tap- four classes, directed by Grand
ped, the winner of the year-long Marshal Charles Quinn, will move
up. The actual moving-up ceremony
sophomore-freshman rivalry is an is
then followed by the most tenpounced, the Senior Class plants its sion-filled part of the day's cereivy, the four classes present their
Shortage Due To Tax
stunts, and in the evening the entire monies—the tapping of the 2Cth
Last week the council released the
student body joins in singing on the Myskania. In contrast to last year's
information that it had been forced
speedy procedure, the tapping this
steps of Draper Hall.
to borrow a substantial amount In
year, will be slower and more formorder to sponsor Street Scene, and
Meet at 8:30 A. M.
al.
that unless a profit is made, the
Moving-Up
Day
is
scheduled
to
Sayles to Announce NEWS
necessary money will be provided
begin at 8:30 A. M. tomorrow mornfrom next year's appropriation.
Following the tapping will come
ing when the four undergraduate
Street Scene, by Elmer Rice, will
classes of the college will meet to the announcement of all the major
be staged in the Page Hall auditorstudent offices. Dr. John M. Sayles,
march into Page Hall.
ium Thursday and Friday, May 22
acting president of the college, will
Once
Inside
Page
Hall,
the
asand 23, at 8:30 P. M. This threemake the first announcement, that
sembly
will
begin.
Tho
meeting
will
act social drama, which is under the
of the board of the STATU COLbe
presided
over
by
Merrill
Waldirection of Miss Agnes E. Putterer,
i.ufiK Nuws for the following year.
rath, President of the Student Asso- Debate keys will then be awarded,
The 1!)4I Pedagogue will be disassistant professor of English, deciation.
NEWS Extra Friday
picts slum life in metropolitan New tributed either Monday, Tuesday,
the Statesman Pedagogue boards
First on the morning's program revealed, and the members of FiYork. Approximately 45 characters or Wednesday of next week, accordare the class speakers. Catherine
appear in front of the apartment ing to Steve Bull, editor-in-chief.
A special Moving-Up Day sup- O'Bryan will speak for the Seniors, nance Board announced.
house, the set being constructed by Necessary to procure a copy of the plement of the NKWS, giving inOther announcements which will
A. Harry Passow for the juniors,
Mr. William G. Hardy. Instructor IQilPedagogue will be your student
terpreted numerical results of Elizabeth Barden for the sopho- be made at that time are the folin English, and the Stagecraft class. tax ticket plus an additional $.50. the recent elections, as well as a
lowing: tlie officers and members of
Retainers of half a student tax short summary about the new mores, and Bernard Skolsky for the Dramatics
and Arts and Music
Tumiell Will Sing
freshmen. Following the speakers
ticket will have to pay a charge of
members of Myskania, will be
Councils, the incoming officers of
Thursday evening Miss Julia $1.00.
The additional charge is available to the students tomor- will be these announcements: Pi Student
Christian Association, the
Gamma Mu, Women's Athletic AsTunnell, '41, will render several out- necessary because not enough money
in the Rotunda. Copies will sociation awards, the MAA Press heads of MAA and WAA, and the
standing numbers, accompanied by was allotted to the Pedagogue by row
distributed from 12 to 2:30 Bureau award, the Edward Eldred members of Debate Council.
John Nordell, '39, on the piano. the Student Association to cover be
After these will come the results
Poter Club award, Newman Club
Friday evening, in addition to the the cost of printing and publish- P. M.
All reporters appointed by the prize, tlie Forum of Politics award of the balloting on the officers of
numbers scheduled for Miss Tun- ing.
NKWS Board will be expected to and the Inlerfraternity Scholarship
nell, Earle Snow will direct the
A pre-Moving-Up Day distributhe Classes of '42, '43, and '44
Cup. After this award, the Seniors the naming of the successful cansymphony orchestra In several se- tion deadline was unable to be met report for work Tuesday night.
will
sing
their
farewell
song.
lections including the Poet and because of the National Defense
(Continued on page ;i, column .11
Peasant Overture by von Suppe.
Program. The fabrikord covers of J. Allan Hicks, Professor of Educathe Pedagogue which are manufac- tion, will provide the after dintured by Dupont could not be ob- ner speeches. Janet Welter, chairman of the arrangements cotnmitlained
since litis material, fabri- ,
,
• , , , » ,
Fraternities Choose
a s beG 1 n KKl sL d b
Irv
koid, is being used as seat covers ! lQC
; l;.Ruth
. ., ARockcastle
.. , : f, and
l *****.
Carmen.
K
for airplanes. Also, the manufacSucceeding Officers turers of cloth for the covers are Coppola.
engaged in making army uniforms. Kxatns Postpone Pushball
Not only production of this yearIn keeping with tradition, each
Because many members of tlie so. jother State Thespian lias a record
Perhaps the marquee of
of State's fraternities recently elect- book, but production of every year- phomore class will be taking the
' of 23 successive performances on a
Grand
Theatre
does
not
announce
book
in
lite
country
lias
been
delayed its officers for the coming year.
social studies comprehensive examlegitimate »a girlie show Is legithat
Stephen
A.
Kusak
and
John
A,
ed due to the inability to obtain inations this afternoon, the rivalry
These are as follows:
timate, isn't, it.?) slage at a salary?
Murray
(Myskania,
'41,
you
know)
Gamma Chapter of Kappa Delta covers. Skidmore College was faced games have been scheduled lor 7:30
Kusak could only say, "Kusak Is
Rho: President, Leslie Graves, '42; with tlie problem of running out of P. M. The games for this evening are the stars ol Count Bernl Vlci's phenomenal—the Grand is paying
Vice-President, Hubert, Moore, '42; fabrlkold in tlie midst of production include tlie semi-annual pushball musical revue, "Fun Americana," oil its mortgage on the money they
Treasurer Robert Meek, '42; Secre- and found it necessary to use two contest between tlie sophomore and now playing lis last Ihree perform- get from the crowds that jam the
freshmen men, and tlie annual ances at the Grand, but it is ex- place to see me."
tary, Jack Smith, '43; Representa- types of covers lor its yearbook.
track and field events between the tremely difficult to convince tlie
tives to interfratornity Council,
Passow of the PTEB, booking
sophomore and freshmen women. Slate College portion of tlie Grand's agent, was enthused, "The theatriPaul Merrill, '42 and Bob Leonard,
clientele
thai
Richard
Dlx
in
I
he
Owen
Bombard,
'43,
and
Van
'43.
cal booking division of the Part
Commencement to Feature
Schulue, '44, will manage the men's Last lioundup is the attracting Time Employment Bureau has met
Edward Eldred Potter Club: Presifeature.
dent, Client) Walrath, '42; Treasurer,
Hill, Clausen As Speakers events, while Dorothy Huyck, '43,
wilh success on Its first venture. It
ami Kathryn Herman, '44, head
Regis Hammond, '43; Secretary, Al
Daily at 3:30, (1:30, and 9:30 P, M., is now contracting for numerous
I he women's teams.
Terlto, '44; Representatives to Inthe spotlight focuses on two khaki- acting Jobs, one of which will send
lei'lralernli.y Council, Leo Griffin,
Dr. Clyde Millon Hill, Professor
clad figures slowly gelling dhwy as tho entire NISWH Board to the sum
'42 and Hal Sinner, '43.
they stand on a revolving dais. One mur slock theatre."
of Secondary Education al Yale
portrays tlie "Spirit of 1817"— bay-i ciruitun was one of the numerous
Kappa Beta: President, Al Stiller University, New Haven, ConneetlSEB Schedules Meetings
onetccl gun et. al., and Hie other's tsiale students who shelled out $.33
'42; Vice-President Joseph Levin,'cut, will be the chief speaker at the
only obvious function is to balance to view tlie mammoth show with
'43; Treasurer, Hurry Kensky, '43; Commencement exercises, Monday
The student Employment Bureau Die dais. The Spirit is Murray and, "3r> Beautiful Girls 35," "(10 AllRecording Secretary, David Slavin, June l(i. The Baccalaureate sermon
'43; Representatives to interfru- will be delivered on Sunday, June has scheduled two Important meet- the balance is Kusak. They are star Entertainers' (excluding Kusak
ternily Council, Henry Brainier, '42 ir>, by Dr. Bernard Chancellor ings next week for all Juniors, seniors, completely surrounded by beautiful and Murray, of coursei, "15 Piece
Clausen, Pastor of the First Bap- and graduate students. The ilrst girls during their entire perforin All Girl Orchestra." Grattan was
and Joseph Levin, '43.
Sigma Lambda Sigma: President, tist Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- meeting will lake place on Tuesday, anco which lasts for 33 seconds— amused. He remarked, after sitting
May 20, at 4:30 in Room 20. This and they gel, paid for HI
Maxson Reeves, '42; Vice-President, vania.
through two shows, "Kusak is so
Dr. I till was thu iuaugurutor of meeting is for juniors who are interEdgar Thoinpkins, '42; Treasurer,
Murray and Kusak complete their bow-legged in his puttees you can
Walter Graywaez, '43; Recording tlie Stuto System of junior high ested in placements. The second engagement with Count Vicl's (pro- pass the whole orchestra through
Secretary, Lyman Juckett, '44; Rep- schools in Vermont, and before meeting is scheduled for Thursday, nounced Vichy) revue tonight with on a Western Avenue Bus." And to
resentatives
to
Inlerfraternity coining to Yale was President of May 22, at 4:30 in Room 20. This their twenty-third
performances. think Kusak was just passed as a
Council, Irving Bliss, 42 and George the Southern Missouri State Teach- meeting is for the seniors and grad- In an exclusive interview, Murray perfect physical specimen for the
uate students.
ers College.
Kunn, '43.
said, "Murray is sensational I What Air Corps!
Bull t o Release
1941 Pedagogue
Murray, Kusak, Beautiful Girls
Put Grand Audiences in Aisles
THIS FALL
TRADE AT
YOUR
COLLEGE
HABERDASHER
mm
Return Engagement Scheduled
With Engineers Wednesday;
Team Drops First Tilt
Phone 8-3553
Honikel's Ph armacy
LUNCHEONETTE
<•
However, behind the three hit
pitching of Steve Paris, the Ramblers
came back to take a 6-4 decision from
KDR. George Seifert also twirled a
low hit game in the BAR-KDR contest, but lost to KDR when the winners took advantage of BAR'S
misplays.
The games scheduled for last
night were postponed.
15c BOWLING
AND
r. Pet.
;)
I'otter Club
Gophers
SIKIIIU Lnmuilti SIKIIHI.
Kapini Delhi •(••<>
Humbler s
IIAK
College House
RICE
ALLEYS
DISTINCTIVE FOUNTAIN
l«<'tii
Baseball Squad
To Meet Pratt
Nothing Else So Good
h So Good For You
JH.L.
Be Thrifty and Safe—Travel by Train
ASSOCIATED EASTERN RAILROADS
• j ^ P J ^ g W F p w i ^ r - t ' - > ) -—*•
H^-w-wi. p f n . f i ''U ,*i/i
tmj.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
25th
V«r
It Can't Happen Herel-
•by Laurtr
Established May, 1916
By the O M d 191 •
Vol. XXV
Thursday, May 15, 1M1
No. 26
Member
distributor
Asioclated Collegiate F m i
Collegiate
Digest
The underirrniliinte newspaper of the N e w York State College for Teachers published every Friday of the college
year by the N E W S Board for the Student Association.
P h o n e s : Office, 3-0373; Murray, Wf'd 238-M; Clark, 4-037.1.
Xntered as second class matter Albany, N. Y., postoffiae.
NPMilNTU
FOB NATIONAL ADVIXTICINO • »
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College PMitbtn
ReprtstnUlwt
4 2 0 MADICON A V I .
NBW YORK. N . Y .
CHICMO • SOtTOR • L « A M t l . l l • S»« FMRCIICO
The News Board
J O H N A. M U R R A Y
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B E A T R I C E A. DOWER
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S T E P H E N A. K U S A K
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BETTY P A R R O T T
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CCMANAGING EDITOR
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EDWIN HOLSTEIN
eoiTOB-IN-CHHF
CO-MANAOINO EDITOR
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WILLIAM DORRANCE
HARRY PASSOW
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RALPH CLARK
JAMES MALONEY
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BUSINEM MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
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SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
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ASSOCIATE EDITOR
The NEWS Moves Up
This iln.v, tt'lmto'or the futcs iloorec,
Shrill still he kopt with j o y by mo.
—Jonathan Swift
m>)
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, THURSDAY, M A Y 13, 1941
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, THURSDAY, M A Y 15,1941
PAGE I
If you compare this week's NEWS with
week's NEWS you will note little difference. But if
you compare tin's week's Moving-Up Day issue with
the Moving-Up Day issues of a year ago you will
see readily the changes which were introduced. Last
September the STATE C O U K G E N E W S embarked on
a policy of gradual evolution defined as "Conservative-Liberal." This issue does not represent the
fruition of that evolution. But it does represent
the culmination of a year's effort to make the
NEWS a newspaper rather than a weekly bulletin.
First phase of the paper's transformation was the
streamlining of its typography, makeup, and stylesheet. Old Style Cheltenham was abandoned in
favor of a modern Sans Serif face. Legibility and
consistency became bywords. " 8 : 0 0 o'clock this
morning" became "8 A. M." And in all evaluations
made of the N E W S this year, paper scored highest
for typography and makeup.
The new order outlawed the writing of stories
with painstaking reference to the bound volumes
and required that items had to have news value
if they were to appear. Traditionally featured stories gave way to ones of greater significance, A real
effort was made to link the college with the "outside
world" through countless polls, interviews with
Lehman and Willkie, stories on the draft, national
defense taxes, and educational trends. More facts
were printed than ever before—and these illustrated
with graphs, cartoons, charts, etc. Not only was
more news printed—that printed was more timely.
This morning's issue contains a tennis result wired
from Conneticut last night. A year ago the student
body waited a week to read of Moving-Up Day
announcements. This year it will not wait at all,
and will get numerical results as well.
The NEWS has become a better looking paper.
Syndicated and locally drawn cartoons have been
used. More pictures have appeared than ever before
—and these have been of superior quality and had
greater news value. The cartoon adjacent to this
column was drawn Tuesday night, engraved yesterday afternoon, and printed early this morning. The
picture of Myskania on page one replaces what
formerly has been a oxlO'.i black blotch surmounted
by indistinguishable faces. Even the advertising
department has produced attractive advertisements,
attractively arranged. And that department met
admirably the crisis threatened when the NEWS
was subjected to a 20' '< budget cut. This year 28
issues have been made possible on a budget smaller
than the budget of a year ago which produced but
22 issues. Only increased advertising revenues,
drastic economies, and wise management of funds
brought about this financial security.
As an editorial force during the past year the
NEWS has been frank, outspoken, and yet reserved.
It made no bones about denouncing a lazy Student
Association which by an overwhelming majority
permitted a poorly drafted and hopelessly padded
budget to pass. It has bitterly opposed the cliquishness of fraternities and sororities, almost singlehanded effected the reform of the Publications
Office, and lead the fight for the publication of
numerical results.
Most significant is the fact that the N H W S has
operated throughout this critical year free from
administrative control. The NKWS Board hopes
that its management of that great responsibility
will serve to prove that this free hand can be
extended again and again without fear.
Failure of A Liaison
•The Critic
"Parody is a symbol of success" 'willing to read a magazine full of
Is a saying which might well apply humor, especially humor that deals
to issue Number 3 of the State Col- I with those things in which the
lege Statesman on the news stands "Jukes" are interested.
as of last Friday. Without a doubt,
The Statesman
"authors-to-be
that issue of the Statesman has met
with more general approval than | were stunted" and attempted a parand were successful. They seany other issue of that magazine ody
lected as the subjects for their takesince its conception last year.
| offs the publications of State College
Certainly the Statesman has fin- I including the NEWS, the Freshman
ally, to the satisfaction of a good Handbook, and last year's Pedagoportion of the student body, achieved ! gue.
a part of its original purpose as "the
The NKWS Board was especially
humor and literary magazine of
State College." It has provided a pleased with the treatment it was
humor magazine which urges stu- accorded although some of the cuts
dents with any sense of humor at all used were the property of the NKWS
to read from cover to cover—even and were used without the permisfor the novelty of seeing how many sion of the Board. But then if the
NKWS Board can contribute to putpages are in the magazine.
The Statesman
continued its ling out a Statesman which some
"good cover policy" again with this students are willing to read—why
issue. The idea was novel, the should it complain about having
photography good, and the whole some of its cuts used without its
matter so well treated that some permission? True, the NEWS has
students were willing to wager that never gone in for literary articles like
Business Manager Bodner was Stu- Mr. Perlman's musical dissertation.
dent Association President Walrath The Nuws masthead appearing on
and only Literary Editor Madeline page 4 of the issue was rather subtle
Scesny's hair could convince a num- and the Gestapo is still trying to find
ber of students that the only con- out who conspired with the printer
nection with the group playing tic- to put a line under Mr. Murray's
tac-toe on the sidewalk and senior name in the masthead of last week's
campus leadership society Myskania I issue of the Nnwn.
was the borrowed gowns.
Conclusions to be drawn from this
The difference between what was I issue are rather obvious. The Statesbetween the covers of this issue of I man has failed as a liaison. It has
the Statesman and past issues is that | never met with success as a combinaIssue 3 had material that was what I tlon humor and literary magazine.
the students wanted and were willing I The board's decision to make the
to take the time to read. Issue 3 had ' last edition of the year a literary
material that was in some degree ap- j edition again is an admission of
pealing to "the Jukes of State who ! failure. Apparently the magazine
simply refuse to read more than a j must be either one or the other
page of literary material" (from the and State College students prefer
Statesman, of course) but who are humor in a magazine!
The Weekly Bulletin
li.-ini e m - I'luli
STATESMAN
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men's T r a c k anil
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Editor.
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Director,
IIH'WIIIIC
•WWIHWHIWJiHl MIWOII|'-l!f,l<>|im!|ll||nBgpi"ll»l,-ri:
Prelude to Pageantry
by Robert F. A g n t •
(Editor's Note—The first part of this article appeared in the Moving-Up Day issue of the NEWS last year;
the second part is written by the same author, but
this time from his point of view as a Senior.)
These are days of prophecy and prediction, of pageantry and power, of displays that absorb the aspects
of destiny. These are the days of marching men; tomorrow we, too, march. But when we enter the door
of Page Hall, we are invading no state, violating no
frontier. We may feel strange, but we are merely
claiming an Inevitable new realm that is ours. We will
celebrate the joy and torture of this inheritance tomorrow as we move into next year, as we move up—
and on.
Man is a creature that takes peculiar pride in the
right of succession, in the passing of property, tradition,
and honor. Moving-Up Day, however, is
Not Mere
more than an ordeal of detail, more than
Pomp and
a reckoning with pomp and plunder; it is
Pageantry
the culmination of a year, or, more exactly, four years in one, for each class
has come to the end of a period. High in the balcony,
decked in a green and unusually large ribbon, sits the
freshman, eager, anticipating, boisterous at the slightest excuse for applause, glad for a holiday, happy that
he is at last free from the apprenticeship of a first
year in college. Near him is the sophomore, superb
in his affectation of ease, proudly and defiantly bearing his colors, expertly critical of the slightest error in
procedure, throughly educated by his one year's experience. Downstairs sits the junior, toying nervously
with his cane, baffled by the mysteries of success, jealous of honor, girded for the torment of the morning's
suspense, wondering,—and hoping. Last and least is
the senior, ignored in his dignity of cap and gown,
solemn and bored by the ancient monotony, despairing of the future in the hands of the juniors, interested
chiefly in forecasts he made and his money that backed
them. This is the stage and the scene for the pageant.
Perhaps the day will be slow; perhaps the schedule
will be lost early, but there is pleasure in the waiting
in line, not knowing what will follow. There is pleasure
in listening to familiar speakers, in following the shifting scene of familiar activity. We will wonder again at
the flow of announcements, at the honors and offices,
at the prizes and positions. We will be amused by the
faculty, apparently as interested as the
Anticipation students. Then will come the moment
Greatest at of highest anticipation. We will see
Tapping
Myskania, itself solemn and deliberate,
slowly pursue the choosing of its successor—though well-substantiated rumor has it that
this year's "tapping" will be remarkably rapid. The
reality of this "tapping" scene could never be reenacted.
Then when the cheering dies and the long program is
over, there will be the march along student-flanked
walks. We will watch the forming of the black figure
"40" for the last time by the seniors. Only after the
stunts have passed and the sing is in progress will we
realize all this, or will we be reminded that the year is
really over. Previously we have watched the movingup, but not until the final song "Great Fire" can we
realize fully that Moving-Up Day is accompanied by
the loss of the Class of 1940.
There are those of us who may say that such a
ceremony as this can have but little lasting effect, but
when we look back, we shall remember little of people,
less of their nature. What we shall remember are the
days spent in festivities together. We shall recall the
festoon of colors and the singing, Page Hall and the
Maelstrom, our wonder at it all, and recount the fading
details of the four great days in which we moved-up
together.
*
*
*
*
And when it is over, what shall we say? Surely we
shall proclaim it a day to remember. There will be
those of us who will wonder at the sadness in the realm
of success, at fear following in the wake of achievement. We must remember, however, that this day we
set aside is more than an hour reserved for demonstration and triumph. Were it only that, it would falter
beneath Its weight of sham, for college moves in
terms of this event, and the moments which we anticipate In its light, become all too soon a memory. Like
a giant May-pole, Moving-Up Day stands
Day Stands in the midst of a whirlpool of activity and
Like Giant gathers together in one head the many
May-pole
strings on which we as individuals so
lightly frolic. Swinging, we feel the uncertain breeze against our faces, and then, dropping
from the whirl, a bit dizzied by it all, watch others
snatch our positions. Calmly, then, this May-polo
stands, symbolic of universal understanding of that
great truth which is so difficult for the individual to
fathom—the Omnipotence of transition.
Each year we reenact the same roles, apply the same
formulas; only the moving line of faces and the rotation
of colors give evidence of the changing scene, and only
the mounting count of the staked numorala on the
lawn outside proclaims the passing of a spent day.
This Is the beauty and the lore of tradition. In if we
lose ourselves, and disavow, for a time at least, our own
impermanence by recognizing and honoring the power
of mutability in a burst of festivities.
It Is not Moving-Up Pay, however, that creates the
changes thai are proclaimed therein. Taken ono by
one in their turn, these events would boEvents are come but a series of memoranda upon
Key to
which we would briefly reflect and forget.
Reality
Bui gathered together, they bring all of
us Into a common key with reality, and
impress emphatically upon us the pertinence of the
skid of time. Mosi of us are still children In need of
parables and pictures, and here in tho pageantry of
this day many of us become aware, for the first time,
of the power ol Transition.
Moving-Up Day in this new light becomes a living
mark, a symbol; not against the future alone, but
against the past. It becomes In its fulfillment a deathless identification branded upon Time, It stands ulone,
supreme and unchallenged, in the realm of a dying
year, radiant with a pagan lustre, like that of tho
evening star as it tilts on the rim of the horizon to
commemorate u day that was.
Myskania Traces
Nelson Guest Speaker
At Muskingum College
Eventful Career
Starting in 17
On a Friday morning in April of
1917, State College President Abram
Rover Brubacher rose in the student
assembly, or, as it was then termed,
"the Chapel", and told the listening student body that it had been
decided that an organization would
be formed of students who in the
future were to "to take charge of
undergraduate
life."
Professor
Walker, who followed President
Brubacher on the stage, then read
the names of the people who had
been chosen by the faculty to
serve on the first Myskania. It was a
week later, though, that Miss Anna
E. Pierce, the Dean of Women of
State at that time announced that
the name "Myskania" had been
chosen for the group, and stated
that the meaning of the name would
remain a secret to those who were
in it. To this day that secret has
been kept.
Body to Supervise
Created to supervise, in the words,
of Dr. Brubacher, "the phase of
student life which includes student
journalism, athletics, social affairs,
college traditions, student honors,
and preferences," Myskania has in
the 25 years of its existence made
and revised many traditions.
Since the day that it was formed, Myskania has undergone some
changes, and most of all, has grown
in prestige and power. When first
formed, its members were chosen by
the faculty. Today each Myskania
chooses its successor.
The rules that Myskania formulated in the first years of its existence were a heterogeneous set.
In the 24 years since its inception, Myskania has come to be the
most authoritative student voice in
the college. It has come to be a
goal for the most ambitious members of each class. It is now an organization composed of the leading figures in the college, of the
heads of student activities.
Present Myskania Informal
This year's Myskania has done
more than its share to bring that
organization closer to the student
body. This morning, the pictures of
the members of Myskania are published on the front page of the
STATE COI.I.IOCK NEWS,
State's scholarship record is
well known, and State's genial
Dean, Dr. Milton O. Nelson, who
has been steeped in our scholatic
superiority, has been drafted to
speak at various colleges throughout the country on this and pertinent subjects. On May 13, Dr.
Nelson spoke at "Scholarship
Day" at Muskingum College, New
Concord, Ohio, on the topic
"Scholarship In America Today."
Dr. Nelson's trip was also a reunion with Dr. William M.
French, acting Dean of Muskingum College. Dr. French also
graduated from State, and was a
member of our faculty as Assistant Professor of Education.
Walrath Re-Defines
Banner Rivalry Rules
Myskania has made the following
clarifications concerning the banner
rivalry. Merrill Walrath, '41, President of the Student Association,
speaking for Myskania, explained the
situation as follows:
"The Freshman class is now in
possession of both banners. The situation seems to be confused by the
rather ambiguous wording of Sections B, Paragraph lc, and 3a or
the rivalry rules which read: 'The
contest shall close at midnight of
Moving-Up Day and not before.
Both banners must be given to the
President of Student Association
between 12 P. M. and 8 A. M. on the
morning of Moving-Up Day . . . Five
points shall be awarded to the class
successful in obtaining and keeping
the banner of the rival class until
the close of the contest.'
"Myskania has ruled that the
freshman class must give both banners lo me between 12 P. M. and
8 A. M. tomorrow morning or lose 5
rivalry points. In fact, the only possible way for the sophomore class
to get the 5 points will be for them
to gain possession of both banners
before 12 P. M. tonight."
pRINK
PAGES
-Moving-Up Day
-O-
(Continued from page 1, column 5)
didates for the Student Association
offices.
The student body will then file out
of the front door of Page Hall, and
the four classes will form their class
numerals on the campus in front of
Page Hall. Following the formation
of the class numerals, the seniors
will gather to hear the ivy speech
which is to be given this year by
Louise Snell. After the speech, the
ivy is to be planted by the outgoing
Senior Class.
The afternoon part of the program will commence at 2 P. M. At
that time the stunts of the four
classes will be presented on the
Page Hall stage. Judging the stunts
will be Dr. Caroline Lester, Dr. Matie
Green, and Mr. Warren Densmore.
The sing judges are Miss Helen
Curtis, Dr. Margaret Betz, and Mr.
Paul G. Bulger.
The third part of the Moving-Up
Day activities will commence at
7:30 P. M., when the classes will
assemble in front of Draper Hall for
the step sing. After the songs have
been sung, the class winning the skit
and song contests will be announced and the rivalry cup will be
awarded. Dancing in Page Hall will
follow.
Morri
rns
Diiner
H. Monette, Prop,
-oFresh Pastries Every Six Hours
Hot Turkey
Sandwich
40c
12 OUNCE BOTTLE
PLENTY O F
PARKING S P A C E
ESS IT E I
Be ".Slack H a p p y " all summer long in one
of our saucy, carefree slack sets
niiiiiiiimwniiin"""M»ww'""w""""">"""
designed
for
lazy
living on
the
....
beach
. . . . lakeside . . . . mountains or campus.
//
•&J
f
Fashioned
STUDENTS
(if cool
rayon
Bengaline
in
Heaven Blue, Lemon Yellow or Natural.
COMING TO NEW YORK
. . itoy at the Henry Hudson Hotel. For a week-end,
a vacation or at a permanent residence thli popular
club-hotel li particularly tollable. Ill varleo cultural
activities and recreational facilities provide exercise
for energetic minds and bodies. Six lounges, five sun
decks, library. Music studios. 60 foot pool. Full social
programs. Popular priced restaurants. Cultural,
ihopplng and amusement areas all nearby.
Sizes 12-20
$5.95
.
The Play
Time
Shop
Second Floor
SPICIAL STUDINT AND FACULTY RATIS
Single 1 3 . 0 0 dally, * 1 3 . 0 0 weekly
Double f 3 . 9 0 dally, M 6 . 0 0 weekly
1200 ROOMS WITH BATH
HEADQUARTERS
AMERICAN WOMAN'S
ASSOCIATION
Visil our new Play Time shop that is just
brimming over with country casuals
....
bathing suits . . . tennis suits and bathing
mxi
• AS W i l l
HOTEL
S7th I T I I I T
•
N I W YORK
John favl Slack, Ce/ieral Manager
i...........T................»..........""»»"<"W«««M-T»*
accessories!
Spaghetti
25c
COMPLETE DINNERS DAILY FROM 40c to 65c
This is being
done in accordance with a longestablished custom.
This year,
for the first time, those pictures
are of Myskania dressed informally—informally in keeping with this
year's effort to remove some of the
artificial barrier between Myskania
and the college. Tomorrow, however, Myskania regains its full
formality when it taps the group
that is to follow it—the 26th of a
series.
Hamburg Special
F. F. Potatoes & Cold Slaw
20c
234 C e n t r a l
Albany, N.
Ave.
Y.
WE NEVER
CLOSE
PAGE 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1941
State Sackmen
Seek First Win
Maloney's
Baloney
Squad W i l l Play Firil of Two
Hamilton Garnet at Home;
Loie to Pratt and RPI
-J.R.M
The
annual
WAA Spring
Awards Banquet, t h e last g e t - t o gether for t h e year, will be held
T h u r s d a y a t Miss J o h n s t o n ' s
h o m e . Armida Casline, general
c h a i r m a n , stated t h a t this year
t h e food a n d fun will surpass all
past banquets.
After t h e banquet, t h e old
council will formally install t h e
new council which will be a n nounced tomorrow. Those juniors
with t h r e e years' sports credit
will receive WAA keys a n d
freshmen with credit in four
sports will get n u m e r a l s .
T h e S t a t e College diamond crew
will play its first h o m e g a m e of t h e
c u r r e n t season tomorrow afternoon,
when they line u p a g a i n s t a visiting Hamilton College n i n e a t t h e
Ridgefield P a r k grounds. T h e game
is scheduled to begin a t 4:30 P . M.
Last year Mox Weber's H a m i l t o n ians took t h e m e a s u r e of t h e local
squad by scores of 8-1, a n d 4-2. T h e
strength of Coach Weber's team this Tennis Team Beats
year is a n undecided factor, since
an accurate record of their current
Connecticut State
performance is n o t available. These
two teams will again meet a t ClinT h e underdog S t a t e n e t squad
ton on Wednesday afternoon.
defeated
t h e Connecticut
State
T h e S t a t e s m e n will be seeking Teachers, 8-1, last night on t h e New
Connecticut h a d
their first victory tomorrow, after E n g l a n d court.
having been t a k e n over t h e hurdles previously beaten mighty Yale U n i by P r a t t S a t u r d a y , 10-5, a n d R P I versity's n e t outfit.
yesterday 9-2.
T h e n e t m e n will play a t R P I this
S a t u r d a y a n d will tackle ConnectiP r a t t G a m e Close
cut in a r e t u r n engagement next
T h e P r a t t contest was a tough
Wednesday a t home.
one to lose. S t a t s played a good
T h e contest with Norwich schebrand of ball a n d led 5-3 until t h e
duled for last Friday was cancelled
seventh.
because of heavy rain after t h e
In t h e 5th inning, with two S t a t e s m e n h a d t a k e n t h e lead in
men on, a n d only one out. P r a t t h i t all five single matches.
a long drive into left field. Rich
T h e squad played S t . Peter's ColYoung snapped it u p on t h e bounce, lege a t Jersey City on S a t u r d a y and
and made a beautiful throw to cut lost 5-3. T h e close fences a n d t h e
off a m a n coming in a t t h e plate. veritable gale which blew conIn t h e same action Daniels flipped sistently cramped t h e S t a t e s m e n ' s
it to B e n n e t t who relayed it back style.
T h e return
engagement,
and caught t h e second m a n a t t h e which will be played on t h e Ridgeplate.
field courts here, is awaited with
Last night the S t a t e s m e n lost their eagerness by t h s team. " I t was a
third game of t h e year when R P I moral victory for State, a n d we'll
took another contest, 9-2.
beat t h e m when we play them
Bob Leonard did some fine hurling again," said S t a n S m i t h .
for t h e locals until four walks, two
hits, a n d two errors by others gave
Ave r u n s to t h e Engineers. T h e s u m Gripe Department
We'd like to cull from our gripes m a r y is:
of t h e past four years a single item
111)11 SOI (I
which we've been wanting to get off K I M
(Hill llll (I
STATU
our chest for some time.
All t h e enlightenment which collliilli-rii-N! Stulc, l.ciiiiiircl a n i l DlllllolB.
lege offers i n t h e a r t of living is K l ' l , K i n r v u i i a n d Nyis
totally nullified by t h e individual
who smugly parades about t h e c a m pus with his whole "personality"
OTTO R. MENDE
wrapped a r o u n d a well-polished a n d
prominently displayed button on t h e
lapel. T h i s fellow is t h e so-called
"The College Jeweler"
strong fraternity man, a n d it seems
to us t h a t t h e r e a r e far too m a n y
103 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
of his type for t h e good of S t a t e .
He loves his brothers; a n d there
all a d m i r a t i o n stops. He laughs a t
his brother's jokes. He lives like
KODAKS
C I N E KODAKS
his brothers. He inwardly, if n o t
openly, h a t e s his fellow organizaAlbany Camera Shop, Inc.
tions. F r a t e r n i t i e s a n d sororities
a r e indispensable, but t h e n a r r o w 204 WASHINGTON AVENUE
mindedness which they tend t o proALBANY. N. Y.
duce should be fought . . . . from
PHONE 0 - 4 5 5 8
within.
We've seen countless friendships
transcending fraternity lines. T h e r e
should be more. As a fraternity
member, we don't think we c a n be EMILJ. NAGENGAST
branded as prejudiced. Moreover,
believe it or n o t , we're sincere, a n d
YOUR COLLEGE F L O R I S T
not trying to be nasty! Enuf.
Comrades, pour t h e wine tonight
F o r t h e p a r t i n g is with d a w n !
Hovey. Comrades
Tomorrow t h e Class of '41 takes
t h e first step toward t h a t oblivion
which r e a r s i t s ugly h e a d before
every class o n t h e eve of i t s moving u p a n d out. And with t h e Class
of '41, t h e humble proprietor of this
page takes h i s bow a n d steps aside.
To be reluctant is to be selfish.
Yet, we feel t h a t even a sports editor won't be above feeling a sudden
u r g e for a vigorous noseblow t o morrow n i g h t when t h e derobed
seniors s t a r t their traditional farewell trek down t h e steps of Draper.
On our freshman a n d sophomore
Moving-Up nights, we recall looking on with amazement a s r u d d e n
epidemics of nasal congestion caused t h e black mass of caps a n d
gowns to be peppered with white.
As a junior, we t h o u g h t we knew
how t h e seniors felt. Now, a s t h e
end draws near, we're very much
afraid we're beginning to experience t h a t same feeling ourselves.
It seems only yesterday t h a t our
knees were beating a tattoo with
fifty others (including Murray's) in
Doc Dorwaldt's Hygiene class; t h a t
a bunch of sophomores almost c u t
short o u r college career by dunking
us bodily into t h e shower; t h a t we
used to live our free periods in t h e
library; t h a t D. V. Smith used to
scare u s ; t h a t we played a sloppycenter field for t h e 12:35 gym class
but we could drool o n like
this for columns.
Democracy in M A A
By t h e time of this writing, MAA
Council h a s probably passed t h e
new I n t r a m u r a l Council s e t - u p t o !
take effect next year . . . . a drastic
scheme aimed a t democratizing the j
latter body.
Tradition h a s decreed t h a t I n t r a mural Council should be selected a t
the discretion of MAA a t t h e e n d '
of t h e college year. Under this, the I
old plan, t h e participating i n t r a mural groups (College House, KDR, I
SLS, etc.) were not all necessarily !
represented.
T h e new ruling clearly states t h a t
all college groups putting t e a m s in
the football, basketball, a n d softball leagues will receive a seat on
t h e council.
Corner
Ontario
this department which appeared in j
last week's S t a t e s m a n . According
to Dr. Hastings, parody is t h e s y m bol of success. T h a n k s , B l a n c h e .
T o t h e new board t h a t will m a n
the helm next week . . . . lotsa luck.
So-long — a n d 30.
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CSNAPPY I
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and L u n c h e s
785 Madison
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SPRING STYLES
MANHATTAN SHIRTS
2-9733
We Deliver
After exercise, nothing is more
pleasant than a refreshing
pause with ice-cold Coca-Cola.
Its taste is delicious; and a welcome, refreshed feeling always
follows. So when you pause
throughout the day, make it the
pause thai refreshes with ice-cold
Coca-Cola.
YOU TASTE ITS QUALITY
5'
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Bottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by
3 Doors from Quail S t r e e t
117 8 . P E A R L
221 CENTRAL AVE.
OA
^3 h ' QgQL xxv, NO. n
—i4;
Men Outnumber Women Boards Release Five Ballot Difference
Editors, Staffs
On Next Year's Myskania For Next /ear Between Tibbetts, Passow
Z-443
Surprises Creep
Into Ceremonies
T r a d i t i o n once m o r e r e t u r n e d
to s t a l k t h e b o a r d s a t S t a t e a s
next
year's
Myskania
eleven
fell
into
formation
on the
s t a g e of Page H a l l this m o r n i n g .
Apparently much emphasis was
placed upon " t h e s u r p r i s e element"
as an important
factor in t h e p l a n n i n g of this year's
ceremony, for t h e usual "presidency
to presidency", "activity to activity",
"fraternity
brother to fraternity
b r o t h e r " method of h a n d i n g down
seats was conspicuously absent.
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1941
Traditional Speeches
Inaugurate Moving-Up
T h i s morning's Moving-Up Day
assembly in Page Hall opened
with
the
traditional
class
speeches.
Miss Catherine O'Bryan, speaking for t h e seniors, denied t h a t
this generation is t h e "lost generation," t h a t there is n o t h i n g
to live for.
A. H a r r y Passow, '42, spoke on
(he subject "A New E r a for
S t a t e College."
Adding a light touch to t h e
addresses, Elizabeth B a r d e n dedicated a n ocb to t h e sophomore
class. T o t h e senior class s h e
bid a fond farewell a n d took
pop-shots a t t h e freshmen.
T h e vicissitudes of a freshm a n from t h e day of h i s arrival
a t S t a t e until Moving-Up Day
was t h e subject of t h e speech by
B e r n a r d Skolsky, '44.
Holstein, Dorrance, Kyle, Klein
To Edit State Publications,News To Be Co-Edited
Cgjfrg-
RETIRING PRESIDENT
Dr. J o h n M. Sayles, a c t i n g president of t h e college, a n n o u n c e d t o
the Moving-Up D a y audience t h i s
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
226 N. ALLEN S T R E E T
ALBANY, N . Y.
673 Cast Vote
In S A Elections
S t u d e n t s a n d g u e s t s filled P a g e
Hall to capacity this morning t o
hear Merrill W a l r a t h , president,
a n n o u n c e t h e r e s u l t s of t h e s p r i n g
elections. T h e y h e a r d t h a t R a l p h
T i b b e t t s would b e t h e n e x t p r e s i dent, Don Vanas, vice-president,
and Patricia L a t i m e r , secretary.
They did not hear that 673 stud e n t s , a record n u m b e r a c c o r d i n g
to M y s k a n i a files, h a d p a r t i c i p a t e d
in t h e elections o r t h a t T i b b e t t s '
m a r g i n of t r i u m p h w a s a m e r e
.0078.
m o r n i n g t h e 1941-1942 STATU COLLKOK
NEWS Board a n d silver k e y a w a r d s
of the publication. I n similar fashion, D r . H o w a r d A. DoBell, Professor of M a t h e m a t i c s , a n d M r . Louis
C. Jones, I n s t r u c t o r in English, a n nounced t h e n e w b o a r d s of t h e
Pedagogue
a n d Statesman
respectively.
Return to Co-Editors
William R. D o r r a n c e a n d E d w i n
J. Holstein will co-edit t h e STATE
Cou.Ktac NEWS next year with A.
Passow First Tapped
H a r r y P a s s o w assisting a s m a n As end man, McCreary began proPresidential P h o t o - F i n i s h
a g i n g editor. T h i s a p p o i n t m e n t of
ceedings when h e , escorted H a r r y
T h r e e students decided t h a t R a l p h
co-editors m a r k s a r e t u r n to a policy
Passow, this year's h e a d of t h e
Tibbets, '42, should be president of
P T E B , c h a i r m a n of t h e J u n i o r Guide
begun in the s p r i n g of 1939. Another
t h e Student Association n e x t year.
System, junior editor of t h e NBWK,
old policy r e a d o p t e d by t h e Nuw.s
T h a t is, if only t h r e e h a d changed
a n d member of Debate Council—as
Board w a s t h e a p p o i n t m e n t of cirtheir vote H a r r y Passow would be
well a s the barely defeated c a n d i d a t e
culation m a n a g e r to t h e Board. An
Merrill Walrath,'41
leading next year's assemblies. P a s for S t u d e n t Association president.
interesting note w a s t h e a w a r d i n g
sow assumed a c o m m a n d i n g lead o n
Murray's first trip to t h e floor of t h e
of silver keys "to seniors whose
the first ballot while t h e Miller s u p assembly resulted in t h e n a m i n g of
merit t h e NKW.S Board d e e m s a d porters fell six votes short of placing
Paul Merritt, three year's class presitheir "dark horse" c a n d i d a t e i n r e dent, prominent varsity basketball Select Gaylord, Mattice, Young visable to recognize." Silver keys
votes, eliminating t h e odds-on favwere a w a r d e d to Stephen Bull, Jr.,
player, and member of I n t e r f r a t e r n orite Tibbetts. I n either instance,
For Class Vice-Presidencies
Elizabeth D o n a h u e , Robert P a t t o n ,
ity Council. As S t a n S m i t h ' s suchad t h e blank voters cast their baland Anthony Ingoglia. An excepcessor, then followed Bill Dickson,
In Mediocre Vote Result
lot for t h e eliminated candidate t h e
tion w a s m a d e in t h e case of t h e
also a varsity basketball m a n , all
result would have been changed.
Peterson
W
A
A
,
Dickson-MAA
round athlete, and next year's presilatter who left college in his junior
No new Student Council keys a r e
d e n t of MAA.
Ryerson-Music, Hirsh-Debate,
in order for class presidents this year to accept a g o v e r n m e n t posiPresident for Commencement?)
year, for t h e results of t h e elections tion in W a s h i n g t o n .
Simmons-D&A Council
show t h a t all class heads have held
Mr. Newton B. V a n Derzee,
1 9 4 1 - 1 9 4 2 Myskania
t h a t office before. Paul M e r r i t t h a s
T h e results of t h e different counc h a i r m a n of t h e college Board of
been elected President of t h e Class
cils a n d association elections were
Visitors, stated last Wednesday
Aaron Harry Passow
of 1942 a third time, T h o m a s Peeney
a n n o u n c e d in traditional fashion this
t h a t t h e a p p o i n t m e n t of a sucPaul Eugene Merritt
comes back as President of t h e Class
morning.
cessor to t h e late Dr. A. R . B r u William Gavin Dickson, J r .
of 1943, a n d Patricia Carroll h a s been
bacher might be forthcoming on
Ryerson Music Head
J e a n n e t t c Frances Ryerson
re-elected President of t h e Class of
J u n e 16, C o m m e n c e m e n t Day.
Kathryii Inez Wilson
Presiding over Music Council n e x t
1944. Merritt rode into office with
Stephen / V K u s a k
Last fall Van Derzee said t h a t
William Richard D o r r a n c e
year will be J e a n n e t t c Ryerson a s a comfortable margin on t h e first
t h e n a m i n g of a president for
Katlierine Dorothy Peterson
sisted
by
Mildred
Mattice,
secretary,
ballot, while it took two voting sesBeatrice/
\ Dower
S t a t e College was being delayed
J o h n Ralph Tibbetts
and Florence Halbreich, treasurer.
sions to reinstate Feeney a n d r e pending legislative action. Since
Bernard Periman
O t h e r council members include;
elect Carroll. About 143 j u n i o r s parthe adjournment of t h e LegislaEdwin Joseph Ilolstein
John i
\ Murray
George Kunu a n d Maxson Reeves,
ticipated in their class elections—a
Operatic Society; Alberta Lee a n d ture, it h a s been impossible for
I r a J e a n Hirsh
low percentage compared to t h e 160
the board to meet i n a s m u c h a s a
Joan McAllister, choral society; Carand 181 who marked ballots for t h e
majority of its m e m b e r s have been
melina Losurdo, S t u d e n t Association;
J e a n n e t t c Ryerson, vice-president sophomores a n d freshmen respecout of t h e city.
Bernard P e r i m a n and I r a Hirsh, Orof h e r class h e r sophomore year, tively. I n general revote t u r n o u t s
chestra.
T
h
e
latter
two
were
elected
Van Derzee denied t h a t any recO
t
h
e
r
a
p
p
o
i
n
t
m
e
n
t
s
include:
to
member of the debate squad, a n d fell off considerably.
ommendation h a d a s yet been
the NKWS Board, Associate Editors, unanimously.
next year's president of Music CounT h e complete list of class office Muriel Seovell, David Slavin, A n m a d e to t h e Regents of t h e U n i Highlight of t h e Debate Council
cil, crashed t h e t h u s far masculine holders is a s follows:
versity of the S t a t e of New York,
drew T a k a s ; Men's Sports Editor, awards was t h e presentation by Paul
r a n k s as she was brought to t h e
which body will actually n a m e t h e
Class of 1942:—President, Paul Carl M a r o t t o ; Advertising Manager, G r a t t a n of a gift to Mr. William G.
stage by Kusak. Agne followed suit
new president, acting on n o m i n a Vice-president,
Marjorie Harriet De F o r r e s t ; Business Man- Hardy, debate coach. Hardy will
by naming a second girl—Kay Wil- Merritt;
tions submitted by t h e Board of
Gaylord;
Secretary,
J
u
n
e
H
a
u
s
h
a
u
l
t
study
for
t
h
e
next
two
years
a
t
Corson, d r a m a t i c s star, NSPA represenager, Madeline G r u n w a l d ; a n d CirVisitors.
er;
Treasurer,
Benson
T
y
b
r
i
n
g
;
Rep's
nell
University.
Directing
t
h
e
c
o
u
n
tative, a n d newly elected president
culation Manager, Allen Simmons.
to MAA, William Dickson a n d Leslie
cil in his absence will be: I r a Hirsh,
of SCA.
Don Vanas experienced little diffiGraves; Publicity Director, A r t h u r Competitive Appointments
president; Glen Walrath, vice-presiculty in out-distancing a large field
Speculation r a n riot a s W a l r a t h Hobday; Finance Board, Henry G e r Shirley Kyle w a s selected to edit dent; Marie Soule, secretary; a n d seeking the vice-presidency.
He
lapped Bill Dorrance, o n e of t h e mond a n d Nicholas Morisillo; C h e e r the 1942 Pvdatjuguc.
Miss Kyle's Sol Greenberg, treasurer.
missed being n a m e d o n t h e first
b r a i n - c h i l d r e n of t h e STATU OOLLHOJS leader, Winifred Baer; WAA M a n ballot by 29 votes. J a m e s Portley's
News, and a co-editor for next year. ager, Mary Susan Wing; Songleader, a p p o i n t m e n t w a s a result of com- MAA-WAA Presidents
T h e Men's Athletic Association prominence in the recent budget d e Kay Peterson, SCA cabinet member, Ira Hirsh; Rep. to WAA, Anita Holm. petitive work in all phases of yearbook publication. T h i s system of and Women's Athletic Association bate helped account for his very good
next year's dorm president, a n d new
Class of 1943—President, T h o m a s competitive a p p o i n t m e n t s w a s in- will be led next year by William showing. Both Taylor a n d Lynch
president of WAA, completed t h e wo- Feeney;
Vice-president,
Mildred
men's representation on next year's Mattice; Secretary, Mary M c C a n n ; stituted by editor S t e p h e n Bull, Jr., Dickson a n d K a t h e r i n e Peterson, polled well on t h e first ballot b u t
neither well enough to m a k e t h e r e Myskania when s h e was accordingly Treasurer, Howard Lynch; Rep's, and incorporated into t h e new con- presidents. Aiding Dickson will be
votes. Bora never h a d a chance.
tapped by Dower, queen of t h e ball. to MAA, Harry Bora a n d F r a n k stitution. Additional a p p o i n t m e n t s F r a n k Hansen, vice-president; L e s Miller t h e n p u t m a n y minds to rest H a n s e n ; Publicity Director, M a r i - to t h e board u n d e r t h e new system lie Graves, treasurer; William Miller, Woman Shatters " T r a d i t i o n "
by calling t h e n a m e R a l p h Tibbetts, lyn Rich; Finance Board, Robert include: Photography Editor, H u - secretary; a n d Carl Marotto, dirFor t h e first time in four years a
successively secretary
a n d vice- B a r t m a n and J a m e s Portley; Cheer- bert Moore; L i t e r a r y Editor, Dor- ector of t h e MAA Press Bureau. woman h a s been elected to a major
Miss
Peterson
will
have
as
her
assistothy
Dougherty;
Business
Manager,
president of the S t u d e n t Association, leader, Esther Tein; WAA Manager,
S t u d e n t Association office. T h e woa n d newly elected president for n e x t Winifred J o n e s ; Songleader, Doro- Helen J a c k s o n ; a n d Advertising a n t s Mary Susan Wing, vice-presi- m a n is Patricia Latimer, '44, a n d t h e
dent;
Winifred
Jones,
treasurer;
K
i
t
thy Cox; R e p to WAA, Lois Halley. Manager, Doris B a r r e t t .
year.
H e r d m a n , secretary; a n d Dorothy office t h a t of secretary—Rita SulliO r c h e s t r a Recognized
van won a similar honor in t h e Fall
Class of 1944—President, Patricia
T h e Rtutv.tmuin
Board appoint- Townsend, songleader.
of 1937 filling the vacancy caused by
B e r n a r d Periman, organizer a n d Carroll; Vice-president, R i c h m o n d m e n t s for next y e a r will be t h e
Elizabeth Simmons was selected
conductor of one of t h e most i m - Young;
Secretary,
K a y Doran; smallest in recent y e a r s inasmuch as president of t h e Dramatics a n d Henry Taylor. On t h e first ballot
p o r t a n t gifts to S t a t e College—the Treasurer, Mickey McNiff; Rep's, to as the a c t consolidating t h e Lion Arts Council for 1941-1942. Dorothy the election resolved itself a r o u n d
Symphony Orchestra—was escorted MAA, William Marsland a n d Wil- and the ICcho B o a r d s in t h e spring Huyck will be treasurer a n d Doris Forrest, Latimer, a n d Snow. L a t i mer's incumbency as class vice-presito ills seat in t h e line-up by Haller. liam Miller; Publicity Director, Geo- of 1939 provided for a joint board. Lichwart will act as secretary.
d e n t a n d the fact t h a t Forrest missBeers next, descended to pin t h e rgia Hardesly; Finance Board, Verne It h a s taken t h r e e y e a r s to reduce
ed being president last Fall by b u t
official streamers on Ed Holstein, Marshall ;
Cheerleader,
Robert the board to its p r e s e n t status,
three votes gained t h e m t h e revotes.
Departmental Club Elections
editor of the Frosh Handbook, publi- White; WAA Manager, Mary D o This third ballot indicated forcibly
T h e Htdtcsmail
Board for 11)41city promoter of big class dances, nuinn; Songleader, Earle Snow ; Rep.
1942 follows: Editor-in-Chief, Mary
In elections held recently, D e p a r t - t h a t t h e students were primarily i n and t h e oilier half of next year's to WAA, K i t Herdman.
Klein;
Managing
Editor,
Roy
Sommental
Clubs of t h e college chose terested in the election of a president
Nuws co-editorship.
mors; Business Manager,
Allan their officers for t h e coming year. and vice-president.
At this point t h e greater p a r t of
Woodell;
Advertising
Manager, Presidents of t h e organizations a r e
Religious Club Heads
O t h e r officers selected follow;
t h e audience proceeded to sit back
E m m a B a e c a r r i ; Assistant Adver- as follows: Classical Club, Antoin- NSFA Representative, Robert Leoa n d relax, only to be newly aroused
tising
Manager,
Dorothy
Brooks;
ette Vanasco, '42; Commerce Club, n a r d , '43; MAA Representative,
Presidents of t h e sectarian clubs
by Murray's startling r e p e a t perArt Editor, David Hayeslip; Assist- Helen Krlzka; International Relaformance of Ills first deliberate j o u r - t h a t have held their elections a r e a n t A r t Editor, Marilyn R i c h ; a n d tions Club, J a n e t Weitzer, '42; Italian Henry Brauner, '42; Representative
to Music Council, C a r m e l l n a Losurdo,
ney. T h e trip ended in t h e selection as follows:
Associate Editors, Betty Barden,
L u t h e r a n Olub—Charles Reynolds, David B i t t m a n , M a r y M a c i n t o s h , Club, Adelaide Clenienti, '42; F r e n c h '44; S t u d e n t Association Songleader,
of t h e eleventh and final m e m b e r of
Club, Roy Soinnjers, '42; S p a n i s h Earle Snow, '44; a n d Cheerleaders,
the 1042 Myskania, I r a Hirsh, active '42.
K a t h e r i n e M a r t i n , L u k e Zilles.
Club, J a c k Smith, '43. Speaker of t h e Winifred Baer, '42, Dorothy Oox a n d
Newman Club—Fred Ferris, '42.
in Music Council, t h e Symphony OrForum of Politics will be Frederick Lois Hafley, sophomores, a n d Robert
Editing
t
h
e
1941-1942
Directory
S
t
u
d
e
n
t
Christian
Association
—
chestra, a s well a s next year's
Ferris, '42.
White, '44.
will
be
Nicholas
Morslllo,
'42.
Kay
Wilson,
'42.
president of Debate Council.
MerrittHeads 42/
Feeney, Carroll In
ISSUE EDITORS
RICE
ALLEYS
15c BOWLING
S-EXTRA
Councils Divulge
'41 -'420fficers
BOWLERS
Chess, Statesman, Exit
Messrs. Knox and Stlmson claim
t h a t their d e p a r t m e n t s form t h e j
backbone of American defense. We'd
like to challenge t h a t stand. S a t urday's vicious torpedoeing of t h e
U. S. Navy by t h e chess team puts
t h e second major b r a n c h of t h e |
armed forces on t h e pawnpu.shers'
vanquished lLst. T h e army was
knocked off last year.
We appreciated t h e parody of
by Carl T . Marotto
<
i printed . . . they m i g h t be d e m o r a l On t h e eve of t h e cessation of i z i n g to t h e sophs." "Curly" Taylor,
F r o s h - S o p h rivalry o n e finds i n - " W e v e been taking it easy j u s t t o
terest i n t h e outcome keynoted a t a make it interesting . . •. now w a t c h
high pitch. T h e reason for this is us. Wow I ' J e a n Harvey flashed i n easily explained—for t h e first t i m e dignation a s to t h e possibilities of
since G r a n t m a r c h e d into R i c h - dcubt, "Of course we'll win, n o t h i n g
mond, t h e remarkable t r a i n of to i t . ' Flora Gaspary, "Well f r a n k events a t S t a t s finds t h a t t h e "ver- ly. . . . (two short l a u g h s ) " . Bill
d a n t " freshmen a r e leading t h e Marsland bared h i s fangs a n d
more experienced sophomores in growled. "We'll tear 'em limb from
rivalry. At t h e present writing t h e limb." S u m m a r y :
"littla foxes" a r e pacing t h e enemy
KVCIIIH
HIM
l|)l:t
by a score of 22'/u to 14 % I
I'IIHIIIIUM
0
'!
Last Monday night t h e frosh Football
0
8
Amazons blitzkrieged t h e Soph w o - Women's Alhli'ilcs
i
•>
men with
a 21-11 bombardment. R i v a l r y HillHT
'i'/j
<»
:(
II
Later in t h e same evening t h e wily ( l l f i ' o Iniski'tliall
liniiiito
it
ai/.
frosh m e n slipped a 10-9 victory
Men's
HaNlii'Miall
0
II
past t h s collective nose of their Manners l Initio
5«
0
rivals, n e t t i n g six points for t h e Mascot I I n a l
(1
II
winners for a whole day's work. Tnir ol' W a r
II
j{
:i
u
However, confidence still reigns fllrl'H soi'ihall
Men's suit hull
:|
o
in both a r m e d camps.
I'llshllall
II (•>) 0
Brief interviews with t h e m a n TrlH'U mill F i e l d
lOvents ( H )
II (2) II
(?) in t h e corridor a n d t h s girl in
( h i s s Stunts
II (II) (I
t h e library resulted in t h e follow- Class
Slni;
II (it) (I
ing c o m m u n i q u e s : P a t Carroll, "My
Totals
aai/j
1.1(4
t h o u g h t s on rivalry shouldn't be 1 T e n l a t l v e
a t Benson St.
FOR STATE C O L L E G E
State College
Freshmen Lead Sophomores
As Rivalry Draws to Close
Awards, Food, Fun!
Come and Get Them
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