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STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1940
PAGE 4
Finance Board Shows
Finance Board Report
200 Sighed For
Ai of July 1,1940
Receipt*:
Forum of Politics Rale
at 1012 full tax tickets
@
A sharp new interest in world Sulo
fin
affairs was dramatically illustrated 8ule
this week when nearly two hundred For
students registered for the first
meeting of the Forum of Politics.
Miss Janet Sharts, '41, speaker of
the group a p p o i n t ed William
Brophy chairman of the all Important
Resolutions
Committee,
which will integrate the work of
the Forum with that of the social
studies classes of the college,
Miss Alice Abelove, '41, will direct
the second presidential election poll,
as a comparison with last year's
straw vote. At that time, it will be
remembered, Roosevelt defeated possible candidate Dewey; Wendell
Willkie received not one vote. The
project that promises to arouse the
most interest will be the work of
the Conscription Committee, which
is being directfd by Glen Walrath,
'42.
Resolutions introduced at yesterday's meeting moved that the Forum should take a stand on the
mobilization of industry as a measure of national defense preparation;
that the Forum go on record involving equal responsibility by all
Pan-American countries in defense
of all America.
Officers of the Forum besides Miss
Sharts are Rose Lison, '41, clerk, and
Bella Lashinsky, '41, treasurer.
Commerce Club Sponsors
Times Union Tour Today
Stanley Smith, '41, president of
the Commerce Club, announces a
guided tour of the Times Union
exhibit at 126 State Street this
afternoon at 4 P. M, Students will
see a movie which will explain how
a newspaper is made up. All State
College students are invited to attend.
Smith also disclosed the appointments of John P. Gardephe, '41, as
publicity director and of James
Portley '43, as program director.
Commerce Club will meet Thursday, at 4:30 P, M. The room for the
meeting will be posted on the third
floor bulletin board of Drapor Hall.
At this time, plans for an extensive membership drive will be discussed. Any person enrolled in any
commerce class is eligible for membership. The freshmen are especially
urged to join this year.
Tax Sales Increase
$12
$14,144.00
Student Board of Finance a n of 10 half tax tickets
nounces that 815 full student taxes
$0
60.00
of 4 faculty tickets ® $5
$0.00 and 117 half taxes have been sold
to date. This is a slight improveissue of duplicate tickets,
a © 25c
.so ment on last year since the figures
Hack tax collections, 14 @ $10
140.00 show that sales have exceeded last
Krom W.A.A., bulno.ee of previous year turned buck . . . .
10.11 year's by $250.
Those who have not paid their
Total Receipts
$12,875.21
student tax are asked to do so as
Iln.ance on hand Huptcmher 10311, per llidley . .
025.92 soon as possible. Seniors are reTotal cash available . . . . fl3.001.ia minded that payment of the tax is
Kxpundltures:
necessary before they will receive
Public Address System charged to surplus
$ 85.00 a recommendation from the college
Present to Dr. Thompson
for a teaching position.
Charged to surplus
20.00
Payment may be made to Edward
Knilini'iier Memorial charged
to surplus
200.00 L. Cooper, treasurer of the Finance
Check No. 1202 of last year
charged to surplus
15.00 Board, or to any of the members
Rrfor
not accouuled
for
charged to surplus
0.00 who include: Ralph Clark, Charles
Qulnn, seniors; Nicholas Morsillo,
Activities:
Baseball
«2.»2 Benson Tybring, juniors; and James
llusketlmll (Varsity)
1,150.18 Portley, '43.
Chess
88.25
College News
Cross Country
Debute Council
Dramatics ami Art
Ifrosh Basketball
Freshman Handbook
Athletic Contingency
Infirmary
Intrai 'ill Sports
M.A.A. Press Bureau
Music Council
Myskanlu
National student Federation
Assoc
Puri-timo Employment Bureau
Pedagogue (amount paid by
board only)
Secretarial (personal service
ijillMIl
Stall' College Press Bureau ..
Sluileiii Council
Tennis
The Statesman
Treasurer's Bond
Woman's Athletic Assoc
Knish Handbook (for P.lll) ..
1,081.57
114.88
800,0(1
007.07
70.50
287.00
8S9.0B
MOU.08
108.70
88.02
081.01
202.08
Z-443
II
Dial 5-1913
Geo. D. Jeoncy, Prop.
"The College Jeweler"
103 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
\
Boulevard Cafeteria
50c
108-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
140.08
18.70
70.05
110.05
500.70
28.15
820.00
12.00
ALBANY, N. Y.
$/C%&*£&-&&& tie
Total Expenditures
$12,145.20
Cash balance, July 1, HMD . . . . $ 555.87
In lltiiik
$548.12
Petty cash
7.75
Religious Organizations
Plan Varied Programs
there's a whole World's Series of
good smoking in Chesterfields.. .that's why
it's the smoker's cigarette. The best tobaccos
in all of Tobaccoland . . . blended together
for MILDNESS, COOLNESS and BETTER TASTE.
Do you smoke the
cigarette that SATISFIES
Western and Quail
0. Dower Can Go
To Coronation, If
The way things look now,
Myskania will not have to
change the date of Campus
Day, in the event that Bea
Dower is elected Queen.
On Saturday, October 4, her
attending physician stated that
she would be able to attend the
ceremonies on October 19. She
is recovering nicely, and should
be quite able to take part in
the Campus Day event after
a few days' rest in her home
In Ballston Spa.
There is an ever-increasing
atmosphere of expectancy and
excitement as the biggest day
in State College draws near.
Everyone is wondering who
the queen and her attendants
will be; that is, everyone except Myskania. The secret is
closely guarded, only adding
to the glamour of the day.
Year
VOL. XXV, NO. 4
State College Men, Faculty
Register Wednesday (or Draft
Men Depart—Women Work Board Created;
As Last War Upset Campus Will Register
Wednesday all the men in State
College who have passed their
twenty-first birthday and who have
yet to reach their thirty-sixth will
register for a selective plan of military duty that is designed to train
the largest peace-time army that
America has ever had. This day
cannot help but call to mind those
days well within the memory of some
of the faculty when State College
men registered to form another
gigantic army for America—a wartime one.
The days of the first World War
were rare ones in the history of the
college. Students and faculty disappeared to join some branch of
Uncle Sam's fighting forces; women
students sewed bandages for the Red
Student Religion Commission
Cross in Huested Hall; the college
organizations, faculty, and student
To Present Albany Pastor
body joined to subscribe almost
For Series of Lectures
$11,000 to the Liberty Loans in 1917;
and eventually a training camp was
Frederick Ferris, '42, president of established on the campus—on the
Newman Club, announces that plans spot where Milne and Page Hall
have been completed for the annual now stand.
pilgrimage to the Shrine of North <
American Martyrs located at Auries- Voluntary Training Proposed
ville. Buses will leave Newman Hall
The war fever reached State beat 10:00 A. M. on Sunday.
fore conscription during those days
Ann Monoghan, '42, is the chair- in 1917. In March of that year a
man of the committee in charge of movement was started under the
President Merrill Walrath of the the pilgrimage. There will be a Mass sponsorship of the late Dr. Abram
Student Association will give up his at tho Shrine followed by a picnic. R. Brubacher, then president of the
gavel this morning to Paul Grattan,
Ferris also stated that there will college, to bring to the campus a
'41, President of Debate Council, as be a house warming party at the voluntary student training corps.
the latter becomes chairman of the Thomas Moore House, 133 South The federal government offered to
satirical debate scheduled for as- Lake Avenue at 8 P. M. tonight.
send an officer to train a company
sembly.
Robert Agne, '40, president of provided that 100 men enlisted and
Qualified representatives of the Student Christian Association, an- the training was included in the
STATU
COLLEGE
NEWS
and
the nounces that the Religion Commis- curriculum.
Statesman will present to the as- sion will meet Monday, at 3:30 In
Before anything further could be
sembly the pro's and con's of the the Lounge. At this time Rev. K. B. clone about this, America entered
subject, "Resolved: That the STATU Welles will present the first of his the war, and such plans were forgotCOLLEGE NEWS is more illiterate than four lectures on the topic, "The Life ten in the general conscription.
the Statesman—line for line, man and Basic Teachings of Jesus."
Immediately after the entry of
for man, issue for issue."
Menorah will hold a get-together the United States into the war,
Speaking for the affirmative—that at Kappa Beta house, 287 Quail President Brubacher announced that
is, for the illiteracy of the NEWS— Street, tomorrow night at 8:30 P. M. all men who enlisted for service
will be Edwin Holsteln and Harry President Hyman Meltz, '41, of would be given their degree immePassow, juniors, Associate Editors Menorah appointed Ruth Moldover, diately if they were seniors, and
'42, as chairman of the committee would not lose their standing if they
of the NEWS,
Janet Sharts, '41, and Janice in charge of the affair. Others on were under-graduates. This anFriedman, graduate, will take the the committee are Ruth Edwards nouncement, coupled with the natand Elsie Ferber, juniors.
negative side.
ural excitement caused by the country's being at war, caused an Instant
effect. By the end of the school year,
thirteen members of the school had
volunteered, and had left school.
Among these volunteers was the first
Ferris Announces
Journey to Shrine
two students, alumni, and faculty
members who were in the army.
These names were listed in a column
which was for a time made a regular
feature of the paper. I t was called
the "Honor Roll."
War Influence Increases
It Is interesting to notice that
at this time the war note began to
creep into everything. Words and
phrases such as "enlist," "Don't be a
slacker", "over the top" were used
in everything including appeals to
pay the student tax ($5.00), to join
the chorus (the chorus needed more
women because so many men had
left for the army that those remaining could not give the ensemble
enough volume), in editorials, and
in every phase of college life,
This quotation, speaking of the
duty of the teacher toward his pupils
may serve as an example;
"There is a twofold obligation on
the part of the teacher. First, it is
essential that we defend the intellectual frontier of our democracy.
We must 'dig ourselves into' their
trenches and hold them" . . .
The war dominated all activity.
Women Fill Campus
Opportunities were not lacking for
the women of the college who
wanted to serve. A sewing room was
established in the basement of
Huested Hall where women might go
and sew bandages to be used overseas by the Red Cross.
The absence of men from the
campus began to make itself felt.
The two fraternities then in existence closed their houses because
there were not enough men left to
j
Training Deferment Till July
Offered to College Men
Chosen for Conscription
16c BOWLING
C.|.l.i,ht l»4t,
ln-cirr i l l i a l
'r«»u» C*.
MORE AND MORE...AMERICA SMOKES
THE CIGARETTE THAT SATISFIES
V
.^
II
support them.
s.
^^^,
a
l
For the second time in its history,
State College finds itself affected by
a national conscription plan. Not
since the days of the World War
have the faculty and students found
themselves in a position where they
are subject to call to serve in the
armed forces of the United States.
Wednesday, the 16th of October,
more than 175 students and 13
members of the faculty will register
in accordance with the provisions of
the Selective Service Plan of Registration. These men, who fall within
the 21-35 age limits, will be subject
to the draft.
Registration Aid
To aid the registration of non-residents among the college students, a
board of registrants has been appointed by John M. Sayles, president
of the college. Included on this board
are Dr. Ralph A. Beaver, Dr. Howard
A. Dobell, Dr. Oscar Lanford and Dr.
Robert Rienow. The board will serve
to register those members of the student body who are not residents of
the Capital District. Commuters and
Albany boys who fall under the provisions of the act will register at their
regular registration booths. The
board expects to handle the registration of 130 men.
Cornelia Autographs Table;
Answers Reporters' Queries
RICE ALLEYS
I j
Non-Residents
And the NEWS was Students' Training Deferred
able to say one November day in
Especially important to college
1017 the following:
men is the announcement that stu"Last spring when President Wil- dents whose numbers are drawn in
son's call for volunteers stripped the draft will be given an opportuState College of nearly all Its men, nity to ask that their training be deeveryone called it the quietest fe- ferred until July 1, 1941. This will
male seminary in existence. Since afford men an opportunity to comthen more men have gone to camp. plete their college year before their
From time to time, more will training is begun. At the end of this
go
"
year, however, all those who received
Also notable is the fact that by such deferment will be required to
this time war temper had risen so receive their training at that time.
much, that a week after the above It is regarded highly improbable
quotation P r e s i d e n t Brubacher that exemptions will be given to college men. The only men who will
made a speech in which he said:
"From our midst have gone some receive exemptions are those with
Editor-in-Chief of tho STATE COL- thirty choice young men to defend dependents and those who are enthe principles of free government, gaged in essential occupations.
I.EGB NEWH, Alfred 13. Dcdlcko.
Over the summer vacation of 1917, government by consent of the gov- Faculty Also Affected
"No!" shouted Don Vanas, D. and ally. Eventually it becomes present- many men entered the army. Tho erned; to redress the wrongs of
It seems highly probable at this
A. guardian of the Page stage door. able." With a swish of her hand, the first issue of the NEWH to be pub- weak nations; to defend womanhood
"No," repeated Miss Futterer quiet- lady removed her smooth red-lip- lished In the fall of 1917 lists thirty- I Continued, on page 4, column 1) time that the draft will affect the
faculty of State College. Fourteen
ly and firmly, "Miss Skinner is seeing stick. "By the way, my number
members of the faculty are eligible
called 'On the Beach at Barbados'
I
no one tonight."
for conscription. They are Wilfred
was
taken
from
life.
I
sat
in
on
the
Forum
Group
Reveals
Infernal
Machine
But—by the grace of an appoint- little scene. In reality I'm afraid It
P. Allard, Charles L. Andrews, Ralph
ment and the prestige of the STATE
wasn't quite as dramatic."
Found in Commons H. Baker, Paul a . Bulger, Edward L.
Conscription Details
COLLEGE NEWH, two sophomores did
Cooper, William G. Hardy, Louis O.
". . . Do tell us," we asked, "did you j
reach the Inner sanctum.
Jones, Thomas Klnsella, Oscar LanThe Initial harbinger of the U. S.
Cornelia Otlh Skinner looked down wear that gleaming ring especially
Various conjectures have
ford, Robert Rienow, Warren Densat us from a cold-creamed face and to call attention to your hand move- conscription order will be evidenced
been put forth as to the ideninoro, Henry L. Sisk, Daniel W.
ments?
Its
sparkle
was
very
noticetoday In assembly when Glenn Walsaid "Hello." Offstage, the actress
tity of a weird contraption
Snader, and Wallace Taylor, It is
able
in
the
balcony."
rath '42, head of the Conscription
seemed more tall and stately, her
which made its appearance in
thought that the professions of
"Why, no," said the surprised ac- Committee of the Forum of Politics,
beautiful black hair even darker, her
the Commons on Monday
these men will not constitute suffiface a little older. She smiled a bit tress,, "I never realized that the ring reveals the details of local registramorning.
cient reason to exempt them. The
at our compliments, Being pressed attracted so much attention." The tion.
only exemptions that will bo made
A
freshman,
wise
in
years,
for time, we plunged Into a cross- last vestige of cold creum had vanThe Forum also announced that
among (horn will be because of any
ventured the opinion that It
examination, queries between Kleen- ished by this time, and Miss Skinner tho Election Poll Committee) under
dependents that they might have.
was a popcorn machine, but
reached for her black velvet wrap.
ex us It were.
tho chairmanship of Alice Abelove,
he couldn't (lnd a slot to put
"Oh,
could
you
.
.
.
would
you
'41, will take a comprehensive poll
"How receptive did you find this
his nickel In. An equally wise
audience In comparison to others?" autograph the table, Miss Skinner?" of tho presidential campaign In an
Sophomore guessed that It was
Absentee Voting
"The table?" she asked in aston- assembly program of the near future.
a scale which called out tho
was the first question asked,
Janet Sharts, '41, speaker of Forum,
welghee's poundage, A Junior,
"Excellent I" answered Cornelia. ishment.
All voters of State College, resid"Yes, the desk that you used us will supervise tho poll and interpret
not so wise, theorized that it
"Very attentive Indued."
ing In a non-personal district may
tho
results.
was a Danco-o-moter which
"You write all your own mono- stage furniture tonight," we added,
obtain absentee ballots by applying
measured tho tremors resultlogues, of course, but where do you hoping.
at tho office of Dr. John M. Sayles.
A committee under the cu-chuiring from tho jltterbugging,
"Certainly," she smiled, "where Is inunship of Ruth Larson and Rose
ever gel, such novel Ideas?"
When registering for the first time,
a diploma from the eighth grade,
"I only wish I knew," was the wry it?" i And so it is that Psl Gumma Lison, seniors, has organized plans
Finally, a Senior, oh, so
high school, college, or a literacy
reply, "I'd get more of theml" She will treasure forever a huge .signa- for a mock political rally which will
worldly wise, put forth the idea
certificate Issued by a superintendent
ture of the celebrated actress, carved bo the Forum's first social affair of
reached for another tissue,
that It was a voting machine
of schools must be presented to the
the your. Since all members of the
"Does It take long to perfect a Into the top of a study desk,)
to tabulato accurately the
inspectors of election. Applications
monologue?"
votes for campus queen instead
Then Cornelia Otis Skinner smiled student body are eligible to Join
for an absentee ballot must be filed
"Oh, ages usually. First I write out good-byus and vanished through tho Forum, everyone Is invited to attend.
of the cookie boxes that Myswith the local Board of Elections not
the Idea, revise It several times, road Washington Avenue stage door; two The date, to bo sot in tho neur future,
kania has been using heretoearlier than October 10th and not
it to the family. Then I luavo It taller forms following her out of will probably fall a few days before
fore.
later than October 18th.
the November 5 elections.
alone awhile—go over It occasion State College, out Into the night.
For S t a t e College Howlers:
From 0:00 A, M. to 8:00 P. M.
Stephen Bull, '41, editor-in-chief
of the Pedagogue stresses that his
staff "cannot settle down to the actual construction of the Ped until the
space contracts of all student organizations are in". The deadline for
contracts is October 15.
A tentative schedule for the assembling of the 172-page year book
has been set. The book will go to
press on March 1, and delivery is
certain by Moving-up Day, according to Bull. The Student Association
will vote on the Pedagogue "mosts"
—most popular, most handsome, etc.
—during the first week in November. Bull adds that the staff's staying on schedule will be "facilitated
by
all organizations
replying
promptly to any inquiry of the
editors."
The staff will be working under
the constitution which was revised
last year.
One dollar from every student tax
has been set aside for financing the
Pedagogue. The student who has
paid his student tax will not be
charged any extra amount for his
book.
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940
Assembly Stars
Heckle Debaters
COOLER, MILDER, BETTER-TASTING
. . . that means Chesterfield
State's religious organizations have
a full schedule ahead:
Menorah will hold a get-together
Saturday, October 12, at 8:30 P. M.
at the Kappa Beta house, 287 Quail
street.
Newman Club will meet Thursday,
October 10, at 7:30 to discuss the
projected pilgrimage to Auriesville.
Lutheran Club meets Wednesday
night to plan for a banquet, and
St. Andrews Fellowship, formerly
Canterbury Club, is organizing a
hay-ride for the near future.
Pedagogue Sets
Deadline Date
Yearbook W i l l Go to Press
March 1 ; Dtlivcry Certain
Before Moving-Up Day
1,200.00
For a GOOD Haircut
Albany, N, Y,
Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu,
National Honorary Society of Social Studies Students, will conduct
a picnic Tuesday in Thatcher Park.
At the picnic, the new six-fold
plan of the Social Studies Department will be disclosed. Dr. D. V.
Smith says, "This plan of the Social
Studies Department has for its purpose the bringing about of a closer
professional relationship between
teacher and student which would not
be possible through mere class a t tendance."
10.00
group of women gathered about a
man In the college halls, we'll instantly know that he goes to RPI.
The next time we see a bunch of
strange-looking young men approaching the college buildings, we'll
know that they come from RPI and
that they come in a group to protect
themselves from the onrush of the
thrilled State women who will be
sure to gather as soon as they are
seen within the college. Yes sir, the
next time, we'll know.
It is evident that the boys on the
hill haven't quite got things straight.
They expect a royal welcome. In the
Interests of hospitality, something
should be done to secure for the next
group of arrivals from RPI the welcome that the boys think they deserve. The women of State should
steel themselves to face the ordeal,
and try their best to make our visitors feel as they were welcome—even
though it may be a hard task.
Or maybe the women should act
as their common sense dictates, and
Ignore the engineers,
t*t Central Ave.
State College News
Planned For Tuesday
44.00
Up on a hill in Troy, there dwells
a group of boys intent on becoming
engineers. Taken all together, they
constitute the student body of the
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Among these boys there are several
ambitious young gentlemen who
gather once a1 week to publish the
Rensselaer
Polytechnic,
RPI's
newspaper. And thereby hangs a
tale.
Last week the Polytechnic printed a column of advice to its
freshman class. In that column wua
included the suggestion that those
of RPI's men who seek "association
with the fairer sex" would do well
to come to "Albany State"—State
College in other words. After this,
they cautioned their readers In the
following words:
"Expeditions to Albany State
should be made in a group as the
Individual is likely to be mobbed.
You see—State's women are rather
in favor of variety too, and any
little bit is pounced upon."
As this reader looks back on the
above statement with a Jaundiced
eye, the only part of it that seems
to have any semblance of truth is
the phrase referring to the RPI
boys as "any little bit."
It must be admitted, however,
that It's nice to know these things.
The next time that we see a large
DICK'S IIAUHKK SHOP
Tuesday afternoon a raprap-rapping as if someone
w e r e tap-tap-tapping w a s
heard from room 3 of Richardson hall. Within the portals of room 3 was a veritable
beehive of activity. Dr. D. V.
Smith was decorating the walls
with hysterical—er-pardon—
historical pictures which he
explained had been obtained
from numerous calendars. Dr.
Smith asks that anyone having
calendars with historical pictures should communicate with
him immediately.
Honor Society Picnic
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
OTTO R. MENDE
"Poly" Fears State Women;
Tells Frosh "Go In Groups"
t
Smith's Calendars
Illustrate History
.
• •m&mmsmmm
PAGE I
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
25th
Year
Cows, Barns, Degrees
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940
State Slumbers O n
•The Commentstater
Established M « y , 1 9 1 6
Walking around State halls last week I noticed some
little pink cards which said "College Daze". Did you
see them? Did they slap you right between the ears
Vol. XXV
Friday, October 11, 1910
No. 4
as they did me? If they didn't, it's about time someMember
Distributor
thing did—maybe this is it. It's worth a try anyhow.
Associated Collegiate Press
Collegiate Digest
I mention "College Daze" because that paints a good
The tinilergriiiluiito newspaper of the New York State Colpicture of State College, 1940-41, so far. The college
lege for Teachers published every Friday of the college
is, generally speaking, down in the dumps. It crawled
year by the NMWS Hoard for the Student Association.
Telephones: Office, 5-03711; Murray, 8-2843j Clark, 4-IW73
down there on Activities Day and has been wallowing
Entered ai second class matter Albany, N. Y„ postoflice.
in the rubbish of social stagnation ever since.
m m n i n i D FOR NATIONAL ADVIHTHINO •»
The freshman class came to State. What happened?
National Advertising Service, Inc.
Nothing. The sophomore class formed a Black Legion
CoUtte PuiUsbttt Ktprttentative
and what happened? Nothing. That morgue that used
4 2 0 M A D I S O N Avt.
N«w YORK. N. Y.
to be the Commons may as well be closed. I'm sure
CHICUO • Bosnia • Lot M t i u i • s»« FMRCIKO
the three people who inhabit it could find
some
other place to sleep. Whether you
sans
The News Board
heard about it or not, the juniors and the
Social
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JOHN A. MURRAY
sophomores held receptions for the freshSuccess
CO-MANAGING EDITOR
BEATRICE A. DOWER
men. They were mostly not social successes.
CO-MANAGING EDITOR
STEPHEN A. KUSAK
Recently, fraternities held smokers for the freshmen,
BUSINESS MANAGER
RALPH CLARK
as is traditional; they were a total flop. Likewise,
ADVERTISING MANAGER
BETTY PARROTT
sororities held open houses for the freshmen. ConSPORTS
EDITOR
JAMES MALONEY
sensus indicates that they, too, were dull.
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
WILLIAM DORRANCE
Spirit cannot be manufactured—it is a spontaneous
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
EDWIN HOL9TEIN
thing.
It grows, if we can sow the seed. This is the
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
HARRY PASSOW
task of the upperclassmen, who know and revere the
traditions of State.
Tradition is the life blood of the college. It makes
it a college instead of an advanced high school. Spirit
All oomraunlotttlons should bo tiihlressod to the odltor ami
miisi he signed. Names will be withheld upon fonnest,
is the life blood of tradition and we have no spirit.
The NTATK COLLEGE MOWS nssiiiiics no responsibility
You can see what the result will be. You as a group
for opinions expressed in Us columns' or eommuni
can circumvent it.
HH such expressions ilo not ni-ces'siirlly rollocl Us view,
Soon we will expose some more tradition in the form
of Campus Day. Shall we make it a bang-up day or
UNIVERSITY OF WIS-CON?IN eo-EDr ore
shall it join the ranks of the walking dead? For State's
D & A — A Study in Myopia
ENOUGH LIPSTICK ANNUALLY TO PAINT
sake, wake up ! ! I
GEORGE WASHINGTON
FOUR GOOD SUED BARN?/ THE AVERAGE
• • •
RECEIVED ONLY ONE COLLEGE
Cornelia Otis Skinner has performed twice this
©•ED COVERS' 9.68 SQ. FEET OF UPS
However some things have happened within and
DEGREE--AN
LIB.
FROM
" ' IM A YEAR
season in the Albany Area. Her first appearance
about our halls through no fault of the students. PrincWASHINGTOM COLLEGE MD.
ipal among the items of the week was
was in July a t the Mohawk Drama Festival, playNight
the banning of intra-mural football on
ing the lead of "Biography". The second was last
Football the front Page Hall campus. No comment
Thursday night under D & A auspices in Page Hall.
At State o n ^ n e cause or effect of this action is necesReadings and Records
sary here. I shall accept it as a fact. ComBoth of these performances were marred by the
ment and an appeal are necessary, however, to rectify
The
Criticshortsightedness of the entrepreneurs.
what I might call an injustice to our student body.
Advanced Dramatics will open its
We have night football at State! On Monday and
Cornelia Otis Skinner was good in Schenectady, current season on Tuesday evening, the Council wanted to make the
presentation a financial success. But
nights there were a total of thirty-four
though supported by a nondescript cast. Unfortu- October 22, of one-act plays. From are we out to make profit or give Wednesday
unidentified athletes trodding on ground belonging to
nately, only the hoi polloi seated in the very best that date on, two plays will grace students a chance to see some of State College students. The twenty-two who played
Slate's stage every Tuesday evening the truly great artists? We should on Wednesday have increased the vandalic qualities of
sections could hear her. T h e amplifying system was
until late in November.
decide.
a football game by playing eleven-man tackle dressed
inadequate.
Drama lovers will be Interested in
The recording companies have in a motley array of football equipment. If we cannot
Cornelia Otis Skinner was good in Albany. Very the exhibition of theatre lore which started the Pall season with a num- use this ground, may I make an appeal to the college
Albany Institute of History and Art
good. Unfortunately, the Student Association could is holding all the month ol October. ber of discs that will soon be on the to take steps to restrict outsiders from doing so.
turntable of every house on the
• • •
not hear her. I'age Hall was too small.
It will include stage sets, costume campus.
Also something that happened in the natural course
Columbia's Allium Set C-32 in- of events was the official debut of Dean Sara T. De
No one denies that D & A needed outside support designs, both contemporary and of
the past, and records of the theatre cludes nine favorites played in the Laney in assembly last Friday. Miss DeLaney made
to " p u t over" Miss Skinner. Nevertheless, the from early clays to the present, with inimitable style of "The Master a favorable Impression on the student gathering with
council is expected to sponsor presentations jor the a section on Albany's special part. Pianist of the Radio", Eddy Duchin. her "Salamagundl" of scholastic and social standards
Student Association, not for the people of Albany Muny famous muse .mis are cooperat- Duchin's wizardy plus the fine selec- of conduct. One person was heard to remark, "It was
ing.
one of the best speeches I've ever heard
tion makes an unbeatable combinaand vicinity.
Apparently her genuine
We enjoyed Cornelia Otis Skinner tion. Will Bradley offers Down the DeLaney j n assembly."
State students fortunate enough to secure tickets very much last week. She provided Road a Piece and Celery Stalks at Imprcssesand unaffected delivery made her seem
an evening of simple, human enter- Midnight, introducing a trio that Assembly at home in State. Being alone and likwere herded together like sheep or orphans at a tainment which struck at the heart should make waxplaters sit up and
ing It was also well presented in a manbenefit performance as Miss Skinner monologued of everyone in the audience. Her take notice. Ray Noble adds his ner that sticks in one's thoughts.
to the Columbia Janz MasHowever, the one criticism that I would like to make
her way through the evening. Fire laws were broken unique talent for character por- orchestra
trayal and her happy choice of torwork list with a tone-poem, Har- is that mention was made of "extra-curricular" activiup and downstairs. An unjustifiable number of scenes made her prog'-am memora- lem Nocturne, backed by From ties. My point can best be made in the form of a quesseats were reserved. N o t enough time was given ble for us all. A professional critic Oakland to Burkank. OKEH re- tion: "Is there such a thing as an extra curricular
leases Sonny Burke with a waxstudents to exchange tax tickets. N o such oppor- would perhaps say sne did not draw sonsation Jimmie Meets the Count activity at State"? Many do not think so. They would
say that "extra class" is much more appropos in an
t't'on that grea'er svi-3 of talent
tunity was given during the week previous to the that she has, that she did not bring and Blue Sonata.
Institution of this type. This is a minor matter, howto us tragedy of a noble cast, epic
presentation.
Decca scores two hits in its per- ever; and I'm sure that our new Dean will find undreamed-of cooperation from our students.
If D & A must exclude or seriously inconvenience tragedy. Be that as it may, it was sonality series. Mary Martin's singa rare treat Miss Skinner gave us, ing makes Ain't It a Shame About
students in order to "cover" artists such as Miss and for that we thank her.
Maine a catchy little tune. HlldoA word of censure, however, for garde sings with a new twist, a colSkinner, a larger auditorium must be provided.
the Council, we were happy to find lection of six Vernon Duke favorites
Cheaper artists is the alternative.
that Page Hall was well filled. We in Album Set Vfi, Her soothing voice
I T A L I A N (1,1 II
I'TEII
The Albany High School auditorium would have were sorry, however, to be forced to gives record collectors many a pleasTin' liiii't'iiu'N work IN UUTllt'l'l' Will III' Illl Illllllll]
ant
time.
Jimmy
Dorsey
takes
two
view
Miss
Skinner's
performance
Inn: Hlymii'il itn• I liuin|ioi'mJ
cluli mi'KiltiK mi VVuiltiuMilny
been the ideal solution to the Skinner problem.
from the edge of a chair placed numbers that have been around for Ml 7 :.'UI |i. in. In llii' Uniilltu. li.v S | I I I | I , | I I N Hnl rcpui'ilntf
Larger and belter equipped, it could have accommo- directly under a roof. The entire some time, rearranges them, and I'riil'i'sMui' IIWKIII will liu Illicit llllllli'illuli'ly nil lends
Ilia spi'iikiT. Tliuri' will bu ri'i'i'lvcil liy I lie liuruiiu, It
dated a much greater attendance comfortably. floor of the auditorium was sold out offers Whiserino Grass and Talkin' Kiimi'
H mill I'l'l'ri'xhmt'iils Is liiipni'iiiivc ihnl they do
to
My
Heart
in
a
manner
that
nl'lorwarilB.
Kri'iilitiii'ii iiru HII.
and
students,
for
whom
the
series
Students would have been seated, fire laws would
Only IIIMHII mm Imtulrml
Ls brought here, were forced to sit makes that record the number one t'Hjii'clully wi'li'iuiii'.
nl liu- ni'lifliiiil Uii'i'i. hullhave been observed, the artist would have had a in the balcony, We understand that of the Decca Hit Parade.
Anthony NiirtllttiHi,
'Iri'il iipplii'iinis Intvi! ruI'ruHlilnnt.
better opportunity to perform. Only permission
ri'lflHlori'il. The nlil nppliA I . I ' I I A KI'SII.ON I ' l l l
t'lilluiiH liu v-1 • 1 I I thrown
of the Albany Hoard of Education and the payment
Kill nl' Alphn Kpsllmi I'hl
mil.
Only now Mpplli'iiilnu
will I'iiiiiluci n IIIIUHII wni'iiiblanks will in. I'nnsiih'i'i'il.
of a nominal fee was needed to secure thai audi- Conscription Memorandum
ini; nil Hnl iiriliiy. I'l'iim S:(ln
Hurry I'IIHHOW,
In 11:1111 p. in. HI lis uuw
torium. T h e addition to the overhead would have
CommunicationDlrwtnr.
iVHlilcnri', sill WIIHIII nifloii
NT.vn:,H.M.»
III;AIII,ISI:
been negligible. A few reserved tickets would have
Avi'iiui'.
All
SIIHII'MIM n ru
To the Editor of the N E W S :
Invlh'il.
All i-niili iliiilliins for llii'
"swallowed" it.
DorlH OruHHiniin,
firm UHUII of tin- "Sinii's
All male students between the ages of 21 and 35, inclusive,
Uoilii.
• •111 JI
fill' I ll 1M yiMir liniHl i„.
Dramatics and Arts Council "missed the boat".
AltT
Illllllll'll in li.v tlclnlii'l' a i ,
attending this institution will have an opportunity to register
Tlicl'i'
will
lie
an
rxhlhl
lillllll'hu
Klihi'lii'iililuill,
T h e package was too large for the box.
under the Selective Service Plan of Registration here at the
linn i l l I'l'pi'uilui'l IIIIIM of
I'iilllcii-lii-Cliluf,
Kivni'li
IIIIKIKIIH,
niiiNlly
I'ltlCNH I I I H I : . U
College in the Rotunda of Draper Hall on Wednesday,
rriiKini'lilH Hi' Krow'ti lex
'I'hi' I'ri'HH Huron II will
October 16th, 1040.
i His. III ill
i'1'lilur nl1 llii' puss inn ,'IIIIIM in In. I'llli'd
Superficial Disapprobation
mil
liy tin. st ii.h-iji l„,tly in
Hi'i'iinil
riiiiir
uf
lirapiT
linll
The registration program is being inaugurated here to make
ilmiiiK llii' wi'i'li nf (lit<>
luilny H iiNHrlnlily |o prnvlili.
it
more
convenient
for
you
than
it
would
be
to
go
home.
Male
l.IT l l .
llii' liiiivnu Willi in I'n ruin I In ii
In the anxiety to assign reasons for events, stuI'nr IIHI. In rt'li'iMuN In homo
MIHH K I I I I I !'•• Iliili'hlnx,
students whose home is in Albany County will register in their
dents will often condemn hastily, This is human
lowii
piipors
liiHti'iniiir In A l t .
own
election
district
that
day.
It ll ix-rlii HlniiiiniiH,
nature, and State sludenls are human, They often
IN I IIIM'IIATIOKNITV
(.'Oil N ( I I I ,
For the benefit of those who may not be aware of the fact,
predicate their judgments on the flimsiest material.
MOCIAI, I ' A I . I I N D A H
Tlii'l'c will I HI ii liwittliiK
registrants must report to police officials the names of all
Oiitniii.|. i i .ifoiiHowitriii
Complaints echo the length of the school at the
nl liilri'l'riili'i'iilly L'ulllH'll hi
liitf,
ilin
TiniiiiiiH
Muom
Itiniiii Illl nl' Hrnpi'i' hull mi
persons who have failed to register. A list of non-resident stushortage of typewriters in the Commerce DepartlloilHi', N:llll I'. M.
Mniiiliiy in 7:18 p. in.
dents will be in the hands of our committee.
• li'lnlii-r
11 lit - Ciiuip
(iiiillln llniliiitr,
ment. There are many other gripes. This complaint
.InhiiKlnii WuuUuml,
I'I'I'HIIIIMII.
1 have appointed Doctors Beaver, Doliell, I.anford, and
lli'tolior 12 Mcnoi'tih tint is natural, It is understandable. However, it is all
DO KM I ' A I I T V
loi'.i'lhi'l'. Kllppil Hotll, hnll.li.,
Rienow, members of our faculty, to be our local registrants.
too readily forgotten that for the two typewriters
Tlio
Alumni
lluoliluiiuu
By the C l m of 1918
The Weekly Bulletin
not available, there are forty others that are. All
too often the providence that gave us what, we do
have is overlooked.
Jt is only human to complain, but
Please help them in this matter,
(Signed) JOHN M, SAYLKB,
Acting President.
hull w i l l I'uiiiliii'i a party
for ilnriu I'l'i'Hliinnn nliin In-
morrow from HIIHI in ii:!iti
II 111. IpplTi'llliiH ull'1,1 ai',.
IIIVIIIMI In DUMB K l l i r y Imvo
iluii'H, All uii'ii uf stuiu are
llivllcil.
K:.'lll l». M.
Ili'tulinr 1H Nowilllin I'lull
I'lljjrljIllltfU In Aurli'Hvlllu.
lii'lolii'r I I Itnlltdmi (.'inn.
mission
Moi'I Inn,
l,nuii||ii,
;i:;iti p, M .
ui'tiiiu'r ID—Cross-country
run, KliUo m Uolhl.
PPfA
Maloney's
V%mv
Baloney
PAGE 3
Camp Weekend Starts Today;
Mercury Squad
Hiking, Games, Fun Promised
Loses Contest
To Morrisville
Football League
Shifts Stadiums
Kappa Beta and College House
Score Initial Victories on
OIL..
Invading Team Has Four-Man T i t ;
Agnello Leads State Runners
Over Washington Park
N e w Football F i t l d i
The men's intramural touch football league is in the same position
Experiencing their ninth consecuas the horizontal prize-fighter, who
Tough One I
tive defeat in an equal number of
is down but not out. It took a beating in that three games were forApparently we were a bit hasty meets, the State college cross-counfeited and in the fact that four
two weeks ago when we spent several try squad came out on the short end
games were skipped because of the
paragraphs hailing the beginning of of a 1C-39 score in their meet with
controversy with the administration
the first hitchless intramural touch Morrisville last Saturday.
A record turnout appeared in
football season in years.
over playing fields.
Rumors of the first hitch swept Washington Park to watch the locals
The new field in front of Huested
like wildfire through the student make their initial bid for a successwas inaugurated by the KB-SLS
ful
season.
The
running
length
was
body last Monday morning. Hushed
game which the Kappa Beta boys
reports from the grapevine had it about three miles. The time of 17:48
won 19 to 0. The game was a lot
that intramural football was no may be considered pretty fair travelcloser and more fiercely fought
more, that it had been abolished by ing for the modern Mercurians.
than the one-sided score would india sweeping decree of the "office up- Four Way Tie
cate.
stairs". Gaining In momentum, the
The first four who crossed the finOn the field in back of the Sigma
rumors have persisted throughout ish line were all of the invading outLambda Sigma house on Ontario
the week, accompanied by much fit. This resulted in the unusual
hairtearing and fingernail biting on phenomenon of a four-way tie W A A ' s C A M P J O H N S T O N - l o c a t e d on a hill over Chatham and Street, the Prosh bowed to College
House in their fourth successive loss.
the part of the good council mem- among Harvey, Kellog, Brewer, and
built by the association in 1 9 3 2 , will be the scene of the Lotta The big difficulty with the Prosh
bers.
Rowler. The next six, in order of
Bunkers weekend.
team is their inability to really work
It seems that the administration their appearance at the terminal
together as a unit. The individual
expressed displeasure at the way in point were Agnello, State; Barnes,
The first Camp Johnston v/eekend
which the front campus was being Morrisville; Marshall, State; Hall,
Football Standings
de-turfed by athletic activity in Morrisville; Hansen, Slate; and of the year is scheduled to start this
afternoon and to continue through
which both men and women were Miller, Slate.
W L T
Sunday. General chairman Susie
participating. A new site for the
Agnello, State captain, crossed the W.'ng, and her fellow campers plan
Potter Club
3 0 0
Due to the fact that "the
games had to be found, and in de- lime strip in eighteen minutes flat.
Kappa
Delta
Rho
1 0 0
grass
on
the
campus
in
front
creeing this, the administration The next State man was a newcomer to leave Albany about 4.30 P. M.
Ramblers
1 0
1
of Page Hall needs a rest,"
OKed a number of substitute grid- in the squad, Verne Marshall, who •and tra-cl to Chatham by train.
Kappa Beta
2
1 0
hockey practice will now take
irons. Among these were the seems to be a very promising lad.
One of the features of the weekend
College House
2 1 1
place in front of Huested at
Huested and Dorm fields which have Bill Miller also showed a classy pair will be a ten-mile hike tomorrow
Sigma Lambda Sigma 0 3 0
the
regular
time.
All
freshmen
since been put into use for the of wings in the contest.
which will count toward Lotta BunkProsh
0 4 0
and sophomore women are
completion of the schedule—we
ers credit. This weekend also affords
Aggies
at
Peak
urged to attend hockey prachope with no more hitches!
Frosh players are doing all right,
Although the State fleet has been an opportunity for a number of
tice to enable them to parbut if one six-man team was left
practicing only a couple of weeks, shorter hikes to be taken for similar
ticipate
in
the
rivalry
game
Cheerleaders Again
in there for the game so they could
and without the direction of a credit.
on
Campus
Day.
Dr. Lester, instruct ..r ol mathemaThe News last week published an faculty guide, their opponents seem
get used to each other it might be
»
*
»
tics,
and
IViss
Shorcclay.
manager
of
editorial calling for some action by to have been more fortunate in
of some help.
the Student Association with re- their training, For the past four James Fenimore Cooper house and
Swimmers seem to be scarce,
The outlook for the rest of the
gard to outfitting our "crummy weeks the Aggies were carefully Junipers, are expected to be at the
but Fran Shapley and Winnie
season is very bright. There are
cheerleaders'' in presentable togs. watched over by their athletic ad- Camp tomorrow as guests of WAA.
only 11 more games to be played.
Baer want to see an increase in
We understand that this has caused viser and showed up in the peak of lesides hiking and games, lots of fun
With any kind of a break at all on
numbers this afternoon. The
is promised. Plenty of ftood food
consternation among MAA Council form.
the weather, the 1940 Intramural
hours are posted on the WAA
cooked over the firetilace will be one
members. Our sentiment is that the
touch football championship should
Assisting manager Cooke in arI ullelin board.
appropriation for such uniforms ranging for the meet were Howard of the outstanding attractions.
be decided by the end of next week.
should come not from the MAA Lynch. Warren Wagner, Mac Cap- j c. Hi uninitiated, it suffices to
budget, but from the Student Asso- pon, Doug Manley, Bob Laurer, Bill ,ay that it gets mighty cold and that
nuny warm blankets are in order.
ciation surplus. We say this, risking a Haller, and Les Gerdts.
The girls should not count on obtainsharp kick in the seat of the pants
The next meet will take place at ing any after they arrive at the
by one Mr. Cooper!
Delhi on October 19 which will afford
A pertinent suggestion has been the locals another two weeks of camp.
made to this department which practice. It is confidently expected
Mob in IS(>ws
Office
seems worthy of being passed on.
that the Statesmen will be in better
Necessary amendment should be condition to compete with their
Makes
Series
Bets
made by the Association this year highly-regarded opponents.
so that future cheerleaders will be
picked by MAA on the sole basis of
People are asking what
ability, instead of being elected by Netsters May Finish
caused the e-'cess mob in the
the student body as in the past.
Activities Office this week.
Under such a system, cost of outAfter a terrific struggle to get
Tournament
in
fitting would be borne by MAA,
to the front, we finally diswith a specific sum set aside in Its
covered a radio broadcasting
The tennis tournament which got
budget for that purpose.
the World Series was to blame.
We put this forth as a plan under way last week is now in full
Pari-mutual betting w a s
for future years. For the current swing. It has already passed the half
heavy throughout the earlier
way
mark
and
with
the
semi-finals
season, Student Association should
part of the week—some people
coming up, the tournament is expay from its surplus.
got as high as a ten-cent coke.
pected to be completed by the end
The odds until Tuesday were
of next week.
about even between the Reds
Excellent weather conditions durEat at John's Lunch
and the Tigers. Now, some
ing the past few weeks have made it
smart people, Maloney includDinners 25c and Up
possible for the continuation of the
ed, are grinning smugly over
Delicious Sandwiches and
tournament and for its probable
their cokes while we wrongSundaes
completion this fall,
guessers add ten cents more in
A few of the players have taken
7:30 A.M. — 11:00 P.M.
the budget's miscellaneous colreal
advantage
of
this
fine
weather
Opp. the High School
umn.
to smash their way closer to the
championship. C. Oarr, B. Bernr T r y~r T V v » hardt, and S. Leven have won enough
matches to come within striking disFor Slate College Bowlers:
tance. Others, like Manley and Stone
have been able to advance without
much effort, for despite the ideal
weather, there have been a number
of defaults.
•J.R.M.
W A A Tidbits
Week
New I94I
RICE ALLEYS
W e s t e r n a n d Qimil
PHILC0
Dial 8-9031!
ELSE'S HAIR DRESSING
I5c BOWLING
From 9:00 A. M. to «;00 P. M.
HAIR STYLIST
Licensed Zotos Shop
805 Madison Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
Good Food in A Friendly,
Comfortable Atmosphere
Transilone
COMPACT RADIOS O F
QUALITY
Good things to e a t . . .
and ice-cold Coca-Cola.
You see it everywhere, because the life and sparkle
a n d t a s t e of i c e - c o l d
Coca-Cola add something
to food that everybody
likes. Try it yourself..
Model r r - 2 ! > only
$9.95
[ Hill Appliance Shop
112 Central Ave.
%JL ttlttftmi at Quail
: Phone 1-1169 Albany, N.Y.
*4USE
THAT
R E F R E S HE S
Boldcd under authority of The Coca-Cola Co. by
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
226 N. ALLEN STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
~*>\WKBm3tixmBfflmwBmais.
^^^--^llpli^^Hjy^
[email protected]:Mm:
:
mmm
/
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1940
PAGE 4
State's World War
Greeks Sponsor
Novel Functions
(Continued from page 1, column k> vided an experience new for all who
•gainst violence; childhood against passed through them. They brought
Inhuman cruelty; a free people denial, work, adventure—and they Sororities and fraternities have
against slavery."
brought tragedy.
given the freshmen welcomes in the
The same day the NEWS published Seven Students Dead
form of open houses and smokers.
the above speech, it also contained
After the war had ended, and had Many pledges of last year were
an article exhorting the students to been in some measure forgotten, one initiated this week-end into the
use less candy and thus to conserve day the students and faculty gathmore sugar. To aid them, it pub- ered on the campus In front of ranks of the Greeks. They are: Chi
lished two recipes for candy, neither Draper Hall to plant seven oak trees Sigma Theta: Patricia Berry, Doro—one for each of State's students thy Cox, Ann Shannon and Mickey
of them using sugar.
who had given his life In his coun- Adams; Beta Zeta: Mary Fairchild,
War Influences Jokes
try's service. Six of those trees were Ellen Holly, Ruth Leggett, Jean
The war affected other things as for men, and one was for a woman— McAllister, Dorothy Russell, and
well as the number of men students a worker in a YMCA canteen over- Jean Sears; Psi Gamma: Betty BarIn the college. Even the joke col- seas. Four of them flourished and den, Dorothy Geertsen, Patricia Gibumns were affected. Jokes such as still grow on the State College camthis one were common In Joke pus, serving to remind us today of son, June Melville, Glenice Matcolumns—they didn't need to be the sacrifices of State's children of thews, Shirley Ott, June Semple and
Mildred Studley.
humorous; the major requisite was a past day.
The Edward Eldiea Potter club
that they be unfavorable to the
Central Powers.
will hold a Vic Party tonight.
"Do you know why the Kaiser is
like a man from the north of IreHardy Announces New Debaters
land?"
Commissioner Cole William G. Hardy, instructor in
"I give up."
"Well, one comes from Belfast, and
Dr. Ernest E. Cole will be installed English and coach of the Varsity
the other is going to Hellfast."
as President of the University of Debate Squad, announces that the
Imagine reading Jokes like that the State of New York and Commis- following have been selected for the
for a year and a half.
sioner of Education at a convoca- Debate Squad:
With 1918, there came a new cus- tion of the Regents of the University
Sadye Zi'inskas, Betty Burke, Solotom to the college—that of holding next Thursday night at Chancellor's mon Greenberg, Dorothy Huyck,
dances without decorations and Hall. Dr. Henry M. Wriston, Presi- Muriel Scovell, Marie Soule, Rolf
without refreshments in order to dent of Brown University, will be
Toepfer, and Ernest Anderson.
cooperate with the country's food the principal speaker.
conservation plan. The Intersorority
Dr. Cole was born in Savona,
party which was held on April 19,
1918, was called the most novel eat- N. Y., November 18, 1871. He holds
less, decorationless, expenseless so- the bachelor of laws degree from
cial function In the history of the Cornell University, the honorary
degree of doctor of pedagogy from
school.
State College, and the honorary deAnti-German Feeling Rises
gree of doctor of laws from Alfred
A reflecton of the feelings of the University.
college and of America in general
Although a lawyer by profession,
can be obtained from a letter which Dr. Cole began an educational career
appeared on the editorial page of soon after his admittance to the bar
the May 15, 1918 issue of the NEWS. in 1895. From then until 1916 he
This letter, which was written by a held four public school principalmember of the faculty of the col- ships. In 1916 he gave up education
lege, read in part as follows:
and became a member of the law
"We are right, Germany is wrong. firm of Cole and Knapp.
The day has passed when we could
From 1920 until 1926 Dr. Cole
see one iota of right in Germany. served on the State Legislature as
"We are against the German war an assemblyman and later as a
code, against German militarism, senator. In 1925 he became chairman
against the German type of educa- of the Senate Committee on Public
tion, against the German system of Education. In 1926 he became legal
government, against the German counsel for the State Education Desystem of diplomacy, against the partment. He was appointed deputy
German disregard for accepted in- commissioner of education in 1928.
ternational practices. We expect to
On June 20 he was elevated to
see the German race a pariah race, the commissionership by action of
outcast among nations—a punish- the Board of Regents.
ment to be a German . . . ".
This sort of writing was not only
approved of at that time, but was Kirshenblum Promises
actually believed in.
So much literature of this type was
November Statesman
circulated, and so profound was its
The first issue of the Statesman
influence that by May, 1918, fully will be out early in November. The
one-third of the men who were board, headed by Blanche Kirshenregistered at State were serving in blum, '41, invites all State students
the army.
including graduates to submit conSlogans Used
tributions, poetry, features, and carThose who stayed at home were toons. Freshmen will be notified
constantly reminded of their part. shortly of assignments and meetings.
All through the issues of the NEWS
Says Miss Kirshenblum, "We exwhich were edited during the war pect numerous improvements and remay be found little bits like the fol- finements in this year's issues. We
lowing:
are taking all criticisms and suggesBUY LIBERTY BONDS — THE tions into consideration. This is only
BUYWAY TO BERLIN
the second year of this experimental
LICK A STAMP TO LICK THE publication. We expect to put it on
a permanent basis this year".
KAISER
Regents to Install
State College News
Bureau Will Complete
Registration of Seniors
Pi Gamma Mu Cadet*
To Aid instructors
The Student Employment Bureau
announces that today, October 11,
is the last day for registration. The
Bureau expects a higher registration
this year than last.
The Student Employment Bureau
Committee met yesterday to discuss
and outline the program for the
coming year. The committee Is still
working on the details, and the
definite plans will not be presented
to the students until a future time.
Seniors and graduate students are
urged to watch the bulletin boards
for further announcements. They are
also asked to watch the mail boxes
for interview notices.
Pi Gamma Mu members will
have an opportunity to develop teaching technique before going into the practice
school, under a new system of
cadet
teaching
announced
this week by Dr. D. V. Smith,
faculty head.
The new program will make
right hand men of each member of the national honorary
social studies society. They
will take over many of th6
routine duties of instructors
of basic social studies courses,
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop.
Z-443
*
Afternoon Lists Rivalry Tilti;
Crowning, Stunts, Dance Slated
For Evening's Events
Dial 5-i913
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
50c
ALBANY, N. Y.
Mead Defeated;
State Opposes
The Third lerm
POPULARITY
Will Begin
Smokers say
that Chesterfield is the one completely
satisfying cigarette. Everybody who
tries 'em likes 'em. Chesterfield's
right combination of American and
Turkish tobaccos is the best that
money can buy.
A
Do you smoke
the cigarette that
SATISFIES
Betty Parrott, '41, Editor-in-chief,
states that the college directory will j
be placed on sale by Thanksgiving. I
Each copy will be sold for ten cents.
Copies of last year's directory will go
on sale soon for five cents each.
WMtmmf&
Welcomes the Students oj the
College Back to Albany
WE WILL BE GLAD TO
SERVE YOU.
R005£V£LT'5
State Debaters
Announce Rally
Parrott Announces Early Issue
We hope you will find it
convenient and sensible to
make Whitney's
your
shopping headquarters this
year.
•
Beatrice I
Alma I
Mary I
Miriam I
Lona I
Madeline I
State's twentieth annual Campus
Day will begin at 3:00 o'clock tomorrow afternoon when women
rivalry events will take place on the
Page Hall campus. The feature attraction will be the coronation of
the nineteenth Campus Queen,
Roosevelt Victory Probable
6Z2k
elected by the members of the Stud- Neophytes Tryout October 2 4 ;
In November Elections,ent Association,
Vermont Debate Initiates
State Tradition G O P
Other activities of the day will
Prolix Varsity Schedule
include the first rivalry games beWendell L. Willkie was elected
tween the freshmen and the sophoPaul Grattan, '41, president of
President of the United States last
mores, skits by each of the four Debate Council, announces an opweek in the straw vote conducted
classes, and dancing in the Page portunity for all students to give
by
the
STATE
COLLEGE
NEWS.
Hall gym. Ralph Tibbetts, '42, vice, vent to their political enthusiasms.
Willkie polled 48.8% of the votes
president of the Student Association, In keeping with the present interest
cast for the candidates of the major
is general chairman of the da s in the coming presidential election,
parties. Franklin D. Roosevelt was
events.
Debate Council will sponsor a Town
given 45.9% of the votes that were
Meeting October 31 at 8:00 P. M„ in
Results are Secret
cast. Of the students of the college
the
auditorium
of
Page
Hall.
Student
Six candidates for Campus Queen
who voted, 53.6% put themselves
were placed in nomination this "campaign managers" will speak in
down
as opposed to the third term,
year. They are Beatrice Dower, Alma behalf of the various candidates.
and 46.4% stated that they did not
Knowles
Mary Miller, Miriam There will be three or lour speakers
'By His Face Ye Shall Know H i m "
object to it.
Newell, Lona Powell, and Madeline and much "atmosphere".
Scesny, seniors. As usual, no one
In the same straw vote, Bruce
except members of Myskania, senior fin Poll Planned
Barton, Republican candidate for
115 Men
Register
Advanced Dramatics
campus leadership society, know the
"Pin Poll" will make its debut
United States Senator from New
With Draft
Board
outcome of the election. Only when at State at this meeting. This novel
York, defeated his Democratic rival,
the newly-elected Queen, with her poll consists of having two pieces
Season James Mead, 301 to 246.
attendants, appears in the Richard- of cardboard, one with Willkie pins
One hundred fifteen State
The presidential vote in this elecson Hall doorway to the auditorium on it—the other having Roosevelt
men, both graduates and untion is one of the closest that has
Augustine and Evans Produce
at 8:00 P. M. will the secret be out. buttons. As each person enters, he
dergraduates, over 21 years of
ever been returned in a State elecThe procession will then move to chooses a pin. The number of pins
age, registered last Wednestion. The actual figures were: Will'Dramatic Gripping Epics'
the platform where last year's queen, taken will be tabulated and the winday, October 16, with the Colkie, 282; Roosevelt, 265. The votes
Jane Wilson, will crown her succes- ner announced. Grattan promises a
lege Draft Board, set up for
The two initial productions of the gathered by the minor candidates
sor. Madalyn Beers, '41, will super- fair election with no "stuffing the
the convenience of the studTuesday night Advanced Dramatics were as follows: Norman Thomas,
vise the procession.
ballot boxes." All sludents are inents.
series will be presented Tuesday at '/#o«
vited to attend this old-fashioned
All those eligible for regis8:15 in Page Hall auditorium. Tom
Queen Entertained
political rally.
tration did so—no draft dodgAugustine and Frank Evans, juniors, t»* • Ctahj* U 7KW. Term
Then, as entertainment for the
Tryouts for freshman
debate
ers at State.
are the respective producers of two
newly-crowned queen, each class squad will be held Thursday, Octo"dramatic and gripping epics." The "* • X«*tWt a t 5"M*
will present command stunt per- ber 24 at 3:30 in Room 28 in Richcast for Augustine's play, a saga of ft
formances. Robert Hertel, '41, Is in ardson Hall. Each candidate must Hirsh Defeats Kunz
charge of the stunts, while Enes present a two minute speech on the
the sea and submarines includes
By 10 Vote Margin Hyman Meltz and Louis Fink, senNovelli, '41, Ira Hirsh, '42, Leo Flax, third term issue. All freshmen may
'43, Robert White, '44, are the class try out. Mr. Jones is coach of the
iors; Vince Miller, '42; Byron Bendirectors.
Ira Hirsh, '42, defeated George ton and Don Vanas, sophomores;
Freshman Squad. Debate Council
Following the stunts, dancing to has appointed Janet Sharts, '41, as Kunz, '43, by a vote of 176 to 166 and Arthur Soderlind, '44. Cast for
the music of Bob Reid's orchestra, student director of Freshman De- for the position of Student Associa- Evans' "restful" play is: Joe Withey
tion Songleader. A total of 347 studwill terminate the day's activities, bate.
ents cast their ballots in the revotes and Robert Jones, seniors; Roy SomDancing will end at 12:00 P. M.
between Hirsh and Kunz, conducted mers, '42; Rhona Ryan, Georgia
Freshman women will have late per- New Secretary
Hardesty and Robert Loucks, freshI
Glen Walrath, '42, has been ap- Wednesday in the Commons.
mission until 1:00 A. M.
I The last minute, whirlwind drive men.
pointed
secretary
of
Debate
CounThe afternoon's activities will beput on by the Kunz supporters gave
These presentations will climax
gin at 3:00 P. M. when freshman cil. He replaces Dorthea Devins, '42, evidence of the results that can oband sophomore women will vie in now at William Smith College. Harry tained by active support of a candi- weeks of intensive preparation.
three rivalry "obstacle" races. One Passow, '42, has been elected Pub- date. Kunz gained 115 votes, while Students will be admitted for ten
cents or Student tax.
rivalry point will be awarded to the lic Relations Counsel.
winner of each race. Lois Hafley,
Varsity debate will hold its first Hirsh, who had the advantage of
At least eight of the ten first
leading
the
singing
in
assembly
for
'43, Pat Latimer, '44, are the class home intercollegiate debate on Novf£
Cm.
tf
Cm
semester
plays have been cast. The
four
weeks,
only
increased
70
votes
managers.
ember 1 at 8:00 P. M. in the Lounge
19; Roger Babson, 8; and Earl Browfrom
the
original
ballot
results.
schedule
for
the
rest
of
the
semesof Richardson Hall. As yet neither
Hay i w
oa. m©
Pushball Game
The complete first ballot result ter includes the work of the follow- der, 2.
speakers' topics have been selected
The
vote
this
year
is
in keeping
was
as
follows:
ing Advanced Dramatics students:
At 4:00 o'clock the giant pushball, for this debate with the University
100 October 29, Harry Jordan and Rob- with the tradition that State College
ten feet in diameter, will be rolled of Vermont. This meeting will be lllriill
Is always Republican in Its politics.
Kunz
51
out, and the freshmen and sopho- the first in the series of about eigh- Co.v
20 ert Agne; November 5, Ruth Keeler Only twice In all the polls that have
more men will attempt to push the teen intercollegiate debates sched- Jtyt*rHOii
Vince Miller; November 19, been taken at State since 1924 has
21 and
ball from the center of the court uled for this year. Debate Council Novelli
12 Louise deAngelis and Dorothea Mac- a Democratic candidate been elected
10
through their rivals' goal. The game will also sponsor some ten intramural Kltchli!
Isaac; December 3, Anna Catutti by the student body. State students
will be played in two periods of contests.
have elected Republicans to the
Total
220 and Tom George.
five minutes each, the winners will
There will be ten plays presented presidency in 1924, 1928, and 1932.
be awarded two rivalry points. Class
next semester, including the annual Polls were conducted at State in the
managers are Edward Reed, '43,
spring production directed by Miss "off" years to determine the winners
and Van Shultze, '44. William Haller,
of the gubernatorial elections, and
Agnes Futterer.
'41, will supervise the game and
only once have State students failed
John Bakay, Harold Duffy, Arnold
to elect a Republican to the goverEllerin, Gerald Saddlemire, seniors,
norship.
and Philip Kaufman, William Dick- 1
iS<
. *
SCA Sponsors Minister
son, juniors, will act as Judges.
In 1924, the State voters predicted
In Series of Lectures that Calvin Coolidge would be
elected to the presidency, and that
Student Christian Association is Colonel Theodore Roosevelt would
Pi Gamma Mu to Discuss
.sponsoring a series of four classes on be made governor, Both these men
the theme "The Life and Teach- were Republican candidates, AlNew High School Plans
*fp*T ^ P f l a T
i" ings of Jesus Christ." The Reverend though Coolidge was elected to the
Pi Gamma Mu, honorary Social
Kenneth B. Welles, of the West- presidency, Colonel Roosevelt was
Studies society, at its Wednesday
minister Presbyterian Church in defeated by Al Smith. In 1926, State
meeting laid extensive plans for n
Albany, leads the meetings on Mon- predicted that Ogden Mills (Repubprogram early in November in which
day afternoons from 3:30 to 4:30 lican) would be elected over Al
all majors in Social Studies, includin the Lounge of Richardson Hall. Smith. Smith was reelected GovContlnued on page 4, column 2
ing graduate students, are invited
Newman Club meets again next
to participate.
Thursday at 7:30 o'clock in NewThis program is to be made up of
Freshmen Nominate President
man Hall. Father Cahill, chaplain,
a thorough discussion of the social
will
open
the
meeting
with
Benedicstudy program in secondary schools.
At an organization meeting of the
tion. During the business meeting, freshman
Included under this topic will be
class Wednesday noon,
Fred Ferris, '42, president, will con- the following people were nominated
such items as: (1) "New Social
Study curriculum for the secondary
duct a discussion on the revised for president: Patricia Carroll, Robschool" (2) "Regents examination"
constitution and on the Corporate ert White, William Forrest, Daniel
and (3) "What is expected of new
Communion Breakfast scheduled for Hanley, Phillip Murphy, Robert
CONFORMING-with provisions of the Selective Service A c t ,
teachers in the social study curriOctober 27. Entertainment will fol- Loucks, Richard Young, Lyman
culum?"
Merrill Walrath, '41 /.Student Association President, registers.
low, then dancing and refreshments, Juckett, and Van Schultze.
Definitely Milder, Cooler'Smoking
decidedly Better-Tasting,
Chesterfield is one up on 'em all
Hush, little thrift stamp,
Don't you cry;
You'll be a war bond,
By and by!
FIGHT OR BUY BONDS!
CLEAN YOUR PLATE — SAVE
FOOD!
Campus Gets Barracks
In the fall of 1918, the Student
Army Training Corps was first introduced to the college. Under the supervision of the federal government,
a training camp was established on
the campus in which students who
were attending the college could at
the same time receive military training. A barracks and a mess hall were
built on the spot where the Milne
School and Page Hall now stand.
At that time, there were about 110
men In the college. Of them, ninetyone passed their physical exams and
were admitted into the SATO, All
the men left as the NKWH, which
wrote In an editorial commenting on
the formation of the SATC:
" . . . there Is but one course for the
young civilian to take. He should
enter college, faithfully perform his
duties here, and accept his glorious
opportunity for service. The need is
great, the opportunity is at hand,
and the men must, and will respond."
The war years at State College
were extraordinary ones. They pro-
?
Queen
Queen
Queen
Queen
Queen
Queen
VOL. XXV, NO. S
Willkie Wins Over Roosevelt
In Close State College Vote
10%
Boulevard Cafeteria
1D8-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
Suspense Climbs
As New Queen
Disclosure Nears
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, OCT03ER 18, 1940
25th
Year
• i & T ^ Pm
hestertield
Cup|rii|(lit lUtO, I.ICOKII & Mmuu Toiucxo Co.
\
ngjn
- • '»
; ; : . , . • : . . : : , .
.iM
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