State Ne e g e ws

advertisement
LIBRARY
-TATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
State
VOL.
ege Ne ws
ALBANY N. Y
X X I , No. 4
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y,, FKJDAV, OCTOBER 16,
Fisk, '37, Will Direct
Point System Group
Assembly Will
Hear Publicist
Advocate Peace
Representatives
from
each
class will m a k e u p t h e new p o i n t
system c o m m i t t e e for this year,
which was a p p o i n t e d t h i s week
by J o h n Deno, p r e s i d e n t of the
student
nssociatinn.
Raymond
Fisk, '.'!", will h e a d t h e s t u d e n t
group, which, u n d e r the constitutional
provision
passed
last
y e a r , will " g a t h e r
information
r e g a r d i n g w o r k a n d h o u r s involved in a c t i v i t i e s ' o f f i c e s " .
T h e m e m b e r s of t h e c o m m i t t e e
a s s i s t i n g Fisk a r e : C a r o l M i r e s ,
Robert
M a r g i s o n , Klsa
Smith,
Lester Rubin, s e n i o r s ;
Marion
Mall, R i c h a r d Cox, H e n r y (Iroen,
j u n i o r s ; J o h n Kdge, J o y c e Maycock, J a n e Sch worziuun, sophom o r e s : a n d l-Jleu Most, ' III, a n d
I he f r e s h m a n p r e s i d e n t ,
Ralph
(I r y z in a l a ,
I rw in
S t i n g e r , s e n i o r s , and Irani Anderson,
'.'IK,
will
iiivi'stigali'
methods
nl
s u p e r s isioii nl' a
m i m e o g r a p h m a c h i n e in In- pur
c h a s e d I'rinii s t u d e n t lax f u n d s .
Forster Will Discuss Current
Problems With Faculty
This Afternoon
Mr. W. Arnold
Forstcr,
Hrillsh
publicist and a u t h o r i t y mi intern:!(iunul .'i (fairs will a d d r e s s tin 1 s t u d e n t
assembly
this
morning
:il
II :(I0
o 'clock, a c c o r d i n g In nil uunoiinceinont
by .hillll
Polio, p I <•- i. I el 11 i.f
tin'
student unsocialinn.
His topic will In 1 :
" T i n 1 Present
Armaments
Knee — Can
It
He
S t o p p e d ': "
I n i»ril ft- In allow liiin
sufficient i i m r :iinl "till |U'ovi(ii' t i m e
for
regular
student
business
tin 1
lL';:i."i ii 'clock | ctiud will nut I.ruin
u n t i l I :<HI o ' c l o c k .
Mr. P u r s i e r is s p e n d i n g t h r e e d a y s
lit each iif I
•i.llrui- of New Vork
Si HI i' d u r i n g this lull nnil wirilcr.
V e s t i ' l d a v lie s p o k e ;i( n 1*41fillII collihiclci] in the L o u n g e of R i c h a r d s o n
hull mi tin* topic, " T l i o Price of
Ponce
America's
slum'."
The
f o r u m wns umli'i' l i e s p o n s o r s h i p of
till' Vnlllig Wmiii'li 's ('lirisl inn us.soci.'il ion. P e a c e club, I HI i rn:i I imi.-i I
R e l a t i o n s cluli, diul tlio v a r i o u s H ligiolls g r o u p s of t h e collet,'!'.
T h i s nl'tol'ilonn Mr. F o r s l e r will
a d d r e s s the fill'u IIV lit n li'n In In'
g i v e n in tin' I n g l e room of
tin'
Al
i
Residence
hall
ill
4:1)0
o'clock.
H i s t o p i c will ho, " K i r
mi'iits nf a Peueoful W o r l d O r d e r . "
Newman Club Plans
Annual Breakfast
N e w m a n chili will h a v e i|s first
C o m m u n i o n b r e a k f a s t of t h e y e a r at
t h e Vincent inn I n s t i t u t e on S u n d a y ,
October
li5.
Rosemary
Dickinson,
'.'(7, v i c e - p r e s i d e n t of t h e club a n d
m e m b e r of M y s k a n i a , is c h a i r m a n ,
A l l m e m b e r s who plan to a t t e n d m u s t
s i g n up on t h e .Newman club b u l l e t i n
b o a r d next week.
Neil
Fogarty,
'•''!', was
elected
p r e s i d e n t of the c l u b , ill a m e e t i n g
last week.
A scries of p a n e l d i s c u s s i o n s is
s c h e d u l e d for t h e c o m i n g y e a r u n d e r
(he d i r e c t i o n of D o r o t h y Cain, '.'18,
chairman
of
the
discussion
committee.
Miss Cain will be a s s i s t e d
b y J o h n l>. b'.van, '.')", M a r y A(fm'fl
Mctzgor and Mary Margaret Puppa,
Kopl
lores, and .Joseph McKi'iill a n d
l l a r r v Taylor, freshmen.
Any New Businesses?
If So, "Howya Doiri?"
' • I 'in in a new b u s i n e s s . ' '
" What is il ' . ' "
' ' I 'in II g o v e r n m e n t m a n . ' '
" II 'ya d o i l l ' y "
" 11 's a g r e a t r e l i e f , ' '
T h u s is born I he s u c c e s s o r
and chief heir of the " k n o c k
knock ' ' disease that so grout l.v
i n c a p a c i t a l i d mir populiilion in
recent I i ines,
Oilier e x a m p l e s a r e : life s a v e r
b u s i n e s s , with the a n s w e r t h a i
tilt' bii.iine.ss is ill the
hole;
b u t c h e r , m e a t s a lot of p e o p l e ;
b a r b e l , in a l a t h e r b e c a u s e his
busiin ss is t a k i n g a cut ; a n d
m o w e r nl' lawns w h o ' s g e l l i n g
a la nil line,
T h e fad has a l r e a d y a t t a i n e d
Mich ii hold Ihal f r i e n d s greet
each nl her with " I 've got a new
b u s i n e s s ' ' instead of t h e i-us
ternary
' ' Hello. ' '
NeW
businesses a r e b e i n g t h o u g h t up before c l a s s e s , a f t e r c l a s s e s , between classes, d u r i n g classes, it ml
o u t s i d e of classes. T h e u n f o r t u n a t e a r e i r r e s p u n s i b l e once I he
c r a z e is upon t h e m .
O u r only
h o p e is t h a t all t h i n g s e n d .
Debate Varsity
Schedules New
Forensic Tilts
Students Depart.
For Convention
Five Women Will Represent
Christian Association
At Syracuse
Five S l a t e w o m e n will represent
t h e C h r i s t i a n a s s o c i a t i o n of t h e college al the a n n u a l s l a t e c o n f e r e n c e
nf the S t u d e n t C h r i s t i a n movement
which convenes at S y r a c u s e , t o n i g h t ,
for the week e n d .
Helen Clyde, '.'!";
J e a n K d g c u i u b e a n d T h e l i n a Miller,
j u n i o r s ; and
Kliz.abeth Allen
and
Marion Rocketeller, sophomores, are
t h e d e l e g a t e s from S l a t e college.
Knch fall, s t u d e n t s from a p p r o x i mately twenty
.New Vork
colleges
meet in sonic c e n t r a l c i t y to discuss
pertinent student problems.
Recuinm e u d a t i o u s of
the conference
are
c a r r i e d to local c a m p u s e s a n d a c t e d
upon by the college C h r i s t i a n associaI ions.
The four major
f o r u m s of t h e
S y r a c u s e c o n f e r e n c e will be as foll o w s : t h e s t u d e n t in social a c t i o n ,
t h e i n d i v i d u a l a n d the s l a t e , vital
religion, and m a r r i a g e a n d the home.
L e a d i n g the g r o u p s a r e Mean H e n r y
I'. Van Diiseii a n d Dr. ( t r a c e Loiicks
Klliolt
nl'
Xew
Vork
city,
both
specialists
in
their
Holds;
Rabbi
M o r r i s l.az.-irnn nf Hall i n a n e , M a r y
laud ; P r o f e s s o r S, Ralph H a r l o w of
Xurthamplon,
Massachusetts;
and
Reverend J o h n M a x w e l l A d a m s of
P h i l a d e l p h i a , I 'oiinsylvaliin,
(in
Sunday
morning,
a
special
sessinu nl' I he c o n f e r e n c e will lie led
by
a
coiuniissiou
appointed
lasl
s p r i n g by P h i l l i p Dobl.s, St. Lawrence u n i v e r s i t y , c h a i r m a n
of
the
s l a t e nrg.'i lli/at inn.
T h e ciuninissioa
will report en rceiiiiimctidul inns In
be m a d e In I he f a c u l t y c o n f o i e n c i ' al
l l n b a r l college on X o v c l n b e r 7, when
p r o f e s s o r s and udlllillisl ratal's meet
with h i . R a i u e y nf t h e A m e r i c a n
Ymilh ciuniiiissiiiii In discuss p r o b
lellls nl'
h i l l college edllcnlioll.
Among the recoinuieiidal ions a r e
ropiest s
for
senior
courses
ilile
g r a t i n g siibje'-ls s t u d i e d
throughout
the
filUI
Mars,
help
III
lilldlllg
II
pleasurable
avocation,
iimplilicatiou
nl' irppnrl nun n s I'm- Held work, and
the inclusion nl' courses giving sin
dents
a
background
nl'
religious
history a n d e x p e r i e n c e .
To Correct Schedule Cards
All s e n i o r s a n d g r a d u a t e s l i u l e n l s
must place t h e i r c l a s s r o o m n u m b e r s
on t h e i r schedule c a r d s on Hie in the
A p p o i n t m e n t b u r e a u office, the b u r e a u
aniuiuiiced this week.
S t u d e n t s will
also i n d i c a t e t h e i r usual w h e r e a b o u t s
for flee p e r i o d s .
T h e c a r d s a r c on
the appointment bureau desk.
$2.00 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
1936
GREETS FRESHMEN
1939 Welcomes
Class of 1940
In Page Tonight
Squad to Meet St. Lawrence,
Hamilton and Skidmore
Early in Season
Mattice Will Be Chairman;
Myskania to Interpret
Rivalry Rules
Accompanying
the
announcement
of t h e first s e m e s t e r v a r s i t y d e b a t e
t e a m for t h e e n s u i n g y e a r by M r .
L o u i s C. J o n e s , f a c u l t y a d v i s o r , is
t h e e n l a r g e d s c h e d u l e for t h e memb e r s of lite f o r e n s i c s q u a d , i n c l u d i n g
two round table discussions and a
r e g u l a r d e b a t e w i t h i n t h r e e weeks.
T h i s y e a r u n d e r a new s y s t e m t h e
m e m b e r s who o r e e l i g i b l e for t h e
i n t e r c o l l e g i a t e d e b a t e t e a m have to
be a p p r o v e d by t h e d e a n of t h e college, t h e f a c u l t y d e b u t e a d v i s e r , and
m e m b e r s nf council,
T h e class of 1930 will e n t e r t a i n
the freshman class from 8:00 u n t i l
1 2 : 0 0 o ' c l o c k t o n i g h t in t h e g y m n a s i u m of P a g e h a l l .
A n a i r of
H a l l o w e e n f e s t i v i t y will p r e v a i l a t
this reception,
C a r o l y n M a t t i c e is
the general chairman.
The program
will open
in
the
a u d i t o r i u m of P a g e hall with a welcome by J o h n Kdge, s o p h o m o r e c l a s s
president.
Myskania
and
Student
council
will also be p r e s e n t ,
the
f o r m e r a c t i n g as c h a p e r o n s ,
Class
t r a d i t i o n s and
iaterclass
traditions
will be e x p l a i n e d ,
'I'he s o p h o m o r e s will then e s c o r t
the freshmen to the g y m n a s i u m w h e r e
t h e r e will be d a n c i n g .
Lew R i d e r ' s
orchestra
will
furnish
the
music.
P a r t of the p r o g r a m will
feature
t w e n t y m i n u t e s of s o p h o m o r e a m a teurs e n t e r t a i n i n g under the direction of William T o r r c n s .
T h e f a c u l t y h a s been invited t o 1)0
present lo meet t h e f r e s h m e n .
Ref r e s h m e n t s will be served.
T h e c o m m i t t e e a s s i s t i n g Miss M a t tice a r e : p u b l i c i t y , M a r i o n
Firman,
chairman, Margaret Mnttison, Myndcrt
Crniin.se;
decorations,
Joan
Myron a n d J u n e P a l m e r , co-chairm a n , V i c t o r i a Hil/.i, L e a h
McKoel,
Klizabeth A l l e n : r e f r e s h m e n t s , B e t t y
Ilayford,
chairman,
Helen
Lowry,
Region
Murphy,
Joyce
Maycock,
Delia D o l a n : e n t e r t a i n m e n t , W i l l i a m
T o r r c n s , c h a i r m a n , finr .on
Tabner,
Raymond
W a l t e r s , J : a; s
Spenee;
faculty,
Hetty
Maker,
chairman,
Duntoii T y n a n ,
Richard
Lonsdale;
mid o r c h e s t r a , F a y e F o r i n u n , c h a i r m a n , J o s e p h Leese, J o s e p h R o w l a n d .
T h e four member-- nl' the senior
r l a s s who will In- liisl s e m e s t e r deb a t e r s in i n t e r c o l l e g i a t e c o m p e t i t i o n
include:
Lester
Rubin,
Lillian
S h a p i r o , Irwin Stinger, and J a m e s
Vniiderpi.il.
Si \I-II m e m b e r s nf the
class of P . u s will I,,- eligible for debating.
They n r e :
William Itradt,
H e r b e r t Dl'im'z, L i z e t t i ' Plirsluill, W a r
roil
I lensmorc,
('luillcs
(In v lord,
P e r c y F n r m a n , mid Sally Whckin.
Seven s o p h o m o r e s will p a r t i c i p a t e
in v a r s i t y d e b a t e .
Try n u t s for I he l o a m were cond u c t e d lasl T h u r s d a y with a l a r g e
n u m b e r nf p r o s p e c t i v e d e b a t e r s participating,
'I'be t r i a l speeches were
based on -nine p h a s e uf t h e p r e s e n t
political
campaign.
T h o s e a p p o i n t e d to t h e t e a m a r c :
John
Kdge,
Leonard
Friedhuidor,
Hetty
ilayford,
Richard
Lonsdale,
R u t h S i n o v o y , (iiirdoii T a l i n c r , a n d
J o s e p h Lec.se, s o p h o m o r e s .
On T h u r s d a y , O c t o b e r 22, t h e S t a t e
college t e a m will j o u r n e y to Skiilniore c o l l e g e
ill S a r a t o g a
f o r ,'t
political round table discussion, The
p u r p o s e of t h i s is t o c l a r i f y
the
issues of t h e 111 3 (I election c a m p a i g n
a n d to d i s c u s s w i t h o u t p o l i t i c a l h e a t
the basic p r o b l e m s of t h e c a m p a i g n .
T h e t h r e e m a j o r i s s u e s which will be
c o n s i d e r e d i n c l u d e l a b o r a n d social
security, business and the constitution, a n d m o n e y a n d
finance.
Bach
nf
tlie f o l l o w i n g
parties
will lie
represented:
Republicans,
Democrats,
I'niunisls,
Soeialisls,
Comm u n i s t s , P r o h i b i t i n n i s l s a n d SocialLaborites.
J o h n E d g e , '3D, p r e s i d e n t of
t h e s o p h o m o r e class, w h o will
bead I he s o p h o m o r e welcome in
the freshmen tonight,
Freshman Class
To Have Revotes
Taylor and Sullivan Win Posts;
Myskania to Supervise
Polls Tuesday
Two
hot
freshman
Tuesday
class
under
Myskania.
ing
officers were
al
offices
a
the
of
the
direction
Revotes
will
chosen
meeting
for
Hie
be t a k e n
of
remain-
next
Tues-
d a y , O c t o b e r 20, a t 12:00 o'clock
in
room 2(1.
Rita
Sullivan
tary and
was
Henry
elected
Taylor
secre-
M.A.A.
rep-
r e s e n t a t i v e of t h e class.
Revotes include; president, Robert
.Martin, R o g e r M o r a n , W a l l e r Simn i u n s : v i c e - p r e s i d e n t , M a r j o r i e llaird
and Ruby Stewart.
Treasurer,
Lloyd
Kelly,
John
Ryan;
reporter,
Norman
Arnold,
R o b e r t C o g g e r , Vulaada R i c h a r d s o n ;
men's
cheerleader,
Paul
Colycr,
J o l l i e s Q u i u n , Haskell R o s e n b e r g .
W o m e n 's c h e e r l e a d e r , Lois ( l a m e ,
M a r i o n K i n g s l e y ; song lender. F a y
Scbeor, Mary Trainor, J u n e Wilson:
m a n a g e r nl' g i r l s ' a t h l e t i c s , V i r g i n i a
S l a t e c o l l e g e will be r e p r e s e n t e d
.Mitchell, Doris S a u n d e r s and Cathby
Rubin,
Bmilt, Tahiicr,
Drooz,
{('mil in in il mi /<(/</( -I, ml II inn ~i)
\ erine Smith,
Appeldoorn, Price Direct Plays;
Norton To Play In "Hamlet yy
W i t h t h e news t h a i H u g h N o r t o n ,
','lli, is lo p l a y in Leslie I Inward 's
p r o d u c t bill nl' " H a m l e t ' ' , a n d the
p r e m i e r e pl'oiluclioll nf the A d v a n c e d
D r a m a t i c s class scheduled fur Tm-s
day e v e n i n g , S l a t e college has a g a i n
become I h e s p i a n m i n d e d .
N o r t o n will I ravel w ith I bivv ;i rtl 's
c o m p a n y which will open in Muslim
en O c t o b e r Mb F r o m t h e r e they will
MII
in
Washington,
Philadelphia,
and linally open in New Vork on
N o v e m b e r HI.
He is d o i n g evtcii
sive r a d i o work u n d e r M r . Reis, of
the I 'iiluuibia Hriiiulcaslillg S y s t e m .
Vincent
Donahue,
'.'ill, tdmi
a
p r o d u c t of S l a t e ' s d r a m a t i c classes,
spent i he s u m m e r al St rat I'm il on
A vmi ns a s t u d e n t a c t o r .
T w o one act p l a y s w ill be pre
seated
Tuesday
evening
al
H:,ill
o'clock iii t h e a u d i t o r i u m of
Page
hall, u n d e r t h e s u p e r v i s i o n of Miss
A g n e s K, F u l t e r e r , d i r e c t o r of d m
unities.
O n e is a c o m e d y , d i r e c t e d
by H e s t e r P r i c e , ','tH, a m i t h e o t h e r
is a m y s t e r y t h r i l l e r u n d e r I he lender
s h i p o f H e t t y A p p e l d o o r n , '3M.
Miss
ea.it :
Price
Arthur,
and
has
Janice
juniors,
Jack
Klinor
Raymond
Xordell,
Dibble
chosen
Xierinail
and
for
and
Walters
suphoiuores,
Hubert
her
liar
and
Cogger,
freshmen,
The
following
uniitlees
will
assist in I he product ion : lights and
sets, Lucille C l a r k ; props, M a r j o r i e
('list ; publicil v, J e a n l.ii-henslein ;
uiul
costumes,
Florence
Riugruse,
juniors,
T h e casl
nl' Miss
Appeldoorn's
play i n c l u d e s : J o h n l.dvvards, T h o m a s
Kelly, Ulld I r w i n S t i n g e r , s e n i o r s ;
Herbert
Drooz and Paul
Dittiuan,
j u n i o r s ; a n d K e n n e t h Dol'illl, '-lb.
T h e m e m b e r s uf the c o m m i t t e e
a i d i n g tin' d i r e c t o r lire: sets ami
lights, Charlotte Lilunan; costumes,
Florence
'zmbrs;
props,
Dorothy
l l n n e r , a n d a d v e r t i s i n g , J e a n Licit
eiislein, j u n i o r s .
S t u d e n t tax tickets must be presented a t t h e d o o r by p l a y g o e r s . All
I hose who do not have t i c k e t s will
pay leu c e n t s a d m i s s i o n ,
Torrens Is President
Of Residence Halls
A g n e s T o r r c n s , ','17, will s e r v e a s
p r e s i d e n t of t h e A l u m n i R e s i d e n c e
halls for t h e coining y e a r .
Molly
Dowling,
'38,
was
elected
vicep r e s i d e n t . She will assist Miss H e l e n
B u r g h e r in p l a n n i n g t h e social affairs of t h e residence h a l l .
Revotes l o r t h e offices uf s e c r e t a r y
mid t r e a s u r e r will be c o n d u c t e d a t
the house m e e t i n g next week. M a r c i u
llruwn, Doris S a u n d e r s , a m i
Kathe r i n e S m i t h , freshmen, n r e t h e c a n d i d a t e s for s e c r e t a r y .
Revotes f o r
the office of t r e a s u r e r a r e b e t w e e n
Mildred
King
and
Jean
Strong,
sophomores.
'I'he budget for liKlli '•'•" was p r e soiiteil
by
the
budget
commit tee.
M i n n i e s t r a u s s , '.'17, is eliairinun nf
the c o m m i t t e e which plums nil expenditures
for the y e a r .
She
is
assisted by two s o p h o m o r e a n d t w o
freshmen
representatives.
A short
e x p l a n a t i o n of the a l l o t m e n t s
was
followed by discussion and a p p r o v a l .
An " o p e n
h o u s e " for all m e n
s t u d e n t s of
tin- college is
being
planned
for
the n e a r
future.
A
g e n e r a l i n v i t a t i o n vvill be e x t e n d e d
In all S t a t , an n and the g i r l s of t h e
resilience hall will act as h o s t e s s e s ,
Hoffman Will Direct
Junior Ring Committee
R u t h lliill'inan will serve a s c h a i r man ni' the j u n i o r r i n g c o m m i t t e e .
Miss 'Huffman
was a p p o i n t e d
by
R i c h a r d Cux, j u n i o r class p r e s i d e n t ,
at a class m e e t i n g c o n d u c t e d
on
Tuesday.
O t h e r j u n i o . s who will
assist
Miss
Huffman
are
Stella
Sampson,
Doris
Anderson,
Joseph
L a Uruff, a n d H a r o l d l l a y n c s . H e l e n
P r u s i k is t h e s o p h o m o r e
representative,
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
State College News
Hair Story Will Armae
Absentees at Banquet
Books of the Day
Established by the Class of 1918
The undergraduate Newspaper of New York State
College for Teachers
Chief among the horse-play
and humorous incidents at the
twentieth anniversary banquet of
the N E W S is the hairy story which
bears repetition for students not
present.
The soventy-five members from
past ami present boards and
stall's found a special sense of
humor among the less hairy guests
present.
When called upon to make a
few comments, Mr. Clarence A.
Ilidlcy, assistant professor of
history, wondered about the k ' r d
of hair tonic which was so conducive to growth on the top of
the head of Hamilton Acheson,
'30.
Mr. Acheson
attributed
the successful
crop of seven
scattered hairs to the hair restorer prescribed by Dr. William
M. French, instructor in education and editor-in-chief of the
N E W S in 192.0. Dr. French, not
to be outdone by the two men
with shining heads, revealed that
all of his success was due to Mr.
Hidley, who had taught him all
he knew about keeping hair on
his head.
Boake Carter Interviews the Average Man
" Johnny Q. Public " Speaks, by Boake Carter, Dodge
Published every Friday of the college year by the NEWS
Board representing the Student Association
Publishing Company, New York, 11)36. 278 pnges.
Telephones: Ottlee, 5-0373; Gumaer, 2-0424; Dexter,
$2.00.
2-4314; Seld, 2-9701; Gaylord, 2-4314
(On sale at the Co-op)
Entered as second class matter in the Albany, K. I'., postoffice
Radio listeners of the lust six years could guess by
his voice that news commentator Boake Carter was a
Cambridge man.
THE NEWS BOARD
.Since Cambridge lie lias been in the service of the
Royal Air force, of tile London Daily Mail, of the oil
HARRY T. GUMAER
Editor-in-Chief
business in Mexico. In the United States his activities
F R E D E . DEXTER
Managing
Editor
have centered around Philadelphia where he writes for
WARREN I. DENSMORE
Associate Managing
Editor
the papers and conducts nightly news broadcasts for
DAVID B . S M I T H . .
Associate Managing
Editor
Phileo.
S O P H I E WOLZOK
Associate Managing
Editor
C a r t e r ' s six years in radio have netted biro, from one
LAURITA SELD
Business
Manager
to one and a half million letters from listeners, comCHARLES W. GAYLORD
Advertising
Manager
menting on his broadcasts. From these lie conceived
MILDRED E . NIGHTINGALE
Circulation
Manager
" J o h n n y Q. P u b l i c " Speaks.
From representative
letters he traces the reactions of the ordinary man to
the New Deal.
Carter writes as he talks—clearly and to the point.
CHARLES N . MORRIS
Sports
Editor
Claiming
no axe to grind, he records his observations
H E L E N CLVDE
Women's Sports
Editor
fairly, blending them only slightly with his own conservative background. Carter is the conservative AmeriP R I N T E D BY BOYD PRINTING CO., INC., ALBANY, N . Y.
can as he should be.
An Uninformed Teacher
Is Still A Teacher
" We could argue ubout it all night anil never get anywhere. Nobody knows anything ubout it anyway."—Final
word in a bull session on politics, economics, or foreign
affairs.
Charlie Taft, Middle-of-the-Roader
You and I—And Roosevelt, by Charles Phelps Taft.
Farrar, New York, HKlo. I l l pages. $1.00.
Charlie Taft is a Laudon brain-truster, but no acute
partisan. He was deemed too tolerant in his views to
attend an anti-New Deal meeting last winter.
Said
T a f t : " T h e y wanted someone who would damn F. D.
R. and all his works. 1 can't and won't, and some
of the Republication orators and candidates who do,
give me an ucute pain in the neck."
Maybe you're tired of it, too.
Some day we should like to see someone question this "final" word—someone who would
Says Time:
wisecrack and say, " I t ' s about time you did
"Charlie Taft is proud to call himself a middle-ofknow something about it."
If someone got up in Chem club meeting and the-roader, a moderate, a mugwump. The thesis of
You and I—And Roosevelt is t h a t to win the li)3(i
asserted that nobody knew anything about chem- campaign, Republicans must appeal to other moderates
istry, people would gather immediately that the who like progress but not too much of it, and t h a t
speaker was merely trying to cover up his own much not too fast. Those moderates, he warns, are
lack of information. Yet in the field of human in sympathy with most of the New Deal aims. He
relations, which every citizen should know be- himself likes its tarilf policies, its securities and
stock regulation, its bank deposit insurance, its handcause he has to vote, people can excuse their ling of strikes and championship of Labor. He apown ignorance by blaming everybody else, and proves of public works, regulation of public utilities
get away with it.
(including government " y a r d s t i c k s " ) , easy farm and
We take it for granted that the field of social home credit, and a more equitable distribution of the
nation's wealth. Strong for social security, he constudies—the study of men's relations with each siders the New Deal's system unjust a n d impractible,
other—is in toto so extensive as to defy final dislikes its " spendthrift generosity ", its currency
analysis. But the chemist in the laboratory policies. But the only things which really make him
doesn't understand all the secrets of the atom boil a r e : (I) " m u s t " bills, jammed through without
either. He knows what he knows and gets adequate debate by Congress or the nation; (2) waste
and polities in relief; (,'J) the spoils system as pracresults, and doesn't go around excusing himself ticed by James A. Farley,"
like some teachers of future citizens are inclined
to do.
Joseph Kennedy of the S.E.C.
State college students will have an opportuI'm For Roosevelt, by Joseph Kennedy. Key mi I and
nity in the next two weeks to become informed Hitchcock. Xew York, 1030. Mi) pages. $1.00.
on political and international affairs, through
Tliis book, by the lirst chairman of the Securities
the visit of Mr. Forster and the political dis- Exchange commission, is a counter-attack on Old
cussions being planned by student council. Dealers who claim that the Xew Deal is leading to
Throughout the year the council, the Young the ruin of the country. Kennedy begins with liis
statement Unit, in I'.KII-.'i.'i he felt t h a t lie
Women's Christian association, the Peace club, personal
would gladly give half of all lie possessed if t h a t would
and the International Relations club plan to co- guarantee the safety of the remaining half, lie felt
operate in making State informed on issues of with his friends that u SO per cent premium would be
the day. The success of these attempts will a reasonable premium to pay for in.siiruuco on one's
be in direct proportion to the attendance and security in that economic earthquake era.
We quote Now York's Daily Xrirx:
attention at each function,
"Old
Deal propagandists are trying to pump up a
An uninformed chemist is not exactly a chemfear among u^ that t lie rescue is eventually goine. to
ist, but an uninformed teacher is still a teacher, eo.-,t more tliiin it was worth cost so much, in fact,
not for better but for worse.
that we shall -ink into national bankruptcy, Tin'
The Stunts Are Here Again
We looked up the directors of the senior and
junior Campus Day stunts and found that their
productions promise to lie goud,
We looked up the seniors and juniors for
the reason that the upper classes have been setting the pace in past years for sloppy stunts
at S. (.'. T. It has usually been an underclass
stunt that captured the prize ami presented a
little entertainment for the queen,
We repeat for the nth time the bases of judgment in the stunt competition which judges
invariably use and people complain about,
afterward. "There must be evidences of preparation, good general class participation, entertainment value, and—perhaps most important—
smoothness or finish in the final production,"
If the judging of next week's competition
turns out to be just a toss-up among three or
four poop productions, we're going to suggest
a simpler form of iriterelass rivalry such as a
"Knock, knock" contest.
dollars and cent- answer In this old Deal argument
is contained in one of the best chapters of Mr, Kennedy's book. Here i- the gist of that answer;
Tin' nuilonul ilela has Inileeil Increuseil in.in IJU.O
billions an Fchnmi-.v JK, l!i;;j lu ;n.| |,|||lons mi
J u n e .'til, HMD; ii I.,Oil lnerellHC of III.II I , i l l l e l i s .
liul I'ruin thin tt'etv Imvu lu ilcducl I billions '.' for the recoverable limns uf <IK- Ueciiiisirncllim
Muiiiice l.'uriioi'ullnn mi.I .iilier Ijiiveriiuii'iil creilll
atfclirtcN ; :.' I'm- the Sinlilll/.iitiiin t'niol. whli h !,.
ciisli Hi;,i Hie Ciiveiioneiii liuri merely liii|ii,iinilei|
for "se In n lini? other nut Ions' inunljniliilliiiiN "I
tllull' currencies us Ihnse clllcriicllcIcK urine
'lli.ii
leaves nil hllll.ins
in which
should lie
llllile.l | M i l l , H I III enver H o m e O w n e r s ' I . O I I I I ( o r
ponttlon, f'eilenil J.'itnn .\Iiii-ljftitfi* nn.l -.miliar loans
which the (iiivenoneiit may mil lie able io colled
In full.
Total real Ineiease In Hie null.,mil ilehl nniler
Hie New Deal, therefore, Is 7 il hllllims H I , Io June
no, luao,
" A n d biiciume of lower inlcresl raii<», ii cost, us
eumpuriitively little more to Unance the Itoimevelt ;i I. I
billion debl Hi,in it eosl to carry the Hoover B0..1
billion debt.
" W h a t have we got lor our money V Or, since Old
Dealers as a rule won't admit Unit, the Xew Deal spendings had anything Io do with recovery, what have we
gotten while we have been spending the money?
" M o a t important, the national gross income has
come up from a low of :ni billions for III,'!,') to an
estimated lib billions for lll.'Hi a :n billion u y e a r
increase coincident with a debt expansion of 7.0 billions in three years."
Statesman
Some people are already guessing
concerning the identity of the Man
of State. Contrary to freshman reports we are not Dean Moreland.
De.-.n Nelson, or Dr. Brubaclier . . . To
continue with administrative affairs
. . . What will the Milne office
hangers-on do, now that the appointment bureau head has gone to Newburgh? . . . Just think of all those
tired right-handers, with nothing to
show for their work , . . Some
things that Christopher Columbus
should have lived to see and know;
Wine, women, and song
but ditt
man forget his woman';
You c a n ' t
paul the wool over our eyes with
auk gag . . . Another couple at the
same party had a lease on the wine,
etc.,
etc., combination,
but they
get a n(ick)el back on the bottle
. . . Who broke the College House
chandelier, anil why?
I t ' s a tall
story . . . The house a t 203 was
crowded with alums . . . While we're
lingerer their influence, we'll invite
them to come a-glenn ami slay Mill
the morrow . . . Qucstion-ul'-llie week :
Did our cheer leader stinger, or was
he in turn stung by his parasite? Lost, or strayed, or atok'ii away—
one handsome black ami whin
p
sign.
finders are definitely not
keepers . . . .Now we'll review I he
NKWK banquet . . . ex news Hoard
members use hair restorer?
We
can'l discover what brand they favor
. . . I'erlmps il 's a French mnssnge
• . . W'e had hi I HI' • ills- glanced al
Hie birthday cake when they slice.I
il • . . Von brutes, you can 'I cut
your cake nud lone ii loo. i 11 i. >< •,
bl'llle a '.' > . . . The Crush men u r l e
in luck . . . Two free vie parlies ill
ion' week end . . , Wli.it couple stayed
from South most of Hie evening in
an nlteinpl Io know Hie | \ D | { chap
1
l o n e - , ' . ' . , . linger tins a gay hud
all right, I'm' lie was seeing dibble
• • . Von 'II by i r inn, my hoy, Mai 'II
b.Virjnn . . . There were :i baker's
dozen of alums a| KDH, hul il was
nothing I
>un about . . , s,, he
sell, ' ' Kiiinn get ling m\ I'
mr de
cisioii now, ' '
Hut n ill he n main
in favor with his popular junior life
saver? . . . Time will I. II. \ an del
I"11'! is nn out of town lake, its onl\
a drop ill Hie juckell Io I.lie . .
We l-ltill 'I liglire lint i|' |,. u i, i,
II
good
bi'l
f o r inugglelon
ami bis
liakier,ing, or if I
Iiould , n , | ( |„
II"' did . , , <• Here I 'in in a iniioglc."
Anne in com lusinn, we ran (,| , i n i,,
one senior who thought October I:.'
was Christopher'N birthday . . . a
lit I In learning is a dangerous thing!
NuXl week: More people the States
man is not . , , We'd elucidate on
who he is, only elucidate is no! I,,
be found a! .State college.
(Think
about this one.)
THE MAN OK STATE,
Hellenics
Knock,
knock!
And
without
another word—this is your Hellene,
i know what the girls have been
doing and am only too eager to
tell all you renders.
So here goes with the news.
Chi Sig announces the marriage
of Alary Hickey, '20, to Harold
Berry. Congratulations to Mary . . .
Julie Keil, '.'15, spent the week-end
at tlie Chi Sig house—and you can
be sure that the girls were glad to
see her.
Alumnae reunion a t Gamma Kap
last week-end. The program for the
alums
consisted
of a
meeting,
luncheon at the Madison
Manor,
afternoon bridge, and bullet supper.
The class of '30 was represented
en masse by Kudorn Farrell, Carolyn
Simonet, Edith Shod, Betty Vnllance,
and Lilly Mae Maloney . . . The girls
have as their new honorary members
Dr. and Mrs. C. C. Smith.
Week-end gnosis a t Kappa Delta
were:
Doris Howe and Lillian
Payne, '35, and Huth Edmunds, '30".
Hannah Frost, '36, was a welcome guest at A. E. Phi—just for
the day though.
Formal initiations are already in
swing. Alpha Rho welcomed into full
membership
Lucille
Alessandrini,
Leah Mekeel, Mary Noiseux, Hope
Sweet, and Emily Vogel, sophomores.
As guests, Alpha Rho welcomed
Elizabeth Shiwson, '35, and Betty
Steele, '34.
This week Beta Zetn leads in the
marital race with three announcements—Evelyn
Dudden,
','!4,
to
Rudolph Kolsner, Hetty Johnson, '.'14,
Io Randall Hastings, and Dorothy
Dodds, '31, to Kenneth H. White. "
Beta Zeta also leads initiations—•
Jean
Kdgcumbc, Gladys
Fluster,
Christine Dcrslihner, Ruth
Thomson, Alvena De-Long, juniors, and
Helen Crosier, Eleanor
Schwartz,
Ivatheriae Schwartz, Virginia Strong,
Aileen
Ilansctt, sophomores.
As
guests over the weekend—Emma
Rogers, '30, Elizabeth llobbie, ','10,
and Marion Adwcll, '32.
.Yews from
the Sigma
Alpha
spindle—Alumnae week-end brought
to the threshold Carolyn Kramers,
'33, Elsie Grant, '33, Anne Mc.CoI'hane, '.'i.'i, Louise Morris, '34, Elise
I'ugsley, '.'io, Olga llyra, '35, Emma
(luattery,
Blanche
Topper,
Alice
Hitter, Velum Wnile, all from '.'tli,
and Theresa Wiciioeko, '34. I bet
they hail a good lime.
A' the I'. A. T, bouse, Esther
I'atashnick, '.'I.'i, ami Lee Levene,
'30, were made welcome.
K.H.I'hi boasts a new pledge.
Klifiuoi' Smallev, '.'17. And a lone
week emI guest .Margaret Delam-y,
(biinmn I'M Sigma made merry
when some of their alums returned—
Margaret McCaim, ';',;,, l.ois 1'iarv,
'30,
Margaret
('iiutioii,
','ili, anil
Maria Sharkey, '.'ill.
Now ,\ou know all al.onl the sot'ol's.
' " tell you more next neck,
Communication
The Now* iiHKiiiucM no I'esnnnsln Illy lor cuiiiiiiuiiicutluini ni'lnleil In
" d " column.
All C.II.III a ni.ail l..ns
miist hear | lie Hljriiiiliirc of the
Miilhnr which will |„. withheld UIJUII
request.
One Junior Man Pays Up
Three Years' Dues
Editor S'l'.m ('OI.I.KIIK ,\'|.;w.s:
1
feel
thai
Hie reeetil
action
of
11
ci'tnin member of I h. junior class
"''""hi he brought I,, I he immediate
"Hclilitin of the members of the sin
denl association,
"ni' '"0 tthu worked during the
•"""""•i fived enniigh money Io pay
'"* ''hiss dues. Tbi s in ni,| Sl , l l n
usual, I'lll Hie fuel tlnil he is so
'""sci.'iilious as lo pay up Lilt! back
'lacs for his freshman an,I sophomore
'lues is deserving of headline recognition,
Words merely praising tills a d ion
seem inaileipinte. 11 is indirativo „f
'in almost unknown class spiiit at
Stale
Admiringly,
A '38EIU
• NATIONAL
Volume V
COLLEGE NEWS
IN
PICTURE
'•«•' •j/am\t!&
Wmk
10ty-*^
/
/
All Play\ Start Here
AN D PAR AGRAPH •
Issue 4
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
il
1 '4 I."
HARRY T. Q
FRED E. D E *
WARREN 1. J
DAVID B. SJA
SOPHIE Wofc
LAURITA SBIS
CHARLES W.i
MILDRED K. I
CHARLES N.
HELEN CLYDI
PRINTED BY
" We could
where. Nobo<
word lu a bu
affairs.
Maybe yc
Some daj
tion this ']
wisecrack a
know somet
If someot
asserted tha
istry, peopli
speaker way
lack of info
relations, v)
cause he lu
own ignorai
get away w/
We take i
studies—the
other—is ic
analysis. 1
doesn't und
either. He
results, and
like some tet
to do.
State colh
nity in the
on political
the visit of
cussions l)e
Throughout
Women's 0
and the Intj
operate in I
the day. 1
be in direct
attention at
An uninf<
ist, but an t
not for both
'•• -•••••
r:'J'
First C.C.C. boys to go to college in Arizona experiment
- 1 Civilian Conservation Corps officials in Arizona are now sending their most promising workers to
1 1 3 . 1 state colleges and the university in a move which, if successful, may be spread to the C.C.C. in
other states. Seventy-five were selected as thefirstto go collegiate in Arizona, with the above group attending
the University of Arizona. They will continue their work while attending college.
T
$ P 0 T L I C H T ER
Rollins, Sigma Nu These Namer
Honor Two Greats Make Newi
Outstanding L. S. U. sophomore
Before ball and receiver meet
8 u n u 8 U a 8 ce
A /**•%r\v\ T"'
' P d photo of a backfield player JJr\r\nr(>c\
^' a , n c * >enn ' KaPPa ^ ' ^ at
J r x C t l O n about to receive a ball from the center shows •*• - i - U I l U I c U Louisiana State University,
Universit
Larry Danbom, senior, fullback for the Fighting Irish of Notre has been awarded the Mortar Board medal for
being the outstanding co-ed member of her class.
Dame, going into action.
Acme
>-M»^f' /
CEW people know that Chic Sale's name, strictly
•*- speaking, is Charles Partlow Sale. He was born in
Huron, S. D., 51 years ago
within sight of one of the
structures he made famous
in The Specialist. Legend
has it that Chic became
"Chic" because he ran a
chicken farm near Madison,
Wis., between vaudeville
engagements. Sale never
got beyond the public
schools in the shadow of
University of Illinois, but
the Illinois Sigma Nus
made him an honorary
member.
Wi'lp,
:•••-,
'••(
" W .
, V
..*•
<f
The
We looked
junior Camr
productions
We lookef
the reason l!
ting the ]w
at S. C. T.
stunt that c
little enterta
Wo repeal
roent in tin
invariably
afterward,
ration, good
tainment va*
smoothness^
If the g :
turns out j$
four poor
a simpler
"Knock, kj
'"V,. w . ,„
Rex Beach (right) enjoyed Rollins' hazing parties
^^*"*^f\
: IP'
M^'''
W,
Exactly 376,69 acres 0/ the Q^id^scfocre Wolverine campus
I T _ : „ , , * . . „ : + . , r*£ \ l . ' / , k « « n « With an annual budget approaching 10 million dollars, the
U n i v e r s i t y O t M l C n i g a n University of Michigan has ground valued at $4.Hjt,8*>, building* valued atto4,4/6qfi}4.and equipment valued at S10.3A7.774. A coeducational institution controlled by
the state, it was founded in 1*17 as the Catholepistemiad (university) of Michigan in Detroit. It WM moved
to Ann Arbor after the legislature approved the change in 18)7.
- *«*WPBBWBBR8B
--:.,:.;'!. .^»-.
T>
UPERT HUGHES has become a master of cerer v
monies in radio. Irwin S. Cobb is about to become one after a taste of starring in motion pictures,
but Rex Beach, once an American titan of mass storytelling like Hughes and Cobb, grows old on a celery
ranch in Florida. When Rex Beach entered Rollins
College in 1891, he signed himself Rex Ellingwood
Beach. He had no use for the middle name among the
tough rabble on the Yukon during the gold rush, which
he had left Kent College of Law in Chicago to join.
Beach was a Rollins Kappa Alpha and had learned
something about roughing it in the Rollins College
football line.
Hi*firstbook was Pardnert in 1905. After that he
wrote nothing for publication that wasn't printed
somewhere. Old timers still believe that Bill Farnum
and Tom Santschi? hero and badman of silent films,
fought the most realistic fight the cameras will ever
record when they made the original picture version of
Rex Beach's Spoikrt, Rollins honored Alumnus
Beach with an honorary degree and later with the
presidency of it* alumni association.
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
•^„..^„--,—^--vw........-.'
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
Page 3
,r .,i,.".r,.^M^*Mli»—W
Published et
Board
Trial
?*ttt
Telephones
Entered as sei
HARRY T. <j
Fiisa> E. D E
>
WAKREN 1. |
Iflt
DAVID B. S i
SOPHIE
/trusted
•,nce to
5ns reposed of
I Bobh capmately
I is t o
I memw two
ymeuts
Wai
LAUBITA S E
CHABLES W
MILDRED E .
CHARLES N .
H E L E N CLVDI
a
—
i
college
-the anfi.Oowan,
I Etkliard
); doom
| i and
_.i
PRINTED BY j
Ai
\ / f n r a 1 T m s ' n t r i c a t e a n d c ' aDora te tempera on plaster mural by
I V l U l d l Tom Loftin Johnson was accepted for the U. S. Military
Academy by Gen. John J. Pershing on thefiftiethanniversary of his
graduation from West Point. The artist is shown at the right.
" We coul(
where. Nobo.
word iu a b.f
affairs.
Maybe y
Some da;
tion this
wisecrack k
know some;*
If someo:
asserted thli
istry, peoplj
speaker wal
lack of info!
relations, vl
cause he hff
own ignora
get away
We take
studies—th^
other—is i
analysis,
doesn't un<;
either. H*
results, an
like some te
to do.
State colil|
nity in the j 1
on politicaj
the visit oi
cussions In
Throughout
Women's C
and the Int
operate in
the day. '
be in diredj
attention ai
An uninfj
ist, but an v
not for bett
ed by
initial
les toeed to
dollar
lgh of
ledges.
iecided
•assing
officers
.1 from
ourths
agree-
Hew life for the Trojan warhorse
P/-*vii*>rKr»iieu> 8 n o r t m 8 A m D r o « Schindler, sopho
IT UWCI11UU9Cmore sensation in the Southern California backfield, is the pride and hope of Trojan followers who
believe that the old warhorse of U.S.C. needs a shot of football
adrenalin.
Acme
~)eeem-
I been
e. I f
isdale,
•evised
fS'
acid
Another college joins voluntary fingerprinting movement
A.J.
r^ \/f
Voluntarily joining a nationwide movement for identi'
/ \ l ( J i n g L j ' J V l 6 n fication, practically the entire Pomona College student
body wasfingerprintedduring the course of registration for fall classes. Ruth Borg is
tured beingfingerprintedby Sgt. George Williams while her classmates IoDk on.
He vacations at college
V/>/>«N**-k/v Ds-vnt/isJ Judge Michael A. Musmanno
K e e p i n g r O S t e d returned to Harvard for the
second time since his graduation from college 15 years ago to
study abnormal psychology and criminology. Said the judge:
"I could have read all this material in books, but I wanted to
make sure I was getting the very latest information."
He's taking motion pictures of vocal chords
^a V " A h i "
- n o t f o r t n e doctor. This is a "studio" scene in the Uni
• oY n
rv V e r l' t y oi I o w a s p e e c h Patnol°gy laboratory of Dr. Joseph Tiffin, and the subject
is Bessie Rasmus. Dr. Tiffin's technique has given science its best movies of vocal chords, aided in finding
cause and cure of stuttering.
B u t 8ay j t for t h e camera
Miientufato
State
jnvon) and
f the
ctober
Bru•Hege;
f the
eland,
in M.
High
k, asMiss
trofesHarry
Lglishj
or of
isdalo,
ur K.
; Dr.
jr of
, proDr. C.
ation;
dstant
ail D.
jiluealOUgll,
Thtf
We lookci
junior Cam/
productions
We looke'
the reason 1
ting the pu
at S. C. T.
stunt that i
little entei'U
We repeal
ment in th
invariably
afterward,
ration, gooj
tainment v |
smoothnessjr
If the
turns out
four poor
a simpler
"Knock,
•'3
3
*
World's smallest radio tube
^hnr* Y\/a\m T n e shortest wave length ever genO I l U r l W d v e crated can be made with this radio
tube invented by Cluo-Ymg Meng, California institute of Technoloiy \march fellow. The tube has a plate the inside diameter
of wfifeh w only (me half 1 millimeter.
WUk WiM
JBffiwgiWWitfr
»--'^^>^^^^«^»^m'^-^'''
Farthest . . . toungest
. , . Smartest
$t
H o n o r e d i & L f i i E L ? ' k f f 1 °fi P^mllnT
** ^°^e congratulates Kenneth
l A U i i U l c u Twnoda because he travelled farther than any of hw classmates to attend Penn
l&ZZ^^freMuaen
whoare .6or under, and waaoneof 47 * e U an mniption
Blocking and passing likfi this make any game interesting
r\
/
\•
Left End Henry Sparks, Right End Perry Schwartz and Halfback
D e m o n s t r a t i o n George Cornell demonstrate passing and blocking technique for
Uniwrifcy of California fans. They're stellar members of the Golden Bears aggregation.
*
Iiiliwi.muii.il
<*»^-mm>mm
M
W P A dramatizes plight of depressiowtom graduates
OI
r ' o n WPA Pedera 1 Theater writers, producers and actors have
L ^ l a S S O I LV just completed a play which deals with the "tragedy of
college-trained men and women emerging into a world torn by depression and
unable to absorb their talents." They have named it Clam of 'iQ, The above photo
shows "Tippy Sayre" washing the first customer of his dog laundry, thereby
proving that a college education helps a young man get ahead in the world,
vmu«
%
WPA VtAnA ThiMiK KM*>
••••'•Ziwim***
\ .
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. OCTOBEB 16
T r a n s m i t OK
i'Kl s O n 11 u r c
The
!
Published
IK
Telephd
>T0 DEPICT the cultural heritage of those old world cut'
* hires that form the background of so many of its students
and studies, the University of Pittsburgh is now constructing
and designing a series of "nationality rooms" that will reflect
"the best traditions of the ancestral homeland and to preserve
and transmit, in tangible, symbolic form, an old world's culture,
while all of us as Americans jointly make or remake a culture
ind tradition of our own."
Entered as
HAIUIV T
FRED
E.f
WAttBENi
DAVID B |
SOPHIE §
e college
f the an'•IcGowan,
i Riclmrd
J-lio doom
jets and
Entrusted
Siance to
Sains re^.posed of
|nd Bob|icli cap'jximately
tit is to
T,
.h mem;,
iow two
layments
LAURITA|
CHARLES!
MILDRED
OHAIU.ES
HELEN C
World's tallest schoolhouse
On itsfirstfloorthe 17 nationality rooms can be found;
PRINTED
" We c<
where. Nj
word In a
affairs.
Magnet's strength 40,000 times greater than earth's
1 n HH
\ £~^.^^A.
Hayden Jones, research associate of die Uni1 2 ' 1 O i l M a g n e t versity of Chicago's Prof. Arthur Compton,
examines the new magnet that will be used in their laboratory in cosmic ray
nted by
study. In the experiments a "Wilson cloud chamber" will be placed in the field B initial
of the magnet, and as cosmic rays pass through the moist gas of the chamber
dues to/jreed to
they will leave a fog trail that will be photographed automatically. AOM
e dollar
ougli of
pledges.
decided
passing
officers
as from
-fourths
s ugreeDecem70 been
ive. If
onsdale,
revised
First to complete its room fund
The committee for the Chinese room received a
$5,000 grant from the Chinese government for its
room.
Maybe
Some >
tion thii
wisecrac!
know soi
If soir
asserted
istry, pei
speaker
lack of i
relations
cause he
own igw
get away
WetaJ
studiesother—is
analysis,
doesn't i
either,
results, a
like some
to do.
State c
nity in tl
on politic
the visit
cussions j
Throughd
Women's
and the I;
operate ir
the day.
be in dirj
attention
An iinii
ist, but ar
not for bo
lacid
Scottish sponsers . . .
To finance the Russian room . . .
A bonnie lass and laddie doing the
Highland Fling in the Scottish room.
These members of the committee staged a benefit
tea and concert, dressed in old-world costumes to lend
atmosphere to the occasion.
WELL, IF i VWANTED
THE BEST SMOKE
POSSIBLE, l b JUST
LOAD ALU THREE
BOWLS WITH
PRINCE
ALBERT/
Student artists paint song writer's life
-D
\ r
• 1 The world's largest collection, outside that
r O S t e r M e m o r i a l owned by J. K. Lilly, of Stephen Foster mementos is owned by the University of Cincinnati and housed in the Foster room
of the campus library. Students in the school of applied arts recently painted
murals on the walls of this room, one of which is shown above.
RIGHT/ BECAUSE IN
EVERV ONE X X » ' D
GET MILDNESS, FULL
RICH FLAVOR, A N D
V NO HARSHNESS
^1
OR^BITE'
I BROKE THIS PIPE N ON MANV A MANS HAPPIER
PRINCE ALBERT. THAT TODAV BECAUSE HE
CRIMP CUT' PA. SAVE IT STARTED SMOKING
A SWELL CAKE AND
PRINCE ALBERTSMOKE COOL THERE'S MO OTHER
r State
convenge and
of the
October
1. Brucollego;
of the
(Ireland,
olm M.
High
•ick, asi; Miss
pro fes, Harry
English j
ssor of
oasdale,
tbur K.
n; Dr.
fsor of
:s, pro• Dr. 0.
;eution;
ssistant
Karl B.
oducaenough,
Tl
We look
junior Cai
productioi
We loo.
the reason
ting the j
at 8. C. 1
stunt that
little onto]
Wo re pi
ment in I
invariably
after-wan
ration, %<*
taintneut \
snioothned!
HERE* WHY THERE* NO OTHER TOBACCO UKE PRINCE ALBERT: RA.IS CHOICE
MELLOW TOBACCO-'CRIMP CUT'FOR COOLNESS-WITH THE "BITE* REMOVED BY
SPECIAL PROCESS. ITS THE LARGEST-SELLING TOBACCO t'**r., IMf,
. U»r>*M.
IN THE WORLD. AND SWELL FOR"MAKIN'S"CIGARETTES.- jTrfl.ttl,
SMOKE 2 0 FIFEFULS OF F. A. AT OUR RISK
Sow*. 10 (r.«r..l visMful* of PrUw. Alhort. h? vm 4m* IW « th. w-hW
«l, lutlMt rim lohocco ran otor Mwobwi, rotwm tho Bochoi IM with tho
rwt of tho tohocco i» it to iw «l ••» lino wHhto • wwalh frow> thw o*t«. aaw
WO will rofwwl Ml •WshoM orfco, plot *ooto«o.
Mil**) R,
*. i.
*• RCYNOLPI
W&YNOUM TOBAC
TOiACCO COMPANY
UM.W)
" "iMtow-Solo*.
- - • - I I I M North CWONM
If tluf
turns ou|:
four poola .simple!
"Knock"
__
^iMm^Hi^
» » wSUPW^W wrw»wwj^p.
There's even a correct way to approach dummies
\Am?m fXff William Matt*, who will WI one of the halfback po»iJ I C S VJU tion* on the Tulare University torn, MIMCI a second
M R * wtwftwf » - » f run around the end with the bell that* already
-^
T*
, .
Lafayette College's head coach,
D U m m V r r a C t l C e Ernie Nevers, demonstrates the
correct form to be used in approaching a dummy, with Leo Zochowski
acting as the willing pupil
rW«- »'*•
P l p o l w l * of f ro-
;E ALBERT
•nal i*h*c«tia
1
•"•T•
•^•^PWTOF
bad
913
She won a popularity election
C-.~.~1swiJ,*—When <& Women's Athletic Associa'
O O n g i e a a e r tkm of Occidental College started off
i». new
_— sports
<.-year, naroara
Barbara Demaree
was.its official ;•
its
Uemaree was.its
H *
Worm's
eye view
al'tZ, YJl'eZA i !»•„«...•*,,
„ '
• . « — « * . i - * - ^pop-br Huddle
ffiBESSE
this when they huddle during a game to
plan their next play-but their faces are
much dirtier than they are during the
practice session when this picture was
taken.
Intenvitknul
Student technicians made this state ship airworthy
/^N
i
1 Students in aviation mechanics at the University of Idaho, Southern Branch, comW V e r i l a U I pletely refurnished this plane for the state's department of aeronautics without aid
from outside mechanical or technical experts. Women in dressmaking classes aided them in covering the
wings and fuselage with fabric. The plane will be used in a statewide survey of airport and airway conditions.
%
v
"TURRET TOP, SAFETY GLASS,
^ \
KWEE-ACTION..Tf!E ALL-AMERICAN COMBINATION*
T
JL he combination of features you find on a
General Motors car is mighty hard to beat,
and that traces to the fortunate fact that this
organization has resources great enough to
finance the cost of pioneering, and builds so
many cars that it can produce new developments at a real economy,
GEMRAI MOTORS
Thit press printed first newspaper west of Rockies
A n t i m i<» University of Oregon iournalism students assist journalism Dean Eric W. Allen in print'
/ \ r i U l j U c ,ng » page on the old Washington hand press, first used in ifttf and which in 191 f
formed the nucleus of the present Oregon university press. 11 is as complete as the day it wasfirstput into
operation almost a century ago.
4 PublU-Mindtd Institution
MKVMOUnr 1 fONTUC • OlllSMOSILK • Bilk* • IA 8*1.1.1: , C*»|M.*fi
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
Page 3
G.A.A. To Hike Tomorrow Treasurers Doom
To Be Complete
On Indian Ladder Trails Padded Budgets
Canute's Corner Men's Program
Hike
Grid Gab
Short Story
C. N . M
Intramural Athletic Program
Includes Varied Group
Of Fall Sports
Elsa Smith, Chairman, Plans Picnic, Games, and Dancing;
Several Faculty Members to Enjoy Festivities
—
Us men aren't to be outdone. The
M.A.A. will conduct its first annual
Washington P a r k hike and hot dog
roast during the coming Christmas
vacation. It might be January 1,
and then again, it might not. Anyway, doughty trampers are urged to
sign up on the main bulletin board.
Don't pack a lunch, but half a
rock, since a common snack will
be provided for t h a t trivial fee.
Buses will leave the rear entrance
a t 3:00 a.m. sharp. Think of the
bus driver and come on time.
Soph's
Sleeper
The fall Intramural program, consisting of tennis, Softball, touch
Snags
Spheroid
fool hall and horseshoes is well under
Now
Charlie
was
an
ordinary
way. Soccer, swimming and bowling
lad. But Charlie has attained
will start later in the season.
glory. A 0-0 tie in the second
The sophomore and freshman softhalf of that memorable Tuesballers leak an early lead with one
day's touch football game lias
victory apiece.
The sophomores,
placed
him among the immortals.
nfter defeating the seniors, were
The sophomore-seiiior
team
looking forward to their tilt with
was crowded before the heckling
the juniors,
scheduled
yesterday.
frosb-junior goal, ilulihan went
The freshmen took their game with
back witli mud in his eye and
the juniors on forfeit when the hitheaved a pass, On it went to
ler '.{•am failed to appear in full.
dribblingly weave through the
Tlie touch football game which
In the Iiiiudi football game Tueshuddled mixture over the goal
occurred on the Alumni Residence day, n soph-senior aggregation deline.
field Tuesday lust was one humfeated n team composed of juniors
Walsh, being the only man
dinger of u tussle.
Each team and freshmen, G-0. The game was
flat
on his back, was not the
featured n passing attack, that of
the first of the series scheduled this
logical receiver. But sophs are
the other team. Referee, head lines- term. Next Tuesday will find the
made of stern stuff and things.
man and umpire O'Hora saw to it
seniors opposing the freshmen and
Hoth the ball and Chuck were
t h a t DO dirty work went on when the sophomores meeting the juniors.
pleased when it nestled on his
he wasn't a t t e m p t i n g to peer in the
The first round of the fall tennis
bosom,
rear windows of the dormitory. tournament
is
nearly
completed,
Everyone had a good time and was Seine of the promising survivors are
Charlie promises to satisfy
glad he eume.
demand in the near future by
Lehman, Waterman, Eminent, Modonating a grand stand to the
Our Alma Mater has produced Numarn, llunvitz. W. I'enney and
Alumni Residence field where
more coaches than one would opine. Casper.
feminine admirers can watch his
Back last week-end were none other
The horseshoe doubles tournament
stellar performances.
t h a n coaches Jadick, Ungerer, Al- got under way this week on the
brecht, DiGioia, Baker, and Welter, Washington Avenue campus. Victors
sports tutors all in secondary insti- will he decided through elimination
tutions throughout the state.
We within the classes, then by eliminaCross Country Team
hope they have winning teams.
tion of the classes.
There has drifted to us a little
Schedules Opposition
Couch (1. Elliot Hatfield is making
moralizing raconte, which we con- arrangements for a swimming pool
The State College cross-country
sider pertinent. Here ' t i s :
In lie used in an evening meet, acteam, still hard at work rounding
Long ago, there dwelt in a little cording to Edward Ilulihan, '37, itself into racing form, lias two
cottage on the outskirts of 11 small
manager of intramural sports.
meets scheduled and one tentative
town, tin aspiring youth, whom we
An interclass howling league and
meet, according to Edward Reynolds,
shall christen Cuthbert.
Cuthbert a soccer league are being planned.
'38, manager.
All runs will take
was a carefree, irresponsible, sort of
Whether or not they will become place away from home, since there
fellow, and one wont frequently to realities depends on the interest is no real course here.
gambol on the adjacent glade. Our shown by the students.
Next Saturday, the squad tackles
Cutlibert had a veritable iiiiinia for
the harriers from the Delhi Agritouch football, and in the spring
Basketball Meeting
cultural school. A week later, Ocof the year took no mean pleasure
All men interested
in varsity tober 31, Bard will cross legs with
in whacking a baseball over tlio big basketball
will meet
immediately
the Teachers in a confest
that
elm tree in the far end of the Held.
after assembly today ia the gym- promises to be close.
Negotiations
Cuthbert grew up, as boys will. nasium, Coach (!, Elliot llatlleld has are under way for a meet witli
He even came to be addressed as announced.
Practice
will
start
Hamilton, which team, if contacted,
Cuthbert the Gouger, which made shortly. The first game will he with
will provide the toughest opposition
him feel nicer than he would admit. IU',1. on lliTcnilier .">.
of tlie season.
High school days floated by for
Cuthy, and the sun of favor shone
brightly on our boy's smiling face.
He was a strapping lad of seventeen when he learned that lie hail
been admitted to Stale College for
Teachers,
In liU not
infrequent
Each year class rivalry becomes loin of singing this song is continued
day dreams, he sighted himself as
nunc hotly contested.
From l!i|8,
today.
a
member
of
Mistletoe,
senior
iilien | he men of the college used
honorary society . ami of all !hings
Rivalry becomes fiercest
around
as line old smoothie, if there evol
I lie week of the Mascot hunt. Shower
a basketball for their pushball con
was one.
baths, dips in I he lake, impromptu
lest, mill last year, when the rivalry
battles taking place during this week
Off to college he trooped and went
was mil decided until the sing on
are ruefully remembered by many
extra-class in a big way. Al the
\lin ing up day uighl, rivalry has lippercliissnicn. from Ibis week nilclose of his sophomore year, he
ilih lei gulie many changes.
III Moving up day, Ihc rivalry is
psycho-analysed himself. He found
football contests between the men
pared furiously; and history shows
that he had a lot on the ball, all
ami sopliiimol'e that il is usually mil decided until
right. But one epochal eve, as he .if the freshman
Mining up ilay.
drew himself to his full height on i-lasM-s were a pail of Hie rivalry in
IbL'il.
King
rushes
in
l
|
i
|
s
.
penally
This year's rivalry includes banner
a drug store scales, he look note ol
lav -, in III III, and I Id » ise pari ies rh airy u liieh extends from I leeema fifteen pound loss since his freshThis
man days. And the mirror in his f"i tin- I'i'esliniaii are landmarks in bei I nut il Mov ing up day.
he lii-l i• rv nf i iv airy. Tugs of war counts live points for the class
room showed a llabby creatine, not
the street-running, bicycle-pumping 111 • 1 u i in I In' » iiineii, and a pule rush capturing anil holding the oilier
Cuthbert we met earlier in the story. participated ill hi I he men ha\e class's banner.
been displaced by our modern I real
The other rivalry events with
So, Ciilhbcrl doped out the idea
in :il of the " i,l ial ilislincl, I lie push
[minis are: I lie pushball contests on
•of going out fur -pm i -. I le wasn't
hall I'oiilesl, In 1032, the pole rush Campus day, two points fur each
giiinl enough for varsity eonipelitimi,
i\,is mm by (he sophomores although contest; a sing in November, I wo
wherefore he sought the intramural
iheir opponents used a lire hose as and one half points: men's basket
Held, No longer did I ill ll\ iiifli'ii
ii pari of their offensive.
Track
ball gainc in the winter, three
up In paunchy proportions during
Is far men ami women, baseball
points; g i l l s ' basketball game in the
I In' school your. And he had a lol
gullies, basket bull contests haie been winter, lliree points; u mascot hunt
ol fun. too.
tith' i
alhletii
features
of
this in early spring, live points; Il do
Morals: A pound of llesh is worth
d e n i a l struggle.
bale shortly before Mm ing up day,
two in the bush.
Fiesliineii, until lll.'ll, were forced
lliree points; pushball coulesl for
A nip in time saves.
in wear purple and gold nips until men I he night before Moving up day,
Participate in intramural sports.
Hit' lirsl snowfall.
t'l
then until two points, athletic contests for girls
Moving up
spring I key were forced In wear the evening preceding
day, Ivvo points; clas.s sliinls Mov
pill pie m i l l g o l d I oijlles.
T l i e WIIIIICII
Chemistry Club to Meet
ing up day, three points, ami sing
were forced to wear billions bearing
The Chemistry (dub will conduct
the college colors. I'util 11131, Ihis on Moving up day evening, three
points.
a meeting on Wednesday III I : I o rivalry started the lirst week of
o'(dock, in room -oil of (lusted ball, school with Pi eshuiaii week.
Hur
according to Itnyniond Eisk, '37, lug this week all I'resliiuau Women
president.
Were required to wear black cotton
Those freshmen who are taking stockings and white dresses. These
De Luxe
62 Robin Street
either chemistry 1 or -I and who rubs and others concocted by the
wish to join Chemistry club Ibis sophomores were obeyed I lull week,
Specializing in Men's Haircutting
your ate asked to give their research but they elided whoa the youngsters
$.35
papers to Nutliau Kullman,
'37, marched about thu Assembly singing
Wilhe in Streck, Prop.
before Wednesday.
" L i f e is very different."
The ens
Highlights of Former Rivalry
Shadows Next Week's Contests
Bill's Barber Shop
,j,j ie o i r l s ' Athletic association
will conduct its annunl Indian Ladder hike tomorrow. Puses will leave
the Washington Avenue entrance of
Draper hall nt nine-thirty o'clock,
Elsa Smith, '37, general chairman,
has announced.
The program for the- day includes
a hike up the trail to the picnic
grounds followed by a picnic lunch.
After lunch, those who have- the
ambition will explore the various
trails.
Arrangements
have
also
been made for games and dancing.
The buses will return to the college
between four-thirty and five o'clock.
Faculty members who are expected
to attend a r e :
Dr. Caroline C.
Croasdale, professor of hygiene; Dr.
Matie At. Green, instructor in hygiene; Dr. Elizabeth 11. Morris, assistant professor of education: Miss
Margaret E. Hitchcock, instructor in
physical education; Miss Isabelle
Johnston, instructor in physical education; and Miss Helen Hall Moreland, dean of women.
Chairmen of committees assisting
Miss Smith are: food, Irma Anderson, '38; entertainment, Jean Edg
cum bo, ' 3 8 ; buses, Helen Lowry
'30; faculty, Helen Clyde, '37; ad
vertising, Katherine Conklin, '38;
clean-up, Alice Bennett, '38.
Fall Season
Tennis
Camping and Hiking
II. i \ c.
The entrants in the tennis tournament have been eliminated one by
one until only three remain to play
in the final matches. The survivors
are:
Charlotte Beck and
Kuth
Shoemaker, juniors; and Florence
H nberer, '30.
Cam]) Johnston is spick and span
with a brand new coat of varnish,
thanks to Thebna Miller and Elizabeth
Appoldoorn,
juniors;
and
Phyllis Arnold, Dorothy MncLoun
and Shirley Thompson, sophomores.
These girls spent
the
week-end
scrubbing Hours, putting in window
panes, and doing a bit of amateur
house painting down at Chatham.
We'll appreciate the results when
I .nt t a Hunkers trek down for the
week-end of October thirtieth.
Once and for all we want to end
those nasty rumors that (I.A.A. does
its hiking in buses!
Come around
the Indian Ladder I rails with us tomorrow and see for yourself. Down
I he ladder up I he ladder - upper
trail lower trail Male's cave Kill
Man's Misery choose your hike ami
go to ill
fall sports will continue until the
eold blast of ,,l' Man Wilder blows
us off the liehls. Jusl a reminder
of the schedule:
Hockey Monday,
Wednesday, I'riday ; Soccer Tucs
day ami Thursday;
SwimmingTuesday ami Thursday:
Hiding
Mumlnv.
EAT AT JOHN'S
LUNCH
Dinners 25e and up
Delicious Sandwiches and Sundaes
7:30 A.M.—U:00 P.M.
Opp. the High School
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop.
Three New Systems on Trial
In Drive for Payment
Of Class Dues
Upper classmen of State college
have unanimously welcomed the announcements of Helen McGowan,
'37, J a n e t Dibble, '38, and Richard
Lonsdale, '39, concerning the doom
of " p a d d e d " class budgets and
lowered class dues.
The senior class has entrusted
their experiment in class finance to
twenty-five appointed cuptains responsible to a committee composed of
Miss McOowun, treasurer, and Robert Margison, president, Each captain has been assigned approximately
twelve seniors whose duty it is to
see to the collection of each member's dues. The dues are now two
dollars and installment
payments
will bo accepted.
The junior class, represented by
eight cuptains, will close its initial
drive for payment of class dues today. Last May, the class agreed to
reduce the class dues to one dollar
and a half, provided that enough of
the class members would sign pledges.
The sophomore class has decided
to postpone decision on the passing
of its budget.
The class officers
have agreed to lower the dues from
$2,00 to $1.50 provided three-fourths
of the class will sign pledges agreeing to pay their dues before December 1. Twenty captains have been
appointed to curry on the drive. If
it is successful, Richard Lonsdale,
treasurer, will present tlie revised
budget to the class soon.
State Faculty Attend
Convention at Placid
Sixteen faculty members of State
college attended the annual convention of the Teachers' Collego and
Normal Schools' Faculties of the
State of New Vork conducted October
11-13 at Lake Placid.
They include:
Dr, A. R, Brubacher, president of the collego;
Dr. Milton (!. Nelson, dean of the
college; Miss Helen H. Moreland,
dean of women; Professor John M.
Kayles, principal of Milne High
school; Dr. lioberl W, Frederick, assistant professor of education; Miss
Margaret E. Hayes, assistant professor of child development; Dr. Harry
W. Hastings, professor of English;
Mr. (ioorge M. Vork, professor of
commerce; Dr. Caroline Croasdulo,
professor of hygiene; Dr. Arthur K.
lieik, professor of education; Dr.
Cnrleloii hi. Powers, professor of
science; Dr. James A. Hicks, prolessor of child development ; Dr. C.
i'. Smith, professor of education;
Dr. Klizabeth II. Morris, assistant
professor of education; Dr. Earl B.
South, assistant professor of educalion, and Mr. Harry llircheiiough,
professor of niatheiimties.
rtption.
OPTICIANS.
FREDETTE'J
(&QA*m\>\*St?dooro6m had
COMClCTt OPTICAL 56RVIC€
Dial 5-1913
Boulevard Cafeteria
and Qri 11
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY, N, Y.
Page 4
STATE C0LLEC4E NEWS, OCTOBER 16, 1936
Stoel to Be President
Guests Celebrate
Of Residence Council
The Student Residence council,
* News' Anniversary which
is composed of the presidents
Sevcnty-flve members of past and
present NEWS boards and staffs
celebrated the twentieth anniversary
of the State College NEWS at a
banquet Saturday night, at 6:00
o'clock in the cafeteria of Husted
hall.
Mr. Clarence A. Hidley, assistant
professor of history, cut the birthday cake which was decorated with
twenty candles.
Former staff and board members
present include: Miss Edna Lowerrce,
'24; Dr. William French, '29, instructor in education, and Mrs.
French; Margaret Steele, '30, Georgo
Rice, '32, Alvina Lewis, '33, Emma
Rogers, '36, Carolyn Simonet, '36,
Glenn Ungerer, '36, and Karl Ebers,
»36.
Congratulatory messeges were received from Edward Van Eleek, '26,
and Donald Van Leuvan, '36, who
were unable to attend,
of all organized residences for women
students, met for the first time this
year last week.
Virginia Stoel, '37, member of
Myskanin, senior honorary society,
was elected president of the council.
Rosomary Lafferty, '37, will serve as
vice-president, and Anne Viglionc,
'37, as secretary for the epining year.
The council, which was formed last
year, has charge of revising and enforcing residence regulations.
Several members of the NEWS
staff presented a short, humorous
stunt depicting various activities of
the NEWS office. Those participating
include:
Editor-in-chief,
Edgar
O'Hora; Dexterous News hound,
Charles Rundle, '39; Wolfie Squeelzak, Betty Hayford, '39; sophomores, Charles Walsh, '39, and Virginia Furey, '39; Smave Dith, Robert Hertwig, '39; and Moron Thensmore, Charles Ettinger, '39.
Nelbach to Administer
College Clubs Decide
Future Arrangements
Student Infirmary Fund
The departmental clubs of State
college are planning a range of
activities from hikes to Ijusincss
meetings for the coming week.
The German club will go on a
hike Sunday, October 18. Although
the destination lias not been decided
upon, everyone is invited to the
wiener and marshmallow roast, and to
sing college songs around the campfire. There will also lie an important
business meeting of the club on the
last Wednesday of October for the
rending of the constitution and the
election of a new treasurer.
The Biology club will conduct a
hike to Dr. Douglas' farm on Saturday, October 17. Cars will leave the
college at 12:30 o'clock,
On Thursday, October 22, the
Commerce club will conduct a meeting to make arrangements for a gettogether.
The Chemistry club will conduct
a meeting on Wednesday at 4:15
o'clock in room 250 of Husted hall,
At a recent meeting, the Student,
Board of Finance put Florence Nelbach, '38, in charge of the infirmary
fund and elected Neil Fogarty, '39,
secretary,
To date, seven hundred and fifty
.students have paid the tax. The
freshman class is still leading the
sales with the seniors in last, place.
It will now be necessary to present
a student tax ticket in order to get
the ' N E W S ' or hold any school office.
Those students who want to pay
the tax should see Professor Clarence
Hidley, faculty advisor, or any one
of the following members! Agnes
Torrons and Ralph Van Horn,
seniors, Warren Densmore and Miss
Nelbach, juniors, and Fogarty, '39.
Kappa Delta Rho Pledges
Gamma chapter of
Rho announces the
Myndert Crounsc and
erts, sophomores, into
bership.
Kappa Delta
reception of
Thomas Robpledge mem-
Debaters To Have
Enlarged Schedule
(Continued from paye 1, column 3)
Miss Shapiro, Miss Sinovoy, Stinger,
lOdge, and Leese.
On October 31, State's debate
squad will meet in a round table discussion with St, Lawrence college at
Canton. The same three major issues
of the present campaign will be discussed. The three or four members
who make the best showing at Skidmore will be chosen to go to St.
Lawrence.
Hamilton college will send representatives here on November 4 to
debate the topic, Resolved: "That
this house favors extension of consumer's cooperative associations."
Leonard Friedlnnder and Richard
Lonsdale, sophomores, will uphold
the affirmative side of the issue.
The first of the interclass debates
begun last year will be conducted in
the assembly program of October 23
between the seniors and sophomores.
ixead any statement
about Chesterfield cigarettes
We tell you what they are made of—mild,
ripe tobaccos. We tell you that we use
on Chesterfield pure cigarette paper.
We tell you that Chesterfields are
carefully manufactured,
We suggest that you try Chesterfields and
find out how mild they are and what a
pleasing taste and aroma they have.
A great many cigarette smokers will
tell you that Chesterfields satisfy—
give them what they want in a cigarette.
LIGGETT # MYERS TOBACCO CO.
1956,
l.jof.iin & MVBRS TOBACCO CO.
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