State College ews Prom, Tea Dance Bids Go On Sale

advertisement
STATE CC utfcfefc bOU TEACHERS?
ALBANY, R Y.
State College
Vot, XX, No. 13
Prom, Tea Dance
Bids Go On Sale
Juniors Plan Week-End Events;
Class Will Meet Tuesday
To Select Queen
Bids for tlie iirimtnl junior weekend, which begins one week from tonight, with the Prom in the ballroom
of the A i i n i n i n chili. South
Allen
street, go on sale this morning in
room X , mid may lie secured there
today and every day next week from
10:01) to H;lfi o'clock.
The junior
luncheon Saturday at 12:00 o'clock at
the
Wellington
hotel and the lea
dance in the high' room of the Alumni
Residence
hall
Saturday
afternoon
from .'IJIIO to .1:00 o'clock complete
tin* class activities of the week end.
Kric
Peterson's
orchestra,
now
playing at Hie Seven (lal)les Inn,
Westchester, will play for Prom. The
orchestra I'm tea dance will he announced as soon as arrangements are
completed.
I'i'om will he from 0:0(1
to 2: (HI o'clock Friday.
Hills f o r I'nun are iW.lKi. Tea
dance will he $l.."i0.
Luncheon will
cost one dollar, lull only juniors ami
guests o f the class may attend this
event.
There will he a meeting of the
j u n i o r class Tuesday noon in room
20ti for Hie election of Hie I'roni
queen. The cainlidales, nominated re
coolly Iiv ballot, are: h'ea Laliruu,
EDUCATOR
TO
SPEAK
Mr. .loliit K i n g s h y , assistant super
inlendeiil of schools of Hie city of
Albany, will lead a discussion meet
ing of Kappa Phi Kappa, national
honorary education f r a t e r n i t y , Thill's
day night, at s ;inl o 'clock in room of
Richardson
hall,
according to
David Rogers, '.'ill, |iresident of tin
local chapter.
The discussion
will
center around modern trends in Hie
secondare school.
§2.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
STATU COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1936
Students Must Pay
New Bureau Fee
By February 20
Banner Rivalry Reopens
As Women Renew Control
If
you
should
be walking
through the halls and hear a noise
like a free for all among the inmates of the zoo, proceed w i t h
cailtion.
You probably are approaching no man's land where
a banner brawl is raging between
the women of '38 and '3!).
Yes,
student council has announced that
banner rivalry is in charge of the
"gentler
sex"
f o r the
second
.semester, and that any interference
on the part of the men w i l l be
held as a serious violation.
Freshman and sophomore women
are eating their " W h e a t i o s " and
brushing up on the liner points of
womanly self defense.
Some arc
being taught
how to execute a
haymaker
with
the
right
hand
while pulling out permanent waves
with the left.
Others are learning the proper use of feet i n coinhat.
Still
others are
studying
angles of bound and rebound so
thill a book accurately heaved will
bounce on at least two heads before coining to rest.
Word has
been received that
the j a n i t o r s
and the medical department are
prepared to clean up the debris
and administer first aid.
Altman Succeeds
Buckley As Head
Of Revision Group
A n y student who wishes to secure
a position through the Appointment
bureau must pay a one dollar fee
before Thursday, according to Miss
Edna M, Lowerree,
A l l seniors and
graduate students must comply with
this new rule i f the services of the
bureau are to lie continued.
Sororities Pledge Total of 104
As Rushing Season Concludes
Chi Sigma Theta Leads Greeks
With All-Time Record
Of 21 Neophytes
KAPPA
Students who are interested in observing and in p a r t i c i p a t i n g in mock
interviews should sign u p on the
date-slips in the Appointment bureau
office, Miss Lowerree stated.
Mock
interviews
will
be conducted by
graduate students in A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ,
and seniors, in room l l ' l of Milne at
3:30 o'clock on the days for which
t h i r t y students sign the preference
slips.
Interviews will be conducted
as often and as long as students
signify their interest by signing.
Tonight State's I'm pie and Gold
squad w i l l be hosts In the Lowell Textile Institute live from Lowell Massachusetts.
This
game
will
be the
second mi the last hip o f the 1930
schedule which started last week with
the game at Phlttshurg which re
i suited in a Slate victory.
(Hie senior and twelve students who
graduated last year or before have
recently
been
elected
to teaching
Juniors To Hear
Dr. Hicks Speak
At Wellington
Dr.
.1. Allen
education,
al
will
Hicks,
professor of
be Ihe guest
tin- annual j u n i o r
speaker
luncheon, to he
conducted in the main dining room of
the Wellington hotel, 13(1 Slate s i r e d ,
Salnrdnv.
Kebruaiv
L'U,
al 1*2:00
o'clock.'
Other guests of the juniors include
Dr. A. W. Rislcy, professor of history,
and K a r l Ebers and Kli/abeih Griffin,
members o f Myskanin, senior lion
orary society, and guardians o f the
class.
John Edwards, '.'17, will be
toustmuster.
The
price of the luncheon wiN be
lollur,
and only juniors
and
f
the
class
may
attend,
I Juniors who plan to attend must sign
"P ' ' " ' I pay for tin* luncheon in room
X "
not' later .than
of
^
. . . . . Thursday
•
• next
•
John
Deno
and
Elizabeth
week
Mearv are co-chairmen of the event.
positions, according lo Miss Kdnu M.
Lowerree, secretary el the Appoint
•lit bureau.
Those who have re
reived positions are .Invito Buckley,
'.'Hi. teaching
Lnglish
at Walden ; ' r j
. 1
wjr
• •
PINAFORE POSTPONED
Ruth Bedell, 'll,-., library work in I he K e S l C i e n C e
H a l l
Thi' .Music association's presenta- I 'hildren 's
room
at II a r in a n u s !
tion
of the (lilberl
ami
Sullivan Hloeckcr l i b r a r y : Helen Foley, '.'l."i, j
operetta
' ' II.M.S.
Pinafore ' '
has Knglish
at Biughaintoii:
Ciernhline
\ | , . | ) l i m ) | curator of the Albany
been |iost polled In Tuesday ami Wed
I lug-gins, '.'Hi. library at Oswego N'or
I,,-1 i I u I <- of History and A r t , will lie
uesday, March 17 and IK, according mnl scl
I ; Hut li Jenkins, ',",.", R
• ; ; , , . „,,,.„, speaker at the weekly lirelo
Norma
Taylor,
','Ui,
student State school; Rosalind Knpps, grad., L j , ^ , ,.|inl in the Ingle room of the
direct or.
I French and L a t i n al Fast Springlu
i
Residence
hall
al 7:30
To Hear Speaker
A
According lo the rules and method
of selection of these candidates as
outlined l»\ the publication boaid, the
fourteen Si it 11 seniors were nominated
by student council and approved by
Dr. A. l i Hi iibuchor, president, he
fore being accepted.
The .students
leech iug l his dis.1 inct ion are ; Ralph
lo students for whal they have a I
ready done, as a recnimnolidaliuii l o
the business and .social world, and as
a standard of measurement I'm iiieiii
bership comparable to such agencies
as Phi lletu Kappa and the Rhodes
Scholarship A ward.
Psi
Gamma:
Jane
Miller
and
Marion Snedeoor, juniors;
Elizabeth
o ' D o n i i e l l , '.'18; and Virginia Bolton,
Helen llen/.e. (laile Kei'ste, Marjorie
W i l l i , and Janet Wiillselileger, freshmen,
Chi Sigma T h e t a : Alary Howling,
'.'18: Betty Baker, Janet Beauregard,
Helen Bil'arella, Nan Finery, -Margaret Fiddlier. Catharine Lynch, M a r y
Agnes Motzgcr, Flenimre Alcllreevy,
Marion Minst. Region Murphy, Alice
O'Brien. Mary O'Doanell, Mary Af.
Pnppa. Rita I'omeroy, Helen P r u s i k ,
{('miliumil
mi page 3, column ')
Juniors Will Edit
Week-End 'News'
In keeping with the spirit of tho
weekend, next week's issue of the
N K W S will I
diled by Ihe junior
members of the editorial stall'.
Editors-in-chief
for this issue will ho
Fred Dexter, Harry Qumnor, and V i r ginia Sloel, assistant
news editors.
They will he assisted by the j u n i o r
members of the stall'' ami the sophomore desk editors.
The Junior issue will consist o f
eight
pages including a four page
section of pictures ami news relative
to the j u n i o r class and siguillcant
events of Ihe week cud.
Cinliu!''iil'• Ifreshmen To Meet Sophomores
In Battle of Song in Assembly
" W l i u ' s W h o ' ' is printed through
the co-operation of the American students under a hoard o f publication I
L
T
\ n
' " " ' ' ' " ' : ' " ' ' ' ' ' " ' ' ' ' : " ' ' ' K"' U K I " I reinlde
:i1 l l : 1
consisting oi' Thomas N'eblctl, presi
Lutherans IO Meet
" o'clock today.
No, we arc
dell! of | he \ a l ioiial Sludenl Feilcrui i " ! predicting an eartlnpiake, hut wi
lion ol America, Allien Smith, presi
aiiiiiiuneiug the annual
Flush
dent of Pacille Students Presidents'
The Lutheran club will coiiducl ils Soph sing.
This sing is the llrsl of
associal ion, and I I . Petlus Uamlall, regular
dinner
meeting
Wednesday j , n " conducted each year.
The second
editor.
The editorial oflice is located al
"e.'iii o'clock at the
Friendship " ' • " ' " '• I " " - ' " ' ' , l u ' M u v i n g i i p day
al thi' I ' u h e i s i t v o f Alabama with House, according to (ili-nn Pngerer, exercises. The winning class is given
Di. Dabuey Lancaster, dean of men, '.'Hi, president.
two points in iulciclass rivalry. To
as one of the advisers.
More than
Final arrangements will he made lend that indefinable air of austerity,
lllll deiilis and L'lltl presidents of st ll
for a delegation going to the North three members of Ihe faculty will act
him
indorsed the Atlantic Conference nf the Lutheran j us judges.
• li- it t
bodies
This sing is important in
poldical ion.
Student
Association
of America, rivalry,
because at present
FroshNearly every American university The conference this year will be at Soph rivalry is tied. The outcome of
and college of prominence, numbering (iettysburg, Pennsylvania, on Febru
the sing will give a powerful advnnabout 311(1, will be i'epreseilled by ap
ary, -H, 20, and March I.
'tag 1 ' to one of Ihe two classes.
proximately
1,300
students in the
William Molleuliopf, ';SH, will lead
The Flush Soph sing sounds like a
111,'HI edition
to be published i n Ihe devotional discussion, The dinner inther tame affair in itself, but i t has
Altman, Elaine l l a i r d , Jayue Buckley,
Paul Ilulger, K a r l I'.'bcrs, Elizabeth
lirillin,
Prank
llardnioyer,
Edward
Kiamer,
Allen
Lewis,
Charlotte
Rockow,
Vera
Simmers,
Frances
Stiidebaker, (ileioi Pngerer, ami Marjorie Whealon.
The purpose of " W h o ' s W h o " is
thai it will serve as an incentive for March.
Fifteen will be the maximum
students to get Ihe most out of their number o f niuuinecs accepted from
careers, as a means of compensation any one institution,
Kappa
Delta:
Fdilh
Coil.
'US;
Marjorie
Albright.
Ethclyn
Buvee,
Marion Dayton. Helen Dunning, Virginia Piircy. Lorraine (Jroen, V i r g i n i a
Hall. Belly l l a y l ' o i i l . Virginia IloagIntnl. K a t i i r y u Krien. Carolyn Matlice. Margaret Matlison. Hetty MeCoiiiiell. Beatrice Monk, dune Palmer,
lean Strong, Dorothy Warren. Margaret Webb, and Fleanor W'ickliaui,
freshmen.
Wield: Wiinitn
l.oiuuii,
'3."i, Knglish j „ >,,|„,.|f .Sunday night.
land
history
at Middlesex;
Wilina i
», , .
, , •,
• , •
,, ,
.,
,.,- , , .
, i
•
-Mr. Dunn, an aulhorilv on inlerior
Mcl.oiiithaii, ' , | . i , History am
Latin
.
,.
, ,
• ,.
•. .
,, , .
,
, ,,
•
, i
• decoration
and
home
I uriiishings,
I at
o i a r : Jo.soii h (van, grail., nisi
. , , ,•
r i
I
. .
i ,'• ,- ,
,
" d i discuss
variations
in Lurlv
| ness
raining and
.uglisli
at 'or . •
,.
.,
, ,,
., . •
h
, „
.
,,r
.,
,
,
, . , . American l i i r u i l i i r e and l urnislu gs
( hescr;
I' uroiicc
Stiincliuek,
do, • . ,
, •
,i ,
,• ,• •
.
,,.
..
, , , ,.
with eiiiphasis on the Ivies ot ' u r n i
science at
II c i i ' ic ; 11 i l i n
ag
. ',, , , . ,
, ,,
i
«i
• " i r e ill the Resilience hull,
garl,
grad.,
etiinincl'ce
at .Monroe
High school in Hocliester ; Mary Tor
reus,
','i."i, seventh grade al New
burgh : and
Elizabeth
Latin and l-'rench al
Hlizabol h I iorihiii, »bo has been al
Walden, will tench Knglish and his
t'"\v nt Fast Rockaway.
The walls, the ceiling of Page hall, j decision
Fourteen Seniors To Be Listed
In American Colleges1 'Who's Who*
Stale college w ill he I'epreseilled in
the
l!i;:,"> Mil " W h o ' s
Who
Among
S t u d e n t s ' ' in American
uniwrsitioH
and colleges with the appearance of
biographies of fourteen seniors.
This
institution enjoys the reputation of
being the only one of its kind in Die
American college world and is Ihe
only plan thai recognizes America's
outstanding -Indents without
inilia
I ion fees and dues.
IS SECOND
One hundred and four women students, including ninety-live freshmen
and nine upperclassmen, became
State college sorority pledges this
week to climax tho annual formal
rushing week-end supervised by intersorority council and Miss Helen H.
Moreland, dean of women. The
number shows an increase of four
over last year, when one hundred
were pledged.
Chi Sigma Theta led the list with
twenty-one pledges, and Kappa .Delta
followed closely with twenty. Gamma
Kappa Phi was third with eleven.
The official pledge list, as released
by the office of the dean of women,
is as follows:
Delta Omega: (Jrace Castiglione
and Doris Palmer, freshmen.
Eta Phi: June Winegar, '117; Edna
Warren ami Ann Wilson, freshmen.
Miss Helen H. Moreland, dean
of
women, who sponsored
the
sordidly
weekend
parlies, and
w ho a niiuiinced t he l e i of pledges.
Bureau Announces
Thirteen Receive
Teaching Positions guUs
Since any changes in the point
system which may be recommended
by flic committee and passed by Ihe
student association will not go into
effect until next year, student council
is al Ihe present time making a fur
Iher checkup on students who have
an excess of activity points,
DELTA
Dean Helen Moreland Announces
Official Lists Of Pledges
For Campus Groups
State Will Meet
Lowell Tonight
On Home Court
I nl'orinnl ion
c o ll e e I" 11 i li g
I he
si length of the Lowell eagers could
Mary
Lam, Clare
l.i a i d ,
Helen
not he secured as the XlitVS goes to
press.
However, rumor ranks (hem
Metlnwan, and A1 inn Snyder.
Daly
Student
council
announced
this
favorably with ihe oilier N'ew ting
juniors who have paid at least half
week the appointment of Ralph A l l
land schools, and recently their lie
their class dues are eligible to vote.
man,
'.'Hi, as chairman of the Point
feat o f llrooklvn college was .'in up
Thomas Meoliuii, vice president of
System Revision committee, succeed
[ -el
to I hi' sport ing circles,
Their
the class, is general chairman of the
ing .Invito Buckley, '.'Hi. uieiubcr of
football record is deserving of favor
week end.
('oiiiniit lee chairmen as
Myskanui, senior
honorary
society,
aide comment
having
included ex
sisling
him f o r I'roui are: music,
who resigned. The coininitte was ap
tensive trips throughout the east.
Robert
Margisiiii; decorations, Virpointed in the fall by Paul Ilulger,
The (loewey squad will he complete
ginia
Stool:
bids, Harry
(liimaer;
'.'Hi, president of Ihe student associafor t o n i g h t ' s game, and all members
chapornnes,
Floiso
Shearer;
Hour,
tion and member of Myskanin.
will undoubtedly sec service during
I'Yoil Dexter; refreshments, Dorothy
Oilier changes in the makeup of the contest.
W i t h the recent victory
Husk: queen arrangements, Dorothy
Hie
Revision
committee
announced
nvcr Pratt still fresh in their minds,
Ostrander.
this week include the resignation of the Stale eagers will undoubtedly be
Clare Leonard is chairman of tea Charlotte Rockow, '.'Hi, and the apspurred to greater ell'iit'ls for another
dance. Committee chairmen assisting pointment of Allen Lewis, ','iii, Hervictory.
her include: music, Kvelyn I l a i n a n n ; bert Drooz, ':|S, and .lean Strong,
state's
freshmen
will
meet St.
bids, Charles Matthews; refreshments, '.'l!i.
Other members of the com- Joseph's Academy of Schenectady in
Ralph Van Horn ; floor, Kdwnrd l l u l i - mittee are: K a i l fibers, '.'Hi; John
the preliminary game.
han; cliaperoiies, Anne Hand.
Deno, John Rnnney, Lester
Rubin,
and
Alice
A
l
l
a
r
d
,
j
u
n
i
o
r
s
;
Dorothy
(leneral committees for the weekend ami their chairmen Include: pub- Cain, Leslie Knox, and Sally Whelau,
l i c i t y , John M u r p h y : invitations, Ed- sophiunoi es; and Dliiilan Tynan, '.'ill.
ward Salmi; taxis, Alonzo Du.Mont.
John Deno and Elizabeth Meury are
co-chairmen of the luncheon.
ews
Wednesday Night H
committee consists o f Helen Smith,
'88,
Helen
llonzc
and
Katherine
Krien, freshmen.
ils own peculiar eventualities. Decorum is maintained usually during
the sing proper, but after the judges'
anything
will
happen.
Two
I years ago, the end of the sing was tho
beginning of an iuiprouiptll
men's
pushball contest minus the pushball.
The rough house started in Ihe hall
jus!
outside Page hall auditorium,
and
swept
a hectic
path
through
Page,
[lusted,
and
Draper
hulls.
(Bass doors and glnss showcases were
no impediments to the combatants,
I'.'ycs
were
blackened
and
clothes
ripped.
The light dually wound up
lo a bruising finish in the men's
locker loom.
The bent condition of
the locker walls bear mute evidence to
what happened,
Last year the men of lli,'i7 cuiuo
dressed for action, but nothing happened, This year with a hundred
men in tho Freshman class, something
strenuous may result. Overwhelming
odds inspire boldness.
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 14, 1936
State College News
ONE DOWN, ONE TOGO
•stebllihed by tht Clan of 1018
Th* Undergraduate Newspaper of New York State
College for Teacheri
THE NEWS BOARD
K A B L D. EBXRS
Editor-in-Chief
Kappa Delta Rho, 117 S. Lake Avenue, 2-4314
E V . I A A. B o o n s
News Editor
Beta Zeta, 680 Madison Avenue, 2-3268
G L E N N M. UNCKSKB
Associate
Editor
IBdward B. Potter Club, 203 Ontario Street, 2-0424
Faro D K T I B
Assistant News Editor
Kappa Delta Bho, 117 8. Lake Avenue, 2-4314
HABBT GuifAsa
Assistant News Editor
Bdward E. Potter Club, 208 Ontario Street, 2-0424
V i u i i r u Brou.
Assistant News Editor
Alumni Residence Hall, 221 Ontario Street, 3-0187
OABOLYN SIMONET
Business
Manager
Gamma Kappa Phi, 288 Quail Street, 2-4144
J O H N DENO
Associate Business Manager
Kappa Delta Bho, 117 S. Lake Avenue, 2-4314
LAUBJTA SKLD
Associate Business Manager
206 Western Avenue, 4-5967
THE NEWS STAFF
SPORTS EDITOR:
F r a n k J. Hardmeyer,
'36
THIS WIDE, WIDE WORLD
SOPHOMORE D E S K EDITORS
Warren Densmore, Muriel Goldberg, David Smith,
Ramona VanWie, Sophie Wolzok
REPORTERS
Rosella Agostlne, Phyllis Bosworth, Loretta Buckley, Elsa
Calkins, Hulda Classen, Kuth Edmunds, Jacqueline Evans,
Ruth Gillespie, Marie Geesler, Mary Hudson, Aubrey
Kalbaugh, Margaret Woodruff, seniors: Alice Barrows,
Helen Clyde, Isabel Davidge, Elizabeth Gooding, Elfrleda
Hartt, Elizabeth Herr, Joan Kaplan, Ethel Keshner, Mary
Lam, Robert Marglson, Mary Plank, Elinor Smalley, Phyllis
Vermllye, Juniors; Betty Appledoorn, Rose Berkowltz,
Mildred Bodin, Anne Burr, Frances Cahlll, Helen Callenius,
Kathryn Carlson, Richard Cox, Alvena DeLong, Antoinette
Don Vito, Elizabeth Drlscoll, Jeanne Edgcuinbe, Ruth Frost,
Ella Glfford, Merrlam Gould, Marjorle Jobson, Phyllis
Jobson. Rose Kurkliill, Charlotte Llbuian, Jean Licheustein,
Josephine Maurice, Mary McClung, Lillian Mosher, Ruth
Mullen, Helen Olski, Theresa Palmer, Mae Rosenbeck,
Adelaide Schmid, Jean Shaver, Martha Sheehy, Muriel
Stewart, Ruth Thompson, Mary Tobln, sophomores.
1035
Member
1936
Pissocided Golle&iate Press
Distributor of
Golle6iate Di6est
PEINTBD
BY BOYD PRINTING CO., I N C . , ALBANY, N.
Vol. X X , No. 13
February 14, 1930
Y.
Albany, N. Y.
WHAT ARE OUR ASSEMBLIES WORTH?
Many questions have arisen lately us to what our
assemblies offer the students, and whether they are as
beneficial as they might be. The chief criticism has
been the number of speakers that have appeared before
the association and the length of the addresses delivered.
Unquestionably, i t is true that there is little time
remaining in our assembly programs for student business.
The few minutes allowed are consumed with
announcements. As many students have only the half
hour for lunch, it is impossible to continue the meeting much after twelve 0 'clock.
Another criticism centers around the unvaried program, i.e., the customary speaker. With the few excepti o n s such as the Christmas sing, the senior-sophomore
debate (which, though it did not lill the objective intended, provided one of the most entertaining assemblies
during the first semester), song practice, and pep meeting, there has been little to promote interest in the
weekly period.
A third criticism has been the unduly long delay of
receiving the report of the representative lo the
Student Federation of America convention.
.Seven
weeks have elapsed before Mr, Deno is scheduled to
present his comments of this meeting. Much of the
effectiveness and value will have been lost by this
untimely delay. If I lie student body is to appropriate
a hundred and fifty dollars to send a representative
for a student report of this annual affair, it should deserve a more prominent spot in the assembly schedule.
Is an equal sum ever spent to obtain any of our other
programs?
The fact that there has been no student business is
due to the luck of time rather than the hick of business,
Many matters of importance are frequently
brought before the students in the spring semester,
Unless each assembly provides adequate time, such
legislation as may arise will be rushed through without
adequate discussion and thought. That is neither sane
practice nor democratic government.
The general listlessness and newspaper reading in
assembly may be directly due to the stereotyped char
actor of these sessions. A little variation can awaken
this dormant interest and make some of these eleven
o'clock periods more than a regular lecture class.
THE MAILBOX—A SOURCE OF REVENUE
Whatever may be written appears to have little
effect on the person or persons who are working their
way through college by way of the student mailbox.
Report* still prevail that letters containing money have
disappeared from this service station.
Those who have suffered a loss will need no word of
advice, but others may be prevented from experiencing
financial embarrassment through appropriation of funds
by some unknown individual. Do not have loiters containing money sent to the college. Do not) have your
roommate bring your letters to the college and put them
in the mailbox. Make some other appointment to receive your mail.
If it is impossible to prevent these losses in any other
manner, the one sure way will be to remove the source.
;
A general revival of spirit evident this week appears
to be the result of release from teaching on the part
of some one hundred fifty seniors, and the beginning
of a new semester. In addition, of course, there is the
general nervousness of the new teachers, and annoyance
of those unfortunates who must pursue their practice
work for the entire year.
In reality, it is the period of more resolutions than
New Year's itself. The promises to dean, teacher, and
self alike are sincere and determined until the self
meets the forces of human n a t u r e ; then begins a sad
story. If will power is strained to its utmost, it is
during the spring semester. I n the fall everyone is
resigned to the fact that one must wade in, as it were,
to the dark depths with the end far in the future. The
second semester brings it closer and, as the weeks wear
away, numerous diversions arise to tempt any well-made
resolution.
We can moralize and resolve all we will, but it still
boils down to the fact that the first semester is little
different from the second. Work must be covered and
mastered, be it a t the beginning in February or the
end in June. I t is not too difficult to cram at the end
and pass, but one may as well tack an A. B. or B. S. to
an empty shell. There will be as much comparative
substance in each. If there exists any " g u m p t i o n " in
this institution, make use of what there is and of the
facilities and opportunities offered.
Be true to the
dean, the teacher, and self.
Either present day events will be minimized in the
history books of the future as a temporary disturbance
in the course of time, or the decade of the thirties will
be the beginning of a long to be remembered era in
world history if the crop of world events continues to
occur as though they were wholesale products of some
hidden machine. Nothing seems to have escaped the
topsy-turvy actions of man or element.
In the midst of world "wide efforts for peace, a war
rages. Unfulfilled threats are making the League of
Nations tremble on its foundations. In Asia, under the
cloak of Hiding a down trodden nation, a subjected race
is being further buried under the shackles of the Master
of the East.
A Congress passes legislation to appease the voters.
A Court nullifies them in turn. One party threatens
and the other storms. Courtesy of action and speech
customarily expected of public officials finds no plaeo
in national politics, if what has already come is but
a sample, the future holds many choice bits of oratory
for the populace.
In Germany, the Olympics are under way despite the
opposition prevalent a short time ago. They mark one
of the few successes today to promote international good
feeling.
Even the weather cannot be classed as normal. Appearing to be docile and almost tropical the past few
years, it has arisen again as if to vent its rage on this
curious world.
Many more examples prevail in the current news.
A perusal of any daily newspaper will show similar
facts to sustain the statement that we are in an unusual
period of history in the making.
BOOKS:
An American Novel
In Depression Days
G.M.U.
(For Sale or h'enl in the Co-op)
Second Growth, by Arthur l'ound. New York. Keynal
and Hitchcock, .'147 pages. $2.50,
lu his new novel, "Second G r o w t h " , Arthur Pound
pictures one of the most exciting aspects of recent
American l i f e - t h e growth of the Middle West. As a
sequel lo " O n c e a Wilderness", it carries on the story
of Captain Mark's sons ami grandsons from 11)111 to the
1930's.
I t seems s a f e t o s a y t h a t a n y o n e w h o r e a d A r t h u r
P o u n d ' s first novel o f L u s t y J o h n M a r k in the s t i r r i n g
y e a r s between f r o n t i e r a n d f a c t o r y w i l l want to follow
the s u b s e q u e n t f o r t u n e s o f t h e M a r k f a m i l y as r e l a t e d
in " S e c o n d d r o u t h " ,
l u his e a r l i e r v o l u m e M r . P o u n d
p o r t r a y e d a n e r a i n A m e r i c a n l i f t — a n e r a w h o s e pass
ing n e a r l y every native A m e r i c a n has f o u n d occasion,
d u r i n g the past few years, lo regret.
B e s i d e s t h i s Increated a f a m i l y memorable not only f u r its representations, but f o r its individual a n d collective personalities
built around its s t r i k i n g central ligure, Captain John
Mark.
W i l l i a m L y o n Phelps r a n k e d t h i s firsl novel
as ' ' o n e o f t h e live b e s t A m e r i c a n n o v e l s o f last y e a r . 1 '
" S e c o n d ( i r o w t h " deals w i t h the y o u n g e r M a r k s w h o
carried
into
throbbing
industrial
developments
of
M i c h i g a n , a dramatic chapter in what W i l l i a m Allen
W h i t e has c a l l e d " .
. . a part o f the social Odyssey
of
America,"
A l t h o u g h it
is s t i l l
M a r k ' s shrewd
policy that directed the f a m i l y a c t i v i t i e s , the m a j o r
i n t e r e s t o f I h c s t o r y is h i s n o l o n g e r .
' I t belongs to
t h e c h i l d r e n w h o have s p r u n g u p a r o u n d h i m , n u m e r o u s
and
slighter
of stature,
like second g r o w t h
timber
around a single remaining tree f r o m t h e v i r g i n forest.'
Mr.
Pound, in perhaps k n o w i n g the s e l l i n g loo well,
and in a t t e m p t i n g to cover loo l a r g e a f r o n t o f m a t e r i a l ,
b o t h s e n i i m e n l a l a n d e c o n o m i c i n c h a r a c t e r , has f a i l e d
to c u t a s t r a i g h t p a t h I it l a r k s c o h e r e n c e a n d seems l o
be m o r e l i k e a g r o u p o f l o o s e l y r e l a t e d s t o r i e s ,
Its
a p p e a l i n g and realistic characterizations logelher with
its e x p o s i t i o n a n d c o n s i d e r a b l e d e t a i l g i v e i l a v i t a l i t y
o f i t s IIW 11.
Mr. P o u n d , occasionally w a n d e r i n g l o his philosophies
closely connected w i t h the economic developments o f
I he p a s t d e c a d e i n A m e r i c a , a g a i n m a k e s h i s o b s e r v a
l i o n b y s a y i n g : " W h e n y o u t h i n k , y o u chase a r o u n d in
circles.
W e l l , ( h e c i r c l e w a s tin.' p e r f e c t f o r m , t h e e n t i t y
s e l f - c o n t a i n e d a n d b e a u t i f u l l y set a p a r t f r o m a l l else.
The
sphere, infinite circles o r d e r l y a r r a n g e d a r o u n d a
c o m m o n c e n t e r , was ( l o d ' s a n s w e r t o c h a o s .
A wise
man
s h o u l d behold t h e spheres a n d p a r t i c u l a r l y , since
l i m e is s h o r t a n d v i s i o n i m p e r f e c t , t h i s o n e he t r e a d s , "
H o w e v e r i l is o n l y o n rare occasions t h a t the a u t h o r
strays f r o m real dialogue, characterizations, u m l narrations to p r o f o u n d thought,
" A
cobweb o f hope s w a y i n g i n die w i n d between
e a r t h a n d h e a v e n — w h a t else is t h e r e f o r m a n t o c l i m b , " '
Enthusiastic Audience Acclaims
Ruth Draper As a Monologist
COMMUNICATION
Editor STATE COLLEGE N E W S :
Enthusiasts of the drama, both of
State college and of the Albany area,
were privileged to see Ruth Draper
present her progrnm of monologues
Wednesday, February 5, in the Page
hall auditorium. Miss Draper, who
is of national and international reputo
in this a r t of the stage, was enthusiastically received by her capacity
audience, and with only the aid of
costumes and the simplest furniture,
created and enacted a number of situations, both comedy and tragedy,
varying from scenes of Irish life in
Kerry, to the table talk of the
matrons of Park avenue.
Her initial presentation, " T h e
Opening of the B a z a a r / ' revealed her
as the village booster, and her exceptional ability with gestures and rapid
change of attention, created for her
audience a setting complete in detail
and replete with spectators of every
sort.
Voice intonations secured a
conception of distance to the listener.
" I n County K e r r y , " her second
act, was equally impressive and her
command of the Irish brogue used
with her skill of presentation of the
previous act, contributed much lo its
effectiveness.
Recently you printed a letter from
a "disgusted member of the Lion
b o a r d " berating the Lion for its
attitude towards sorority rushing.
The Lion is, and has always been
intended as, a humor magazine, and
not as an editorial mechanism to
" e x p o s e " and condemn nay particular phase of college life which
does not happen to please its chief
executives. We are endeavoring to
keep it a humor magazine, not a
scandal sheet.
The petition referred to was a very
reasonable request, not a demand—
a request that we delay our issue a
few days. I t was signed by fourteen
sorority presidents. The reason given
for the absence of one signature was
that the president could not be
reached in time. Before and after
the presentation of the petition,
sororities had expressed their hopes
that the Lion wait until after rushThe f a d s a n d f a n c i e s o f t h e d i e t a r y
ing. If a group of leading seniors
believe that harmful effects might w o r l d w e r e h e r t o p i c o f c o n v e r s a t i o n
result from an issue of the Linn be- in h e r n e x t p r e s e n t a t i o n , " D o c t o r s . "
fore rushing, why should the Lion W i t h h e r i m a g i n a r y c o m p a n i o n s , s h e
hesitate to delay its issue a week or p r o v i d e d a b a n q u e t o f d i e t a r y d e l i ten days. Its humor should be just cacies, a n d h e r t a b l e t a l k , r e p l e t e w i t h
tis timely and very little difference h u m o r a n d d e v o i d o f s c i e n t i f i c b a s i s ,
will be made in any other consider- p o r t r a y e d t h e t y p i c a l d i n n e r p a r t y o f
ations, as we have definitely deter- the s o c i a l l y e l i t e o f P a r k a v e n u e o n a
dietary " s p r e e . "
mined.
A s t h i ! t r a g e d y o f t h e e v e n i n g , she
As lo the letter sent in by a " d i s gusted Lion board member," it is e n a c t e d a scene i n a m i n i n g t o w n o f
inaccurate, prejudiced, and in bad t h e f r o n t i e r . O p p r e s s e d b y a d r u n k e n
form. The vote was seven opposed h u s b a n d , a n d d r i v e n t o d e s p a i r b y
to delaying the issue, with the other p o v e r t y , h e r m o n o l o g u e c r e a t e d a n a t ten in favor. His attitude towards m o s p h e r e e x c e p t i o n a l l y v i v i d a n d o f
the petition shows clearly that he s t r i k i n g h u m a n a p p e a l . I n t h e s e c o n d
misunderstands the position taken p a r t o f t h e t r a g e d y , i t r i s e s t o a p e a k
by Intersorority council. As to the at t h e e n d w i t h h e r f r e n z i e d d e p i c t i o n
possibility of influencing the fresh- o f a p i t h e a d scene a f t e r a c a v e - i n
men, a thing ho declares impossible, w i t h h e r h u s b a n d a s o n e o f t h o s e
the editor of one " g e n e r a l p a n n i n g " c l a i m e d b y t h e " b l a c k d a m p . "
issue was paid afterward by a sorority
In
her
final
presentation
she
w h i c h had definitely
benefited, a c h i e v e d a s e l l i n g i n a n I t a l i a n
although he had tried to be unpreju- c h u r c h , a n d i n t u r n she i m p e r s o n a t e d
diced in his view.
The disgusted a r t i s t s , e x c u r s i o n i s t s , n a t i v e s , b e g g a r s ,
member incorrectly quotes the peti- a n d w o r s h i p p e r s i n t h e i r v i s i t s t o t h e
tion, and with a weak, inefficient, c h u r c h ,
T h e r e a l i s m o f these w a s
letter full of misstatements, shows a u g m e n t e d b y c o s t u m e s a n d h e r p e r himself for what he is by saying he fect c o m m a n d o f t h e l a n g u a g e s o f t h e
would abide by the decision of the c h a r a c t e r s p o r t r a y e d .
majority, and then proceeding to
Miss D r a p e r ' s p r o g r a m was origspread a division of opinion before
inal f r o m script to costumes.
Her
the general public.
Lion
b o a r d b u s i n e s s has a l w a v s
b e e n Lion
b o a r d b u s i n e s s , a n d not
a
t h i n g t o be p l a c e d b e f o r e t h e
general public.
I f the a u t h o r o f the
l e t t e r is so l o y a l t o t h e Lion,
and
w i l l i n g t o a b i d e b y i t s m a j o r i t y dec i s i o n , as he h y p o c r i t i c a l l y s t a t e s ,
t h e r e w o u l d be n o r e a s o n f o r h i s
a t t a c k under cover o f a s y m p a t h y
.seeking w h i m p e r ,
ROBERT K. BENEDICT,
Co-Editor,
I,ion
GRECIAN GAMBOLS
ability in c h a n g i n g her a t t e n t i o n s a m i
characterization was a new a n d u n fathmned type of drama for S t a t e ' s
stage. S t u d e n t o p i n i o n r a n k s her a p pearance a m o n g t h e m o s t s e n s a t i o n a l
production of the D r a m a t i c s and A r t
association at S t a l e collegt
Mary Lam Gives
Play at Delmar
M a r y L a m 's A d v a n c e d Drama! ics
presentation of N o v e m b e r
l u s l i c i l r i u u n a b o u t a n o l d ma 1 w h o
had lost I he sense o f t i m e wa>
(luced w i t h l l i e o r i g i n a l c a s l at t h e
Bethlehem
Central
school,
Delmar,
"ii M o n d a y n i g h t .
W i t h f o r m a l rushing in full swing,
m a n y a l u m s g a i l y w e n d e d t h e i r wav
The
cast f o r I he [ d a y i n c l u d e d :
lo ihc s o r o r i t y domiciles.
P h i Deli';, J o h n H i l l s , ':-;;,; H u g h ' . N o r t o n a m i
welcomed Loretta L l o y d ,
':!!i, Jean Marjorie W h o u t o n , s e n i o r s ; A l i c e A l t r c i l l e , M i l , a n d M r s . S. D e m i s e , \ l - | . l a n ! ,
'.'17; W a r r e n D e n s m o r e , '.'IS ;
A t A . K. I ' l i i we l i t n l F l o r e n c e M a r x
and
Pari
Sense,
','ill.
Dorothy
'•'hi, S a r a B r a m l c r s , '.'lli, M a r c i a H o l d
W h y l e , ';i(i, s u p e r v i s e d m a k e u|i f o r
man
a n d E v e l y n ( J r o e n b e r g , class o l M o n d a y ' s p r o d u c t i o n , a n d I t n l p h V a n
'•'••''. H i l d a
l l o n k l i e i i u , ','(4, E l u r e n r i
Horn,
was i n c h a r g e o f sets a n d
E l l e n , Hose D u b r u s i u , B o r l h u l*'r
lighls.
ost,
a m i l l e s s i e 11 a r l m a n , c l a s s u l '.'I.',
Tic- p r o d u c e r , m e m b e r s o f I he c a s l ,
; al
Delia Omega, Kuth
Wheclock,
a n d a s s i s t a n t s w e n - e n t e r t a i n e d ,• I t h e
and
MiAlice Ham I, \'M
i<l al home o l ' D r . H o w a r d A . D u l i e l l , p r o Alpha
K b 1, K i t t y M
•hell,
H e t t y l e s s o r o f m a t h e m a t i c s , I ' n l l o w i u j - I he
S t e e l e , a n d I loris Shavei class o f '.'it, p r e s e n t a t i o n .
and
H e t t y Slnwsoll am
I'.'mnia T e n
I . l a d , .-lass o f ' I t :
l i a i u i n a Phi Sigma
announces thai Hetty
Di
Harriot
Minnies
both of
Helen
Donahue and
Mi
Wil
S w i f t , class i,r
':',,",,
guests.
Y.W.C.A. Chooses
Council Delegates
Sigma Alpha wclcuii
111I1
lormal
membership W h i m
Wuito,
Hi, S l l r
Caldwell and Louise K m i t l
juiiior»,
and Sophie W o l z o k , M s .
K i n P h i a n n o u n c e s t h e 01 I g e i u e n !
of
M a r i a n S t e e l e , M l i , In
Sllllllcl
(iraves of Seheueciad,\.
Kappa
D e l i a Welcomes i n t o In,11
orary
membership
Mrs
Winifred
Munroe.
A n d here a r e m o r e week end g u e s t s
At
licla Zeta, Margaret H i l l , Margaret S t r o n g , and M i s , Duckwall, all
of I h c class o f ' 8 5 , were e n t e r t a i n e d at E p s i l o u B e t a P h i , ( i l n d v s X c w c l l '
' 8 0 , a n d T a r i s a M c N a u g h t o n , ' 3 f i , m'
Psi ( l a m , Edna Pchnielj ' 8 3 ; and
ul
D., L i l l i a n P a y n e , "A'i.
Tl
Veiling W o m e n 's 1 ' I I I ' I H I i n n us
hit ion is s e n d i n g C h r i s t i n e D e r
• liiuicr and
Jean E d g c u m b e , sopho
m o r e s , is d e l e g a t e s l o tlie- N e w V o r l
Slate
Voiilli
coufeieiice
which
if
being
iliarV
coilljlicl
LJI t o :
I
al Knrllester Pel,
The
l|,i-|,i, o f till
conference
is
" Voiilli
Moves
on
Toward a Christian W o r l d . "
The m a i n discussion g r o u p s a r e " A
Program o f Personal Religions l.iv
ing,"
" T h e Creation of a Christian
Kconoinic
Order,"
" Building
an
Enduring p e a c e , " " B u i l d i n g a Christian H o m e , " '• B r e a k i n g D o w n Barriers Belweea P a c e s , " u m l " P r o v i d ing
a Constructive Pse o f Leisure
Tune,"
p" .
Volume IV
•NATIONAL
COLLEGE NEWS IN PICTURE AND
PARAGRAPH.
Insue 19
PLAINE ELLIS,
University of
Arizona student, arrives in New York
to make her Broad'
way debut as Pearl
in Tobacco Road.
'TO FIND OUT HOW THE OTHER HALF SWIMS, Bob Kiphuth of Yale, dons
*• this newly invented underwater helmet so that he can watch his proteges from the
bottom of the tank.
CTACE STARS LIGHTEN TRACK TASKS "Gloria Pierre and Ethel
M Thorsen of the Follies cast exercised during their Boston stay by pounding
the board track with Herman Blanchard, Boston University track ace.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FEBRUARY H
W
Page 3
• MM.*.*.
CAMELS
Public Alumnus J^o. 1
legation
tion
COLLEGE SMOKERS!
- ;:f|§
>
Read Our Invitation to You
i7.»4firB«?'
Ye Tawne Crier Rings In
*x
iSigntd)
^
^
rP^Ppsssrl
mfa
"X
^
Sayles
jf the
ichors'
P and
juts of
to 26.
cliair)eparttopic
'' The
Iminis-
R 1 REYNOLDS
TOBACCO COMPANY
REYNO
R.J.
!;7* 9 T O N 4 A I J ! M.NORTHCAROUNA
. . .We who make Camels
and know Camel's quality
are confident you'll like
them! Camels are made
from
•
s**l
I .Tn mus
'cation,
pt pro-
:
^•\
ALPH SLEICHER, Amherst College senior, is one of the
leading collegiate squash racquets players in the eastern
leagues, and was one of the top-flight players in the recent eastern
intercollegiate tourney.
Original Gay Caballero
O H I O UNIVERSITY'S Alumnus No. t is another
^ man of huge bulk: Frank Crumit, radio network
singer heard Sunday afternoons from coast to coast.
A Phi Delta Theta, he once returned for a visit and
gamely sang two of his
own songs on a serenade
program in front of Lindiey Hall. To those who
asked who Frank Crumit
was, came the information:
a jovial undergraduate with
baseball and football ability, he left Ohio U. in
1912 to study music in
Cincinnati. Thence, by
way of vaudeville, he was
featured in Broadway shows like Oh Kay, Betty Be
Good, and Hf>, Ho ^dnette.
These were shows dedicated to. girls, among them
a stage star, Julia Sanderson, whom Frank married in
1927. They now co-star on the networks. To Ohio U„
Frank Crumit, ex'12, has dedicated two songs. The
Buckeye Battle Cry of Ohio State is also Frank's work,
as is Gay Caballero. The latter is one of those things
Frank can really deliver,
College
annual
j>n conjited in
jy 17.
j State,
S.ory of
j Milton
I Moreilm M.
i
A MERICA'S Public Alumnus No. i is Alexander
** Woollcott. As late as his senior year at Hamilton
College (New York), his brothers#in Theta Delta Chi
didn't know whether or not they should read him out
of the club. Brother Alex persisted in wearing a red
fez about the house. No action was taken, however,
and in 1909 Woollcott received the blessing of his
Alma Mater and a Ph.B. degree.
Although he was a postgraduate one year at
Columbia, Alex has his fondest words and thoughts
for Hamilton. In appreciation he received an honorary
degree in 1924. Dramatic critic for the Times, Herald,
and World in New York from 1914 to 1928, Woollcott
has since puttered his way to a fortune as a writer
and radio star. Pudgy, preferring physical inertness,
he once acted on Broadway in a play that required
little effort beyond keeping from rolling off a divan.
Yet, in the Great War, he became a sergeant in a
hospital unit.
Had Chaucer's Canterbury Pilgrims been recruited
in this century, they would certainly have taken
Woollcott along, and some of Chaucer's nimblest tales
would have begun this way: "Woollcott speaking."
ress
W
COSTLIER
TOBACCOS!
I tho
(if
II
that
and
on",
and
mill
De-
)
you'n
I < ? E P H i N E ' y ° U ?i g '"* W 1 • boa c o n s t r i c t o r ltom Lthe Can"' Zone, is proudly put on exhibition by her master
J Frank Trevor, a Cornell University senior. Josenhine shares a room at the seal and serpent house with Trevor.
UKE THEM
TOO!
i
i
finer, MORE
TOBACCOS
EXPENSIVE
-Turkish
• IIHI Domestic
— t h a n .my
other
lu.md.
Doinil.ii
I
cm
$
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 14JL936
KUL
BKVAI
GLENK
M
HAW!/
VIBOI;
Ali
CAEOL'
JOHN
LAUBII
Waf
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Helen
Hartt,
Lam, K.
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Mildred
Katliryn
Don Vlti
Ella Oil
Jobson. I
Josephln
Mullen, I
Adeluido
Stewart,
PBINTEI
Vol, x J
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announce
hour for
ing iiiuul
Anothe
grain, i.%
timiM sue
debate (
tended, \>
during tl
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weekly J)|
A thirl
receiving
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preaeiitj)
oft't'i; liven
untiinolv
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ni'ter ffi:
this 'Ion
(j'elnrkfPt
THE M
Wlmfel
effect m
way tlir*
Ho|iorl» |
«liHii|i|j98I
'i'iiotf?
iidvii'Oj b
financial
by MOHW
lainiftg i
roomily
in tk. m
•elvfjron
tiidl
I
'•
r r \ n r u mnn
vmmmm
S T A T E COLLEGE N E W S . E E B R T I A B Y 14. 193fi
-Page 3
w
offer wins college smokers
a bettor pipe tobacco I
ress
egation
cion
College
annual
>n con:ted in
y 17.
i State,
tory of
Milton
. Moroolin M.
, James
ication,
.nt pro-
"You eaa't beat Print* Albert for a cool, mild,
slow-burning •mote," Norman Tilton, '38, declares.
Sayles
of the
tellers'
22, and
.cuts of
to 26.
i chairDeparte topic
"The
dminis-
I'M A P. A .
BOOSTER
TOO!
L2
•iday to
Adviser
tte, Inicrvc as
or new
ies who
with
member
resolution of
hostess
Teaclier
ulucted
. Miss
10 New
ns at a
i state
Richard Durham, '37, aaya: "P. A. is mild and slowburninf—and around 60 pipeful* in the big red tin."
V-J
)E PAUL UNIVERSITY (Chicago) claims Dorothy Gardner as one
of its outstanding beauties.
RUILDING activity on
*-* the University of Oklahoma campus provides sub'
ject matter for photographs
for these students in the
news'picture class being
conducted by Prof. A.
Clarence Smith.
Oklahoma is one of the pioneer
schools training reporters
in the use of the camera.
«
».
•t*&-;*-**: S
TRIAL O f f I R FOR COLLEGE SMOKERS
Saaeke SO fragrant pipafub of Prince Albert If jroa don't find it
the •ellewail, tastieet pipe tobacco you ever amoked, return the
pockat tin with the mat of the tobacco in it to IU at any time
within a month from thia date, and we will refund fall purchase
price, pine postage. (Signed) R. J. Reynold* Tobacco Conapanj
Wineton-SeJem, North Carolina
f
PRINCE ALBERT
TIN NATIONA1,
JOY SMOKI
ptpafuU or fragrant tabacc'p in
•vary 1 annas tin
of Prinea Albert
r \ E S T R U C T I V E EARTHQUAKES are duplicated in the lab*-^ oratory for the first time in history by this new type of shaking
table developed by Arthur C. Ruge (foreground), Massachusetts
Institute of Technology research worker.
of the
:ion of
•e that
in and
ition".
ic and
!C,
>P
ery
m;
r
R E C O R D I N G OF GRADES at the University of Southern
^Californiai wi -be speeded by the use of this new photostatic
machine> which will turn out 6,000 grade cards in less than a day.
S m s t a l l e d jt t o o k
£weeks
& ! toi do 1the "same
' W a amount
o( work.
Q U T S T A N D J N G EXPERIMENTS
--. ih rocket
V / flights
iln»lits are being
heinc conducted in Mi
New Mexico
by Prof. R. H, GoUdard of Clark University.
1 < A N S A S HUNGER MARCHERS were lead
V f e the state's capital at Topeka last Saturday
by Kenneth Born, University of Kansas senior and
chairman of the United Action Committee.
<
"*t**
;i d o z e n
eet
'THE M A R V E L O U S
*• Machine (capable of
giving instantaneous analysis of anything) was created
by Rensselaer Polytechnic
I n s t i t u t e undergraduate
masterminds for a stu<
dent-faculty party.
clerks several
A PERSONAL APPEARANCE CLINIC, open to freshmen only, is operated by
• ' * home economics students at Ohio Wesleyan University.
'«iiuaMii** :
R U T H WOERNER, outstanding student iciress ai J dwala
fessiorwl stage following her graduation this June,
A NEW VERSION of Ibsen's The Lady From the Sea
^ W M produced recently in the Vassar College experimental theater. The netting was inspired by Rockwell
K«*'i punting*, and themes from the music of Sibelius
mm woven into the play.
, * . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
-
.
•
•
CTVE CONCERTS were given by the tamed Rutgers University glee, club during the tour at the Bermudas
concluded on February 10. Samuel K. Moore is manager of the organization, while Robert K. Zimmerman u
its president1
Mild
he De-
P Q A C H S MALADY BAFFLES DOCTORS - Suffering from a peculiar ailment,
V* numbness in hands and other extremities, Roman L. Speegle (center), University of
Rochester boxing and swimming mentor, has presented a medical problem which has sc>
far baffled all specialists. Despite his handicap, he still turns out winning teams.
.
CUCCESSFUL transplanting of the heart of one animal
V? into the body of another, long a goal of science, has
been accomplished by Drs. H. H. Collins and W. H. Wright,
University of Pittsburgh scientists. They are shown above
at work on their now successful experiment.
ARVARD'S
Dramatic
Club workers prepare
the sets for a current produc
tion in their newly acquired
workshop, the old Green Tree
swimming pool.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 14, 1936
State Basketeers
Beat Plattsburg
Home Team Shows Improvement
As New Semester Begins;
Score Is 49 To 37
A f t e r a n e n f o r c e d v a c a t i o n of t w o
weeks b e c a u s e of m i d - y e a r e x a m s , t h o
S t a t e college b a s k e t b a l l t e a m res u m e d tlieir s c h e d u l e w i t h a v i c t o r y
i n t h e first g a m e o f t h e second semester.
T h e P u r p l e a n d Gold t r a v e l l e d
to P l a t t s b u r g lust S a t u r d a y t o earn
a w e l l - d e s e r v e d v i c t o r y over P l a t t s burg
Normal
school
when
State
r o m p e d h o m e on t h e l o n g e n d of a
49 t o 37 s c o r e .
P l a t t s b u r g broke into the scoring
c o l u m n w h e n M i l l e r s a n k his first of
m a n y c o r n e r s h o t s . On a p a s s from
Amyot. to B a n c r o f t , S t a t e tied u p
t h e s c o r e n e v e r t o be h e a d e d a g a i n .
Tho long court, which gave Plattsb u r g t h e a d v a n t a g e , m a d e t h e first
h a l f a n i p a n d t u c k affair,
Miller
k e p t P l a t t s b u r g i n t h e g a m e with
six b u c k e t s b u t t h e c o n s i s t e n t t e a m work shown by the S t a t e basketeers
f o r e t o l d t h e u l t i m a t e score.
Ifershk o w i t z h e a v e d a p a s s (he l e n g t h of
t h e c o u r t t o D i c k M n r g i s o n f o r his
first b a s k e t . On t h e p l a y , Dick t u r n e d
h i s a n k l e b u t ho c o n t i n u e d t o play.
D u r i n g t h e half, L e n W e l t e r pleased
t h e c r o w d w i t h t w o of his pivot
o v e r h e a d s h o t s from t h e c o r n e r . T h e
replacements
instead
of
slowing
d o w n t h e g a m e s p u r r e d u p t h e action.
A t h a l f t i m e , P l a t t s b u r g had
a c h a n c e f o r t h e g a m e when S t a t e
led b y t h e n a r r o w m a r g i n of 22 in
21.
SPORT SHOTS
One half of a r a t h e r d i s a s t r o u s
b a s k e t b a l l s e a s o n is b e h i n d u s . Coach
Goewey's troubadours have had a
b i t of t h e w o r s t of i t so f a r .
B u t t o us seasoned o p t i m i s t s t h e r e
a r e s t i l l a few v e r y f a i n t r a y s of
hope.
W e tackle Lowell
Textile,
Bridgewater State, Syracuse, Brooklyn Poly, St. Michaels, a n d H a r t w i c k
in t h a t o r d e r .
Tills l i n e u p s h o u l d n ' t be t o o l o u g h
for
Bancroft
and company,
Wo
a d m i t S y r a c u s e will p r o b a b l y offer
a s l i g h t problem,
E v e n s o , ' if we
k n o c k oil' t h e r e s t of ' e m ( w h i c h w e
s h o u l d ) we come o u t b e t t e r t h a n
,500 for t h e s e a s o n .
A f t e r a quick g l a n c e a t t h a t v e r y
t o u g h schedule t h e y d i s h e d u p for
C o a c h ' s d e b u t , .500 p l u s l o o k s l i k e
a healthy average.
W e predict clean c u t v i c t o r i e s o v e r
four of t h e c l u b s , a hectic s t r u g g l e
w i t h S t . Michaels, a n d a d i s a s t e r a t
Syracuse.
Hope s p r i n g s ( d e n i a l .
BECOMES MANAGER
W i t h (lie r e s i g n a t i o n of X o r b e r t
tluber,
':ili, from t h e p o s i t i o n of
basketball
manager
following
his
g r a d u a t i o n at the close of t h e first
s e m e s t e r , Alonzo DiiMont, 'M7, succeeds him In that position.
DiiMont
lias been a s s i s t a n t m a n a g e r of b a s k e t ball t h i s season, a n d nlso w o r k e d a s
a s s i s t a n t m a n a g e r of b a s e b a l l lasi
spring,
Hobart Quintet
Defeats State
W i n t r y winds wailed, a n d blustering blizzards blew, b u t the brave
souls w h o s p e n t t h r e e d a y s a t C a m p
J o h n s t o n s w e a r t h a t t h e y h a d a good
time. E i g h t girls, well equipped with
snow suits, skiis, a n d t o b o g g a n s left
college a week a g o l a s t M o n d a y a n d
s t a y e d i n t h e c a b i n i n t h e w i l d s of
Chatham until t h e following Wednesday afternoon. L o n g snoozes in front
of t h e r o a r i n g fire h e l p e d t h e m r e c u p e r a t e from e x a m s .
S t a t e ' s f r e s h m e n w o n a n e a s y vict o r y o v e r M i l n e H i g h s c h o o l ' s first
t e a m in t h e g a m e w h i c h w a s p l a y e d
last Monday.
T h e score was tied
1 0 - 1 0 a t t h e h a l f , b u t a t t h e e n d of
t h e g n m e t h e f r o s h led b y n s c o r e of
22-14.
E d i t h Bailey, '39, was the
high scorer for t h e girls in blue.
R u m o r h a s i t t h a t G . A . A . will coo p e r a t e w i t h t h e T r o u b a d o u r s in p r o d u c i n g n s h o w . S o m e t h i n g t o look
forward t o !
Varsity Drops Pre-Exam Game
To Visiting Basketeers
By Two Points
A f t e r t w o t r i p s within a week, t h e
S t a t e College b a s k e t b a l l t e a m p l a y e d
H o b a r t on t h e P a g e H a l l c o u r t , F r i d a y , J a n u a r y 24. A s p i r i t e d c o n t e s t
saw H o b a r t turn back Stnte by t h o
close s c o r e of 3 8 to 3 6 .
State
scored
first,
live
seconds
a f t e r t h e o p e n i n g whistle, w h e n B a n c r o f t g r a b b e d t h e t a p for his first
field g o a l . H o b a r t d i d n o t h a v e t h o
t i m e t o s e t u p tlieir zone d e f e n s e
u n t i l S t a t e w a s o u t in f r o n t 13 to o.
The extensive trips under inclement
weather conditions plus t h e three
h a r d g a m e s b e g a n t o s h o w on t h e
State players and Hobart started to
s h a k e tlieir f o r w a r d s , J e n k i n s a n d
S p i e s , loose.
D e s p i t e seven p o i n t s
by C a p t a i n B a n c r o f t a t half t i m e , t h e
P u r p l e a n d Gold was on the s h o r t e n d
of a 1 0 - 1 5 score.
T h e r e s t b e t w e e n halves s e e m e d t o
have given S t a t e a new i m p e t u s
when, w i t h i n a few m i n u t e s a f t e r t h e
second h a l f s t a r t e d , t h e home t e a m
led 2 1 - 2 0 .
H o b a r t ' s zone d e f e n s e
t h e n b e g a n t o t i g h t e n while Hie forward wall ran the score t o 2 9 - 2 1 .
A f t e r S t a t e had a time o u t , t h e
T e a c h e r s p u t on a brief rally in which
Len W e l t e r s a n k two of his spect a c u l a r o v e r h e a d shots to p u t t h e
S t a t e P a s k e t e e r s in t h e ball g a m e
again.
T h e pace a g a i n forced S t a t e
to call for t i m e within a i'c-w m i n u t e s .
Total*
IT
::
Librarian Submits
List of New Books
Miss M a r y K, C o b b , college libra
rial), s u b m i t s a list of a d d i t i o n a l
b o o k s received by (lie college l i b r a r y
as gifts.
T h e lisl includes books
d o n a t e d by Mr. A r t h u r J o h n s t o n , Mr.
Louis J o n e s , I n s t r u c t o r in Kuglish,
a m i t h e KiIncut ion In class, IP.'lo ;iit,
M u s i c : A c a d e i n u s , /•' » d i in i n I n
I'riim r.
Science:
Chapman,
Trawl
"!
[Urdu;
Harrow,
AVic
Worlds
of
Phi/nira!
Discovery;
I) r a c Ii in a a ,
Stadia
iii lh,' Literatim
of
Natural]
Science.
Social S c i e n c e s : Ley b u r n ,
Frontier
Folkways;
Bedford, Economic
II is -l
lory of A'ni/laml.
T r a v e l : H y r n e , ft'/i'ai l>, titan Life in \
Tallin anil Country;
Muirlicad,
(!mil\
Itrilain,
Northwestern
France, Soutlt I
em France;
Wilson, I'aris on Parade. \
TO OPEN BOOK TABLE
The
Voting
Women's
Christian
a s s o c i a t i o n h a s r e o p e n e d t h e book
t a b l e in room X oil I he lower corr i d o r of D r a p e r hall. S t u d e n t s wish
illg to h a v e t h e i r bonks sold should
b r i n g them to t h e Inble t h i s week if
possible.
T h e t a b l e will c o n t i n u e
t h r o u g h o u t tills mill ncxl week f o r
t h o s e who h a v e bonks to sell or b u y .
Freshman Women
Join Sorority Life
As Rushing Ceases
{('iiiiliiiiKit
fi'nin
jiniii
I. column
ii)
\ | a rioii Keiiil jo». Prance.-- H u n a n , a n d
s
M a r g a r e t S m i t h , n e C r a i l d a l l , fresh
men : ami Until Dillon, "Mi.
Alpha Epsilon P h i : Malviua ilrussIIIIIII, Piieila Kiirkhill, H u t h P e k a r s k y ,
Helen S c h w a b , Kdith Shoiigold, Mar•jiilel S i r l i n . Sylvia W e i s s , l l e i n i e e
Viilfcc, f r e s h m e n .
Gamma
K a p p a P h i ; Isabel Mii,iiu ,in. ':;; ; ( hn'sl iue Ades, P h y l l U
\
hi, l l o t n
\ n - l i n . Muriel H a r r y ,
.loon | l \ i mi, I'.n e Kormitll. J a n e t
i.iiine\.'
Mil,bed'
Kelsey,
Mildred
Mah>nc,\ • J u y e e May cock, f r e s h m e n ,
Beta
Zeta:
Helen
K.
Ueruard,
Hetty IJndge, M a r g a r e l l l l c k o k , Ma
lion Hockerl'eller. K l e a n o r S c h w a r t z ,
Kill lir\ a KchHurt/., Hetty J a n e Slieru u n d , C. Virginia S t r o n g , mid J a n e
S r h u l u , freshmen,
Pi A l p h a T a n : ( i e i m i d e
l.ernei,
':iK;
A n Hi'
Kiilieliman.
I'liarlolle
l ' n \ . a n d B e a t r i c e Koblenz. I'l'eshlliell.
Phi D e l t a : leannelte Harlow, M a r
liurel
Dm i la
Lillian
II i u e » ,
I -Mini M a r i e , l e - - e . U n t i l L e w i s ,
l.nu n , M a r y
I llidorkil'lv, a n d
Walralh.
freshmen.
Helen
lane
A l p h a R h o : .lane C r a w f o r d . K l e a n o r
Wise, and Harriet lireen, freshmen.
Epsilon
Beta
Phi:
Mary
Zila
I'nie.v a n d J e a n n e l i n s s c l i n , f r e s h m e n .
G a m m a P h i S i g m a ; C a t h e r i n e Callius a m i Delia Dohiu, f r e s h m e n .
P h i L a m b d a : H e t t y F a l l o n , Heldn
I ' t h e . a n d Luis W e s t e r , f r e s h m e n .
I . a u r i l a Sold, ' 3 7 ; " T h e women
a r o u n d here know all the a n s w e r s ,
a n d now t h e y can pop t h e q u e s t i o n s . "
J o a n B y r o n , ' 3 9 ; " I could tell
you!
. . .
I think Leap Vear is
t h e d e u c e of a good i d e a . "
G e o r g e B a n c r o f t led t h e l a s t S t a t e
rally which k n o t t e d t h e s c o r e a t 34
with f o u r m i n u t e s left t o p l a y . T h e
slow d i s a p p o i n t i n g finish s a w S t a t e
a g a i n lose a g a m e on t h e foul lino
with S p i e s c r e d i t e d w i t h t h r e e of
l l o b a r l ' s four fouls. T h e crowd that
had yelled itself h o a r s e r e a d H o b a r t
38, S t a l e 3(1 w h e n t h e final w h i s t l e
blew.
Captain
Bancroft
w a s t h e individual s t a r of t h e g a m e w h e n he tied
with S p i e s for h i g h s c o r i n g h o n o r s
with
11) p o i n t s .
Bancroft was a
marked man covered by a t least two
men f o r t h e e n t i r e g a m e y e t lie got
12 of his p o i n t s in t h e second half.
S i n c e t h o C o b l c s k i l l H i g h school
was s n o w e d i n , t h e S t a t e F r o s h p l a y e d
a p i c k - u p p r e l i m i n a r y g a m e w i t h College H o u s e . T h o w e l l - o r g a n i z e d F r o s h
r o m p e d homo on a 2 5 - 0 score with
T o r r e n s , D o r n n , a n d L e h m a n t i e d for
high s c o r e w i t h six p o i n t s each.
T h e s n o o p i n g r e p o r t e r c a m e upon
dioicc replies as he s c a t t e r e d
TOTALS
h i s q u e s t i o n h i t h e r and y o n .
J e n k i n s , r. f.
Irrlo. r. f.
Spies. I. f.
ifllgc. e.
lOticksou, r. IT.
Nlehols. I, g,
F e r r i s . I, ft.
" O h G o d ! " w a s all A u d r e y B u r l i n g h a m , '38, could say.
" C a n ' l s a y a w o r d , " said V i r g i n i a
I'tirev, '.'(!).
Leslie Knox, '38, who
was s t a n d i n g n e a r b y , only smiled.
Robert
.Margison,
IIOIIAUT
o
O
T
II
ll
II
TOTALS
Kel'erec—Dowltllg.
Score nl luill' tlllK!
Utiliarl in.
'37, blushed.
T h e r e p o r t e r u n e a r t h e d news of a
c o n s p i r a c y which may develop into
n m o v e m e n t of m a j o r p r o p o r t i o n s a t
S(;ife c o l l e g e — t h a t of all S t a t e college men r e f u s i n g to ask for a d a t e
oil L e a p y e a r d a y , F e b r u a r y 2 0 . T h e
movement is sponsored by a comm i t t e e tin M e n ' s Rights, iieaded by
(
!'<
D u g e r e r , '3(1, and i n c l u d i n g
Fred D e x t e r a n d William M c t l r a w ,
juniors.
1
n
11
0
111
1
1'
1
L'
II
n
III
This y e a r ' s delegation from S t a t e ,
one of t h o l a r g e s t i n t h e h i s t o r y o f
t h e college, is c o m p o s e d of D r . M i l t o n
(i. N e l s o n , d e a n , M i s s H e l e n H . M o r e l a u d , d e a n of w o m e n , M r . J o h n M .
S a y l e s , d i r e c t o r of t r a i n i n g , D r . J a m e s
B . P a l m e r , p r o f e s s o r of e d u c a t i o n ,
a n d Miss H e l e n H a l t e r , a s s i s t a n t p r o fessor of social science.
Dr. Nelson a n d Professor Sayles
will a t t e n d t h e c o n v o c a t i o n of t h e
A m e r i c a n A s s o c i a t i o n of T e a c h e r s '
Colleges on F e b r u a r y 2 1 a n d 22, a n d
t h e D e p a r t m e n t of S u p e r i n t e n d e n t s o f
t h e N . E . A . f r o m F e b r u a r y 23 t o 2 6 .
Dr. Nelson will be t h e g r o u p c h a i r m a n of a d e b a t e b e f o r e t h e D e p a r t m e n t of S u p e r i n t e n d e n t s , t h o t o p i c
under
discussion
involving,
"The
b u d g e t a s a n i n s t r u m e n t of a d m i n i s tration."
Miss Morolund will leave F r i d a y t o
visit t h e W o m e n ' s P e r s o n n e l A d v i s e r
at Purdue university, Lafayette, Ind i a n a . In S t . L o u i s , she will s e r v e a s
t h o c h a i r m a n of a s e m i n a r f o r n e w
d e a n s in colleges a n d u n i v e r s i t i e s w h o
will
discuss
"Cooperation
with
Y o u t h . " Miss M o r d a n t ! is a m e m b e r
of t h e s t a n d i n g c o m m i t t e e on resolut i o n s of t h e N a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n of
D e a n s of W o m e n , a n d will be h o s t e s s
at a m e e t i n g of t h e D e a n s in T e a c h e r
T r a i n i n g I n s t i t u t e s t o be c o n d u c t e d
in t h e H o t e l S t a t l e r T u e s d a y .
Miss
M o r e l a n d will also r e p r e s e n t t h e N e w
Y o r k S t a l e A s s o c i a t i o n of D e a n s a t a
meeting T h u r s d a y t o discuss s t a t e
programs.
Corbat's Boot Shop
209 C e n t r a l A v e n u e
S h o e s a n d H o s i e r y for E v e r y
Occasion
OPEN
EVENINGS
S t a l e College 1."
EVORY & CO
General
Printers
rescripiio/i
OPTICIANS.
FREDETTE'*
65 QAwttbia&tFdcoroAoK Pearl
COMPlfTt OPTICAL 5fcRVlC€
LUCILLE BEAUTY SALON
P h o n e 4-9481
208 O u a i l S t r e e t , near W e s t e r n A v e .
A l b a n y , N . Y.
APPOINTMENTS
Kxtablinlicd
Ivs:,
P r e p a r e for t h e P r o m
DRESS
F i v e m e m b e r s of t h e S t a t e C o l l e g e
f a c u l t y will j o u r n e y t o t h e a n n u a l
N a t i o n a l E d u c a t i o n A s s o c i a t i o n cong r e s s which is b e i n g c o n d u c t e d i n
S t . L o u i s t h e week o f F e b r u a r y 1 7 .
F R A N K H,
1 ' n g e i e r , s p e a k i n g for t h e coinmil lee, s a i d ,
" Xti
self-respecting
S l a t e college man should be so easy
I" gel a s In ask a girl for a d a l e for
February
211,
T h e c o m m i t t e e on
M e n ' s R i g h t s is not t r y i n g In a r o u s e
(he a n t a g o n i s m of (he fair sex by
ils a c t i o n , bill is merely sticking up
for I he N i n e t e e n t h A m e n d m e n t . "
EVENING
Dr. Nelson To Head Delegation
To Educational Convention
From State College
Dr. P a l m e r , v i c e - p r e s i d e n t of t h e
D e p a r t m e n t of R u r a l E d u c a t i o n of
t h e N . E . A . , will s p e a k b e f o r e t h a t
g r o u p on " S t a t e S t i m u l a t i o n a n d
Supervision
of R u r a l
Education".
l i e is c h a i r n a n of t h e P u b l i c a n d
Constructive Studies Committee, and
will a t t e n d t h e m e e t i n g s of t h e D e p a r t m e n t of S u p e r i n t e n d e n t s ,
STATU COLLEGE
liatiernl'l, r, I'.
ii
Mal'tflson, I. f,
Welter, c.
Amyot, r, it.
I l e r s h k o w l t z , I. ff.
Milliter. I. it.
Ilytiii, r. f.
V i r g i n i a Hall, '.!*>; " L e a p y e a r
here m e a n s j u s t one more d a y to
d a n c e in t h e C o m m o n s , "
Marjorie
Adams,
'30: " I
proposed last leap y e a r . "
sol
College Faculty
Attend Congress
G.A.A. FLASHES
Leap Year Quiz Reveals Plot
To Advance Men's Rights Here
The fast pace that S t a t e continued
in t h e second h a l f saw P l a t t s b u r g
f a l t e r a n d d r o p b e h i n d never to
threaten again.
T h e Stale forward
w a l l , led by M a r g i s o n , ran t h e score
T h e s o n s and d a u g h t e r s of S t a t e
u p to .')!) while P l a t t s b u r g g a r n e r e d
27.
G e r r y A m y o t held Miller score- feel thai Leap Vear is g o i n g to m a k e
loss in t h i s rally.
Willi t h e g a m e very little difference a t t h e i r colreporter
a l m o s t a s s u r e d , t h e P u r p l e a n d Gold lege, t h e \ T . w s s n o o p i n g
slowed d o w n anil played j u s t hard discovered a f t e r a series of intere n o u g h t o p r o t e c t t h e c o m f o r t a b l e views with a n u m b e r of t h e m . " L e a p
at
lead t h a t h a d been e s t a b l i s h e d .
As V e a r will make no difference
college,"
oracled
Charlotte
t h e final w h i s t l e blew, .Inlinny R y a n S t a t e
c o m p l e t e d t h e s c o r i n g with a side Kockow. '3(1, e p i t o m i z i n g (he g e n e r a l
c o u r t shot t h a t g a v e S t a t e 19 to 'M a t t i t u d e of her sister s t u d e n t s . " T h e
women a r e a l w a y s p o p p i n g t h e quesfor P l a t t s b u r g .
t i o n s a r o u n d here a n y h o w . "
T h e m a n with t h e injnrei•d foot
Mike (Irillin, '36, issued a s t a l e
a g a i n w a s h i g h s c o r e r for S t a l e ,
nielit I" t h e press which c l e a r l y outD i c k M n r g i s o n r e g a i n e d his early
lined t h e position of t h e men on (his
season form to lead S l a t e to victory
question,
" A s f a r a s t h e men of
with 12 p o i n t s while .Miller h a d eight
the college an- c o n c e r n e d , " he s a i d ,
baskets for P l a t t s b u r g .
An encour" I here will be 110 radical c h a n g e .
a g i n g s i g h t w a s t h e i n c r e a s e d unison !
S t a t e college men a r e c a p a b l e of sayshown by t h e f o r w a r d wall of t
i n g ' N o ' forcibly and c o n s i s t e n t l y .
State machine.
I n t e r v e n t i o n uf e x t e n u a t i n g c i r c u m s t a n c e s , of course, m a y all'ecl t h e i r
S T A T E CO 1.1, Kill-:
decision.
However, let tlicin s t a n d
l'l'
Margison, r, f,
-I
12 mi t h e i r own two feet, b e w a r e of
.1. ltyan. r. f.
_'
r e c l i n i n g positions, a n d be linn a n d
Bancroft, i. f,
::
careful.''
B y r n e s , 1. r.
"
Welter, e.
I
O t h e r v i e w p o i n t s on t h e q u e s t i o n
IlershUiiH ilz. r. (;.
reveal some differences a s to t h e real
H a r r i n g t o n , r. (?.
1
m e a n i n g of lie- q u a d r e n n i a l t r a d i t i o n
Amyot, 1. K.
I
for S t a t e college.
Tiihils
IT
Kiiiinn Mead, '3(5; " I f
someone
I ' l . A T T S I l C K t ; NOHMAI, S t ' l l t l t l l
I should bid, up, il might m a k e some
lb
f|i
i d i fl'erelieo I n m e .
I s l i l l t h i n k , llOWMiller, r. I'.
s
ii
,-\ er, I hat I he f e m a l e o f Hie s p e c i e s ,
S p n r r s , I. I,
L!
n
Super, e.
I
1
w b i l e s l i l l i n u r e d e a d l y , is a l s o m o r e
Conway, i*.
l
I
n l , I Ii- I han Hie m o l e . ' '
S m a l l , r. u.
a
o
Drown, r, u.
n
n
Itell, I. v.
II
II
l . n v n r i i u n,\ . I. g,
Ii
II
l . o i i e i ' u n n . |. u.
II
T l i " i i i | i . - n i i . I. f,
"
I
Page 3
SHIRTS
WATERVILLE LAUNDRY, INC,
289 Central Ave.
Phone
5-2241
BILL'S BARBER SHOP AND BEAUTY PARLOR
62 R o b i n S t .
Special S t u d e n t R a l e s for W a v i n g
During Prom Week
3 4626 Bus.
Willielm Streck,
Phone
4 - 5 6 5 3 Res.
Prop.
PATRONIZE THE COLLEGE CAFETERIA
A Non-Profit M a k i n g
Enterprise
Special S t u d e n t s ' L u n c h e o n 20c
36-38 B E A V E R
STREET
9 1 S t e p s E a s t of P e a r l S t r e e t
Page 4
Plant For Addition
To Milne Building
Reach Completion
A three-story nddition to Milno
High school to provide classrooms
for special courses in art, home economics, dramatics and class instruction demonstrations, plus a machine
shop in tho basement is planned and
will be erected during 1936 through
funds furnished by the unemployment relief bond issue of last fall.
This project was made public by Dr.
A. B. Brubacher, president, recently.
The structure, which will cost approximately $30,000, is one which
will fill a long-felt need at the Milne
High school. The art, home economics and machine shop rooms will
enable the school to follow the courso
laid down by the State Department
of Education in providing training
facilities for junior high school
teachers.
Construction of the addition, which
will be erected between Page hall
and Milno high school, will be a
comparatively short project and will
probably be completed during the
summer vacation, according to Dr.
Brubacher's statement.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 14, 1936
Co-op 'Open Door' Policy
Aids Student Orientation
In all the turmoil and excitement of the resumption of classes,
those few freshmen who are making their entrance to State college
nt this time are not only neglected, but ignored. As a NEWS
reporter, aware of this situation,
scouted around for a solution to
the problem, a side trip to the
Co-op seemed an excellent solution.
Miss Fny, manager of tho collego bookstore, especially extends
to all new students an invitation
to come in and get acquainted.
Aside from its commercial aspect,
Miss Fay points out a few of the
services and attractions of tho
shop. The haunted bookshop is
an excellent place to pass a few
hours browsing among famous and
popular writers, and a placo where
acquaintances are rapidly formed.
If there are questions which you
wish answered concerning time
tables of busses or trains, the
Co-op stands at your service.
And in tho financial field, Miss
Fay will render a service to college students by endorsing checks
which tliey wish to cash.
Debate Trvouts
To Be Thursday
TO ISSUE " LION "
Tho winter issue of the Lion, college humor magazine, will be distributed on Friday, Robert Benedict,
Debate council will conduct try- co-editor-in-chief, stated today.
outs for varsity debate on Thursday
at 4:15 o'clock in room 28 of
Richardson hall.
All sophomores,
juniors, and seniors who are not by a two-thirds vote of cacli house,
already on the varsity squad are eli- to ovcrrido any 5-4 decisions of the
gible to try out, according to Ralph Supreme Court that declare an act
of Congress unconstitutional."
Altmnn, '36, president.
Candidates who are chosen to the
Each candidate trying out must varsity squad as a result of those tryprepare a five minute speech on either outs will thus become eligible for at
side of the question: "Resolved: least one inter-collegiate debato in
That Congress should be permitted, the course of the year.
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop.
Dial 5-1913
" 8-9919
Boulevard
Cafeteria
and Qrill
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
Steefel Says
MEN'S FORMAL
ATTIRE
FOR ALL
OCCASIONS
•
Use Our Rental
Department
•
Steefel Bros.
82 State St.
© 1936, UGGHT & MYERS T06ACCO CO.
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