N State Coll ews .^t"

advertisement
srATE
.^t"
N ews
State Coll
18, No. 7
STATK COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., DKCEMHER 8, 1933
2.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
STATE TO MEET
DREW IN OPENER
Y.W.C. A, RECEPTION
TO BE TOMORROW
FRENCH EDUCATOR
TO SPEAK TODAY
Baker Declines T o Give Line-Up;
Hints at Use of N e w System
Tomorrow Night
Junior College Women T o Attend
Luncheon-Meeting in Lounge
At 12:00 O'clock
VOL.
Hv
The
William
W o m e n students o f the J u n i o r
Nelson
lege w i l l attend a reception
1933-3-4 court season w i l l
open
iten
t o m o r r o w night in the Page hall g y m encounters
Drew
university o f
M a d i s o n . \ ' e w Jersey. T h i s is the first
time
in the h i s t o r y
o f Slate
college
basketball that D r e w has been listed o n
the
schedule,
according
t o (leorge
K e t c h a n i . '34, V a r s i t y manager.
R o g e r H a n c r o f l , '34, varsity player
f o r three years, w i l l captain the team.
H a n c r o f l seems confident that the S t a l e
learn " w i l l take the opposition into
camp."
col-
tomorrow
i f r o m 12 :()() u n t i l 2 3)0 o'clock
i
-1.^.
of
Members
honorary
society,
Myskania,
senior
representatives o l
will
lunaii
M . Augltste
V . Desclos,
des U n i v c r s i t e s et Ecoles
will
Francaiscs,
address t h e 1 1 : 1 0 assembly
m o r n i n g on the topic " F r e n c h
this
Exam-
inations, T h e i r D o c t r i n e and P r a c t i c e , "
Grenfell
R a n d , '34, president
o f the
association, announced
today.
STATE COI.U;(;E N E W S to have copies
student
Monsieur
Desclos
is l e c t u r i n g
under
the auspices o f the I n s t i t u t e o f I n t e r national
CONDUCTS DINNER
FOR 21 INITIATES
R a n d , ' 3 7 ; and clean-up, Josephine K i r and D r . I l a r r v E. P r a t t , p r i n c i p a l o f
hv, \\7.
A l b a m H i g h school, also an li
miry
' T h e V o u n g Men's C h r i s t i a n as.socia
member o f the f r a t e r n i t y . D r . I'Vcdlioii
recently
accorded
meinbership c r i c k and D r . P a l m e r were received at
j e l i g i b i l i t y to the men o f the J u n i o r this l i m e i n t o h o n o r a r y m e m b e r s h i p ,
g r o u p i n accordance w i l h the p o l i o
T h e names o f the initiates a r e : Gus
'established hv the student association A skin, D o n a l d Benedict. D a v i d B r a y ,
o f Stat,' college in e x t e n d i n g parity t o James I M a n , T h e o d o r e K c k c r t , W i l b u r
r e g u l a r l y enrolled students in the J i m F o w l e r , T h o m a s G a r r e U , B e r t r a m M r
ior college.
N'ary, F r a n k P c l r m i i s , T h o m a s R y a n ,
and M e l b u r n W o o i n a n , s e n i o r s ; and
W i l f r e d A l l a r d , John B i l l s , K e n n e t h
Christian, Carlton Coulter, David K r o inan. Robert RalTertv, C l i f f o r d R a i l ,
W i l l i a m T o r p c y , A l e x a n d e r J a d i c k , and
I )an V a n I . e m a i l , j u n i o r s .
EDUCATION CLASS
SPONSORS MILNE
CLUB PROGRAMS
vised hv sludeiils in E d u c a t i o n
115. a
Handbook
\l,
ois,
Directory Shows State Students
Come From Quasi-European Cities
Monsieur
assistant d i r e c t o r o f t h e Office N a t i o n a l
of this publication sent to him.
'
c u r s e in e x t r a c u r r i c u l a ' - activities,
Every si,idem o f the j u n i o r I n c h
\\'e,liiesda\ night al N:lll) o'clock, ac
school is a o l u n t a r v uieniber o l one
c o r d i n g to June C a n ) , ' 3 1 . president.
o f the groups. M e e t i n g s a n c l u r l o l
T h e students inducted into pledgl e v e n Wednesday m o r n i n g t r
I I :30
membership in,dud,•
K e l i l i a ( oiincllv lo 12:00 o ' . l o c k .
M
l 1 1
;
1l l
and W i l l i a m N e l s o n , se
•-. and M i l
"
' " '" " "
" " supervisors are
ilics for t l i
lb. e i g h t h , and
d i e d h'acei and R u t h W i l l i a m s , j u n i o r s
Mil Sarah V a n
Miss i u u n c l l , is edit,,, in chii l o f m i l l grades, Helen
the / . n n / , hunioi m a g a / i n e
Nelson is I l a n a g e i i . and \ i r g i n a A b a j i a n , sen
managing editoi o l the \ ' i w - and was i o r s ; a v i a t i o n , Charles l u c k e i t . ' 3 4 ;
beginners' d a n c i n g , G e r t r u d e l . o i t u s ,
'3-1,
and s a . a l i Rundle, graduate -in
stall
Miss | acer is cirrul,'
i man
dent
; engineers, Paul Sands, g r a d u a t e :
ager o i the \ ' i w - and Miss W i l l i a m s i ,
e x c u r s i o n . Agnes 1 , 1 , , „ i d A l m a D o l i
associ,
laliagmg e d i l o i , , l the \ i w
i,i, s,i
s ; e l , , , d u b , M a r i e D u n and
and w . o , , !
in d u e l o l i l l
I'l.C
i
Desclos Will Discuss Examinations;
Association T o Elect Annual
N. S. P. A. Delegate
Education.
Voting
f o r a delegate t o attend the
N a t i o n a l Student Federation o f A m e r i ca convention t o be conducted in W a s h ington,
D. C , Wednesday,
Thursday,
F r i d a y , S a t u r d a y and Sunday, Decemthe D r a m a t i c and A r t c o u n c i l , music
ber 17, 28, 29, 30 a n d 3 1 , w i l l also be a
I j o u n c i l , and members o f College publi
' w e n t y - o n e upperclassmeii were . l i gation hoards have been i n v i t e d t o at ducted i n t o f u l l m e m b e r s h i p i n C h i feature o f the assembly this m o r n i n g .
lL m
' lchapter o f K a p p a P h i K a p p a , national
M o n s i e u r Desclos has been in charge
Daisv B r v s o t i , 35, w i l l he general ,
,
, • , . - . . , ,of the educational exchanges o f teachc h a i r m a n f o r the reception. Miss B r v - h o n o r a r y educat.onal t r a t e , i n l y , at f u r ers and student's between E n g l a n d and
sou w i l l be assisted by the members o f " m l i n i t i a t i o n services conducted yeslerFrance f o r many years. In 192b he bethc first and second Y . W . C . A . cabinets d a \ a f t e r n o o n at 4 :()() o'clock i n the
came the d i r e c t o r o f the exchanges beand the f o l l o w i n g committees : a r r a n g e
| . „ m l R l . ,,f Richardson hall,
tween the U n i t e d Slates and France.
incuts, I.ois P o l l e r ,
3 h ; niMtalioiis,
. ,.
.
, . ..
, ,,
,
H e is c h a i r m a n o f the F r e n c h c o m A ,i,nm r
Jacqueline h'.vans, ' . i n ; p u b l i c i t v , H u l ' " " " 1 , K ' " " " ' " , ' s ' " " " w e i l at
dab Classen, ' 3 d ; r e f r e s h m e n t s , H a r r i e t | 7 :()() o'clock at the U n i v e r s i t y club. I he mittee on the i n t e r n a t i o n a l i n q u i r y i n t o
T e n Kvck and H i l d a l l c i n c s , j u n i o r s , p r i n c i p a l speaker at the d i n n e r was D r . e x a m i n a t i o n s now being conducted in
I c o - c h a i r m e n ; entertainment and music, A . R. B r u b a c h c r , president, w h o is an d i f f e r e n t c o u n t r i e s by the Carnegie C o r Frances Sttidcbakcr and Elaine l l a i r d , j h o n o r a r y m e m b e r o f K a p p a P h i K a p - p o r a t i o n o f N e w Y o r k and the Car! sophomores, c o - c h a i r m e n ; reception. • pa. O i l i e r speakers w e r e : D r . Robert negie F o u n d a t i o n , under the supervision
1
M a y b e l l e M a t t h e w s , '34, S a r a h L o g a n , W . h'rederick, and D r . James l i . P a h n - o f the I n t e r n a t i o n a l I n s t i t u t e o f T e a c h ' ' 3 5 , Elizabeth G r i f f i n , '3d, and A n n e er, assistant p r o f e s s o r s o f e d u c a t i o n ; ers' college, C o l u m b i a u n i v e r s i t y .
HONOR SOCIETY
WELCOMES FOUR
Seventeen clubs have been organized
i o r e x t r a c u r r i c u l a r a c t i v i t i e s in M i l n e
MEMBERS-ELECT jumor
iiigi, school .ins s,.,„es,er. The
activities o l these groups are super-
T h e eastern branch o | the A l u m n i
association elected al the last dinner
meeting M i s . I ( n r o t l n B r i n i m i r T e n
K v c k , '30, president ; K l i / a b c t h i ; n n ,
'2,\. r e c o r d i n g s r e r c t a n : M i s , M i l d r e d
Gable O u a v l r . 'JX, t r e a s u r e r ; and Miss
A n n a K Pierce, 'K-l, member o f the
e x e c u t i v e l o m i n i t l e e ; ace dialing to M i s
B e r t h a E. H r i i i u n e r , '0(1, seen l.u \ o l
the association.
STATK COLLEGE N E W S
have an international circulation.
Copies of it will he sent to England this year at the request of Mr
John Bradbury, professor of English at Chester college.
Professor Bradbury taught English at the State college summer
school sessions in 1930 and in 1932.
During these sessions, he developed
an interest in our College publications.
Recently, Miss Helen T. Fay,
manager of the College Co-operative bookstore, received a communication from Professor Bradbury, in
which he requested that she negotiate with the editor-in-chief of the
; t o f a m i l i a r i z e them w i l l . State customs. , K A P P A
P H I
K A P P A
„ _ . , , ™ „
„ _ „ , „ . ,-w^-.
A bullet luncheon w i l l lie served at
Coach Maker has been r u n n i n g the
si|ii.'i(l t h r o u g h practice games w i t h city
teams o f excellent c a l i b r e , but d i d not
issue any statement thai the team w o u l d
' w i n o r lose.' Baker said today, " C o o p e r a t i o n lias been the keynote o f practices thus f a r , and f o r the first time
in n n coaching career, I a m unable t o
name a s t a r l i n g line up at such a late
dale. H o w e v e r , this d o e , not indicate
that o u r boys have not been i m p r o v i n g .
I t does show that there are no i n d i v i d u a l
stars."
B a k e r h a - issued suits to the f o l l o w ing players: Hancrofl, 'Klip' llurnell,
George Bancroft, T o m Carter, I Ian.Id
Stone, Charles Kissam, T h o m a s G a r r e t t , Charles l.voiis, ( K n i e r B r o o k s ,
E d w a r d l ) e Temple, D o n I l i i d d l e s t o u .
C l i f f o r d K a i l , and | e r r \ A n i e n t . U n d e r
Coach Baker's new system a l l o f the
sipiail w i l l probably see service in the
game t o m o r r o w n i g h t .
I''red M n h i n i a n , '.)5, assistant basketball m a n a g e , , has begun negotiations
\ b o v e , Coach R u t h e r f o r d R.
f o r next year's games. T h e reason f o r
Baker, w ho directs the v a r s i l v
this s c c i n i n g l , previous correspondence
basketball
learn
which
will
is that the coach is eager to hook more
o p e n l i s 1033-3-1 s c h e d u l e t o games w i t h l a r g e r colleges. K e l l e r s r e night. T o p , Roger
Bancroft,
questing dates for games have been
'3-1, w h o w i l l c a p t a i n t h e P u r p l e
sent t o the f o l l o w i n g c o l l e g e s ; U n i and ( o d d t h i s y e a r .
versitv o f V e r m o n t , T o r o n t o , W i l l i a m s ,
Amherst, Clarksoii, Miildleburv, A l
f r e d , I ' r a l t , and I l o b a r ! .
A d m i s s i o n to the game w i l l be by
presentation of student t a x ticket o r
pa\ mellt o f f o r h cents. Assistant m a n agers w i l l cheek a l l enhances |,, I'age
hall g y m n a s i u m , K e l c h a i u stated today.
D a n c i n g u ill follow the game u n t i l
A l p h a Phi Ga
la. national h o n o r
12:110 o'clock. Music w i l l he f u r n i s h e d
a n j o u r n a l i s t i c f r a t e r n i t y , conducted
b\ B i l l (ones and his I'lavbovs.
a pledge service f o r l o u r ncophvlcs
Mrs. Ten Eyck Heads
Alumni Branch Group
The
n the Koiinge o f R i c h a r d s o n h a l l , to be
.ponsored by t h e Y o u n g
Women's
C h r i s t i a n association.
A c t i v i t i e s o f the V. W . C. A . at Stale
college w i l l be e x p l a i n e d to the g r o u p .
W o m e n students o f the J u n i o r college
w i l l be eligible to membership in the
College association, A l m i r a Russ, '3-1,
president, stated today. T h e g r o u p w i l l
I sing College songs in a f u r t h e r effort
n a s i u m at 8 : 1 5 o'clock when the State
team
College News Will Send
Copies Abroad This Year
I I'll,, and M . o e a l e t H a l l , s,
,,1,-iice, \ u g i i s t a \ a d . g r a d u a l
F r e n c n Club To HaVC
Party Tuesday At 8:00
J
I'Vciich club
J
will
c
h i d a ( hrisl
inns party Tuesday night at S :IKI o'clock
,,, , , „ | _ , , l l l l t , r , , ( R,Vliardsou
ball,
..
.
.
.,,
. ,
N l
S|KI
M
'"" ' " " ^ '
'
- l""'«l*'"<.
anno,meed today.
A C h r i s t m a s p r o g r a m w i l l be the
,,,.,,,, | ( . . 1 | 1 ] | V ,,,- | h l , 1 | . u . ( y
Several
is
o i the c l u b
will
present a
h'reiich ( h r i s i i u a s scene and the g r o u p
" i l l sing F r e n c h carols
M a n Z a b r i s k i c , ' . b , w i l l be general
chairma
the p a r l y , and G i / c l l a
H u m m e r , '35. w i l l h, , ban m a n o f the
i c h cshmeiils ,
ee
M o n s i e u r Desclos has lectured in the
U n i t e d Stales several limes in recent
years. H e visited the U n i t e d States in
1927 as a member o f a commission o f
f o u r men appointed by the M i n i s t r y o f
Public I n s t r u c t i o n o f F r a n c e , f o r the
purpose
o f learning
about
Union
Houses, their a r c h i t e c t u r e , a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , uses, and Control. T h e a i m o f this
commission was i n aid in s o l v i n g the
problems o f the c o n s t r u c t i o n and adm i n i s t r a t i o n o f the U n i o n House o f the
Cite L ' n i v e r s i t a i r e . H e is not only an
educator, but a connoisseur o f F r e n c h
a r t , upon w h i c h subject he also lectures.
M o n s i e u r Desclos lectures either in
F u g l i s h o r in F r e n c h .
Nominees f o r the N . S. I . A . delegate, one o f w h o m w i l l be elected t o
represent State college at the annual
convention, listed in alphabetical o r d e r ,
a r e : W i l l i , d A l l a r d , D o r o t h e a Gahagan. M a r i o n l l e i i i e i n a n n , D a v i d K Ionian, and C l i f f o r d R a i l , j u n i o r s . Fach
w a r , one member o f the j u n u i r class is
ANNOUNCES
HISTORIANS
Selection o f class h i s h i r i a i i s for the
I "34 / ' , ' , / , „ / „ , / , „ • w e i r announced loda\
b\ Eleanor W a l c r b i u v , '34, editor in
chief. They a r e : senior. A l i c e F i l z p a t rick ; j u n i o r , D o r o t h e a G a l u g a u ; sophninorv, Elaine Bail d . and freshman,
Elsa S m i t h Collections f „ r /"',-,/,,,,,„/»,'
w i l l be received todav.
Bicycling As Collegiate Activity
Proves Interesting To Instructor
Ion, g r a d u a t e , Maliic. i I, n I in, i aha n i,
tiat, . i i i u i u presents m a n , interesting aspects to M r .
3 4 ; u p , w i l t i n g \ u u , l b i n i a u i i , '34
B i c v . l i u g as .,
•|oi m plivsics, who h,,s he,,,in, an eiilIiiisiastic devotee
I be l „ , , s ' s|„,p club and die g i r l s ' -h,,p I u l h , i A n d r e w s , u
pasim
t h , 'oil's " I h e n is ,dwa>s the lure to ex
W b u i o,,r ., ks ., I, II,,w indent. " \ \ hat . lb, nan
v
home l , , w n "
lull .-ii'-- -up, iwised lo \ h H a r l a n R.n
o l tin i n e n l h r, •
I c o i i n l i v loads in the I a p i t o l I l i s t i i c l , and there are
,1 i i . i l h , ,
m p i e me « h , n b, aiisw, i s " R
," " M l i n ' l s , " " I l \
I , " o i liolid. a , i - l . i n l p i , , | , ,.,,i ,,| , , | u , a t i o i i p l o t , i l l , o l d . h i l l ,
" M i s i , , , " Yi I lh< l , a n main
l u d u i l s al S|,,l, college l i
ea, I
In se II M i l l i e I h u b scl
I I h, hbi.uw M I m a n , points ,,| n i l
In- l o i a al m l , 11 -l in Ibis \ n i n i t , w hi, b I h.n c found
Mi
\udlews
t o w n s , .in,! a sin , r , o i the I "34 M a n o l h g i ,h
v reveals iii.no o i l ,ei H , , club is ass,,led h, M r - I hehll.l when ', u l l l l g , ' l , t h , o
i i,,l,,
ith
g a i, poll, i I
i i h , - I M I I ,,i i i n \ ' m
" h o m e t o w n s " thai would , .HI , ,,
i , r inns !• i i i p n - e when he l u - i beard h.,ton. \ l i l u , lil,i .ui.-iii. and i l , -in
. ll.I in,,mil,mi , i , w s w i l l , Il I h . n , dis
III, nam, , w r r , In n,,| l a n n b a i w i t h all l b , t o w n and , i l l , , , | \ , w \.,,k stale
bib l o M l \ n n . i K Bai am. Ill
Dunne
\ , o , nib, i , M l \ u d r i ,
o w i , , I suae I became interested in
I,nn, , ,
n n , in M i l n e
i t i n c i a i w n i c l u d , d ,, visit I,, M , „ k i n oh
S l a l i o i l , >•, i i u g l i l w, II b, a in,i i , p i , , i i i i n e , , n „ , , i i l
,MIS . , , , ., m i , i
I l l , beneficial exercise de
vei H. w i t h ,, l e g i s i i a l i , , , , ,,i in,|, in
tollowI , , o . 3 " , \ i n I, i d . n o I '
Massachusetts, o n , , , | the In I e l l ' h a w line
l i v e d Horn this i
le , , | i i , , , , ' cauiiol
i
s , s l a h l i s h e d h , ill, w l u l , m a n
f111111 all p a i l - , o l lb, w o i l d l o a n i l r R o m , . 1 1 I n i n b i n l g i . 4 . 1 i . m k l o i :
ilu western se. I n , , | the stall
I irii
be
ovcrestmiated,"
concluded M i list ,,| t o w n aod i Hi, n, H- ,1
oi ,
s , K'awn.o • . I ,,
Ii, D, Hi
Maine.
TO HAVE TEA
d i , setll, ,1 as an I n d i a n mission sia
An,hewM a i n o l l b , iiaiii, . w h n h , , i , l o l „ M C M I O , I M o i d , S,iv aim all, and V ai
I
I ,, l b
I |,l II , l , „ a l , , l both in „ a w , J
,H. M o c k h r i d g , . P., lav. has h u b ( , I
\ l v. Us tunes, hi, v c l i n g h a - been
In -aeiiia I hi la •
i l l will ,
N e w Y,.il> .tat. and o i l
o i oi ill,
I I,ei, a n m a m o i l , , , names , , i
nal a l i n o s p h e i e extant
" R a t h e r , the taken up hv g m i i p s on the campus A
, „ b i n , d l a g , is ., l l o i i n - h i n g sum cvcling club was o i g a n u c d i n M i l n e
III I,, s nil ,,', |,,ck al o / S M a d i
w o r l d are A I, i.,n. A m a , , dam. A l l i e n
places which a
cresting b,».,u..
Attica, Avon
B a h , L i , I;, i l m . ( u n t h , v beai i b , names , , i , , , r l a n i men, .ix .-nn.
III, i o l o i i v ,
ed as the ' l b , w c ' d l l l l c s ! 11 Igll school i h r , e v ears ago bv Rllssell
b r i d g e C a r l i s l , . I .,, 11,
I l u l e , I oi
aicb .,- \ \ eh lei . H u d s o n . K,„,s, , , l i .
Miss K a l b e i i i i e W h o hug and Miss | . „ , n in the state o l .Massachusetts,' I i i d l i i m , ' 3 1 , f o r u i e i sludeiil association
v d i s a p p o i n t m e n t . " O n this president and member o f M v s k a n i a .
•••til. ( ui.... D e l h i , I l a u k l o i i , H a m I I ei . \ l
•. M o n t g
e r \ , and M a n I C o i i k l m , sup, i vi ,,, • ..I I'm., m i n i
I, and Miss t r i p , M i
M u l r c w s t r a v e l e d a total o l
" T h e d.-pai lineiit o f health and h y b u r g , l l i i u i . Jordan
Lebanon, l i m a , R i p l e j
B a l l , and \ \ a l , rl,,o are also lish in M i l u i H i g h s d
( a l b , i iue B i o d e i nls. ' 3 1 . w i l l p m u
niiielv n i d i - . l e l i u i i i n g f r o m Stock igieue encourages studellls t o take i n L i s b o n , Lii/.ciue, L o u s , M a i n e , M , x
towns w i n c h are represented al M a l e
ico, O r e g o n , O x f o r d , K'.nena, Rome,
Last w a i ' s d i r e c t o r ) revealed that
I In i o ,
u i n s in , barge o l i l u lea In idge the f o l l o w i n g da) via a d i f f e r e n t teresl i n bic.vcbng as an excellent
Salem,
Savannah,
S.\ r a i u s e ,
Troy, one o f tin sophouiore women l i v e d i n are
Mowers, Catharine K e a r n e y , ' 3 5 , route
means o f h e a l t h f u l e x e r c i s e , " O r C a r n W a r s a w , and W n m - s t c i
Russia and received her m a i l
f r o m al r a u g c l l l c i l l s , Helen J . K e l l y , ' 3 5 ;
"Moreover,
besides t h e h i s l m ic.d hue C i o a s d n l c . head o f the department
T r o y lias I lie greatest number o l rep Poland, while a member o f the senior l.u i i l l v , A l i c e l i l / p a l i ick, '34 . and i c values , , f places w i t h i n easv 'cvcling I and College phv sician. staled (his m o r n i , i •luneiiis, Pearl l l a i n e l i i i , '^
distance, there are b e a u t i f u l landscapes ' i n g .
resentalives a l Stale
T h e numbers class resided in Eden.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, DECEMBER 8, 1933
Page 2
State College News
Established by the Class of 1918
The Undergraduate Newspaper of New York State
College for Teachers
THE NEWS
STAFF
MARION C, HOWARD
Editor-in-Chief
162 Western Avenue, 3-0975
W I L L I A M C. NELSON
Managing
Editor
Kappa Delta Rho, 117 S. Lake Avenue, 2-4314
J E A N CRAIGMILE
Advertising
Manager
Phi Delta, 20 S. Allen Street, 2-9836
KATHRYN HAUG
Finance
Manager
SEASON OPENS TONIGHT
Basketball is again in the limelight. J n fact, the varsity
will play its first game with Drew tonight. T h e team is
expecting the co-operation of the student body with reference to correct conduct at the game. Students are also
asked to come in time for the event as well as for the
dancing.
The athletics department is attempting to attain and
establish desirable inter-collegiate standing which is practically impossible without the whole-hearted backing of the
students. The council is arranging games with larger colleges and universities. In order to show that we are
worthy of such recognition, the team as well as the student body, should be at its best.
Gamma Kappa Phi, 21 N. Main Avenue, 2-41*44
D A N V A N LEUVAN
Associate Managing
401 Western Avenue, 2-2650
Editor
RUTH WILLIAMS
Associate Managing
Beta Zeta, 680 Madison Avenue, 2-3266
Editor
MILDRED FACER
Circulation
Phi Lambda, 536 Mercer Street, 2-6533
SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Almira Russ, Bessie Stetkar, and
Thclma Smith, seniors; Ruth Brooks and Valentine Keutowich,
juniors. JUNIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Celia Bishop, Diane Bochner
and Marion Mlcczek, seniors; Florence Ellen and Hilda Heines,
juniors. REPORTERS: Beatrice Coe and Rose Rosenbcck, seniors;
Bessie Hartman, Emily Hurlbut, Olga Ilyra, Dorothy Meserve,
Esther Rowland, Helen Smith, Mary Torrens, and Marion Walker,
juniors; Rosella Agostine, Elaine Baird, Phyllis Bosworth, Margaret Bowes, Lorclta Buckley, Frances Breen, Elsa Calkins, IIuldah Classen, Doris Coffin, Margaret Dictz, Frances Donnelly, Karl
Ebcrs, Ruth Edmunds, Rose Einhorn, Blodwyn Evans, Jacqueline
Evans, Eudora Farrell, Margaret Flanigan, Merle Gcdney, Marie
Geesler, Elizabeth Griffin, Elizabeth Hobbie, Dorothy Ilerrick,
Mary Hudson, Aubrey Kalbaugh, Virginia Chappcll, LaVonne
Kelsey, Jeanne l.esnick, Janet Lewis, Martha Martin, Eleanor Nottingham, Evelyn O'Brien, Emma Rogers, Charlotte Rockow, Dorothy Smith, Edith Scholl, Glenn Lingerer, Nina Ullman, and
Elizabeth Whitman, sophomores. ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER:
Julia Riel, '35. ASSISTANT CIRCULATION MANAGER: Margaret
Walsworth, '35. ASSISTANT ADVERTISI o MANAGERS: Beatrice
Burns and Elizabeth Premer, juniors. BUSINESS STAFF: William
Davidge, Edith Garrison, Frances Maxwell, Alma Quimby, juniors.
r
^ ^ y - - ™ ,
( C h a r t e r ^ •,,,;;rV'T,T
Member)
ffissocuUcri gpllcffiatc %>rcgg
-i3 193 3 t»*il™A'i|jfk^i?«»«0 1934 -
Published every Friday in the college yenr by the
Editorial Hoard representing the Student Association.
Subscriptions, $2.25 per year, single copies, ten cents.
Delivered anywhere in the United States. Entered as
second class matter at postoflice, Albany, N. Y.
By M. C. H.
e, al a - I n a l l h e .
and 111
,1 I o l l e g e - l i d e n t -
N. S. I . A.
:<;ATF
( hire again nominations have been mad, I
elegat,
to the N.S.F.A. convention. Voting for a n
elltativ
of Slate college will take place today.
All of these people vvhos, names have be, submitted
have proven able leaders through previous vvak m extra
rurrieulai a, liv itics
The person chosen will represent Male college m more
ways than one He, or die, should take with him .ome
thing of Stale college spin! and tradition. Hi-, personality
.should be pleasing and >rl definite enough to command
respect.
The NEWS prints today the records of each candidate.
These should hi' carefully read and a personal opinion
.should be formed before voting takes place.
The divergence of two systems of debate, rather than the conflicting logic
of opposing teams, secured the centre of interest at the fifth annual international
contest conducted last Friday night in Page hall auditorium between the men's
varsity debaters of State college and a team representing English universities.
The formality of American argumentation, supported by statistics and 'cold' facts,
was met by informal, yet consistently relevant exposition of the British debaters, which condoned 'lies, more lies,— and statistics.' "No string of wisecracks should be presented but if quiet humor can be relevant to the discussion it should be included," the English debaters averred following the debate
in considering the two systems of forensic argumentation.
—
Three Senior Teachers
To Direct Milne Plays
| r n ; ( s ;i
The N E W S does not necessarily endorse sentiments! nicuts. T h e book has the subtitle. " H u m o r , C a r t o o n s . "
expressed in contributions. No communications will be I ( ) l u . , . , i u ,,, s c ( , t h c hmwTt
,,„. Crosby's objectives are
printed unless the writers' names are left with the Editor
srious p r o p a g a n d a , most
in-Chief of the N E W S . Anonymity will be preserved if so far from that. Thev u n p n i
desired. The N E W S does not guarantee to print any or ironical.
all communications.
Mr. Crosby begins the book by giving the newspaper objections to Skippy's memorable Memorial Day
PRINTED IIY C. F. WILLIAMS & S O N , INC., ALDANY, N. Y.
Prayer. He answers the accusations by an analysis
of "A Cartoonist's Philosophy." l i e declares that if
Vol. XVII1, No. 7
Dec. 8, 1933
Albany, N. Y. having patriotic motives is p r o p a g a n d a , then be will
continue a propagandist until the nation is out of
danger.
T h e cartoons, Iwcutv-live in number, are reprints
MORI': SOCIAL I.I IT.
from '/•/;,• Washington I'lernld. Mis a t t a c k s are varied,
111 i l u l l
La.st week X
inducted i s lir.il inform
including those against pacifism, against a n u s and
navy reductions, against Europe and her debt-saving
dance of the ic;
III the
I gymnasium. The dan
problem, ami against Congress. Possibly the most
was open lo .ill students
as a result, about fifty
striking of these is h i . picture of G l i d e Sam lying dead
. if will nil wile m it II 111
sixty < oiiples attended, i
on a bleak, sunset Held with a knife in his back, symbol.
hers of the . Ink
i-oiig arniv and navy cut.
I his, beside. Senior H o p . has
In another cartoon we s,-r John lluli about to serve
the 1'. S. debt saving lurkev lo Italy, France, and Belonly soi ial uv cut . ipen to the until
gium
while I'ncle Sam look- on in shocked silence.
traditional Campus I )av events.
Very ironically, Crosby again pictures the Tortoise
not wish to attend I lop, either bei
Pacifist on the right road to world peace, but mi
or because the cost was ton murl
fortunately his feel are not on llie ground
Crosby's work is siirelv applicable lo \ m e r i , an eonwas, therefore, rei en •d very w e l l I n the stud • i l l s a n d
ilitious,
ll would ,,-ilai
it deal
with inure aihertisi l , w o u l d ha vc been i t i 1 b e t t e r
lo think about, if it did
attended.
It seems a shame that M a l e i i liege d o e - i,,t have
Mill) pleasant ,oi ial I III H o n - , iftel er. \
u v would
it provide a small s,
Red Rhapsody, In C o n kl a n d M l /
so, iety, but a l - o n vv u h l - i l l ! , - i l l
v M o k e - C,, _W pag
mi
III
Ver the week el 1 L.spe, ially w o u l d tb,,s
i n d e n t b o , v a p p r e i ial - a p l . u e
loving members ,,f tl
Mi
IT.-simons start- his fifth mv sterv Mor\ with
where tin v IOIIIII d.o
Interview with Visiting Speakers Reveals English College
Students Face Economic Difficulties
The debate was arranged by the NaL. T. Kitchin and F. L, Ralphs, of
London university, in presenting the af- tional Student Federation of America,
firmative aspects of the topic: " R e - wjiich also presented the four visiting
A n t h o n y Adverse, by H e r v c y Allen. F a r r a r a n d solved : that the theatre is of more cul- teams that have appeared previously.
Rincbart. 1,224 pages. $3.00.
tural value than the cinema," held that No formal decision was rendered. Dr.
"movies, in order to be popular must Harold VV. Thompson, professor of
France, Italy, Africa, and America, all contribute appeal to an audience having the mental English and coach of debate, presided
to the setting of this m o m e n t o u s novel. I n fact, it is age of a hoy fourteen years old," and over the discussion.
a p a n o r a m a of latter eighteenth a n d early nineteenth furthermore, "the motion picture must
Following the debate the Edward
century manners, customs, and m o r a l s . I t s authen- he as easily understood by the back- Eldred Potter club conducted a recepwoods population as by the most'sophis- tion for the speakers and guests of the
ticity shows the great a m o u n t of research Hervey ticate of urban dwellers."
club in the Lounge of Richardson hall.
Allen must have done in order to complete such a book.
James Dot an and Ciretl fell Rand, In an interview with a representative of
T h e book is written in the form of a biography of seniors, in defending the negative, the STATE COLLRCK N E W S , the visiting
Anthony Adverse, an illegitimate child w h o is cast averred that the cinema held great cul- debaters went on record as believing
that there arc fewer signs of depression
off by his foster-father and b r o u g h t up by the great tural potentialities, was able to portray
more 'naturalness' and could avoid the in America than in Europe.' The great
merchant Bonnyfeather. He serves his apprenticeship space limitations of the theatre. The number of automobiles seen on the
and finally comes to his own t h r o u g h inheritance of egress of leading actors from the legit- highways and in the cities was conimate stage to the cinema was listed sidered by them as indicative of general
Mr. Bonny feather's estate.
as a trend favoring the assertion that prosperity.
T h e author creates an excellent b a c k g r o u n d , both the cinema was more cultural. The
"Students in English colleges and
mental and geographical, for every move Anthony availability of the 'movies' to a greater
makes. T h r o u g h an excellent c h a r a c t e r portrayal, we percentage of the population was also universities find difficulties in financing
their education very similar to those exsuffer with A n t h o n y ; his successes are ours, and his noted.
isting at present in America. The quest
emotional reactions are ours. More than that, H e r v e y
for higher education and graduate deAllen weaves into the tale adventures a n d experiences j
grees continues to include more stuwhich give us an adequate picture of the limes. It is [
dents
who find no work available upon
a tale of birth, of love, of adventure, of physical passion,
their completion of college," Kitchin
of travel in the American clipper ships, and above all, >
stated.
He pointed out that from a
of romance.
Teacher's College near Leeds, where
Mr. Allen's style is free and the story is easy to
hree Christmas plays will be pre- the graduating class numbered over one
follow. His descriptions are excellent. H i s use of co- Isentcd Friday night in the Page hall hundred students, only eight secured
incidences is actually convincing, ft is certainly the auditorium by the Milne junior and sen employment as teachers. "The principal
type of book which, when once started, can hardly be I ior high school. The plays will lie di- means by which English students'work
put down until completed. Its popularity will possibly j reeled by Maybelle Matthews, Alice their way.' as you say. is by tutoring
make it the best loved book of our time. It has alreadv
underclassmen, although we find that
Fitzpatrick, rind Mary Moore, senior
become the bust-seller.
The junior high school will present the field of student employment has be"Told in a Chinese (iarden," directed come so overcrowded as lo force one.
by Miss Moore. The senior class will group to organize and manage a cabapresent Anton Chekov's play, "The ret," he concluded.
Always Belittlin', by Percy Crosby,
Crosby, Proposal," directed by Miss Matthews,
and "Grandma Pulls the Strings," by
publisher. 62 pages. $2.00.
David Carb and Edith Barnard Delano,
T h e famous artist of the much loved Skippy now directed by Miss Fitzpatrick.
Admission will be twenty-five cents.
. || .
vigorous protest against limitation of a r m a -
Manager
British Team Favors Informality In Debate
But Opposes Inclusion of "Wise-Crack"
Superficialities in Forensic Discussion
h, newspaper headlines "Will GliuM, Leave Swill's
oily '-" and "Can Hlandell Moiiev, New Decorations,
ud Modern Plumbing Stop I one IVnurc of Lauioin
.boil Wbii h lor More than I hirlv V c a n II,i- 1',,-en
•ole i i. , upa
' Grim ( >ld House ,m Lake •"
I n<- author •'• ' "'i I - 1 ollrav
a e l , , u p ol l
lerils,
o
oi I-, artist ,, a id musicians, seam-! tin- setting of the
-Id. haunt,,I In, ne, Suddeul.v one ol the group h iliur
e n d . but II w s certainly in ghost of the old vv an
,ho had pievi, Islv set a i III •
oiliplished 111. gruesome ,e
I h e plot deepens as,
lie bv one, lb, people, Mlsp I, d oi the , i line, either
esllov lllelils. ves, or b e , , , ie vn Inns of the same
vil power. I'h
• ii, liisi,HI i. a bit surprising, to sav
l b , ' 1st.
Red R h a p s o d y is possibly the must thrilling as well
as most balding of FiUsimoUs' books. T h e author
-in reeds ill keeping llie e \ , Henient of the murder until
tin- conclusion.
Ilolh No W i t n e s s and 70,000 W i t n e s s e s are mini
beied among (he author's previous works.
Van Kleeck,'27, Heads
Teachers' Association
Edwin Van Kleeck, '27, was elected
lire,idem of the Southeastern zone of
Ihe N'rw York Stale Teachers' association at the annual convention recently
conducted in Xew York city. The
Southeastern zone includes the southern Hudson counties, the Metropolitan
area and Long Island.
\'an Kleeck was editor of t he Si vi i;
CUI.I.KUK Ni-.ws and a member of Myskania, senior I
-ary society , while at
Stale college, lie is now superintendent ,,f schools at Walilen, \ . Y.
TO CONDUCT MEETING
The regular meeting of the Lutheran
club vv ill be e hided ill the form of
a supper meeting at the Friendship
hulls,', Wednesday, at 5:.!(l o'clock. A
song festival will take place after the
regular meeling. I aura Vroiii.au and
Ruth Wright, seniors, are m chairmen.
Calendar
Today
II :l() Student assemble, auditori
inn, Pag,- hall.
7:IHI
Tonight
Edward Eldred Potter club
formal
initiati
linner,
drill, Houlevard cafeteria.
THE PLAYGOER
It h a s alvva.v . I„ eu o u r a i m lo be coll
Tomorrow
U:ll(l
Y. W . C
A
lunior college women -an
dents, Lounge, Picbardsoii
hall.
K:I5 llaskelliall game. Mai, col
lege versus Drew inn-., i iiv.
gymnasium, Page hall
Sunday
,1 no Gumma Kappa Phi sotorilv
lea, sororih h"ils,, JI N'oitii
Mam avenue
ritv
(In Sigma I'll,-t.i -
in o u r c r i t i c i s m ,
rii,live
reception l o r
ill, pi ad,
we humbly
a n d it
kit, si e l i ' o r l , in w h i c h not m i e uglv
ol c e n s o r c a n I,,
is
MI 1 mil i b i s , , , u r
word
found.
( In I'm Mav n i g h t , t h e set w a s bril
liai.lh.
a l i v e a n d in k e e p i n g
pla.v a - M w a
vvri
with t h e
I'll, i
r s Mi-
llie , . , i u u g w, wish to ,|ivi,le l u l w e e l l
I iailctl
.<n.\ P e n e d i c l
i six l a u g h s a n d
t w o a n , k, i -. i i"i , , i l i b i n g al l i m e s i h e
I ipilll ol lb, huilci.iuc
I be o l h , l live
c b a r a c . r- may h a v e ,, m i , k, i a p i e c e
M.i'.b on avenue,
Tuesday
,S Ud En II. h
club
I oimg, . Ri, haul
5 .in
7:30
hi
111,,1 111'..'.
hall
Wednesday
I mil, i .iti Cub -.ii|i|„-i ui,, i
illg. I'lielliLlnp house, I'llMale iliei I
S p a n i s h ( , r i m a n , bibs
inert. I iinline, Hi, hardsoii
ball
Thursday
M moral! club discus
i
meeting. Lounge, Richard
s,,n hall.
Ph) sirs club meeting, room
150, lliisied ball.
7 .111 (iii I Scout meeting, gyinua
siiini, I lawbv hall,
-1:10
Mr. I
, , il.mil',
we
I
wish
•' hoiniii, I. w h i c h h e
d e n i v . ' l Inn did not r e c e i v e ,
lo p l u . k
s, w i a l
loves a n d
i w i l h " i i , ,,| l b . in " P i una D m i
na" i i.u ii ll loi ii iking sin ,, • stiillv
lb, high, .1 II. 'I, i a v ill,on , v, i all, nipt
,d ; M r l\ie, anli I'm the 111,,si llagi ant
on Slat, 's stage ; ll-ttv Grrg.u v f,u lb.
line exhibition ol , skill).) nose rubbing
| Mr l h.-u.v I,a hi-, pone, and for Inabiblv lo digest the euoi inoin amount
of words he swallowed; Hetty Mcui.v
: for her ability to over act over acting :
and filially, Mr. Goldberger for bis
j well-fitting derby.
The rest of (In- huu<|UCt we leave vv ilh
| Mr, Jones for the most successful at
| tempt at asininily this season. We
I have every confidence thai if there had
been others, III- would have still be. II
I far superior.
(follratatf Diotst
SECTION
"National Collegiate News in Picture and Paragraph"
HIGHEST RANKING INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS PLAYER of the
year is Jack Tidball of the University of California. He was selected by
the intercollegiate tennis committee of the U. S. L. T. A. i„,„„.,l0„.i N.«. pho,„
QUEEN OF QUEENS is the title given
Oklahoma State University's newest royalty, Miss Mary McGovern, who was chosen
by popular vote from a group of past
queens.
COMMENCE FIRING! A four-inch
gun on the destroyer U. S. S. Fairfax
(shown below) manned by naval R. O.
T. C. students from the Georgia Institute of Technology. This was part of a
recent cruise in which student officers
from Harvard and Yale also participated.
"LITTLE SHIEK" — this j
is the title given to Selim|
Said Abboud by his classmates at the University of I
Minnesota. This Bedouin
(at left) was once sentenced!
to death, but was miracu- ^N ORCHID to Marcella Lawrence was
lously saved by the gov- v o t e j by the Ohio University band as they
ernor-general.
welcomed their new co-ed sponsor.
w
Mlnnltpolll Journal Photo
v
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"WHAT-A-MAN", prize Bulldog owned by eight-year-old Arthui
Smith of Cleveland, is ready to tackle the toughest of gridiron warriors, and he guarantees never to let go once the tackle is made. H«
is all padded for the game.
»,,„„,, v*™ n«>.
S C E N E S FROM THE
ENGLISH COLLEGES —
Armstrong College students
aided the Royal Infirmary
by their annual Rag Procession through the streets of
Newcastle (left). Welcoming their new professor, students of M c C r e a Magee
College "chair" Prof. W.O.
Guthrie (right). Pillion riding is a very popular sport
at Cambridge University
(belOW).
Wld. World Photo
Wide Worl.l PI
wife worn not*
TOP HATS AND ALL,
students have returned to
Eton College to work this
year under their new headmaster, Mr. Claude Elliot
( l e f t ) . Resting between
h i k e s , the Eton College
O. T. C. is receiving orders
from an officer as they sit on
the roadside near Sunningdale.
PARLEZ V O U S
FRANCAIS? —
You should when
you meet M i l e .
Marie Grinneisir
(right) of Bordeaux, France, a
student at the University of Buffalo.
BAREFOOT
DROPKICKER —
when he wants accuracy at the crucial moment of the
game, James Kinney (below), Ham1 i n e University
freshman and native of the Hawai-,
ian I s l a n d s , removes his cleated
shoes and k i c k s
barefooted.
RUTGERS WINS TRIANGULAR REGATTA-A specially arranged one
mile race between the crews of three leading eastern colleges was won by the
Rutgers eight after a stirring battle on the Schuylkill nver. Pennsylvania
was second and Manhattan College third.
lotuMtloul N.w Hate
gSMhrij
laU f nm
BEST EXEMPLIFYING THE SPIR"
OF SPORTS at Midland College, Miss
Estella Loseke has been voted athletic
queen by her fellow-students.
• i
A.N
t l i1
••
••?""" • * *
"^
W V T l l KBfc^-^^^W'^W^^
7
*
i
1
•*4,
A WHOLE CONSTELLATION OF STARS—The leaders of the various sports divisions at
Simmons College, Boston, Mass., are shown here in a smiling mood. From left to right: Sidney
Stanton, tennis; Jessie Dodge, riding; Dorothy McClure, basketball; Dorothy Squire, field hockey;
ICWUM view photo
Harriet MacDonald, swimming; and Sally Rahn, archery.
ELECTIONS ARE OVER—and here are three of the class
presidents at Bryn Mawr College, left to right: Betty Faeth,
junior; Sara Mache Miles, senior, and Doreen Danaris Canaday,
Wide World Photo
TOURING THE NATION on an extensive speaking tour, Miss
Amelia Earhart, America's "flying sweetheart", has visited a
large number of colleges this fall. She is shown here being
received by a large crowd on the Dartmouth Collge campus.
OPPOSING THE APPOINTMENT OF A SOCIALIST these co-eds at the University of Puerto
Rico joined the men on a strike against the removal of Prof. Clemente Pereda from the faculty.
Prof. Pereda, shown at the right above, is a former member of the faculty of Middlebury College
and of Columbia University. Prof. Pereda has been called "Jesus Cricto" by the striking students.
W . J , W»ild
fluxo.
NEW EQUIPMENT FOR STUDYING ATOMS has been installed in the
physics laboratories at Purdue University. Here is shown a large quartz spectrograph for photographing spectra.
REPRESENTATIVE senior
woman on the Coe College campus is Miss Edith Benson, co-ed
leader,
SUPPORT THE ADMINISTRATION — Prof. William D. Cairns of
the mathematics department at
Oberlin College proudly displays his
Blue Eagle.
OUTSTANDING JOURNALISTS AT DE PAUW UNIVERSITY have been
pledged by Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic fraternity, in recognition of
their outstanding work in the field of student journalism. Eugene Pulliam (third
from left, kneeling) is a son of one of the founders of the organization.
-0EVERY EVENING at sunset, Armas V. Erkkila (below) plays the chimes in the Mead Memorial Chapel on the campus of Middlebury,
Vt„ College.
WITCHES* RULER— Miss Helen Casemore, co-ed at Christian
College, Columbia, Mo., reigned supreme over the "goblins" as
Hallowe'en Queen, to which position she was elected by her classmates.
GONE ARE THE CROWDS, the bands, the charging football teams, the cheers and the life
— the curtain has been rung down on King Football's act for the year. And here's the main
entrance to the Blue jay stadium at Creighton University, all locked up for a cold, lonely
winter.
TREED— the authorities at the Northern II
linois State Teachers College are stumped, foi
they cannot keep students from mining thi«
fine old birch on the campus.
BEFORE AND AFTER? — No, this is not an advertisement, but merely the smallest and the largest students at the State Teachers College, Superior, Wib.
Ambrose Yehle, 250 pounds, is holding Earl Wallman,
50 pounds. Both are 21.
DRAMATICS CLAIM the spare time of Miss
Jane Eikenberry, popular student actress at
Miami University, Oxford, O. The young star
is a junior.
QUEEN OF THE CORNHUSKERS does not come from Iowa.
Here's Frances Cosgrove, popular co-ed at Cortland, N, Y., State
Normal School.
BOOK OF THE W E E K
One Eye Westward . . .
the novel which is most interesting. The evolution of the love of
Tomorrow Never Comes. By Wal- Catharine for Martin and the lester Gilkyson. Sears Publishing sening of her regard for her ruthCompany, Inc. $2.00.
less, sacrosant mother are both
given to us convincingly. The porThere has been a tendency trait
of the mother, Florence Wilamong certain authors to produce let Carmichael,
succeeds remarkplays and novels with a particular ably. She is a grasping,
hypocritview toward their ultimate adop- ical woman, capable of any
actions
tion as material for motion picture which might further her own
inproduction. Mr. Gilkyson's novel terests. The helplessness of her
unquestionably has the situation husband in the face of her "holy
and characters most suitable for
use in scenario form. The Free- crusade" is pathetic.
monts are the people concerned. Were it not for the occasional
Martin Freemont is a successful entrance into the novel of the steyoung lawer about to begin a po- reotyped melodrama we have seen
litical career which is to see him so often on the American screen,
chosen as the Republican candi- Mr. Gilkyson's novel would apdate for Congress. His wife is the proach high quality. His prose is
daughter, oddly enough, of a undowered, simple and direct. It
woman whose selection by the has the matter of fact tempo of its
Democratic party as candidate to characters. Perhaps it is the most
oppose Martin Freemont compli- suitable fashion in which to
cates the novelist's plot to such an achieve successful presentation of
extent that it needs the entrance middle class people, but it is not
into the story of a complete gang- even remotely capable of the enland set-up to clear the way for grossing effect of the style of Sinthe eventual triumph of young clair Lewis. Mr. Gilkyson has
made a great potential story for
Freemont.
Hollywood but he has sacrified
The story t}as speed, tenseness quality in the attempt. He is an
and a fair love interest centered able writer, but he has obviously
around the gradual accptance by created a story for a definite marCatharine, Martin's wife, of his am- ket and his work is stamped with
bitions as a politician. The ac- all the limits and defects of that
count of her growing faith in the market. He gives a shallow result
ability and justification of her hus- where he had an opportunity to
band is excellently conveyed to us create several characters of more
by the author. It is this phase of than passing interest.
HOCKEY IS THE SPORT OF EASTERN CO-EDS in the fall—while the men are fighting
for the glory of their alma mater on the gridiron the women are battling on the hockey field.
Above is shown the hockey team of the Beaver College which recently opened its season against
the hockey team of New York University.
Wide World Photo
T R E E S ARE THE
H O B B Y of President
E d w i n L. Stephens of
Southwestern Louisiana
Institute. At the right is
the Robert Martin oak
which he planted in 1901
in honor of the founder of
the institution.
AN ICE BREAKER is Miss Jane
Woodward, c h a i r m a n of the Ice
Breaker Ball at Ohio State University.
<0
THE ROYAL HOUSEPARTY—The faculty and the freshman class of Converse College are shown as they assembled in the
main lobby of Wilson Hall on the campus of the Spartanburg, S. C, institution for the annual reception given by the faculty.
Dr. E. M. Gwathmey, president of the college, and Mrs. Gwathmey are the King and Queen of the function.
NEW DORMITORY AT DENVER SCHOOL COSTS $275,000—Foote Hall at the Colorado Woman's. College
has just been completed, while at the right is a view of Treat Hall as seen from the new structure.
A GEORGIANA COLLECTOR
second only to DeRenne — Louis S.
Moore, a University of Georgia graduate, prizes most his original of a
petition made by the c o l o n y of
Georgia to the King in 1737.
EMBARRASSED WILL ROGERS closed his eyes
when he was photographed with this group of rowing collegians from Yale University when they visited him in Hollywood during a western crew trip.
Or was it camera fright?
"COLLEGE REVIEW" at
the University of Alabama
featured Miss Becky Stover
(left).
PRACTICE BABY —Virginia Fay (at right), nine
months old, lives with senior students at Hood College in their home management house.
OLDEST GRADUATE of Boston University observed his 93rd birthday last month. Dr. Samuel H.
Beale graduated in 1871.
[STUDENT OPINION is the
"collector's hobby" of Miss Annie Lee Marshall, journalism
student at t he University of
Texas.
Jleport
=Z*=
CLASSICS IN DRESS FOR THE CLASSROOM
—at the extreme right is a frock that is smart in
high colored silks or wools, with the lapped bodice
and dolman sleeves adding youthful details. In the
center is a frock which is chic in a hairy or feathery
wool, with a scarf that gives a high draped neckline,
while at the left is a frock that is a classic in tweed.
MARKS:
POOR, F A I R , G O O D , OR E X C E L L E N T
SUBJECT
LET 'EM EAT CAKE: A sequel to "Of Thee I Sing". The
producers attempted a satire which evolved into a political nightmare. Nevertheless, pretty amusing hooey.
AMERICA IN SEARCH OP CULTURE: And Mr. William
Aylott Orion's reasons for her wild goose chase. Something for
you social philosophers to play around with.
TOO MUCH HARMONY:
One of the back stage epidemic.
Crosby's voice and Oakie's southern accent cover a multitude of
pretty feeble stage settings. Skeels Gallagher is funny as usual
and that's about all.
LONG LOST FATHER: Prom G. B. Stern's novel with fohn
Barrymore as the debonair man of the world who suddenly realizes the responsibilities of parenthood when he discovers that his
vivacious and long neglected daughter is strikingly beautiful.
(Barrymore good movie)
HEADLINE SHOOTER: Story of a newsreel photographer and
Hollywood's extra heavy, ready-to-wear, news flashes.
NIGHT OVER PITCH'S POND: By Cora farrett. An ominous tale which is a mystery and isn't. 'The atmosphere which
permeates this book will make you feel like you did the night
your fraternity quest wound up in a graveyard.
I'A'ITKKNS MAY BE ORDERED
from
114 S, Carroll St., Madlion, Wii.
Enclouc itampi, coine, money order
or check (or 20 cent* for etch patiem and coil of mailing. Pleaie indicate pattern number and line on
order.
.
'
MR. DARLINGTON'S DANGEROUS AGE: By Isa Glenn.
A bachelor banker gets himself into hot water in the Par East,
Can you imagine anything more delectable? fust imagine—
don't read!
THE MAN WHO DARED: A film based on life of the late
Mayor Cermak of Chicago. A lavish spread of never-told a-lie
baloney. (Preston Poster, Zita fohann)
IT TAKES HEALTHY NERVES
TO BREAK RECORDS IN THE A I R !
HE FLEW AROUND THE WORLD ALONE! Wiley Post climbs
out of the W i n n i e Mae at Floyd Bennett Field
as the w h o l e world applauds his skill and marvelous physical endurance. "Smoking Camels as I
have for so long," says Post, " I never worry about
healthy nerves—and I'm a constant smoker, t o o . "
FLYING EIGHT DAVS AND NIGHTS without a stop, Frances Mar.
salts and Louise T h a d e n set the world's endurance flight
record for w o m e n . Miss T h a d e n says, "For t o m e years
I've smoked Camels. T h e y taste better." A l s o a Camel
fan, Miss Marsalis says, "I've never changed because 1
can't afford to take chances with m y nervous system."
RACING ACROSS AMERICA in 10 hours and 5 H minutes,
C o l . Roscoe Turner recently added a n e w WestEast transcontinental speed record to the East'West
record h e w o n earlier this year. "Like most pilots 1
smoke a lot," says Col.Turner. "I smoke Camels for
the sake of healthy nerves, and I enjoy t h e m more."
SHE W h y is it that all you pilots
smoke Camels, too? Is it be*
cause they're milder?
HE: That's o n e way
You see, pilots
and they have
Camels don't
j u m p y nerves.
of putting it.
smoke a lot
f o u n d that
give them
IfrAdTfo
I t U MORE FUN TO KNOW
CifHlt «rt mac)* fromfloor,MORI IXHNWVI
tobacco* m m ony omor popular brand. Loot
tobaccos for clgaraftof foil bo bought from
5c o pound to f 1.00. ..but Carnal pays tho
militate mart mot Intufo your on{oymont.
Men and women who are famous for
their brilliant flying agree about
smoking and healthy nerves. "I never
worry about healthy nerves," they
say, "because I smoke Camels."
They cannot afford to make a mistake in choosing their cigarette. They
have to know. And it is more fun to
know, because of the greater smoking
pleasure they find in Camels. Camels
are milder. .. better in taste. They
leave no "cigaretty" aftertaste.
Change to Camels . . . and see for
yourself that they do not get on your
nerves or tire your taste!
CAMEL'S COSTLIER TOBACCOS
NEVER GET ON YOUR NERVES^!.. NEVER TIRE YOUR TASTE
Copyriuht. IQStl,
H. J . lteyuulilu 'J't.bmvo Cum.niujf
SECTION
• "National Collegiate News in Picture and Paragraph"
ROMPING IN THE FIRST SNOW of the winter season,
these Elmira, N. Y., College coeds believe in safety in numbers when they start out on their initial skiing expedition,
/
/
/
I
I
*SF
MAKING THEIR MARX IN THE WORLD, these members
of Sphinx have just been initiated into the highest non-scholastic honorary society at the University of Georgia. Each
class of initiates is required to present a skit—and here's the
latest edition,
*"•"•• I«""»I >•»««>
.
H\-~>.
$$5$ #,
HERE COME THE FUTURE ADMIRALS! And the midshipmen at the U. S.
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., made a striking picture as they marched
with precision onto the drill held for a dress parade.
KMWBI view n»w
SHORTS. SLACKS, OR JODPHURS are worn by the well-dressed bicyclist, as
is here demonstrated by Rockford College co-eds—devotees of the newest college
sport.
GYPSY REVELLER-Prc
ident Aaa M. Royce of the
Platteville, Wis., State Teach
era College.
A BOWER OP FLOWERS at the Purdue horticultural
•how is shown above, while at die right is the artistic
garden which was one of the features of the exhibit which
attracted SJBOO.
THERE'LL BE SPUDS FOR DINNER, is the positive
opinion of these co-eds at the Alabama College who run a
depression dormitory at the school. They live with ten
other co-eds.
v. T. ». S. IM>
HEADS COLLEGES PRESIDENTS
—Pres. Ralph D. Hetzel of Pennsylvania State College, new leader of the
Association of College Presidents of
JAPANESE AMBASSADOR HONORS STUDENT SON
AT PRINCETON—The Honorable Katsumi Debouchi gave
a dinner recently in honor of his son, Masaru, a senior at
Princeton University. They are shown here together after
the banquet.
Wid« World Ptio
THE FAMOUS AUCTION SCENE from Harriet Beecher Stowe's epic.
"Uncle Tom's Cabin", which was presented by the University of Michigan Play Production society. The above scene is the most colorful of
the entire play.
DRAMATISTS IN THE MAKING are these candidates for membership in the Marquette University Players who have been given tryout*
by Miss Ruth C. Klein (seated), associate professor of speech and director of the Players.
*u«i*w i « u H«.
"AH-H—-CHOO"—Bonnevierre Marsh, star
ring in the University of Wisconsin Players
production, "Alice in Wonderland."
THE TIN SOLDIER-or whatever
you want to call it—of a recent production of the Galilohi Club of the Lewis
ton Normal College.
ROBOTS REPLACED MEN in the production of HR U. R." at the Los Angeles Junior
College. Here is the man in the iron mask.
COLD FEET? Even down in Georgia the pools aren't particularly warm this time of the year.
But these Agnes Scott College co-eds don't seem to mind. They are shown on Kid's Day, an
annual event when students dress as children.
KING WINTER PAINTS an entrancing portrait of the Rogers
Memorial Gateway at Christian College. This stately monument is
built of Bedford stone in the form of a triple gateway connected by
a stone wall. The architecture is Tudor-Gothic.
rTh
HJJ
THREETIMES
Miss Ellen Hopkins
(at right) has been
chosen by the students of Ohio Wesleyan University to
rule them as queen.
GUEST OF HONOR
at the University of
Iowa alumni meeting
in New York City
was President Walter
A. Jessup, of t h e
Iowa institution. He
is shown at left with
a group of alumni.
Wide World Photo
GOLD-PANNING CLASSES have
been established by Prof. Oscar A.
Dingman of the Montana School of
Mines. Below the professor is delivering his out-door lecture.
A CEMETERY WITHOUT CORPSES has
been established by Prof. R. L. Dowdell of
the University of Minnesota. To test the
effect of soil corrosion, he has buried 1.000
pieces of metal used in funeral merchandise.
Here are two views of his experiment.
STATIONERy-T
O r d t r Now (or Xmtt
Handsome monogram or name and address printed in blue or black ink on a high
grade vellum-finish paper and envelope.
Ideal at a perional Christmas gilt for
your friend* and just the paper you need
for your own use.
100 sheets - 3 fold - and 100 envelope.
or
150 theett - 2 fold - and 100 envelope.
Packed in a beautiful Gift Boa
for f l . 0 0
EGYPTIAN BORN, these nine Monmouth College students are all the sons and daughters
of Monmouth graduates who are serving as teachers or missionaries in Egypt. There is
in existence an alumni club called Monmouth in Egypt, and now a student club called
Egypt in Monmouth.
"GOOD NEWS FOR THE VILEST
OF MEN" is the title of the John
Bunyan volume being examined by
Miss Alta E. Jenkins, Baker University
co-ed.
Please specify site you prefer and whether
monogram or name and address it desired.
Shipped anywhere in the U. S.
Th« M o n l « r « y
J • ii • s v i 11«
Stationary
. . .
Co.
Wisconsin
Mvy'^j
N.T&0
FICES
f R o ! C S B v C K v R w A ^ A I l ? S M S D A t S I ° , I N - Y U ' S T U D E N T S - F o r their designs of an airport
for upper N e w York Bay. three N e w York University students were rewarded with medals by Capt.
Eddie Rickenbacker. war ace The contest was sponsored by the Community Councils of N e w York
and the Guggenheim school of aeronautics.
B L A N K E T E D beneath one of the first snows of the season, here is the beautiful campus walk to Old Main at
Lawrence College.
T O STUDY W A T E R F L O W A G E students at the Cam:gie Institute of Technology built this model da m and river
bed. The model is complete in every detail, and fjivest le students an opportunity to work the year-round on their
projects
CARRYING T H E PKJSKINI Bag-carriers in the morning, these
Tulane University backfield men are ball-carriers in the afternoon
I hey are here alighting from a long trip—and in true football style,
K<r»iUi. Vl«w Wwo
L O N E S O M E COLLEGIATES at the University of Arizona have established what is known as a
"date bureau" where the bashful student or co-ed can get dated up with his ideal type. The fee is
twenty-five cents.
International Newt Photo
A REAL GRADUATING PRESENT—Mrs. Lola G. Apperaon of
Lynchburg, Va., gave her five granddaughters a trip around the world
when they graduated from the Farmville College for Women.
•Ural*** vitw Pboiv
T H E FIRST W I N T E R S N O W invades the 30,000-acre
mountain campus of Middlebury College.
» — * » 4MW*MM
BOOKS OF THE WEEK
Hollywood Bound
Love in o Bonk . . .
Ctoutowa. By John Held. Jr. Cash Item. By Catharine Brady.
Longmans, Green and Co. $1.00.
The Vanguard Press. 12.00.
We have ever*
to believe This poignant novel with its cold
that John Held, Jr. has written but meaningfull title is, generally
this rambling book of "travel" not speaking, an attack upon the ecofor the purpose of proving to us nomic conditions of our country.
his literary ability, but for its sub- But Miss Brady, instead of launchsequent adoption for movie pro- ing a cut and dried treatise oh the
duction. The action centers itself subject, brings into her book a love
about the journey across Forty- interest which concerns itself with
seventh Street, New York, of a two people who are caught in the
young girl who gains employment struggle of money and who eventin a department store, dance hall, ually, after numerous setbacks,
and theatre, and meets in her wan- find a life that holds for them true
derings for a livelihood the varied promise of happiness.
types of humanity which a large The author gives us with meticulous accuracy an account of the
city has to offer.
As we turn the pages of Mr. goings on in the bank where young
Hold's amazing story which is ob- Larry Yomans is employed, showviously intended to startle us we ing us the numerous possibilities
are inclined to pass off each mildly of the unethical handling of its
interesting chapter as we might a funds and it is therein that the
succession of exaggerated car- book has its value. ,
toons. His characters are more Although Miss Brody's style is
like pen and ink sketches and fail as unadorned and matter-of-fact as
to convince us in their movement the people it portrays, the story
has its dramatic moments, and
of the gravity of the situations he were
not for the fact that the
is creating. He brings into his authoritemploys
the time-shift with
story, where ever possible, some only half the ability
of let us say
thrilling issue which could with Ford Madox Ford, which
very little difficulty be converted us from scene to scene andsweeps
backinto screen material: the none too ward and forward, her novel would
scrupulous press, the mayor on a be comfortable to read.
party, a back stage suicide, and the In this story of banks and secureventual marriage of the heroine ities it is again driven home to us
to a young multimillionaire are all how great a part money plays in
things which we as movie goers the scheme of things and what the
have witnessed not too infre- lack of it can do to ambition and
quently.
to love.
CLOSING A SPECIAL TRAINING COURSE, Sir
George Adam Smith, of Aberdeen University, England,
inspected the ranks of the Officer's Training Corps at
King's College.
out* nm»
P O P U L A R Miss
Mary Ingle McGill is
the president of the
student Y. W. C. A.
at Transylvania University.
—<#—
BATTALION S P O N SOR—Miss Cecil Olson is
the co-ed sponsor of the
North Dakota State College cadet corps.
RECEIVES HONOR —Prof. C.
B. Jordan of Purdue University
was awarded a degree of Doctor
of Science by Ohio Northern University.
HAWAIIANS INVADE THE U. S.—Here are the 20 husky members of the University of Hawaii gridiron squad as they landed at Los
Angeles en route for their game with Denver University
NATIONAL INTER F RA T ER NI T Y
P R E S I D ENT
— G o r d o n E.
Burns of the University of Kentucky is a campus
as well as a national fraternity
figure.
MISS COLONEL TO YOU —Here
are the four co-ed sponsors of the
Knox College military unit: Vera
Brodman, Helen Philblad, Margaret
Nelson, and Virginia Kost.
ORIGINAL THINKING
and personal experiments
are important at Case Tech,
as this photo proves.
T H E "CONTINENTAL DRIFT"
THEORY is being tested at the Northwestern University o b s e r v a t o r y
(above) in cooperation with five United
States stations.
KWIMI VI«*> »«•
"INDOOR UNIVERSE" —that i s
what they call the Fels Planetarium,
constructed as a memorial to Benjamin
Franklin. An interior view of the new
planetarium is shown at the left,
Kiyiton* VUw Mtoiu
HI-YAH DUTCHESS—Bob Hunt tips his hat to Betty Barton at the
start of the Hobo Day parade at Ventura Junior College. At the right
is part of the reception committee.
torn
erative basis, wives of Columbia University professors take turns at
"minding" the children.
t,fMM v«» t*»
COLLEGE ABOLISHES FOOTBALLand rodeo takes its place, Here are. two
views of the Cheyenne School of Colorado
Springs rodeo. And this is no "bum steer"
either.
V
.
§•
M
•
*
N V
'ART STUDENTS HOSTESS SERVES—Miss Nene Vibber of
New York, recently appointed hostess of the Art Students
League, as she inaugurates her new duties. Left to right: Peggy
Hay, Miss Vibber, Valeria Yochem, and Elene Bartlett.
.
,
Kcyuonc Vftw
ONE T O T H R E E THOUSAND is the ratio of
co-eds to men at New York University's uptown
center. Miss Isabel C. Ebel is studying for a
degree in aeronautical engineering. Wide World Photo
Hwio
^•W
,
*
*
*
*
1
,
PROM QUEEN—Miss
Mary Brodberger led
the annual junior dance
at Saint Mary-of-theWoods College.
-TQTCELEBRATING T H E 150th ANNIVERSARY of the founding of
Dickinson College, this group of eminent educators were awarded'
honorary degrees. Left to right: Dr. I. H. Morgan, president of the
college. Wyatt Brown, W. P. Tolley, j . H. M. Knox, Jr., C. A. Fife,
A. H. Lea, J. Buffington, Frederic Woodward, H. W. Dodds, E. M.
Wilson, and R. C. Clothier.
U. S. AMBASSADOR OPENS
NEW HALL OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE AT EXETER—Mr. Robert W. Bingham performed the opening
ceremony of the new Lopes
Hall. Above is Ambassador
Bingham with a group of English statesmen and educators,
while at the left is the new
Lopes Hall, with some of the
girl students outside.
W^&X^zg
y»»i»EJfr
*Z%?<ZZ:
Report
THE BEAUTIFUL CAMPANILE on' the campus of
the Iowa State Teachers College.
MARKS:
P O O R , F A I R , G O O D , OR E X C E L L E N T
SUBJECT
LITTLE WOMEN: ]<> March steps from the pages oj Louisa
Alcotl's novel and lives and breathes and vibrates, Katharine
Hepburne is responsible. Joan Bennett, Frances Dee and lean
Parker will make you want to cut oat.paper dolls again.
CADET MAJOR William M. Brown of Davidson College with that
college's proficiency cup.
THE WOMAN WITH TWO SMILES: Maurice Le Blanc,
This couldn't even be pinned on the butler—a meteorite is responsible jor corpsy-worpsy, (Author's theme song "We were only
looting.")
HOLD YOUR HORSES: A lopsided show in which lone star
joe Cook pulls about 400 useless gadgets from his bag of tricks
and saves the evening from boredom,
DASH,
SIMPLICITY,
AND CHIC are embodied
in these two models for
class wear. At the left is a
charming frock which is
very attractive with the
bow in front and with the
Ascot effect around the
neck. At the right is a very
simple frock for the smartly
dressed co-ed.
PATTERNS MAY BB ORDBBKD
from
114 8. C.rroll St, M»dl»oo, Wit.
Endow «ttm|>i. coin., mon«y ord«r
o. check lor W ce«U for e«cb pittern Mid coil ol iMilin*. PI«fM •»dic*te p»tt«ru number nod • « • tm
order.
STAGE MOTHER: Alice Brady in an all-weepy. She raises her
sheltered daughter, (Maureen O'Stt/lii'tttt) to become a stage star
and one fine day the sequestered lambkin breaks loose. This is
the cue for the Brady woman to go into her act.
MR. BROADWAY:
Remember this title and then see the movie
across the street or you'll be fighting to gel your money back.
CONTROL PROM THE TOP: In this book Mr. Francis Nelson
lakes a jew of the president's advisers for a merry ride, Flimsy
argument but nevertheless a new angle on the New Deal,
DESIGN FOR LIVING:
What happens when three men ate in
love with the same girl. Honors are divided by the Miriam Hopkins, Frederic Marco, Gary Cooper and Everett Horton. Very well
done and cardiac tremors guaranteed.
THE SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI: College-sport romance
with crew displacing joolball. Buster Crabb* has some difficulty
—pictures calls jor words instead of grunts. He does a good job
however of caressing ore handle for a thousand jeet or so. No
offense, Sig Chis.
\r
w
1*1
Copjrrlibl, 1M3, It J. HrrnoMifobMco Company
Steacly Smokers turn to Camels
"Refereeing football never was an armchair
job, and it is more of a strain than ever in this
day of 'open' play. It takes healthy nerves —
and plenty of wind, too, to cover the field...to
stay on top of every fast-moving, deceptive play
during sixty minutes of fighting football. Because
nothing can be allowed to interfere with healthy
nerves I smoke Camels. I have tried them all —
given every popular brand a chance to show
what it can offer. Camels don't upset my nerves
even when I smoke constantly. And the longer
I smoke them the more I come to appreciate their
mildness and rich flavor."
if
H
i>
Many smokers who have changed to Camels
report that their nerves are no longer irritable
..."jumpy." Switch to Camels yourself. Smoke
them steadily. You will find that Camels do not
jangle your nerves or tire your taste.
IT IS MORE FUN TO KNOW
Camels are made from finer/ MORE EXPENSIVE tobaccos than any
other popular brand. Camel pays millions more—for your enjoyment.
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, DECEMBER 8, 1933
MISS KAMMERER
Graduate School Enrollment Totals 116
APPOINTS WINTER
With Thirty-eight Colleges Represented
Thirty-eight
colleges
throughout the United States are represented by the
SPORTS CAPTAINS
The Girls' Athletic association has
begun its winter season of sports under
the direction of Elizabeth Kammerer,
'34, president. Activities will include
basket ball, swimming, and bowling,
Miss Kammerer said.
Harriet Ten Eyck, '35, will lie captain of basketball, and Elaine Raird, '36,
will be swimming captain. The captain
of bowling has not yet been announced.
Swimming, as in previous years, will
be in the Jewish Community center
swimming-pool, two nights every week.
Sorority Will Conduct
Sunday Afternoon Tea
Gamma Kappa Phi sorority will conduct a tea Sunday afternoon from 3:00
to 5:00 o'clock at 21 North Main
avenue.
Members of the College faculty and
members of other sororities have been
invited as guests. Miss Goldcna Hills,
supervisor of mathematics in Milne
High school, and Miss Elizabeth Anderson, supervisor of commerce in Milne
High school, u ill pour.
The committees fur the tea include :
general chairman, Klorcncc llartmann,
'?>S: arrangements, Marion I .yon, '35;
refreshments, Muriel Denton, '34 ; ami
reception,
Marie
Priudle,
Marion
Auchter and Luis Van I >c Walle. sen
116 graduate students at State college, according to information obtained at the
office of Miss Elizabeth Van Denburgh, College registrar. Of these 116
graduate students, 42 are from State with exactly half that number as graduates
from the class of 1933. Although this percentage is larger than that of any
other college, it is nevertheless a decrease from the previous year, when the
percentage was 4 1 % as compared with the 36% this year.
Union college ranks second in the all bachelors of science. Four of the
number of graduate students with 13 students are civil engineers, two are
representatives, and St. Rose third with bachelors of philosophy, and one is
nine. Rensselaer Polytechnic institute an electrical engineer.
and Syracuse each have four, and Vassar, VVellcslcy, Russell Sage, Middlebury, St. Lawrence, Clark, Hart wick,
Buffalo, and New Rochelle each have
two representatives.
The only college west of the Mississippi river having a representative is
the University of Colorado with one
student. Dartmouth, Colgate, Simmons.
Hamilton,
Princeton, Cornell
and
seventeen other colleges also have hut
one representative.
The majority of these students graduated within the last few years, but
there is one student from the class of
1905 from Hates college, one from the
class of l'Jld from Simmons, and one
in mi l n 19 from Boston college.
Mure than two-thirds of the grad
uate group have the degree of bachelor
uf arts, while the remainder an' nearlv
THE SIDE LINE
I hate to mention it again but after
seeing the frosh perform last Wednesday, I think that Angna Enters should
be booked for a return engagement.
Congratulations, frosh 1
Well, tomorrow marks the start of
the 1933-34 hoop schedule. I predict
that our boys will come out on top by
at least eight points. Optimistic?
I have not been able to fathom Coach
Baker's new system; however, I am
sure it's a good one.
The preliminary game will be between the Delmar Dishwashers and
the State College Junior varsity.
Captain Drake of the Dishwashers
says that his team is one of the snappiest in the Capitol District and they
expect to throw a wet blanket (dishThe Young Women's Christian asso- cloth) over the enthusiastic Junior
ciation will conduct a "silly symphony" varsity team.
card party Friday night at 7 :30 o'clock,
in the Lounge of Richardson hall.
SCOUTS WILL MEET
Decorations and prizes for the party
The College Girl Scout troop will
will carry out the "silly symphony"
conduct its first December meeting in
theme.
Laura Clarke, '35, is general chair- the old gymnasium of Hawlcy hall
man for the party. Her committees in- Thursday night at 7:30 o'clock.
Instruction in signalling for those
clude : publicity, Harriet Ten Eyck, '35 ;
trying for their second class test and
refreshments, Sarah Logan, '35; and
•-tar lore fur those working on first
tickets and decorations, Daisy I'rvsoii, class requirements will be the features
'35.
of the meeting.
Y.W.C.A.TOHAVE
"SILLY SYMPHONY"
PARTY ON FRIDAY
GARRETT LISTS
JANUARY 6 FOR
CLUB PRODUCTION
Forty College men will participate in
the annual presentation of the Troubadours, men's social organization, which
will be conducted Saturday night, January 6, in the auditorium of Page hall.
Orchestral selections, comedy skits, and
chorus singing will be included in the
program.
Thomas Garrett, '34, will direct the
production. The following committees
have been named: stage manager,
Thurston Paul, '35; music, George
Pratt and William Jones, juniors;
business, George Ketcham, '34, chairman, Carlton Coulter, '35, Glenn Ungerer, '36, and Zigmond Sefick, '34;
advertising, Wilfred Allard, '35, chairman, Edward DeTemple and Karl
Ebers, sophomores; house, Donald
Benedict and Grenfell Rand, seniors.
TO H A V E MEETING
Physics club will conduct a meeting
Thursday at 4:10 o'clock in room 150
of Hustecl hall. Loraine Loder, '35,
will speak on "Science of Musical
Sounds," while David Rogers, '36, will
lead the discussion following the topic.
WELCOMES MEMBER
Gamma chapter of Kappa Delta Rho
fraternity welcomes Donald Packard,
'35, into full membership.
G garettes
IMot so long ago practically all
cigarettes were made by hand
Now, Chesterfields are made by high-speed machines
thai turn out 750 cigarettes a minute, and tlie
cigarettes are practically
Bv
:he use of long steel ovens
drying machines of the
most modern type and hy ageing the leaf tobacco for 30
months like wine is aged
Chesicrficld tobacco is milder
and tastes better.
Only [Mire cigarette [taper
the best made — is used for
Chesterrield.
And to make sure that everything that goes into Chesterfield
is just right, expert chemists
test all materials that are used
not
touched hy hand.
in any way in the manufacture,
Chesterfields are made and
[lacked in clean, up-to-date faclories, w here the air is changed
every 4'/a minutes. 'The moisture-proof package, wrapped in
Du Pout's No. 300 Cellophane
the host made reaches you
just as if you went hy the factory door.
In a letter to us, an eminenl scientist says:
"Chesterfield
Cigarettes
arc just as pare us the
water you drink, "
V^hesterrield cigarettes are just
as pure as the water you drink
(o l'Mi. I ii.i.i ii m Mvi.ns TOUAICO Co.
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, DECEMBER 8, 1933
13 CLUB PLEDGES
to Elect Convention Delegate;
6.A.A.ANN0DNGES Assembly
ALLARD WILL BE
News Lists Activities of N. S. F. A. Nominees TO ASSUME NEW
STATUS TONIGHT JUNIOR CHAIRMAN
HONOR VARSITIES
Dr. Carolyn Croasdale Presents
Sports Awards to Students
At Annual Dinner
Fifty-one women students received
credit in hockey and twenty-six in soccer, and honor varsity teams were announced at the annual fall award dinner conducted recently by the Girls'
Athletic association. Awards were presented by Dr. Carolyn Croasdale, college physician.
Those who received credit in hockey
are: Hestella Arthur, Julia Fullerton,
Justina Gould, Minnie McNicklc, Gertrude Sawyer and Myrtle Stowell, seniors ; Joan Barrow, Daisy Bryson, Hilda Heines, Emily Hurlbut, Sarah Logan, Lois Mclntyre, Rcba Morey, Elma
Nestorsou,
Janet
Morris,
Evelyn
Stachle, Harriet Ten Eyck, Hilda Van
Alstine, Lucy Wing and Edna Wright,
juniors; Elaine Baird, Marion Bowman, Esther Carlson, Elsa Calkins,
Huldah Classen, Ruth Duffy, Evelyn
Dahl, Mary Elmendorf, Margaret Hof,
Elizabeth McKinstry, Martha Martin,
Julia Merchant, Evelyn O'Brien, Charlotte Rockow and Margaret Warner,
sophomores; Lois Bowman, Jeannette
Cronk, Helen Clyde, Doris Flansburg,
Patricia Gauthier, Evelyn Hamann,
Mary Hershey, Ida Hammond, Ruth
Hallock, Ethel Keshner,
Dorothy
Knapp, Elizabeth Morozowski, Elsa
Smith, Elizabeth Strong and Katherine
Strevell, freshmen.
(Continued from patio 1, column S)
elected by the student association to
Miss Heinemaini is chairman of the
represent State college at this annual ticket committee for the G. A. A, and
convention.
Troubadours production to be presented
Allan! is vice-president of his class in the spring, and a member of the Adand will be general chairman of Junior vanced Dramatics class. She was chairWeek-end in February. He is vice- man of the class Moving-up day stunt
president of Troubadours, men's mu- last year, secretary of her class, treassical organization, prominent in dra- urer of Dramatics and Art council, a
matics, and served as director of the member of the Lounge committee, and
junior class stunt for Campus day in was a member of the cast for "Street
October. Allard has been prominent in Scene," a play presented by the AdCollege athletics, both as a member of vanced Dramatics class. In her freshthe varsity basketball and tennis teams, man year she received honorable menand as a member of the freshman bas- tion in the freshman prize-speaking
ketball and tennis squads in his fresh- contest. Miss Heincmann is ?. member
man year. Last year he served as class f Kappa Delta sorority.
marshal, as a member of the sophomore
Kroman is president of the junior
soiree committee, as a member of the class. He served as chairman of sophcast for "Patience," musical production omore soiree last year and as vicepresented by the Girls' Athletic asso- president of the class. He has taken
ciation and Troubadours, and as a mem- •lart in class stunts for Moving-up and
ber of the Junior Guides committee. Campus clays. He has also been a memHe is a member of Kappa Delta Rho ber of various class committees and a
fraternity, State Letter club, French member of the College basketball
club, and a pledge member of Kappa squad. He is a pledge member of KapPhi Kappa fraternity, men's education- pa Phi Kappa.
al fraternity.
Clifford Rail is vice-president of the
Miss Gahagan is business manager student association and has been a memof the Echo, College literary magazine, ber of the student council for three
and secretary of the Dramatics and years. He was president of his class
Art association. In her sophomore during both the freshman and sophoyear she was a member of the literary more years. He is a member of the
board of the Echo, director of the soph- Varsity basketball team and has repomore class stunt for Campus day, resented State college in court encountbusiness manager of the Young Wo- ers since his freshman year. Rail was
men's Christian association Fashion also a member of the 1935 freshman
Revue, and chairman of the Y. W. C. A. basketball quintet, and is coach of the
Candle-lighting and Lenten services, 1937 team this year. He is also a memand a member of the sophomore soiree ber of the tennis varsity, is a member
committee. She was class speaker on of the junior ring committee, and a
Moving-up day of her freshman year, pledge-member of Kappa Phi Kappa.
and a contestant in the freshman prizespeaking contest. In both her freshman and sophomore years she attended
the state Y. W. C. A. conference as a
delegate from State. She is a member
of the Y. W. C. A. cabinet and of Psi
Gamma sorority.
The varsity hockey team includes:
Hestella Arthur, Minnie .McNickle and
Gertrude Sawyer, seniors; Sarah Logan, Lois Mclntyre, Janet Norris, Evelyn Staehle and Harriet Ten Eyck, juniors ; Elaine Baird, Ruth Duffy, Elizabeth McKinstry and Charlotte Rockow,
sophomores; Doris Flansburg, Evelyn
Hamann, Mary Hershey, and ElizaThe freshman court squad journeyed
beth Morozowski, freshmen.
Those who received credit in soccer to Worcester last Wednesday for the
are: Hestella Arthur, Minnie Mc- opening game of the 193,3-34 season.
Nickle and Marjorie Woman, seniors; The yearlings ended the game on the
Joan Barrow, Hilda Heines, Emily
Hurlbut, Sarah Logan, Elma \ e s t e r - short side of an 18-17 score.
Speed was the keynote of the entire
son, Evelyn Staehle, Harriet Ten Eyck
and Lucy Wing, juniors; Elaine Baird, game. Both teams displayed excellent
Elsa Calkins, Esther Carlson, Mary door work but the scoring ability of
Elmendorf. Laura Hendricks, Martha
Martin, Charlotte Rockow, Florence the teams was mediocre.
Tate, and Mildred Shultes, sophoI-'. McCabc of Worcester was the
mores; Lois Bowman, Marjory (lord- high scorer, dropping six field goals.
man. Jeannette Cronk, Ethel Keshner
'Howie' Pember garnered ten points
and Elizabeth Strong, freshmen.
Gordman, Ethel Keshner and Eliza- I for the State team.
The starting
tarting line-up consist
The varsity soccer team is: Hestella 1
Arthur, Minnie McNickle, and Mar- Pember and Burns, forward
jorie Vroman, seniors; Joan Barrow, | and Wansboro, g u a r d s ; DuMont, cei
Hilda Heines, Sarah Logan, Evelyn ter. Williams ami Median also plan
Staehle, Harriet Ten Eyck and Lucy ! during the last period of the game.
Edward Sahol, freshman athlet
Wing, juniors; Elaine Baird, Esther
iwing
Carlson, Mary
Elmendorf,
Laura man; ger, ha- booked the
Hendricks, Charlotte Rockow and Mil- ; garni s for the 1937 quintet :
drerl Shultes, sophomores; and Lois
Bowman, Jeannette Cronk, Marjory
Gordman, Ethel Keshner and Elizabeth Strong, freshmen.
FRESHMEN LOSE
COURT CONTEST
WITH WORCESTER
I V I , . .»
Mar III
German Club To Have
Sing At Next Meeting
will conduct a Christlnesda> night at 7:30
NEWS NOTES
ARE PLEDGES
Epsiloti Beta Phi sorority welcomes
the following into pledge membership:
Jessie McAvoy, '34; Wilma McLcnithan and Marv Rilcv, juniors; and Ruth
Fisher, '36.
Me
sioll
4:111
CLUB TO MEET
•ah club will Conduct a (lis
eting Tliursdax aflernooi
ock in the Lounge of Rich.
The Edward Eldrcd Potter club will
conduct a formal initiation dinner at
7:00 o'clock tonight at the Boulevard
Grill. Dr. Harold W. Thompson, professor of English, will be the prinicpal
speaker, Bernard Kerbel, '33, will be
the toastmaster. Thirteen freshmen
pledges will be received into full membership.
The pledges to receive formal initiation tonight include: James Beale,
Robert Benedict, J. Thomas Brecn,
John Cttllen, Harry Gtimaer, Edmund
Hogan, Frederick Lauder, Robert Mae(ircgor, Robert Margison, William
McGraw, John Murphy, James Vandcrpool and William Zubon, freshmen.
Mr. Paid Sheats, instructor in government, and Mr. Carlton Moose,
supervisor of general science in Milne
High school, will give initial speeches.
Other faculty guests include Professor George M. York, head of the commerce department; Mr. Clarence Hidley, assistant professor of history; and
Dr. Donna! V. Smith, assistant professor of history.
The committee assisting Kerbel includes Leo Plante, '34, George Taylor,
'35, and Robert Margison, '.]7.
Professor To Address
Club Wednesday Night
Professor Balbino Flores of the Junior college will address the Spanish club
at its annual Christmas party Wednesday night at 7:30 o'clock in the
Lounge of Richardson hall.
Mr. Jesse I''. Stinard, head of the
Spanish department, will furnish copies
of the Spanish Christmas songs which
the group will sing. I lancing and refreshments will follow.
The committees for the party are as
follows: decorations, Lois Potter, '30,
chairman, Donald Packard, '35, and
Philip Carlson, '.id; refreshments, Em
ma Guattery, '3d, chairman, Dorothy
Partridge. '34, and Barbara Nottingham, '35; entertainment, Mvra Stephens, '3o, chairman, Mildred Grover,
'3b, and Sue Caldwell and Ruth Rouse, I
freshmen.
I
Dr. T. I e d r r i i
rman
H u e in From of Mirror
SU OT
pending witl Turin,
selacr.
Wa e r v i l l e ,
id
I Mmar
High
mu-ic
B
EMOC
I I'M-1 lull)
LOOK!
LISTEN!
Seniors
Ope,,
Follow all traffic signals I
W h e n the light shows red—
STOP!
Vuu are Hearing the busy li.if-
Kye« KxiinilniMf
Telephone 4-lTSt
lie uf life.
N. P. F R E D E T T E
EYE
liuUdinft,
Room
and
GLASSES
10, 61 Colutrhia
land
j on
trustworthy
in that
which awaits you.
KILLED
Street,
A good
picture will help boost you along |
Albany,
N; Y:
position
This pic lure •
- tlii- messenger you are sending
nit as your representative.
G,F, Williams & Son, Inc.
' Ur*VI
0
Albany, N. Y.
YOU AT YOUR
vNRA
Dial 5-1913
" 5-9Ji2
1). J e o n u y , P r o p .
are Particular
36 Heaver Street
of Ihu Statu Cuiltgu Ntm
I ' n o n e 4-0070
BEST
Boulevard
Cafeteria
Grill
198-200 Central Avenue
Albany, N. Y.
Try Our Special Dinners $1.00
• •
-• •
CtdscS ucru
tSmahj
HI E H , WIDE
LI N E5
" I W - l . u - T i i y " iH ciil in a deep " V " at
the center front to give yon an alluring
-pread-apart "imhriiKnered" cITeel, vet
niilifts ami sii/i/nirlx the bust /ivrfttilY.
'I'll.' back is extremely low. "Dee-I.aT u y " i* albii Hindi! completely backless,
for evening wear. This in only one uf
m a n y b e a u I if ill new M a i d e n Form
creation*. Write, fur frvtt Iwoltlvl. Depl.
CI. Maiden Form Rrmwirru C o , Inc.,
\ e » Vork, \ . V.
" / nil W./I.IHI • in
l«,„Mr ,. that
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lluautf llu-lirn
s/.l.,
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,
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•
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,.','„„«/r
dun
Albany Art Union
PHOTOGRAPHERS
and
frltlltft
R f
revileD dim rot IluC eW
Milieus
793 Madison A v e n u e
OCULISTS' I'KKSCIUITIONS
*
RASSIE
uily \\ eleomes Mary
duuti student, Ruth Min
•a An s, juniors, into pledge
Heady fur Christmas
Geo.
LINE
eunevA l u r t n e C 402
UCs|
cek-
NANCY ANN SHOP
ill I
The
Prin tpr v '" c"'n""""'
NEW V
sredliubeR eohS roirepuS
STOPI
Hewitt
ARE WEEK-END GUESTS
Week-end guests at lleta Zeta were
Marion Dillenbeck, '31, Katherine
llainesworth. '3d, and Marion Odwell,
'31.
0EC-LA-T4V
To Read
end.
H o s i e r y , P a j a m a s . Lingerie, Gloves a n d
"Practical (lifts fn All"
igmg
e pla; •d afterward
iiiM i iimmittei
ern. \5-, pre,
prot
I.mill, II. '34, ch
. Tin
bell, l.az.-tta In bin and ( lifford \i;i.
junior. . re in .him nt,, Marion \ , I ,,
'34, chairman, Alfred I ,„',.. '35, ai
Rob, il Benedi.t. '37, piiblicitv, l.orail
l.oder, '35
will be general chairman for publicity
for junior week-end, Allard stated to-
WELCOMES PLEDGES
l Ither ^
Saugertie
Mechanic
school-.
II.
irtnn
ing editor of the STATK COI.I.KOIC N E W S ,
efaC d r a v e l u o B e h t ot txeN
innge
hall.
Allard has named the following
chairmen to head committees for Prom :
music, William Jones; decorations,
Lucile Hirsh; floor, Milton Goldberger; programs, Julia Reil ; bids,
Evelyn Staehle; invitations, Dorothea
Gahagan ; chaperons, Lois Odwell ; and
refreshments,
Marion
Heinemann.
Catharine Kearney .will be chairman of
the committee whicn will supervise the
selection anil coronation of the 1935
Yam Queen. Florence Ellen will be
hairman of flowers and taxis com
mitlee.
Dan Van I.euvan, associate manag-
EOHS DOOG TNAW UOY Fl
GNIRIAPER
SECIRP ELBANOSAEK
TA
WELCOMES MEMBER
Beta Zeta sorority welcomes E\
I hidden, '34. int.. full membership.
I
,\
Wilfred Allard, '35, wall be general
chairman of the annual junior week-end
activities to be conducted Friday and
Saturday, February 9 and 10, David
Kroman, junior president, announced
today. Allard is vice-president of the
class. Junior activities will include the
Prom on Friday night, and the luncheon and tea dance on Saturday. The
class of 1935 will select a 'Prom Queen'
this year, continuing the tradition innovated last year by the class of 1934.
Kenneth Christian will be general
chairman for the luncheon and Gertrude Morgan will be chairman for tea
dance. Committee appointments for
these activities have not as yet been
made by the chairmen.
NAMF S A S S I S T A N T S
Minnie McNickle. '34, and Eloise
Shearer, W, have been named as assistant captains of swimming to assist Miss
IS P R E S I D E N T
l-aird. '\s::i:;(ant i-tpt tin:. I::r basketMrs. Dorothy Brimmer Ten Eyck. ball will be Janet Norris. Sarah Logan,
'30, was elected president of the East- Evelyn Staehle, and Lois Mclntyre,
ern branch of the alumni association at juniors.
their recent dinner inciting in the
Cafeteria of I lusted hall.
ANNOUNCES MARRIAGE
Sycldum hall announces the marriage
if Margaret Odell, '33, to Jay Smith
if Smith's Basin, \'ew York.
VISITS SORORITY
Rut i I'iiiklemaii, ex \U, was ;
at the Pi Alpha Tan house this
1935 Vice-President Will Head
Committees for Activities,
February 9 and 10
48 North Pearl Street
Price:
Six $2.50
Twelve $4.00
li.1l IO „ 'in'//"
/;„„/,/,.
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.dr..
/</...//»•. :::T:
g
AT ALL HADING STOfffS
tOOK fOU tHl HiMt
BP*..A
0 I «s D I I t
S SI
EH.ES
. ».T | • .
irmmiii'iiiiniffli
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