N State Coll ews COLLEGE HAS SIX

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LIBRARY
TATE COLLEGE POD r r ,
^ to® TEACHERS
News
I NY, ^ y
State Coll
VOL.
18, No. I
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., SEPTEMBER 29, 1933
COLLEGE ADMITS
300 AS FRESHMEN
COLLEGE HAS SIX
FACULTY CHANGES
Dr. Nelson, Miss
Average
Moreland Get
1,5% Increase
Over Last Yeur.
on 1933-34 Staff
The administration has announced
six changes on the lW.i-.34 College
faculty. T h e Hoard of Regents ratified
the six appointments at their meeting
in June.
Dr. Milton G. Nelson will assume
the duties of dean of the College on
Monday, succeeding
Dean
William
Metzler, who has held this post since j]
192.3.
Dr. Nelson was graduated from t h e ' ;
State Normal school al Oneonta in
1907,
following which he served as
principal at West Hartford, Connecticut, and as District Superintendent of
Schools for Delaware count v. l i e received the degree of Bachelor of Srience from Stale college in 1924, did !
, , . „ .
„ „ „
,
,
graduate work at Cornell university
, Miss Helen Hall Moreland
w h
h:,s
1 1
and secured the degrees of Master of
"
.»PI»•>ntc-<l :,s .lean o
r'V, '
tllc
Science in 1925 and Doctor of Philos- \ v , ' . " m ' ' ! M]"""l?
"'«"•'""•»< " f
ophy in 1926 from that institution. Dr. - M l s > A m 1 ! 1 ' ' " ' i e r c < ; '
Nelson is an alumnus memher of Kappa
Delta Rho fraternity, and is a member
of the following professional
fraternities:
Phi Kappa I'hi, Kappa Phi I
Kappa, and Phi Del a Kappa.
\i.
Miss Helen Hall Moreland has al
reaily taken over the duties of dean of
women following the retirement of
Miss Anna p . Pierre, who had been
a memher of the College faculty since
1886.
Miss Moreland holds a Bachelor's degree from the University of
California and has Master of Art's degree's from Mills college, California,
and at Columbia university.
Three hundred high school graduates
were
admitted
to Slate
college
this
fall in the class of 19.57 out of a list
of more than one thousand applicants,
Miss Klizabcth Van Deuhurgh, registrar, announced today.
The lowest average of those registered for the bachelor of arts degree
is 86.5 per cent, which is 1.5 points
higher than that of any preceding
freshman class. The lowest average of
! those seeking the degree of bachelor
of science in commerce is 85 per cent,
the same as last year.
Sixty-live of the three hundred entering students are men. This is an
increase of two over the number of
men in the freshman class entered last
year.
The members of the class, as an| iiounced bv the registrar, are as foli„„... •
low
Hiirn W. Alexander,
A. Allnril,
, hln It. ArniKlniiiK.
|
ICniil.v (I. linln, llerliert li. Iliipilnck,
Miirlliii K. Uiirlnw, TlKimiiH M. HnrTlng| Inn. Alloc BIII'I'IIWM, Mnlllilii M. Hiinci',
(Continued on Imgc 2, column 4)
In order to make more room
for the summer students the old
gymnasium in Hawley hall was
used as an additional reading
room. Among the other innovations in the College library is
the system of closed reserve
shelves, which will he continued
for about a month.
Students
must now go to the desk and sign
for the books on reserve. This
year the stacks will be open so
that students may find the hooks
wauled.
1935-1937 PARTY
WILL BE TONIGHT
Annual
Inter-Class
Reception
Will Begin at 8 o'clock
In Page Auditorium
College traditions and activities will
be further disclosed by the juniors at
the annual Junior-Freshman party, to
be conducted
tonight at 8 :(K) o'clock
in the auditorium of Page hall, David
Kroman, president of the junior class,
announced today. Lucile Hirsh will be
general chairman, Kroman stated.
All
juniors a r e expected
to escort
their freshman sisters or brothers to the
party.
F.ach freshman will enter by the
side door of Page hall and upon entrance into the auditorium will receive
a red tag with his name on it. He is to
wear this card in plain sight.
will
wear green cards.
Seats
Juniors
in the
auditorium will be alternately marked
wilh red and green tags.
The individual
classes are to sit in those n , w s which
are marked by class colors.
Klizabcth Gregory and Valentine
Reutowicb, co-chairmen of the entertainment committee, will direct a stunt
depicting the history of the class of
1935. Juniors who will be in the stunt
include; Marion Ileineinann, Kenneth
Christian, Gertrude Morgan, William
William R. Rogers. '.54. will hold the
Jones, George Pratt, Clifford Rail,
19.53 award of the Wheelock Scholar- Janet Norris, Hilda Heines, Kathryn
ship ol $100, as announced on Com-Stuart. Charles Atwell, Carlton Coulter, William Torpcv, Hlaiiic Cronin,
niencemenl day, June 19.
Florence Kllen, Robert kaffcrty, MilThe scholarship was founded by the
Ion Goldberger. Wilfred Allard, John
Associated Academic Principals of the Hills, Kenneth Drake, Dorothea GahaStudent council has appointed the
Male of New York in memory of gan, Martin Ludwig, Puis Melntvre,
following
campus
commission for
Charles Wheelock, and is awarded on Anne Koran, Fdith Fslabrooks, Lil19.3.5-34: Hannah Parker, chairman,
lian Payne, Kathleen Kenny, Grace
Commencement clay to the man in the
Pritchard, Lois Odwell, Lucille Manand (,corge Keleham, seniors; Ksther
junior class having the highest all ning and Catherine Kearney.
Rowland and Florence I'.lleu, juniors;
around standing in scholarship, student
Following the conclusion of the
William Shahen and Marjuric Kalaidleadership, e x t r a c u r r i c u l a r
activity, stunt, dancing in the gymnasium of
jian, sophomores.
Page hall will b e e lucled until II :30,
and administrative possibilities.
The members of the directory board
Rogers is president of Kappa Phi Miss Hirsh slated. Refreshments will
for this year will be Robert Meyers, Kappa, honorary educational fraternity, he served during the course of the
chairman, and Prances Higgins, sen- vice-prcsidenl
of Pi Camma Mu. evening.
The following committees will asiors; William Jones and Hilda Heines, honorary social science society, and a
juniors; (ilenn L'ngerer and Fnima high honor student. I le will attend the sist Miss Hirsh : refreshments, Daisy
Mead, sophomores; and Ralph Van I''.!.! annual convention of the Asso- Hi vsoti, chairman, Idwall Parry, Carla
Horn, '.37.
ciated Academic Principals of NewNielsen, Gladys Robarge, and June
posters,
Flaine
Cronin,
York State in Syracuse in December. Blowers;
he members ol the rtrola com
milter Ibis year a r e : Thomas Garrett,
The Wheelock Scholarship has been chairman, Ruth I lilkert, and Charles
A
t
w
e
l
l
;
music,
Clifford
Rail,
chairI chairman, and Charles Robson, seniors; j awarded for ihe last four years. It
man, Alfred Lucas, Guy Fnl'auto. Zalohn Bills and Thurston Paul, juniors ; l was given in I'M! I to Horace 11. M vers,
ven Mahdcsian, Thurston Paul, Mari Leonard Welter, '36, and lohn I nil, n. j'.51, in 19,51 to I norm- P. Rice, '.52.'and
tin Ludwig, and Louis Marauo; decoi'37.
Ilast year to George A. Iliserl, '3.5.
rations, Helen Rich and F.velyn Rich,
co chairmen. |ohn Bills, [ lavid Kroman, Hilda Heines, Lillian Payne, and
Grace Pritchard; and cleanup, Kenneth i hristlan, chairman, lohn I lawes,
Robert Raff. i n . and Frederick Mohr-
WILLIAM ROGERS
RECEIVES ANNUAL
WHEELOCK PRIZE
STUDENT COUNCIL
NAMES NINETEEN
FOR 1933 POSTS
(Continued on page 3, column 1)
DIRECTOR LISTS
1424 AT SUMMER
SCHOOL SESSION
One thousand four hundred twenty •
four students attended the 19.3,3 sum j
liter session of Stale college, according
to registration data obtained at the of- :
lice of Dr. Milton (.. Nelson, professor of education, who served as director
of the summer session.
Forty-one per cent of this number !
were college graduates registered for
advanced course's; thirty-one per rent
,..
.......
, , », ,
were graduates of normal or training
D l
schools; twentv per cent of the total
,
/ , W i l l i a m H . Metzler
were enrolled for undergraduate work. | « h ' . ' , w l 1 1 r e t , " ' ' ' <<mw.rroW I n n
Dr. Howard DoHell, professor „f I position as dean of t h e College
E!inShH3;E1!^'E:JUNIOR
EDITORS
, „,»„
. , , , , tt n
of iustnirtioii. I hirteeu were \isiling
instructors from other educational institutions, while the remainder were
Stan- college faculty members from
riiu|;ii. M _ h i M
ther |regular
Courses of instruction were offered
superiuteudenls and principals who
to specialize in school admin
istralioii, lo college graduates who
sought credit toward a master's degree,
and lo regularly, niatriculated students
who sought additional credit.
Summer session began on Wedm s
The colonial design of Hawley
hall is repealed in the new medium walnut furniture installed
this summer in the College library. The room now has a seating capacity of about two hundred and fifty persons. In addition to the numerous chairs and
tables, there is a new loan desk
near the entrance, especially designed for the room, a table for
reference books, and a card
catalogue made on the unit plan
so that it can be enlarged.
for B. A. is 86.5";
Showing
Appointments as Deans
Library Has Furniture
to Seat 250 Students
.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
Dr. William H, Metzler Will Conclude Duties;
DISTRIBUTE 400
1937 H A N D B O O K S !
Achieved Renown In Held ol Mathematics
ENTERING CLASS
ATTENDS Y.W.C. A.
TEA ON MONDAY
File junior stall of editors bas (lis, „ „ , . , , , , s , | ] .,„,•„, , , „ , : , v a , . : l h i s _ u , „ , | ) 1 ] n l l | , ,,„„ , „ „ , ,„. ,
SlaK,
nn'U''l three hu.ulre.l copies c,l the „.,,,,,. m c i n h t . , . „f i l s u , l l h v w | „ „ ,,1,,,-d his IW.ilw
on Ihc Throrv o)
' ':" j l 1 imdbooks
tok rreslmian
entrants , \
, , N K-1 x 1. •.. dean, brings to a I>,-I,T„WUMI .. published in W>, which
l l u
ls
mi
''"••>
': 1 '
''
i'"Uiiii1 ui red1 d , V, is nr i ; i,
„,.,, N
i s u .„ . Vl ,.„. ,„.,,,, i , , , , , . m o .
k | s
! , n . ' : ' " • ,''",' '
' " I " ' " . ' , " 'I'' close his len-vear period ol service has won for him a worldwide repu
imitation leather stamped with l h c | R . r ( , Dean Metzler has not only con tatim
( oilier seal and 19.57 in gold.
||ributed a ureal deal to Male college,
I Iran Metzler i- one o | the few lliei
Tin first tea of the \ e a r was eonN,
»
leatures ,,i thr book include | m t l l a s a | s l l made fur hinisel f a repu
ill the I'uited Mates CMT lo i e r r i \ i
1
Il
t
1
the
''"
'' ">' Alpha I''"' ' " ' e n s t a l j l i n in the field of mathematics. Dean die honor of lamming a Fellow of tin| ducted hist Monday aftcrm,
orgam/atiou, and the recently intro
Metzler is a true scholar, in .were sens.
R-.yal Soeieu oi Fdinburgh. I h i- I rotunda ol Drapi r ball In tin Young
Iiced ( ll('W<' ( ' i r l s ' ' " ' " "'""1> Alter
,„ ,,„. w , „ . d | a l l , | , | l r aamiuis'traliou
n's i hristiau association. DorW
also our ol the liftiru holloiar^ mem
11
additions to ( olleg, tradi a , „ | , , , „ , , , , , | „ „ u u ] 1 , ,-,., , ., ,1,^,1,,.,
.August 12. Approxiniah 1\ li
hers ol the I'cllowship of the KoWli olbj Giilliu. May hell. Matthews, IheL
n o u s aiUTIUI " I III. linn ill i i s s o . , , ,
| ( | ^ U | , h | | j s ,,.I,,-,.„„.,„
huildrril fewer students altendrd sinu
' wlmu
Sorii l\ ol Canada, o n h tw
ma Smith and Alniira Russ, meiubers
1
• " " 1 l l " ' " ' « sorority rushing rules
, ) r u | M l . , / U . , r i . t . t . j u . , | | , j s . \ |j ,|,
nirr session this w a r its registratioi
arc n
the I'uited Stales,
of Mvskauia, and acliw participants
.„ ,,„ , l m r , , , h , , , T l , n i | l l , , j ,
totals for the 19.52 session totaled 1,'M-i adopted In llllrr ororily ( oiinril last ^
Dean
Metzler
is
a
member
of
many
year h a w been nicorporaled m tin |SKK, and his I'll. D. at Clark n u n c ,
in the \ ' W. C A . pound for the early
loo irn null;, main al societies, among
handbook
, l h j , , |H<i_\ | | , u a , .,„ i l l M n u i , , r „
Mathei
...1 Association pari of the tea and w e n later relieved
which a n
Ruth Williams served as edit,,, in mathematics
at the
the Massachusetts
In
inalhrinalirs at
M;
In
M i s . Marion Cheescbroiigh, in>i < ii< at I'u ilaiu . I oiiilon Malheinati
duel
with the lollowine, associal. stitnlr
„ , ; , , , . ,ol
, , 'iVehnnlogv
Trchllolog\ Iron, IK'U <i-\
•al s , „ „ n . of wind
K lour or live structoi in 1 aliu, Mis- ( athei iue Peltz,
nlitoi
lohn Pills, I atherinr Krai
In l.so.i he lirrani, bead ,,l the depart
its
m.
uili.
is,
in,in
a
closed
group
ii
,
^
„
,
.
n
o
,
Doris
KelK.
\',lleutine
Renin
/
insiriii tin in Fnglish, Miss t aroline
il two hundred and I n n , are from ibe
M i M i , which position iie held until
I i sti i, insii II, i
ualheinaiii s, and
I'niieil Stall - . and mathematical so
rlu:i
Ii
|
U
|
1
|7
he
wa
dean
o|
Ih.'.i
P n . co id will In elms, n ,o in.mi
'
"
inn
hi
in, In.n
llalv, Scot | M.s h
d 111 \ ini
m l II. In in
llees for campus i|iiren as a lesiilt of all
die I ,\ aduate school, and li
1921 2.!
land, a- well . , , tin American Math. ' Pu.ebdi
elect
to h, conducted in indent ,i • V W T A C,<\nMl>
<lf»rvipl» ' l , i ' " " ' ' ' " ' l " " " ' ' ' " ' i,,l'ni1 A "
lv
' " ' " " '' ' ' " "
I
I he h ,i w.i- adopt.,I ,,i llu siigges
seinbh today al 11 In o'clock in tin I . VV A ' . / V l > u l l l ( I l t d l r V l l l
,„ S\racuse. In |9.5| be i n c h e d lb
I''' 111 M ' l z h l ' an , x president ol ! ,„„, ,,f | „ |.;| I A ,| K ih II Mortis, as
auditiiriumof Page hall
J ( ) Be WeilI1CStilly Nlfjllt h,7'/."" «W
' " " • S l ' " lh"> " '
'be Ass,,, i.
u ol I each, is , , | Mat he | , , ,slant
, ; , , , , ,„
,,.^
, ( ,|, k ,,iion and Miss
pi , ,li
P n ll member ol the sllldeut ass,, !
J
«
-til lit ll
ilics h a die Middle ManI M
Tin annual candlelightiug ser\
Mi izlel
I i,
Helen II Moreland, dean of women,
I
I )iu ing Ibe great w
i i h
'I'll
i In
clloice lol
I,aid li
,1.11
the N'oung Women's Christian
abroad,
I'"I
"
"
'
•
"
'
'
to
refresh
,
leinbeisof
the class ol 1937
queen on a ballot. The live w
.ll./.hio
II. is a C
riation will be conducted Wedi
".» i .V'111"1: after ils first d.n at t'olleg. . and also
under the Young Men's ( In niiau as
reiving the highest number
ol • • I h ,
Mail, in,, nies
Gael
to
prm
ide
an
opportunil)
loi the freshsociation
and
the
American
I'.xpedi
Will he c iisidercd candidates. Re voles "it-'lil al K III) o'clock in the I .unige ,
liouary h o n e s
I hiring iln- lime he Ihe • • J o u r n a l o l P e d a u o g ) " l i e is a men and in. tubers of family lo meet.
will he .onducled before Campus day. Ixichardsoii hall.
Kmm.i Mead, .5'
II
|
i
,
m
e
m
b
e
r
of
t
h
e
f
o
l
l
o
w
i
n
g
f
r
a
l
e
r
n
i
t
i
e
s
:
u
The
freshmen
were
escorted
to the
visited and made reports
'I'be prison receiving tin highest mini [chairman ol devotions, Is in charge ,
, L . S 11( Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma \ i , Phi Kappa Ira by the members of die Junior (iuiile
Fuiopian miiv*
her ofIhe
voles
thai ballot will st
behighest
queen, j\ 'l' 1The
' s m 'program
i
while
twoinreeei\ing'the''in
will include music by | wlndi Amei irain were stud>iilg. In l'«, and K»PI'M ''l»i K cippa.
committee at the conclusion of tllc
uiunber of voles will be her attendants the Y, W. C. A. choir, and will run ibis wa> Dean Metzler bad the oppor111 a personal interview with a ineni- lotus,
f roil) Ihe senior class. Identity of Ihe elude wilh the candlelightiug proces I limit) of visiting countries which lew her of Tins N't-ws slal'f, Dean William
Coiuuiiticc chairmen for ihe tea
queen will be kept secret until the night ' siiat on the front campus and the sing I Americans were able to do at thai time. Metzler staled that he wished the uieiu
w e r e : arrangements, Hannah Parker,
of Campus day. T w o students from j ing ol "hollow the Gleam." T h e cabi-j
111 1923, William 11. Metzler ae hers ,,i the sludenl body success in '3-1; food, Kathryn Wilkins, '3-1; and
each of the three remaining classes will tiel members will he diessed in while ; ccpt.d the post of dean al Slate col- every possible way, both now and after clean up, Daisy Brysou and Hilda
also be appointed to attend the queen. I and will lead the procession,
Hege, which position he has held until , die conclusion of the college course,
Heines. juniors.
Assembly to Nominate
t a m p u s t^ueen t o d a y «i,i,, I:.,IM, R'UI,, ami Dan va.
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, SEPTEMBER 29, 1933
State College News
Established by the Class of 1918
The Undergraduate Newspaper of New York State
College for Teachers
THE NEWS STAFF
M A R I O N C. HOWARD
Editor-in-Chief
162 Western Avenue, 3-0975
W I L L I A M C. NELSON
Managing
Editor
Kappa Delta Kho, 117 S. Lake Avenue, 2-4314
JEAN CRAIG M ILE
Advertising
Manager
Phi Delta. 20 S. Allen Street, 2 9836
KATHRYN H A U G
Finance Manager
Gamma Kappa Phi, 21 N. Main Avenue, 2-4144
D A N V A N LKUVAN
Associate Managing
401 Western Avenue, 2-2650
Editor
RUTH WILLIAMS
Associate Managing
Beta Zeta, 680 Madison Avenue, 2-3266
Editor
MILDRED FACER
Circulation
Phi Lambda, 536 Mercer Street, 2-6533
Manager
SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS : Alinira Russ, Bessie Stetkar, and Thelma Smith, seniors; Ruth Brooks and Valentine Reutovvich, juniors. JUNIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Celia
Bishop, Diane Bochner and Marion Mleczek, seniors;
Florence Ellen and Hilda Hemes, juniors. REPORTERS :
Hilda Bookheim, Beatrice Coe and Rose Rosenbeck, seniors ;
Bessie Haftman, Emily Hurlbut, Olga Hyra, Anna Koren,
Dorothy Meserve, Esther Rowland, Helen Smith, Mary
Torrens, and Marion Walker, juniors; Rosella Agostine,
Elaine Baird, Phyllis Bosworth, Margaret Bowes, Loretta
Buckley, Frances Breen, FIsa Calkins, Huldah Classen,
Doris Coffin, Margaret Dietz, Frances Donnelly, Karl
Ebers, Ruth Edmunds, Rose Einhorn, Blodwyn Evans,
Jacqueline Evans, Eudora Farrell, Margaret Flanigan,
Merle Gedney, Marie Geesler, Elizabeth Griffin, Elizabeth
Hobbie, Dorothy Herrick, Mary Hudson, Aubrey Kalbaugh, Virginia Chappell, LaVonne Kelsey, Jeanne Lesnick, Janet Lewis, Martha Martin, Eleanor Nottingham,
Evelyn O'Brien, Emma Rogers, Charlotte Rockow, Dorothy Smith, Edith Scholl, Glenn Ungerer, Nina Ullman,
and Elizabeth Whitman, sophomores. SPORTS EDITOR: William Nelson, '.34. ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER: Julia
Riel, '35. ASSISTANT CIRCULATION MANAGER: Margaret
Walsworth, '35. ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGERS: Beatrice Burns and Elizabeth Bremer, juniors. BUSINESS
STAKE: William Davidgc, Edith Garrison, Frances Maxwell, Alma Quimby, juniors.
WELCOME, FRESHMEN
Once again the administration, faculty, and students
of State college have welcomed a new class—the class of
1937. The various organizations of the College, the departmental clubs, and religious organizations have conducted
receptions, teas, and meetings especially for the purpose of
becoming acquainted with the entering students.
Now has come the time for all students to get down to
real studying for the year. Seniors have assumed new
teaching duties in Milne High school. T h e juniors are
taking more advanced and harder courses in education
and methods. The sophomores are undertaking new positions in extra-curricular activities. Just where, many
freshmen think, do we fit into this scheme of things? That
is a problem for each individual freshman to figure out for
himself.
In fact, each freshman is "on his own," so to speak.
He now chooses for himself the friends with whom he
shall spend his spare time, the books he shall read, and
the hours he shall keep. Moderation, tolerance, and a
clear head here seem to be the prime virtues of a freshman—moderation in the time spent on studies and recreation, and tolerance for other members of the group.
T H E STATE COLLEGE N E W S takes this opportunity to
welcome the freshmen and to wish each individual student
all the success possible in this newest field of conquest.
BOOKS:
PRIESTLY
WRITES
ABOUT SENSATIONAL
NOVEL
PRESS
All books for sale in Co-op.
W o n d e r H e r o . By J. B. Priestly. H a r p e r and Brothi, 3.37 pages. $2.50.
The same humorous vein with which Priestly presents
the travels of a show troup throughout rural England in
The Cooil Companions, is found in his latest novel, Wonder
Hero. The "ins and outs" of the profession disclosed in
this last book are realistic, almost bordering on the sensational. The Press, its effect on one of its casual readers,
and the effect of that reader on the Press is the plot for
the book.
In the first few chapters we sec Charlie Rabble going
through his hum-drum existence, doing the mechanical
things about his uninteresting job and reading his "Daily
Tribune." Over night he becomes a national hern—the
man who has saved his home town from being blown into
bits.
lie is taken up to London, entertained by royalty, is
invited to premiere performances at the most expensive
theatres, and is given a suite of rooms in the New Cecil,
London's newest hotel. The "Daily Tribune" gives him a
generous purse as tribute for what be has done. In fact,
although he has become a national figure, he is really but
Published every Friday in the college year by the a puppet in the hands of feature seeking newspaper men.
Editorial Board representing the Student Association.
Finally, Charlie escapes to his distressed family in
Subscriptions, §2.25 per year, single copies, ten cents.
the north country where he has time to decide just what
Delivered anywhere in the United States.
Entered as sort of a hero he is after all. From then on be lakes a turn
second class m a t t e r at postoffice, Albany, N, Y.
about face which results ill an amusing conclusion.
As compared to The Good Companions, this book is not
as carefully planned in details of selling. I lowever, 1'riest
The N E W S does not necessarily endorse sentiments
l\ has ci it inlv lost n::ihin s ::l the vividness I description.
expressed in contributions. No communications will be
The author has emphasized the sensational side of the
printed unless the writers' names are left with the Editorin-Chief of the N E W S . Anonymity will be preserved if so newspaper, lie has also created admirable contrast by
desired. T h e N E W S does not guarantee to print any or placing I he depressing working conditions of industrial
England side hv side vvilh the glamorom frivolities of
all communications.
London,
P R I N T E D BY C. I-'. W I L L I A M S & SON, INC., ALBANY, N. V.
Vol, XVI11, No. I
Sept. 2'), 1933
Albany, N. V.
AN EXPLANATION
In the concluding assembly of last year, it was an
nounced that William Nelson, '3-1. had been appointed to
the position of managing editor nf T H E STATIC COLLEGE
N E W S . This appointment was not explained at the time,
and on account of that, a certain misunderstanding has
arisen.
Almira Puss, '34, was appointed to the position of
managing editor In the 1V33 Xi.Ws Board. On account of
the point system, il was necessary for Miss Russ to resign
her position on the board.
Upon consideration of other members of the staff, the
board could find no one outstanding person, who al that
time, had done either enough work to merit the appoint
ment, or had acquired sufficient experience to fill the
position, f o r that reason, the board decided to leave tile
position vacant, and divide the work among the other staff
members. In fact, NEWS Board went so far as to pledge
itself that Miss K'tiss would do no more work on T i l l
STATE COLLEGE N E W S than her position as Senior Ass,,
eiale editor would guarantee.
This, however, did not meet with the approval o( the
Student Council, so the council named William Nelson,
'34, managing editor of the V).U NEWS Board. The 1933
board fell that in making such an appointment, Student
Council was assuming loo much power, espcciall) in view
of (he fact thai N'elsnii bad heretofore never held a posi
lion on T H E N E W S .
The matter, therefore, was laid before the 1933 My,
kania, which, alter careful consideration, decided in favor
of Student ( i.uiii il. W illiam Nelson will retain his posi
tniii as managing editoi
DI'.AN MET/UK RETIMES
William II Metzler, who ha, served in the eapaeitj ol
dean of State college, will retire tomorrow. The College,
both student, and faculty, will regrel to lose such a dis
lingiiished scholar. Not only has Dean Metzler fulfilled
his work here admirably well, but also he has, through bis
own writings, added considerably to the prestige of the
College. State has certainly been fortunate in having such
a person as Dean Metzler a member of the faculty.
T H E STATE COLLKOE N E W S extends to Dean Metzler
its best wishes for success in every venture which he may
undertake in the future, and a sincere "thank you" for all
he has done for us in the past,
M..C
Shakespeare and Hawaii, by Christ.ipl
Doubleday D.iran and Co. 9i pages. $|.()l)
Last March. Christopher Morley was asked to deliver
a series of lectures lo the students al the I'niversity of
ill,
informal and exlempo
spear
introduction, Morlev
Is us that i
with the exception o
i few of th barbarisms >t mi
lich have been civilized.
promptu
j
Morlev in his lirst lecture, "The Mulberrv Bush." begins
in his usual style hv saving that he was not admitting what
il was he wanted In talk about for fear the audience would
he alarmed and stav awav in huge ipiantilv. Ile goes on
to describe the colle'ct
if a young woman whom he had
mil mi die boat, a most avid souvenir hunter. This, he
declared, is the vvav most people behave towards Shakes
peare. Ile , a \ s , "We go aboard thai great craft and we
pick up a lyric here, a song there, a hit of sonnet or a
sudden llasl'i ,,| passionate dialogue elsewhere, vet how
little do ihese casual souvenirs from that g n a t body of
work thai human mind has ever produced, express the
realil.v of meaning of the whole."
Shakespeare is no! worn mil and ancient hisli.rv III
fact Mni lev was surprised to discover just how modern
vva. ( iiriolainu, one of die least known of Shakespeare's
plavs h began, for example, with a riot and outbreak
among the line' .ployed, and a I lis ami) marching lo the
Senate ill koine lo trv In gel subsisienei anil inonev. "Has
it ever occurred to von," he ,isks, "the analogv between
Kilistein ami Prosper,,;-" lu the Inn/;,I
he explains,
Ihe whole conception o| th.' Kiiistcin lluory, is all lore
seen ill Plospeio's philosophv
Mnil. v goes mi I,, ,| , limn Ireliv on,I 1/ ehiltil, /
hv I imi Maiuuis, the dialogue helweeu A n In die I orl<
I Ihe M e m
ml aboiil Sbake.spear.
ninpl,
il Shakespearean i rili
N'olb
t h a t h,
said ,.i written abmi'
ui,I human
Shakesp,
Mo •)'• talks is dial liter
,,!,
alilli is a red thing, the aelual m i v oi the human heart
and Ihe woe and ecslaiv ol bin n i Hpciicnce, In pro
pmiuding Ibis theme, Mm lev li.ki us iiiln main amusing
iillle side Hacks al I Sbellev,
eiii.iid Shaw, Anatolil-'iance and Conrad,
Morley entitles In, leclures: "The Mulberry Hush,'
"The Sense of Significance," anil "Shakespeare as a Syin
hoi." In closing he stales that a genuine love ,,f beauty im
plies the privilege of recognizing il close at hand. As ai
explanation, be quotes,
"Yet we may pardonably ask the worth
Of measuring, by standards sprung
from dust,
An ecstasy of lunar origin,"
Europe and World Fair Loire Some Professors;
Others Continue Studies at Summer Sessions
Miss Helen T . Fay, manager of the
While many members of the State
college faculty spent a large part of College Co-operative book store, attended
the eleventh annual convention
the summer vacation at the College
summer session, others spent their of the National Association of College
Book
Stores
at Bloomington, Indiana.
time in traveling.
Dr. Caroline Croasdale, College phy- Colleges represented included: New
sician, enjoyed a Mediterranean cruise. York university, Boston university, and
Dr. Matie Green, assistant professor of ColL.nbia university. Miss Fay also
hygiene, toured France, Germany, and visited the Century of Progress E x northern Italy. Miss Alice Kirkpat- position, going by plane from St. Louis
rick, assistant instructor in library to Chicago.
science, went abroad, staying at SalzMiss Eunice Perine, assistant proburg in the Bavarian Alps.
fessor of fine arts, Miss Helen James,
Miss Margaret Hitchcock, instructor assistant instructor in library service,
in physical education, was at the New Miss Marion L. Swayze, assistant inYork university summer camp. Miss structor in library service, and Dr.
Minnie Scotland, assistant professor I Elizabeth Morris, assistant professor of
of biology, attended Cornell university education, also attended the Century of
summer session and received the degree Progress.
of Doctor of Philosophy.
College Admits 300 To Class of 1937
.3)
lliinniir, Mary Mnrliow, Dora It. Hard,
via N, Bliinii, Kvelyn M. BogurfJus, Oer- lOH'relda Ilnrtt. Anne II. Harvey, Eleanor
ril ('. Bal, Hols I. Ilowman, Marian O. Si. Ilii.sclnns, John L. Hast lags. ElizulJraiuliii. Juruoa Itreen. Until II. Ilrltt, hctli B. Herr. Mary A. Ilershey, Horotliy
Catherine 10. Brudorlck, William E. J. Holmes, lOdmund F. llogan. Thomas
Bross, Riil It. Bni'iick, Beatrice 10. Bush, 10. Houlihan, Alice 10. Htirlfiut.
Frederick .1. Byrnes.
Nnney SI. Ingro.
Sue Caldwell, Jean A. Cull, Ellwiheth
Jeanne F. .Incolis, Henry .Inked. CiilliN. Ciirnilehiiol, Sliujorle Carnegie, lOllzn- crlne Jnniliii. Wanda II. Jcvvett, Italph
helli l \ Chevalier, Adele ('. Clarke, Helen S. Johnson, Anna 10. Josefek.
.1. Clyde. David Cohen, Frank \V. Collett,
Lillian Kaplan, Julius Kill/., Aniinlielle
Loo It. Collins. .Iniiet 10. Conuery, Mary
Frnncos SI. Kcllc.v. Slarlnrie
•linn. Mnrv A. Conk, lOnnlee YV. SI. Kecrv,
A. ('
Kelley. Louisii SI. Kelly, Arlcnc It.
Cotton. Adelte Coiirlines. Kiilherlne A. SI.
Kemp,
Harriet A. Kemp. Kthel Kcshner,
Criindnll, Kiilherlne S. Criiiiilnll. Jean Josephine
F.
Klrli.v. Esther SI. Kirchnelle Crunk. John I'. Cullen, Louise I . ner, Sluric Klvelln.
Ciinnlnghtun, .lulla S. Cznjn.
Horotliy
J.
Kimpp, Friincoa Knilieu.
Isabel 11. nnvldgo. Neva V. Davis,
Hazel V. Dclnney. John ,1. Deno. Hmmlil Ada I). Kniipiiel. Helen Kormnn, Lois
A. He Sim. Freilcriek 10. Hosier, .lean SI Si. Kruus. lOliziilietli Kndehi. Sylvia F.
HI BIIIHI, Rosemary Dickinson, Marion Kinliiii. Irinii A. Kiichn. Arllne K. Kiihn,
A. Dillon. Norma It. Dixon. Margaret T. Margaret SI. KiizloNki.
H
s. llrace \V. Hominy, Rlla M. DonSlnrle T. La llrnu, Itoscmnry .1. Liifahue, Frances 10. Drnee, I.ilia M. Diill'e.v. I'ert.v. Marie 10. Linn. Frederic 10. Lauder,
Aloii/.o DII .Mont.
Velum L. Heighten, Mnrv C. Leonard,
llulli
L. Liehlcnl.erg, lOvclyn C. Lindrns,
Marian (J. lOaslnian. John II. lOdwards,
Helen II. lOnierlek. Laura 10. IOnirelson. lOlhc! SI. I.llllc. .Maggie SI. I.oda. Helen
F. 1 as. Virginia SI. Louoks. 'I'liclimi
lOdmond lOi-wln.
SI. London, Dorothy J. I.urenz.
Helen I.. Fair
k. Ainislusln II. FarSidney W. MeAiiley. Helen 10. Slednwrell. Iti.Ho S. Fusee. lOnlmii I.. Faulring.
KslhiT M. Felirer. Anne M. Fillponielc. an. Holier! W. SlcCovvan. Joseph !'. SleI. Mcllriivy, Roliert (I.
Sylvia Fiiikh'Steln, (leorge It. Flsk. Clar- ilrane. Willi,Sliiclircgor. Christopher A. SleNnnicc.
ice I,. Fitch. Doris 10. Fiaresl.urg. Hide
M. Folic!!. William It. Fo.vle, Doris i Mn r.v I'. SleRlli', Frances S. McVeigh,
(leorgc II. SlaeKle.
Fred
lull, Dorothy M. Fiillom.
Patricia A. (iaiitliler. Minnie 10. (lew Alice C. Sliiloncy, Isalielle L. .Mansgull, Klcna M. (illotinc. lOllznhel il (louil Held, Itolierl 10. Slnrglson, Irene SI. Shirking, Claire L. (loldslcin. Marjorie I limn. Mnrv 10. Slnrkliiiin, Tlioinns C. SloeHonliniin, Dorothy C. (Iriihiiin. Clmi-li- lian. Adeline I.. .Mercer. Elizabeth II.
Oreelilierg. Dornthv L. (Irlesau, I.mils Mciiry. Ccnevlcvc Mczur. Can.I A. Mires,
10. (Ii-imevvnld. Ralph II. (irzymiilu. Nor Frnnees I!. Sli al, Howard A. Morgan,
IIIIIII II. (,meters,HI, Elsie M. (incut, II., i lOllzaheth 10. Slorozovvski, dairies N.
.Morris. Mary 10. Morris. Kin h S. Mowers,
r.v T. I In inner.
lOslelle A. Slurphy, Helen M. .Murphy,
Miirtlin A. Hull. Flossie H. lliillmliiv, .lolin 10. Slurphy.
It Ml h 10. Mullock, lOvelvn I.. I Hi ion on. Ida
Eliza In Hi C. Naroskv, Lorriiine X.
.1. Ilnn
ml. Violet 10. ILinev. M. Naomi Niles.
Helen 10. Ogden, llellv II. Olcsen. Lillian (ilson. Dorothy (1st rnndcr,
lirnce V. Parker. Frnnklln 'I'. I'arkln
sini. Thomas J. 1'arroll, Slimes Passer,
Howard \V. 1'omlier, Siarv 10. Pierce,
Mary E. Plank. .Mary W. I'l-nli.
Cn 11,cri ne E. i.iiilnn.
Anne KM ml. .luiia M. Hansel,er. AnnaCollege gymnasium classes for wom- Indie .1. Heed, Martin A. Heel. Alum E
Ki-ln lio ril. Jane ('. Hendpll. Until SI.
en will commence Monday, Classes lieiiss.
Margaret I.. Itoels, ||o|ie 10, Hog
will be conducted in the gymnasium of cis. Judith I'., lingers. Ivillicrlne Hogei's. .lames A. 11...ISM. Cornelia A. |(,,sPage ball, Miss Isabellc Johnston, in- hronk, Finklc SI. Iliisenlierg. I.cslcr W.
structor in physical education, stated Klilien, Dorothy I.. Husk.
lOdvvard J. Suliol. I;
Sackrldcr,
loda.v.
Alary V. Salame.v, Helen Sit ill In. Edith
X. Silver. Thidinii A. Scliolllii. Dorolliv
There will be a varied program of M.
Seliiumichcr. .Margarcl E. Schuyler,
activities offered in ihe classes this Ellziilielli J. Scull, Miriam Scott, Lnu•-IIn Selil. Wascl Sepllc, AIIIIII P. Service
semester. Freshmen and sophomores Lillian I.. Shapiro. Elolse Kln-iirer. Eu
gcula E. ShcnlK. Helen A Sheldrake,
mav participate in any of the follow
Miirlnii E. Sluihcs. II nl h A. Sickles.
ing: hockey, soccer, rowing, riding,
Sylvln I-'. Sllshy. Virginia A. Small,
swimming, golf techui.pie, folk and lap Elinor P. Saiallcy, Alice M. Smllli \ r
lene E. Siniili. 11. loisa Smllh. I0st her 10.
dancing, as well as the regular gym- Smith, Frnncos c. Smllli, June 'I'. Sinltli.
.Ii'.-iii M. Smllh, Louise Smllli. Martini
nasium work.
M Smith, Alum I!. Snyder, Mnrv M
.lied I,
Sludell
iiiasium S | III.-II. M i rii.-irct F. Spencer. Ka! Ii'erinc
Chnrles J. Sprall. Irwin F.
w o r k vv il
phvsi- A
to tal
Si l:.' i' VI glnin E. Sl.iel. KaHicrlnc I).
Gymnasium Instruction
Will Begin on Monday
Mis,
|
SI w e l l .
OliZi
Ill
SI n i l .
Calendar
Today
:|ll a in. Student assei
auditorium of Page hall
Tonight
:IIH p. in. Junior Part)
I' reshincn, auditorium,
ball,
Tomorrow
hall
Ml p in Svdd
I lilt;
Monday
Scheduled
Meeting of fresbuiai
trv mits fm I )i .nii.itII -< .,n,
A n , I -,,11111 il, i,mm llll, lira
pei hall,
o llll p ID. I miner given hv tin
la.uliv to Dean \ \ illi.mi II
Mel/ler, gull ,,1 Hoiilcvan
catch i I,i
llll II
Tuesday
7 .ill p. in Y \l ( A . d e l
together in Lounge ,i kicb
ardsoii ball
Wednesday
"'OK p. in. Y. W. C. A. t a n
die
Lighting
services in
Lounge of Richardson ball.
Will
ilk
Ellziilielli
I. In
Pe
Mi
Itmli M. 'runner. I.
'I'll V III
James II. 'I',,I,in. K|,s
a.pkln
Agnes Torrens, Mmli,
Phi His A. lie k: i \Ln|,,rlc E I vim ..::,
•Inuies r . Winder
I, Elcnnor'E. Vn
Horn, Itnljili S. Van Horn. Lulu 1. Vn
Pallcn, Phyllis M Veniiilvc Anna \
Vlglionc, Ciilierliie Vlrdi'nic .Morn,
Vlshiicr.
I i i w e l l M W el le. I ' l l i r l o l l i II \v iiiH o v e r ,v A W,11
,,. 10,1 n r M .
'. 10II tllhelh A
color, S'lrgln n
W i l e , , . lOliz I,,
W i l l i , ins. M i n
W i n in r, F r u l e i
s l . e s k l l O d l l l 1!
/lee
,11,1 1
Main 1 / a i l ,
icr. W i l l Hi n 1' W a
ITCH
Arlim M w
W e , In, 1. l l n T V
o. \ v i it In • - Ii W i l d !
III
Al
Willi
in-i s W i l
VI
s II Wlrps
Le
W o , 1. I.es lie I V ,
f e l l . la '1' /.i III,
\\ .
','
'i.
II
'Oil
lln
ui
kl,
Organizations to Sign
For Rooms with Dean
All organizations planning to con
dun Hirelings ii: the College hiiililuigs
must sign I'm dial purpose in die ol'lice
ol Miss Helen II. Morelaud, dean ol
All arrangements concerning hours
ol meeting, programs, and chapeioncs
are lo be made only with the consent
ol Dean Morelaud. Special cards must
befiled for meetings alter 0:0(1 o'clock
These regulations are necessary lo
avoid Ihe confusion which might result
if Iwo or more groups planned to conduct a meeting at the same hour in
ihe same room.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, SEPTEMBER 29, 1933
College Has Six Faculty Changes
13 JUNIORS FORM
ADVISORY GROUP
FOR NEW CLASS
(Continued from pagc I, column I)
Dr. Carlcton E. Power who has been
a member of the College faculty since
1915 has received the designation of
professor, and will have charge of the
work in the department of natural sciences, including physiography and general science. Dr. Power was formerly
assistant professor of physics.
Dr. James C. Palmer has assumed
the post of professor of education left
vacant by the promotion of Dr. Nelson.
Dr. Palmer has been for several years
associated with the education department of the Potsdam Normal school
and holds the degrees of Bachelor of
Science and Doctor of Philosophy from
Cornell university.
Ralph G. Clausen has received the
post of instructor in biology. Mr. Clausen is a graduate of Colgate university
and has done graduate work at that
institution and also at the University of
Illinois. Mr. Clausen was formerly instructor at Union college.
Mrs. Anna Keim Harsam will return
to the faculty this year as assistant instructor in the home economics department of Milne High school, suc-
cecding Mrs. Florence Frear, retired,
Mrs. Barsani was formerly associated
with the home economics department
Carrying on the tradition of the siswhen this work wa offered in the
ter classes, thirteen juniors served as
State college curriculum.
members of the class guide committee,
to assist in introducing the class of
1937 to the activities of State college.
Duties of the committee included asThree Men on Faculty signing
juniors to freshmen as junior
Attend Annual Council brothers and sisters and conducting an
Three members of the State college information bureau for the freshmen
faculty attended educational meetings in the rotunda of Draper hall.
The committee also conducted the
this week. Dr. A. R. Brubachcr, presifreshmen on tours of the College
dent, Dr. Milton G. Nelson, professor buildings last Monday morning and
of education, and Dr. James Palmer, the junior-freshman sing in the afterassistant professor of education, at- noon in the auditorium of Page hall.
tended the thirty-first annual meeting Juniors will escort the freshman brothers and sisters to the Junior-Freshman
of the Council of School Superinten- Party to be conducted tonight.
dents at Saranac Inn, New York, on
Esther Rowland served as chairman
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.
of the committee. Miss Rowland was
assisted
by the following : Gladys RoDr. Brubacher and Dr. Nelson also
attended the meeting of the State nor- barge, Anna Anys, Helen Rich, Evelyn
Rich, Janet Norris, Harriet Ten Eyck,
mal school principals and State teach- Clara Rcisig, Carla Nielsen, Florence
ers' college presidents at the Lake Pla- Ellen, John Hawes, Thurston Paul,
Kenneth Johnston, and Wilfred Allard.
cid club vesterdav and today.
Former Dean of Women
To Direct Syddum Hall
Miss Anna E. Pierce, dean of
women at State college for many
years, who resigned her position
on the faculty at the close of the
spring term will continue to be
the director of Syddum hall. Miss
Pierce was graduated from New
York State Normal school in
1884, and for two years taught
at Lisle. In 1886 she became affiliated with this institution while
it wiis still a normal school and
has served in the capacities of
instructor in English and mathematics, professor of elementary
school methods, principal of the
primary department at the model
school, and dean of women at
the State college.
Page 3
1934 Myskania Names
New Class Guardians
Myskania, senior honorary society,
has announced the appointment of eight
class guardians for this year. Elizabeth Kammerer and Roger Bancroft
will direct the activities of the seniors;
Almira Russ and Grenfell Rand those
of the juniors; Dorothy Griffin and
Robert Robinson will take charge of
the sophomore activities, and Thelma
Smith and Mary Moore, the freshman
activities.
TO CONDUCT DINNER
The members of the faculty will conduct a dinner in honor of William H.
Metzler, retiring dean, Monday night,
at 6:()() o'clock, in the Boulevard cafeteria. Dr. Harold W. Thompson, professor of English, is general chairman
for the event.
ELECTS EDITORS
Two new members have been elected
to the board of the Pedagogue, senior
year-book. The are Elizabeth Zuend,
'34, photograph editor and Ruth Hilkert, '35, art director. Helen Donohue,
'34, has also been elected to the literary
staff.
TO HAVE RECEPTION
The Edward Eldred Potter club will
conduct its annual reception for freshman men in the Lounge of Richardson
hall, Friday night at 8 :00 o'clock. Kenneth Christian, '35, will be chairman
for the event.
Tobaccos grown in
this country are "seasoned"
with tobaccos from
Turkey and Greece
THE ANSWER IS VERY SIMPLE:
T
Turkish tobacco i
p.nked thousand
of liny A./rn to the
//.//.. It aura»e\
""<|
i
O B A C C O S to taste right in a
cigarette need to be flavored or
seasoned just the same as you might
season a steak or a pudding.
N o tobaccos have ever been found
that equal the spicy aromatic tobaccos of Turkey and Greece for this
purpose. That's why we send 4000
miles for aromatic tobaccos from Samsoun and Smyrna,Xanthi and Cavalla.
When blended and cross-blended
in just the right amounts with Chesterfield's mild ripe Domestic tobaccos, the result is a rich flavor and a
line fragrance.
ipa*
Chesterfields are seasoned right—
they taste right. May we suggest
you try them.
v
kesterfield
© I93J, l.iuiiinr & Mviiiis TOBACCO C o
e//e
Inali
M1LDE
ne> cif/ane/le that TASTES BUTTER
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, SEPTEMBER 29, 1933
114 SENIORS BEGIN "Acquire Friends, Participate in Eitra-Curricola"
Urges Dean Moreland in Talk to Freshmen
TEACHING DUTIES
Readjustment to College life was the | mcnt of Health education and the State
principal topic of the message to the Department of Health in collaboration
with the College hygiene department.
freshmen by Miss Helen H . Moreland, dean of women, on Monday and
Tuesday in Page hall auditorium.
The freshmen were urged to be liberal in their ideas of college life. They
were advised not to hold too closely
to the narrow scope of their former life
in high school and in family, New
acquaintances should be made and extra-curricular activities undertaken, but
not hastily, lest their hurried judgment Cub Classes to be Conducted for
curb their later decisions and actions.
Editorial Try-Outs during
The freshmen were advised to regard
Lunch Hour.
their instructors as trying to engage
the students' interests in scholastic
work..
Ninety-five students have enrolled in
Dean Moreland gave an additional the cub classes of the STATE COLLEGE
N
E
W S , as compared with an enrollwarning to the boys. Outnumbered approximately four to one by the fem- ment of one hundred and ten last September,
Marion Howard, '34, editorinine sex, they were advised to proin-chief, announced today. The sevenceed cautiously with any "come hithty-four students who signed for edier" look from State's women. The
torial work will be in charge of Almira
possibility of acquiring an inferiority Russ, Bessie Stetkar, and Thelma
or superiority complex might prove a Smith, seniors, senior associate editors.
liability to an enjoyable College ca- The nine "cubs" trying out for the
reer, she added.
finance staff will be under the superAn innovation this year was the vision of Kathryn Haug, '34, finance
tuberculosis test to the incoming fresh- manager. Mildred Facer, '35, circulamen. Although the tests were not com- tion manager, will take charge of the
pulsory, approximately two-thirds of eleven students signed for circulation
the freshman class took advantage of work; and Jean Craigmile, '34, adverthe opportunity. As a whole, the re- tising manager, will work with the
sults were reported favorable. The "cubs" enrolled in the advertising depositive results will be followed up partment.
later with x-ray photographs. The
The fundamentals of all News work,
tests were given by the State Depart- style, journalism, methods of preparing the copy, and all other general information, will be taught to'those enrolled during the first semester. The
second semester will be devoted to
short assignments which the "cubs"
must cover.
Professor Sayles Announces
Schedule for Milne High
Practice School
95 WILL TRY OUT
FOR NEWS STAFF
One hundred and fourteen State college seniors began their practice teaching Tuesday in Milne High school,
according to the fall teaching schedule.
A special requirement for graduation
is that every senior must teach a class
under supervision in his major or minor
subject for twenty weeks. Demonstration classes will be taught by Miss
Mary Elizabeth Conklin and Miss Ruth
Moore, supervisors of English in Milne
High school.
The schedule is as follows :
8:05 o'clock—Edltll De Hollander, Till
year EngUsli; Francos White, 7th year
science; Alice MclOwnn, Ttli year mat hematics; Dorothy Klc.se and Helen 1'lerxo,
8th yenr social science; Leorn Geudefl
and Bessie Sletknr, 8th year English;
Sylvia Surolt, 8th year science; Kiitlitirine Worden, nth year social science;
Mary Lou Walt her, Latin I ; Kathryn
Ilaiii:. elementary algebra; Charles Klssam, algebra; Leu 1'lante, general science; Rita Brownhnrd and Marlon Krvln,
9th year English; Ida Wciner, Latin 2;
Marion Welch, Latin 2; Hilda Bradley
and William Rogers, history A ; Helen
Perry, French 2; .lane McConncll, French
2; Robert Robinson, geometry; Thomas
Ryan, physics; Knthnrlne Bell, French
,'i; Ellsiabcth Wells, Intermediate algebra; Catherine Jamison, commercial
geography; Hazel Brown and Sophie
Zelnick, chemistry; Alvlna Trentelman
and Elizabeth Arnold, I'Jtli year English; Christine I'aland, typewriting 1,
»:(),-> o'clock—Mildred White, 7th year
science; Frances Illgglns. 7th year English; Gladys Annstrong and Isabcdle
Carlson, 7th year social science; Muriel
; Klizabelh
IMester, 8th year scle
Steele, 8th year mathematics; Kiwi Kjolseth, Sill year English; lmrntliy Maloney,
8th year mathematics; Helen Gates, 81 h
year mathematics; Doris Bell, biology;
Roger Bancroft, ill It year social science;
Matlillile Centner. French 1; Miss Conklin, 10th year English; .Millet Rubin,
bookkeeping I; Freda Luadell, French
2; 1'hilllp Rlccardl, geometry; Mildred
Mickey and Margaret Moal. history B;
Alverda Belle and Laura Vn.iiian, lllh
year English ; Thomas Ryan, physics laboratory; Marle-Loulse Sharon. French :!;
Muriel Dentun and Helen Hoke, history
C; L. A. Johnson, Latin I; Alice Hoyland, shorthand 2; Anita Fraelick, chemistry; Anthony Uorslno, Intermediate
algebra.
10:05 o'clock—Elizabeth Delane.v, 7tlt
year niathematles; Marlon Cornell and
Alice Owen, 7tli year social science idemonstration) ; Ellen O'Noil, 7th year science; Marion Mloezek, 8th year mathematics; Moris Shaver, Hth year science;
Miss Moore. Sth year English; Louise
Morris, Latin I; Mae Smith and Myrtle
Stowell, Otli vear English; Ruth Flnklestein, Latin I; Marguerite Paris, Latin
1; Dorothy Klmincrle, elementary business training ; Kill herlne.Morrison.shorthand 1; Marv Esther Ilallailay and
Frances Bstes.lOlli year English ;Charles
Jucketl ami Azalla Norris. history A;
Morolhv Barker. Latin 2; Morolhv Griflln, French 1; Nellie Wood, goomelry;
Hilda Booklieim ami Elizabeth Dickson,
IJtli vear English; Mafic Prinille, French
2; Olympia D'Alulo ami Charles Gilford,
history C; Elizabeth Skau and Dorothy
Grainer, chemistry.
IU:05 o'clock—Pella Bishop, 7th year
English; Plane Boeiiner, 8th year social
language; Louise Kelly and Ruth Be
deli, 8th year social science; Marlon I'lki
and Helen Gnltscliulk, Mb vear soclu
science; Gertrude Rosenberg, biology
.Mary Crary ami Mary Wlsneske, alge
bra; Marlon Kelly, lllh vear English
Bertram MoNury, Fremdi 1; Ellzabeti
Zncml, commercial arithmetic; .leash
Eaton, Latin 2; Mary Nuonan and Mmj
O'Connor, history A; Mavl.clle Miiltlicw,
ami Geraldine Peters, lotli vear English:
Anna Fusslk and Florence Fraukel,
geometry; Monabl Benedict, plivslcs lab
oratory; Evelyn Wells, Latin IS; Helen
Buckley, French 2; Marlon Howard, lllh
year English; Eleanor Waterhurv and
Lois Benjamin, 12th vear English; I.e.on
Websler. solid geometry; .lames Dolan
and Catherine lleffern, hlsturv C; Bali
27 GET POSITIONS
DURING SUMMER
P l a c e m e n t s in C o m m e r c e A r e
First; English, Mathemetics
and Science Next.
Twenty-seven members of the class
nf 193.3 have secured positions since
the last report in June. Of these, eleven
will teach commerce, five English, three
mathematics, and three sciences. The
rest are divided among the various
other departments and grade positions.
Alice Klamps will teach mathematics and commerce at Remsen; India
Newton, commerce at Truxton; Ellen
Murphy, commerce at Delhi; Mary
Killiber, commerce at Sherrill ; Clayton Stewart, commerce at Spencer;
Katherine Long, commerce at (jouverneur; Ethel Fredcnburg, commerce
and history at Minim ; Ruth Boyd, comOrmund
merce iit Westmoreland;
Oliver, commerce at Portland, Pa.;
Dorothy King, commerce at Ravena;
and Esther Lawler, commerce at East
Aurora.
Marv l\;nl will teach I ugh: h al
Shortsville; Hilda Smith, library science and English .-it Cohocinu: M a n
(.recti hhr if, v. lence and I nglish at
Porl Jefferson; William Howie, English and history at \'ew llyde Park:
and Evelyn Armstrong, English and
history al ('astlcloti.
Allien;, Hall will teach mathematics
ette Hiitzenhiuli, inter
Hale algebra; al Avcrill Park; Harold |)a\ev, sci
Ruth Fellows, Imslnes- English; Han,I,I
eiice al Sag Harbor; Franklin (lark,
Gardner, chemlslry.
1105 o'clock—Margaret Ilallailay and ,cicllCC mill lliathelllilt ics al Peril : llftice
Helen Meniilsoii Wheeler, Till vear social Kilhv, science at N'iagara [wills. Homer
science; Miriam W I ami Lillian c , ... , .
... ,
principal it Tt
Vaughn, 7th vciir iiialhemalh-s; Doris NiellicKI will In • w i l l tea.
Malllcc mid Alma Rliukus, 8| h year pram
English; Grace DeSant Is social Ian- B r a ( | c ,„ | )„ r s l .|„ I . ; ( h a i l , .
guage; Ellen .Noun. Junior business ,•
,,
• at S'oril
Iraliilng; Agnes Beck iiud Genevieve lull, seventh gr; nil -rl I i
Shorey, iilgidirn; Lena Gould, IKli vein Adelaide l.iltdt,
, „ . . I •.!,,. • l.t, e M u l l i m
social science; Maiv M v ami An
Crouch, Dili year KIIL'IIKII ; Margarei
,' , ' ' ' , , , • ; and M;
Dickson ami Mauilce Klelnberg Id,,I rliool ;il Ifiiski ii Albam
ogy; Catherluc Flizpnlrh-k ami Tin-Inn. aghau, S. In „ -I II
A;
Lois PI
liyws lunmiiicil
Wlzwer, Ken
Helen
Dnla
treys, hlslon
2; Rose Wlz'i
Elizabeth I'i
year English
Jullll Shields
m. hi ,klo
ir
his
B; Mais
Edna Chase, l l l h
I Benedict, p i , i s l e , ;
.".; Elizabeth John
Helen M a h a l . IJIh
Ion. Ecllerl chew
IK I
IJ I"
Hewitt
Telephone
e
plele
l-mt
EYE
CLASSES
OOl LISTS' I'HKSCKIITIONS I'TIXKI)
IlttlltliiiH, liootn 10, 61 Columbia Street, Albany,
and
Grill
198-200 Central Avenue
Albany, N. Y.
Try Our Special Dinners $1.00
N: Y.
+
Appointments
Dial
Reasonable Storage Kates
l-"4Hl
Lucille Beauty Salon
208 Quail
COOK'S
Street
Near Western Avenue
1'rliio CnnUbiuni w tt It fjuullly uml Workiiiuiulilp Kvcnliiii Appoint men I a I-'JINI
+
NANCY A N N SHOP
Madhson A v e n u e ill Quail
State Culleie Mnipplnl Center.
Open Evening
-:- 24 Hour Sercice
GARAGE
COR, SIIKKIDAN AVENUE & KOHIN S T R E E T
•
P A
I A M A C ! '''"' l'"'»m»a. '"• uluily, l«r uluupina, In thu iypl.nl
I 1\ J A . 1V| t \ v) J
inlleiie mamiur ul Brim* thin lit yuur huilitui
91 Steps Halt of Pearl Street
Boulevard Cafeteria
(;iiim,eH Fitted
+
j Evening
General I'r inters
36-38 Heaver Street
Fifty-five freshman women and forty
WELCOMES PLEDGE
freshman men attended the annual
Gamma chapter of Kappa Delta Rho
freshman
camps conducted Friday, Satwelcomes Francis J. Hardmeycr into
pledge membership.
urday, and Sunday, September 15, 16,
and 17, under the direction of Maybelle
Matthews and Almira Russ, seniors,
ANNOUNCES MARRIAGE for women, and Grenfell Rand, '34, for
Eta Phi sorority announces the mar- men. The women's camp was conducted
riage of Madeline McKeon, '33, to R. at Camp Cogswell and the men's at
David Tris, former student at Rollins Camp Albany on Lake Cossayuua.
college.
The purpose of each camp is to give
the freshmen an opportunity to become
orientated to College life and to meet
TWO SORORITIES MOVE the upperclassmen and faculty by
Two sorority houses have moved re- means of camp fires, songs, discussion
cently. Phi Lambda moved May first groups, games, and stunts. Features of
to 536 Mercer street, and Beta Zeta the girls' camp were an Indian campmoved August lirsl to 680 Madison fire ceremony, readings by Miss Agnes
avenue.
Futterer, assistant professor of English, and a talk by Dr. Harold Thompson, professor of English on "The Two
Aspects of College Life."
TO SUBMIT BUDGETS
Other members of the faculty who
T h e State College Finance Boa
visited the camp were: Miss Helen
requests that all organizations ham
II. Moreland, dean of women; Miss
budgets as soon as possible.
Isabclle Johnston and Miss Margaret
Hitchcock, instructors in physical education; Dr. Caroline Croasdale, professor of hygiene and College physician;
ARE VISITORS
Dr. Millie Green, assistant professor
William Collins, '33, John Grosvenor, of hygiene; Dr. Elizabeth Morris, as'33, Raymond Harris, '33, George His- sistant professor of education; Miss
crt, '33, William French, '29, and H a r - Edith Wallace, assistant professor of
M. Haswcll, '32, were recent visitors Latin; Miss Catherine Peltz, instrucat the Kappa Delta Rho house.
tor in English; Miss Marion Chesebrough, instructor in Latin, and Miss
Helen T. I r ay, manager of the College
Co-operative bookshop.
WILL CONDUCT A TEA
The men's camp was preceded by a
Syddum hall will conduct its annual general get-together of freshmen, uptea for freshmen living at the house on perclassmen, and faculty on Thursday
Saturday afternoon, September 30, al night. T h e speakers at this meeting
the house at 111 Ontario Street, ac- were Mr. Rutherford B. Baker, direcrding to Valentine Reutowich, '35, tor of men's athletics; Mr. Paul Shcats,
assistant instructor in government; Mr.
president.
Donald Bryant, instructor in English;
Lawrence Newcomb, '31, and Samuel
Dorrance, '32. Activities at the camp
GROUP HOUSE MOVES
included a camp fire, a "stunt night,"
Finer
11 all, women s group house, and games for the camp championship.
which
formerly located at 495 A picked team of undergraduates deState s
t. has moved to 461 State feated a faculty learn in a game of instreet.
door baseball on Saturday with the
score of 30-12.
Dr. Donna! V. Smith, assistant proANNOUNCES MARRIAGE fessor
in history, welcomed the freshPi Alpha Tan sorority announces tin. men at dinner on Friday nigh/t. Other
marriage of Bertha Pitkin,'29, of Sche- faculty who intended were; Dr. Robnectady, to Benjamin Lasdon of Albany ert W. Frederick, assistant professor
in education; Dr. Edward Cooper, instructor in commerce; Dr. Karl Dorwaldt, instructor in hygiene; and Dr.
VISITS SORORITY
Adna Risley, professor of history.
Eurelta Lloyd, '11, was a week
Officers for the cam)), in addition to
guest at the Phi Delta sorority In
Rand, included: John Hills, '35, treasurer, and Thomas Garrett, '34, athletic
director.
Newman Club to Have
1937 Party Tomorrow
+_
EVORY & CO.
55 Women and 40 Men Attend
Annual Orientation Groups
on September 15-17
Editorial T r y - o u t s
The editorial try-outs a r c : Edna
Wright, and Sylvia Zarch, juniors;
and Doris Baird and Frank Hardmeyer, sophomores; Agnes Torrens,
Norma Dixon, Ruth Leibtenberg, Virginia Stocl, Evelyn llamann, Betty
Stttll, Lois Kraits, Fred Dexter, Catherine Brodcrick, Mary Epallen, Margaret Domes, Elfreida Hartt, Carol
Mires, Cornelia Rosbrook, Eleanor
Van Horn, Marion Townsend, Alma
Snyder, Mary Plank, Josephine Kirby,
Hetty Wildt, Frances Smith, Elinor
Smalley, Anne Filipovich, Mary Lam,
Phyllis Vermilye, Helen Clyde, Martha
Harlow, Anne Harvey, Mildred Grover,
Robert Margison, Katherine Crandall,
Christopher McNamce, Martin Reed,
Jane Smith, Dorothy Knapp, Annabelle
Reed, Charles Morris, Winifred Wilcox, Sue Caldwell, Mary Salamey,
Alice Allard, James Beale, Harry Gumaer, Thomas Hreen, Ruth Rouse,
Jeanne Jacobs, Esther F'ehrer, Catherine Virdoret Elizabeth Miury Rose
I'asec, Rosemary Dickinson, Rosemary
LalTcrtv, Dorothy Graham, Dorothy
Rusk, "Edith Wood, Alice Barrows,
Frances Drace, Elizabeth Gooding,
Marion Bowman, Ida Jane Hammond,
Ethel Keshner, Elizabeth Herr, FranTO HAVE MEETING
ces McVeigh, Anne Viglione, Lillian
The Young Men's Christian associaShapiro, lulward llogan, Sylvia Kcetion
will
conduct a get-together in tin
don, and John Hastings, freshmen.
Lounge of Richardson hall Tuesdaj
night at 7:30 o'clock, according t<
Circulation T r y - o u t s
Donald Benedict, '34, president. This
Newman club will conduct ils annual
I rv <i.it- l r ; irt iilatiHi staff include will be I he first of a series of activities reception for frc-hnien tomorrow at
Florence Tide, '.id. Laurita Scld, Kliza which I he Y.M.C.A. cabinet has H 31) o'clock al Newman hall, 741 Madihcth Kudcla, Ada Knuppel, Elizabeth planned for the year's program.
son avenue. Catherine Kearney, '35,
Strong, Hope Rogers, Ruth llallock,
The program will include talks by will be general chairman, Other comPhvllis Tucker, Rose Waite, Ann Ser
if the men i it tin
ilh All mit lee chairmen will h e : entertainment,
vice, ami Beverly Wallher, freshuieu.
Regina
Barrett, '3d; refreshment,
he I'e.-ulL. ml ( illcg.
Helena Bchr, '35; and publicity, Marattend, and
ial n
Finance T r y - o u t s
garei lloff, '36.
led lo all fi
'I hose m iug out for finance are :
William Baker, '3b, Louise Gruncwald,
Duroiln Rusk, Prances Kelley, Edith
Wood, ll.lcn Sheldrake, Bcttv M o r n - ,
Ruth Tanner, and Donald De Serio,
vNRAy
Dial 5-1913
Geo. I ) . Jeoney, Prop.
" 5-9212
Mi
Kills
111.
up
rlisine. depa
It, but the lisl
t
J'RANK II,
ARE HOUSE GUESTS
Marie Havko, '29, and Lois Burgdorf, ',33, were guests at the Gamma
Kappa Phi sorority house last weekend.
N. P. F R E D E T T E
A : l.i.IN Pan
95 ENROLL IM 1937
FRESHMAN GAMPS
MEWS MOTES
Certified
Molillnbrianhin
HKl'MHS
WASHING
Pliant 4-tVil
IIAVmUKS
TIHKS
We Cull I'or ami Deliver Your Car Free of Chortle.
Canine to Colletfe,
Nearest
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