StateCollege N e w s * 11 COLLEGE FOR TEACHEW

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U 3ftAftv
* 11 COLLEGE FOR TEACHEW
ALBANY,
N.
V,
StateCollege News
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930
VOL. XV. No. 8
34 PLANS DEBATE
FOR DECEMBER 12
749 PAY STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION TAX
1934
Seven hundred forty-nine students
have paid $10,486 of the $16,068.65
student association budget, according
to assistant professor Clarence A .
Hidley, treasurer of the student association.
The freshmen head the list
of those who have paid the student
tax, and the juniors are last. Three
hundred five freshmen, 166 sophomores, 140 seniors and 136 juniors
have paid the tax.
Last year, the record year for tax
collection, §11,760 had been collected
at the end of the regular collection
period, while this year approximately
$1,300 less has been collected than
last year, according to Professor
Hidley.
Since more than 300 students have
not yet paid their tax money, an extension of the period of tax collection
will be necessary, M r . Hidley said.
The cut in the budgets of the various organizations will be the same as
lust year if not less, Mr. Hidley announced.
The officers of the finance board for
193(1-31
are: chairman,
Professor
George M. York, head of the com-I
merce department; treasurer, C'lar-1
encc A. Hidley, assistant professor of
history, and secretary, Norman Collins, senior member of the board, i
The other members of the hoard are:
Marion ((dwell, ' 3 1 ; Dorothy Hall
and Robert kankins, juniors; and |
Prances McMahou, \^.
COLLEGE ALUMNI
TO HAVE ANNUAL
DINNER TOMORROW
Presents Book
Committee Will Choose Team
To Contest Philodoxia,
High School Team
Leads Tax-Payers'
List;
Sophomores Are Second;
Juniors Rank Last
The members of the finance board
are elected at the time of the class
elections in the spring of the preceding year. The seniors and juniors
have two representatives on the board
and the sophomore class elect one.
$2.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues.
G.A.A. TO CONDUCT
WEEK OF HEALTH
Poster
Contest
and Selection
Of Healthiest Woman
Are Features
For the first time in the history of
The annual health week under the
any freshman class, a team will be
auspices of the Girl's Athletic association will be conducted this year from
chosen to engage in an early season
debate with the Philodoxia literary
November 17 to 21, according to Beasociety of the Albany High school
trice Van Steenburgh, '31, president.
Friday night, December 12, at 8:15
Tentative plans for the week include
o'clock.
The debate will take place
a poster contest, the selection of the
in the Albany High school auditorium
healthiest girl in College, and the
upon the occasion of Philodoxia's anpresentation of an assembly program,
nual honorary night ceremonies.
she said.
Every member of the class who is
Annette Lewis, '32, is general chairinterested will be given a tryonl, acman for the week. Jean Minkin and
cording to Grenfell N, Rand, chairFrances Virginia Peck, seniors, will
man of the committee in charge.
assist her. Leah Dorgan, '32, is in
"Ample opportunity will be given
charge of publicity. The other memeach candidate for the team to debers of her committee a r e : Annis
monstrate his ability," Rand said.
Kellogg, '.U, Augusta Vail. '33, and
The other members of the committee
Helen Barrett, '34.
are Frances K. lliggins and Charles
Every
freshman and sophomore
Hinham.
member of the gymnasium classes will
Miss Helen T . Fay, manager
Cieorge I 1 . Rice, '32. will coach the of the Co-op, who will give a
be required to make a poster for
freshman team.
The tryouts and
health week and hand it in before
hook away each week.
Pach
selection of the team will he under
November 13, Miss Lewis said. A n y
volume given in this manner will
supervision.
subject
of health such as posture,
In- one written by the faculty
sleep, fresh air, exercise, food, ventilaThe team representing Philodoxia
and will be autographed.
tion, clothing, and sports, will be suitwill consist of George ( apian, Norable, she said.
One representative
man ( ochranc, Jack Goodman, capfrom each gymnasium class will he
lain, and John (arncvale. alternate.
selected to work with the publicity"
i arncvale, who is also president of
committee to distribute the posters
I'hilodoxia, said: " I am looking foreach day.
ward with interest to the meeting of
our team with that of the freshman;
ir a c |, u c x . k t n e State college CoThe three most original posters will
l State college.
I he results of | ( ) p t . r ativc book store will present some he selected and given the place of
this movation should indeed be grati- j sltulcnt with a book written by some honor across the main stairway in
lv||
'g.
member of the faculty, according to Draper hall. Miss Lewis announced.
I wo questions have been offered as ,-,„ announcement made this week bv These will be awarded a red seal and
possibilities. 'Ilicy are; I. Resolved: | \\ j„ s | | c | c l l | , | . a v , manager of the ribbon, she said. Miss Eunice Ferine,
assistant professor of line arts, will
I hat the policy of co-education is fie- j i,,,,,^ ..tore.
sirable in American colleges; 2. ReAs the' students pass into the give instruction in the making of
solved: That armed protection of Lounge each Wednesday at the time posters on Monday and Wednesrlay
foreign investments is justified.
„ f , | K . student-faculty teas, each will from 9 to 12 o'clock to all those who
are interested.
Ibis debate will he a non-decision I |, c g j v e l l a s | j p (Jf , m p c r 0 „ xv llich
one.
I he time will he seven minutes ; w i M U . W ritten a number.
At the
The healthiest girl in State college
for each constructive speaker with t .| (JSC ,,f t | K . reception, an announce- will be selected from representatives
one ten minute lebuttal.
I m ! | 1 ( w j | | | l cm a ( | e a s ,,,w h i c n n u m .
of various organizations.
Each club
! her has been picked as the lucky one. or organization, group house, sorority,
G
A
A
tn HaVP Annual
Among the hook- which will be and gymnasium class will present a
candidate for this title.
X o woman
can be a candidate from more than
Kira] ;m
1)JRh Sdli)ol
one organization, Miss Lewis said.
; lul
1
The names must be in by November
T
R. liruliaclier and Miss kallicruie 14, at which time the candidates will
The annual fall award dinner and j K, Wheeling, as.sistant professor of he examined by a student committee,
gym frolic of the Girl's Athletic as- , English; "Anecdotes and Kgotistns of composed of Miss Heck. Miss Minkin,
sociation will be conducted on Satur- Henry Mckenzie," In Dr. Harold W. Miss Lewis. Ksther Mead, '32. Naomi
Albrecht, '33, and Minnie McNickle,
day.
November
n, Bea- Thompson,
professor
of Fngli.sh;
The dinner
will 22,
he according
in Ih'
essor Barnard
S Brom
, head
true
\ anhall
Steenburgh,
'31, president
m i l P department
I Chemistrv."
by '34.
I lasted
and the fro
ih. "Nutrition
he i hemistry
; and
gymna.sitim of I law ley half
'Ihc live healthiest candidates will
. t it lit i> 01 of the I 'ruled States,"
Sin nhiirgh anniiiiiii ed.
Dr. David Hutchinson, head of be selected by this committee. These
will be examined by Dr. Caroline
Betty Gordon, '33, i . gi n
•i tin
nl
man for the event. The following
The III .1 pr. -em il|..n was made D. Croasdale, the College physician, and
i "i
ittees will as si a her :
Dr.
Howard
Doll, II. proiVs.or ..f the winner announced in assembly on
mint. Kalheriue Moure, '33. chairman. m.ilheniali. . to \ui,c > iy. r. ool, '31. November ..'1.
and Mildred Smith, \'^ ; han.pi.t, in the Loiing, of Ri, hard-un hall, at
Marion Gilhert, '31. i liairm an, Made- the Li. tilt\ Hide 'I le i la-l W'edni hue Hayes, '31, \ era Burns and Ali.e day afternoon. 'I he I k is entitled
(iihlin. juniors, and lierlha Buhl and "The TeaHiing Profession and I'raiI .abelle Hewitt, sophomores ; decora- lice," by Dr. A. R. Itrubacher.
tions,
Marie Juilil, '33, chairman,
Helen I'roiiiie and Violet Putnam,
sophomores; waitre-ses, Evelyn A r m - !
The Girl's Athletic association will
strung, '3,\. chairman; clean-up, Paura
present a vaudeville again this year
Styn, '33, chairman, Mary Moure,
STUDENTS TO GET
FACULTY-WRITTEN
BOOKS EACH WEEK
u. H. H. w nave annual i
,. ,.
,„..„,„„,,,.
Banquet November 22 ' ,!'"i "-"-"." i»- ?™f** A-
The annual meeting of the eastern i
district of the State college alumni association will be conducted toinor- i
row night at a dinner in the cafeteria ]
of I lusted ball, according to Mrs.
Bertha Harford, president of the eastern district, who will preside at the
meeting. Mrs. Harford is :m instructor at ihc I lackett junior high school,
flic dinner will he preceded bv a
social hum- in the Lounge of Richardson hall. Mrs. Kenneth Mac After,
formerly Pdna Shaffer. '2-1, will sing.
YOWXJV
o. CO±.UHS
The dinner will begin at 0 o'clock, |
These are the men who tinderMrs. Harford announced. Mrs. Mac- j took the collection of the stuAffer will also lead informal singing
dent lax. I h>s arc: Professor
during the dinner.
M. York,
chairman;
George
Miss Margaret Hayes, assistant diClarence A. Hidley, treasurer of
rector of child welfare anil social
the student board of finance; and
work in Milne high school will be the
Norman Collin*, senior member.
I ler topic will be
principal speaker.
"Parent Kducation." Miss Hayes was
formerly distrii t supervisor for the
lor iis annual entertainment, accordFli/.abcth Kammerer, and Jean Cragslate education department of North
Plans for scheduling six debate'
mile, fresbiuen ; cbaperones, Judy Pis-I
ing to Beatrice Van Steenburgh, '31,
Carolina.
for varsity debate teams are practer,
'32,
chairman;
and
publicity,
A
l
president. There will be two directors
There will be reports presented
tically completed by the debate conn
\ ina Lewis, '33, chairman, and Anuis ,
from the various committees, M r s . :
i il, according to George P. Rice, '32 and a business manager appointed this
Kellogg, '32.
Harford said. Special attention will
Dr. Sherwood Kddy, who spoke at
sei retary of the coiini il.
year to manage the presentation, she
be given to the report t,) be presented j t | l c . M l , ( | n U y
.s c l ) r i s l i a „
I he men's team will meet the repreM
MEMBER WELCOMED
! sentatives of the University of Ver-t said.
bv Miss Hazel Rowley, assistant pro. .
,.
,
. ,
.,, .
last year a vaudeville was prefessor
in physics, con erning the • ' ' • ^ w l i o n dinner last night, will be
I'si Gamma sorority welcomes Mr. inont some time in March. The de
irrison
M. Terwilliger, assistant hale will be in I'age ball on tin sented under the direction of Ruth
amendments to the constitution. The 'be speaker in the assembly this
j Hughes,
31. This was the first
annual election of officers will also morning at I I o'clock in the Page professor of commerce, and Mrs. 'ler- question of whether or not the cbaii
vaudeville to have been given since
take place at this meeting.
| , a | | audilnriiiiii according to Russell I willigcr, and Mr. Chester T c r r i l l , as- store system is beneficial, Stale co
l')2d. It consisted of a short musical
Mrs. Quccne I Ionian Faust, former , ,,
,..
'
,
sistant professor of commerce, and lege will uphold the negative. 'Hi
comedy, popular song and dancing
instructor in biology, was in charge | ' ' " " " " " ' • " ; l " 1 ; , " 1 " " ' , s 1 1 " u " , ' l s " , Mrs. T c r r i l l , into honorary member- | council plans a return debate wit
ads,
and a tumbling and pyramid
of the publicity for the event, Mrs. sociation.
Dr. Pddy, who has ju^t : s | n , , .
Hamilton colleg
building
act.
Barford said.
returned from a t r i | abroad
• ' • • will
• "
Florence Gormley, '20, was director
n the international
The next meeting of the associa- probably spe
s ituatioii as he saw il in the principal
of two of the three musical comedies
lion will be conducted in the spring,
presented by the association. The one
with the an- c untries of Kurope visited during his
probably in conjunction
conj
given in 1929 was entitled " A r t for
journey, (ieorge P. Graff, '31, presiiiual round-table conference
Art's
sake," in which two members of
of
the
Y.
M.
C.
A.,
said.
dent
eluded.
junior
class,
Mildred
This summer, Dr. Kddy visited 1
State college co-eds' style of dress
In taking count of necklines, the the present
Smith
and Isabel Heard, played the
Kurope, Asia, and the Orient, l i e has I closely parallels the trend which is V-ncikline won by a very large ma
spent the majority of his time In past [being indicated by the leading women'.' jority, with the U neckline second, a- leading roles.
Hockenberger Is Longest, Fry
years in foreign countries lecturing magazines, such as the Vogue, l i a r
Marion Sloan, '29, co-operated with
shown by the fact that, of the average
Shortest Name In Directory and interviewing numerous uolilical, per's Bazaar, Woman's Wear, and the ol two bundled women counted, si.xl) Miss Gormley in writing the comedy
The comedy was entitled
riling to a live wore V necks ami sixteen U in l°28.
diistrial,
i.il,
and educational New York
Christine Hockenberger, '34, has
The runners up were the "The Third Act." and Edna Wolfe,
study made by ictlial count of one'necks.
the distinction ol having the longThis square neck, the cowl-shaped neck, or '28, and Alice Hills, '29, played the
\fter his graduation from Yale in hundred Mate i liege women.
est name in the State College D i IK'«., I )r, Kddy went to India where study was mad in connection with with a collar, with twelve wearing parts of hero and heroine.
rectory for 1930-1931, while Sara
course 1(1, a I them; and (lie oval, or bateau, neil,
be worked lor 15 years among the | the home econ u i ' i ,
The first musical comedy, presented
Pry, '31, has the shortest.
students there. He was then appointed I course in rostuu c designing, taugl I hue, with .sc\eu wearing i l .
in 1927, was named "On the hence,"
There are sixteen .Smiths this
secretary
of
the
Y.
M.
C.
A.
of
India
by
Mis.
Anna
I
based
on "Then You'll Remember,"
Bars.mi, assistant I
"Waistlines have gone back to i)• • i"
year, whereas there were thirteen
and served in this office for nine \ professoi - o f houn eciMiomics.
I mal very decidedly, with those lb.it a popular song of the time.
last year.
This year's Browns,
working among il
students of
Ai cording to the figures compiled j : • not normal ch , ide>l between niediseven in number, exceed last year's
W I L L BE CHAIRMAN
Russia, China, a d the Near by the class by counting the first huni nid lung," says Mr-. Bar-am.
by two. while the Junes remain
Past
dred women who went mlo tin- Mhrarv I
'Hem hue. were nut counted, be
the same, eight ill both editions.
Abbie Dinueeii, '33, was appointed
Dr.
Pddy
has
written
many
books
-ary to take the nica,- chairman of the sophomore soiree at
There has been a decrease in Robduring their class period, lifty-muel i
on pai ilisiu, of which he is a firm have, or are grow mg long h or,
insons, however, from five last year
I urenieilt from the floor to prov. .
a meeting of the sophomore class readvocate.
He is also known as anclose to the bead in a ilat ku.it, .bole [distance." she added. "However, oh-j cently, Betty Gordon, class president)
to only four this year.
authority on sex problems.
forly-oue have short hair.
I
U'oiiliuutd
on page 5, column 5)
announced,
\
DR. EDDY TO TALK
TO STUDENT BODY,
LUDLUM DECLARES
Debate Council Plans
To Have Six Contest
Milady Will Wear V-Neckline. This
Season, State College Co-ed Proves
G. A. A. TO PRESENT
VAUDEVILLE SHOW
AGAIN THIS YEAR
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930
State College N e w s
Ksulilislieil in 1916 by the Class of 1918
The Undergraduate Newspaper of New York
SUte College for Teachers
THE NEWS BOARD
NETTA
~
MILLER
Edilor-in-Chiej
S96 Morris Street, Telephone 6-033211
GEOROE P. RICE
Managing
Editor
455 Elk Street
CATHERINE E. BRODERICK....Associate Managing Editor
3100 Sixth Avenue, Troy, Telephone Troy 6621-J .
AUDREY FLOWERS
Advertising
Manager
Page Hall, 131 South Lake Avenue, Telephone 6-6482
ANDREW A, H R I T Z
finance
Manager
201 North Lake Avenue, Telephone 6-5810
ALEXANDER SCHOOR
Feature
Editor
1B4 CentralEDITORS:
Avenue,Genevieve
TelephoneWinslow,
3-7616 Lilly NelSENIOR ASSOCIATE
son, and Martha North DKSK EDITORS: Samuel S. Drnnsky,
'32,
and Alvina U. Lewis-, '33.
JUNIOR ASSOCIATE
1934 STEPS OUT
The class of 1934 has given unmistakable interest
that it intends to advance the interests of debate in this
College. Already the class has taken steps to organize
a team. Already it has scheduled one debate.
Such activity is worthy of commendation. N o other
freshman class in the history of the College has thu9
early organized its debate team, No other class has
made an attempt to schedule contests for its team, other
than the usual iuterclass rivalry contest.
Material for next year's varsity debate teams will undoubtedly be developed by these debates. Should the
present class challenge its iuterclass rivals to a debate,
it will have the advantage of knowing who can debate.
It will have debaters of experience upon whom the members of the class can rely.
The freshmen have made a good beginning.
Their
activity in debate will be watched with interest by the
student body as well as the faculty.
EDITORS:
Prances Keller, tlessie Ncvine, and Ruth lirezce. REPORTERS I
Vera Burns, '32, Bernard Kernel, Clara Allan, Abblc Dinecn,
Carolyn Kramers, Harriet Dunn, Elizabeth Gordon, Alice
Klomp, Katlicrinc Moore, Margaret Service; Hilda Smith, Laura
Styn, Edith Topper, and Helen VV'altennire, sophomores,
BUSINESS STAFF: Betty Kauttcr, '31, Curtis Rutenbe
Lloyd W. Jones, Jean Watklns, Mary Doherty,
;
BOOKS:
ESSAY
THE
ON
CONVERSATION
STORY O K A
FIGHTER
'',V
Conversation.
Bv Andre Maurois. 82 pages. E, P.
Dutton and Co., Inc. $1.00.
In
a
series
of
brilliant essays, Maurois, author of the
Published every Friday In the college year by the Editorial
Board representing the Student Association. Subscriptions, $2.25 newest biography on Byron, sets forth the principles for
tier yearx single copies, ten cents. Delivered anywhere In tli the application of conversation for offensive and desecond class matter at postofficc fensive purposes.
hew people realize, until it is too late, the power and
ie N'EVVS does not necessarily endorse sentiments e>
uses of conversation. Fewer still realize the value of
ontributlflns. No communications will be printed mi
silence at the proper moment. One of the most inter-rs' names are left with (he Editor-in-Chief nf the
esting parts of this book is the author's revelation of
nymity will he preserved if so desired. The NEWS (I
the uses of silence.
Every individual, and particularly college students, is
PRINTED BV MII.I.J ART PRESS, 394-396 l!n ladwa y—Dial 4-2287
forced to resort to conversation of different types and
Albany, N. Y,
Nov. 7, 19.50
Vo 1. XV. No. 8 under varying circumstances. What conversation can do
for the individual when it is employed as an art and
what it can do to the individual when unskillfully used
A SUGGESTION TO LOITERERS
is the main theme of the book.
T h e groups of gossip-mongers who stand in the vicinMembers of the English department have praised this
ity of stairways while classes are passing afford daily hook and recommend its reading. If the student is alexamples of what not to do to speed the progress of ready a skillful conversationalist, he can add to his ability
by reading this hook. If he lacks skill, he can lay the
students from one room or building to another.
groundwork upon which to build a pleasing and useful
This hindrance is not felt so much in the morning reputation as a conversationalist.
when ten minutes is allowed for the passing of classes, Hisiiiarck, the Story oj a Fighter.
By Emil Ludwig.
but in the afternoon when the time is cut to five minutes,
661 pages. Little, Brown and Company, Boston.
$1.00.
the groups seriously impede traffic and often cause stuThat which is imposing here on earth . . . is always
dents to be late for classes. This, of course, docs not
akin to the fallen angel; who is beautiful, but lacks
raise the student in the estimation of the instructor. It peace; is great in his plans and efforts, but never sucalso causes an interruption at the beginning of the class ceeds ; is proud, and melancholy. These words, written
that would be better avoided.
by Bismarck, may be taken as the summary of his own
career.
Milne High school students who loiter are urged upon
Teachers of history in high schools and colleges have
their respective ways by children who act as traffic done much to keep up the traditional ideas about Bisofficers. But such a procedure should not be necessary marck. They have firmly implanted the picture of the
Bismarck has always been
for College students. A little cooperation by these so- man of blood and iron.
cially-minded students would do much to remove the depicted as imperialistic, ruthless, and furthering the
interests of the Fatherland at any cost.
difficulty.
Alter having read the opinions of dozens of authors
The Lounge of Richardson hall has been provided as about the life of the Iron Chancellor, it is refreshing
the logical place for the students to meet and talk. They to read this candid and straightforward biography from
should not make the halls a meeting place for lengthy the pen of a fellow-countryman of the great German
statesman.
discussions.
Although written by a German, the hook does not
The problem of passage is particularly noticeable in overflow with sentimental and patriotic phrases. Rather
Richardson hall where the doors are of insufficient width does the author present the story of Bismarck, the man
to permit passing quickly and easily. And it is here and the diplomat, with clearness and with fairness.
Willi characteristic German thoroughness, Ludwig hathat students offend most by loitering.
ution lo the early life of the Iron I'ban
mh
The solution to the problem lies in enlisting the c o - i . d p
lion seems justified, because much of the
tin
\[ upon in*
operation of all oi the students. When the time draws j later
Bisi
k': ; y
near for the ending of classes and during the passage of J •l''?'.'|
h e , ien 1" •r t r
i fighter whthe students, the socially minded should not pause in | • '
hold hand. !•
,' W as \
itte
the halls or near the stairways for pleasant conversation.:
,
nculated in 1
They should take for their motto—"Keep Moving."
j',.);,,,.'
i ton- Ir.mi ti
uril •lit i< i l l tc
Peets,
sophomore'-.
ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGERS
Mazar and Helen Rohcl, juniors.
aas.n
HAVE YOU FAIH YOUR TAX?
Calculations by the student hoard of finance prove
that the progress of tax collection is not up to the
standard of last year.
To date approximately eight hundred students have
paid about §1I),()00 into the student association treasury.
This means that there are more than four hundred who
have not yet paid.
Student activities, supported by the association tax,
cannot continue as planned unless everyone who can do
so pays the tax.
Unless the payments increase, a heavier cut will
necessarily result this year.
BRANDED AS "MUCKERS"
Branded as "muckers" and given suspensions by their
dean, forty-two Princeton university men will have
ample opportunity for a time to reflect upon the foolishness which drew upon them a merited punishment.
Just before the football game with Chicago university,
a number o( Princeton men indulged in hilarious demonstrations of spirit to such an extent that it necessitated
calling out police reserves and closing traffic on a city
street. Bottles, furniture and articles of apparel were
freely cast by residents of dormitories. One motorist
narrowly escaped being injured by
urled by
one of the rioters.
finally
The disturbance went on unihe •d lor h.
the exuberant spirits were satisl
consider
Now that the affair is oyer,
e pan
the results of such irresponsible action. The men have
brought upon themselves a great amount of criticism
Upon their alma mater they have drawn unde-irahlc
publicity, Their action has east a rcllertiou upon a university whose reputation and traditions are unsurpassed
in this country.
What did they achieve? The game with ( Imago resulted in a scoreless tie their administration has become
They hav
justly incensed, and they are suspend
gained nothing and have lost mm It.
f ll>'
Their foolishness has brought lo the
public at large to the uiuiei e ^ a r j rah
hyiaii who should exist milv in novels
speak only in "talkie ."
The campus newspaper, rather than condemning the
a t iodic tiled thai it favored k-niein > n ilc-ding with
,| !( . , u lprits. Instead, it should have a.K ,. aied a punishincut commensurate with the traiisgres iou they made.
Dean Gauss acted rightly.
Other colleges may well lake their I lion as a type
unnecessary, and utterly
iinde.iral.
ded
to I"
|
THE STATESMAN
MY KAY ( UI.I.I.VS
Despite the scandalous "tagging" of ears parked in the
College driveway, the co-eds and their guests were able
to enjoy one of the most charming of the "Senior I lops"
to date. The ballroom was most skillfully decorated,
and the colors were carefully amalgamated so as to
harmonize with the exquisite evening gowns and the
brilliant complexion of the young ladies. 'I be orchestra
ua.s very considerate in that they allowd the couples
ample time between dances to return from the lounge
where the side shows were being conducted. At this
point, we would like to congratulate the chairman and
her c
nittce on thru- splendid piece of work in making
the " H o p " such a real hip success.
At the Greek d.Hires the following night, the Hallowe'en spirit was still prevalent.
Many sororities complained of having lost the major portion of their refreshments as die result of the work of an unknown
croup of men who very gallantly carried off everything
in sight. Other sororities were further humiliated lo
'ights" hanging on their pi
It
rumored that the
j li Mini.itun
is last
ir on the i ampiis
•r the
.in,. :I would ap
Inter
the
idei
rding
leg;
proper!
.pin
I will u ok' pin
forth in Ei
After reading the K'ensselaer Polytechnic, it is very
idenl thai the autl or of the "Ink-Lain-" ha- iml as vet
e
III l a d , I don't think that heknows which
al I at. In the fir-1 phu e, the jampe. ilii all) in- tin. led I" beware "I
.King hai.u lers who might endeavor to
mi during I ampiis Night proceed
ilallv, I recall observing several strange
p. reason with the- janitor at the
ill in vain. They claimed they had
oiildn't understand what they were
c il is not dilhi nil to p. ic eive of
sistmg among these "prospective
iwever
we Irttsl thai in the future
I •)
I'ortui He b iys will be prepared to i ope with
ituati oils Which II
The hoys should
r that the name "lv. P. 1." is event!)
Slate l o l h g e maiden. Thus they should
eu lo
lilli. nitv in securing a f. rmal invila
unter
\\.
G.AA Strives For "Highest Standard":
Leader Stresses Fair Play And Health
BY IJBATRiri; V A N STERN BUROH
I'RKSIIIBNT, GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Life here at State, as at any college, tends to reach an amazing complexity.
With concentration upon a rapid succession of events, the student feels the
need of a careful, well-balanced program. Recreation, involving careful attention to the best principles of good health, aids in acquiring the mental and
physical vigor necessary for success.
The Girls' Athletic association strives to supply the need felt for types of
recreation which will increase both friendships and enjoyable associations
with other women at college, stressing the opportunity to provide the physical
efficiency needed for a college career. In the program of G. A. A. there are
found, therefore, the "highest standards of clean sportsmanship, loyalty to
the group, the wisdom of good health, and the pleasure of fair play."
' Qualities that contribute to sound
leadership are robust health, intellectual curiosity, responsible citizenship,
and the thoughtful use of leisure time.
The ideals and opportunities that (',.
A. A. represents are based upon these
objectives, for G. A. A. encourages
"play for play's sake", the motto
adopted by Athletic Council of American College Women, the national
athletic organization to which G. A.
A. belongs. It encourages every girl
in college to play, to play skillfully
and hard so that each girl will develop an athletic "hobby"—a hobby
that will prove so entertaining that
it will be carried on through life.
G. A. A. aids in devoloping good
sportsmanship. It helps you to forget yourself in promoting the team.
It furnishes the opportunity for leadership. Thus are derived the benefits
of health, leadership, friendship, and
the satisfying use of leisure time.
Advocate Sport
Beatrice Van Steenburgh, '31,
who advocates active participation in College sports by the
members of the Girls' Athletic
association.
But who are entitled to enjoy these
privileges?
Every girl in college,
upon payment of her student lax,
automatically becomes an associate
member of the G. A. A. She may
use its equipment, take advantage of
the coaching supplied by the department of physical education and the
student coaches—in short, take part
in every activity sponsored by the organization.
Associate
membership
may become active membership upon
meeting the requirements in any one
of the sports offered by the association. Active membership carries with
j it the right to vote and t
Id office.
I The association is led by
an athletic council composed of
members. This council is madethirleen
up of
ATTITUDE COUNTS
TOWARD GETTING
JOB, SAYLES SAYS
()ne of the first things to do to
obtain a teaching position is to decide
whether you really want a position,
or whether you are going to be bound
by geographical limitations, according
to Professor John M. Sayles, princiI
pal of Milne high school, who spoke four officers of the association elected
on the appointment bureau in the as- in the spring, a representative of
sembly Friday morning.
| honor council, together with a re|
f demand | resentative and manager from c; h of
"A senior's standard
should take into consideration not the three upper classes, a mai
only the amount of salary to be re- from the freshman class, and ;
ceived, but also the cost of living in porter chosen by the president,
the locality and the proper associa- council meets regularly once a
tion of values, with a point of view and attends to all business of lb
oi the opportunities for growth, in [social
I'n .I'c- >• a
S a v 1 e a said, posed i lb
mind,"
lion who
t i n vth
ds br dtb il experi
part
ok shoul.
I athlcl
.ted in
lllsohltch
j Moving up day.
I Whatever your pel sport . .r •
G. A. A. c es forward wilb
game. The crisp air of fall
Ihockev and volley ball. Swinin
lt|o||
[also offered as a fall and
\PI
dot ics In
-.port.
Then, after
Than!,
d gr. ling, In vacation basketball starts. I'r;
are coiidui ted every Mnndav,
the interview, act lllter- ncsilav and Eridav,' from three
•.sled i
.tain ig the position; have live o'clock, under the <lin.li
•onlidc
•If, being sure that faculty and -indent coai lies i
I'lhing worth selling; be j gymnasium of P
I hi Tin
like
k intelligent que
days and Thursday! Hi winter pvi
nceruing the school situation; mid and tumbling '
is pracii.i
d do not be afraid to tell a good
With the advent
story," Professor Sayles said.
baseball and track
lie
In particular, students should re- there are bow ling, leun
niber that tin
mit going to Outing club with it1 one posit,
ill their life
shoeing, and -kaling I
lid lake the dividual fan. ie-.
Iter they are ,
•tible to k i
pen by
At the close of each
.11
(.
o r m i n g the
ol the ppolllt- A. lias an award night
piel
lailge of
a gymnasium frolic, vvl
included
formal gathcrine with dam ing. singing, and
THREE ARE PLEDGED
There will be a full c . n
tin- year on \ o \ e m b c r
In
Lambda
sorority
welcomi
• >lh> McGiimiss and Ahuiiia Pel
At pre t-ilt, I amp Col
II is il "I
. juniors, and Lucille Wain-lc; for G. V A . week e ids, I,
'•'I" pledge in. i nl.t-i--.liip.
the ambitious of the
secure a lodge of ufiinds for tin- purpcr
A. A. presents a mu
Today
vaudeville in which
\ M Mu.le it assembly.
takes some part. La
II is II.
installation of the nc..
at the spring award banquet
: omorrow
.in P M German < luh "KafK'atch
Plan now In make it your v
Leninite. Kiehardhall
Sunday
V M. (' A. disP M
gr.uip
Kappa
Delta
lirnils I se.
Tuesday
i h y Id
I" M
Advan.,,1 Dramaclc-lll
iM,
is
pi.cv.
Auditorium,
dav. I" Hie ]
, ,,!,', b , ,,l
ell
the Inghe-I scbola li, av. i ige, ,u
Wednesday
i
pl.lcl
fifteen
bonis nf
.3:15 : I'U P.M. Student faculty
si ien. e., according to bli/abclli
tea.
Li innge, Kicbaidson hall.
aarity, '.il, president ,,[ Pi I,
Thursday
Mu the national honorary -,,. ia
' M. b i c n c h club nicetarity, '.II, president of Pi t,
• uugc, Richardson hall.
dice fraternity. President A. U.
barber will present the award
Calendar
Fraternity To Award
$10 Prize Next Friday
\
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930
NOTED EDUCATORS
PLAN EXPERIMENT
Novel Dance Programs
ALUMNUS DEFEATS
Are Favors at '31 Hop
132 IN EUROPEAN
Novel dance programs were disTYPE EXAMINATION
tributed as favors at the senior hop
Milne
Friday night in the gymnasium of
Page hall. Punch was served for refreshment.
More than two hundred and fifty
people attended the dance, Catherine
Broderick, '31, chairman, announced.
Johnny Ringer's Brunswick Recording orchestra furnished music.
Dr. and Mrs. Harold \V. Thompson and Dr. and Mrs. T. Frederick
H. Candlyn were chaperones.
Unusual effects were obtained by
engaging an interior decorator to
decorate the gymnasium in the College colors.
Most of the guests for the hop attended the week-end dances of the
sororities.
Junior and Senior High
Schools Will B e Scene
of Investigation
Milne junior and senior high school
will be for the next several years
the laboratory for an experiment in
child development and parental education. Noted educators are at present
carrying on the work of discovering
what educational content should be
provided for the training of high
school teachers under the auspices of
the Laura Spehuan Rockefeller foundation, and with the cu-operation of
the Milne high school authorities and
President A. K. Hrubacher.
"This department will he concerned
with the investigation and development of the pre-adolesccnt and adolescent hoys and girls," said Dr. Guy
!•'. Ilillehoe who will act as director
of the experiment. "The active cooperation uf the parents will also he
solicited from the standpoint of educating them l" the values of the
school and the whole educative process, ' according to Dr. illehoe.
"It is thought that a great deal of
valuable knowledge may he Rained
from the parents which will materially affect the hie ol the hoy and
nirl in school."
Dr. Ilillehoe was formerly assistant
professor of education at Teacher's
college at t'oluuihia university air
has also taught in the Philippine
island-. He has written several theses
.HI child education.
1 Jr. Kleanor I.. Ileehe, who will
come here l-'ebruary 1. will he asso
ciate director of the experiment. Dr.
Ileehe will he ill charge of the nursery
school which will he established in
i onnci lion with the Albany city
M hools in the near future. Siie is a
graduate ol lohns Hopkins university. I hi- spenal research work will
he'in the nature oi stndv of the preschool age.
Margaret I. H a w - , who will also
he an assistant direi tor, was former
connected with the state department
uf education of North Carolina in the
capacitv of district supervisor.
Dr. "Robert \V. Krcdcrick, formerly
.if the I'niversiu of I'.uffalo, will conduct research with the seventh, eighth
and ninth grade pupils of Milne high
school.
Dr. Hruhacher who wrote an article
for the September number of "New
York Stale- I'.ducation" describes the
educational experiment as it is being
carried on in the Milne high school.
"The educational development of
hoys and girls between the ages ol
11 and IN presents problems of tin
usual dillii ultv and importance," sail
Dr. I'.iulia.her in this article. "If it
is possible, a course will be est '
lished nn a graduate level which will
M-ek a t loser correlation between the
adolescent child and ihe home an
between the home and school activities." he com hided.
BUREAU TO HAVE
PART TIME WORK
FOR COLLEGE MEN
Several part-lime positions will be
available for the men of the college
m the near future, according to
Samuel S. Dransky, '.i_\ chairman oj
Ihe committee on employment spun
sored by the student Voting Men's
( hristiau association. The men will
he used in guidance and ho\ \ work,
I iransky announced.
Several requests for jobs have been
addressed to the Kxi hauge i luh, the
Kiwanis club, and the Nolan < luh,
Dranskj said. Although no ileliuitc
response has j el been rcic-ivcd I roll I
tlu-a- s e r u i c < lubs, there is reason lo
expect favorable results, he said.
I'.esides DraiisU, members ol the
emplov ineiil i oimniltee are , Kenneth
\
M'iller, '.!_', Alviu Shaffer and
t .eorge I lisert, sopl
.res, and I iren
k-ll Kaud, '.14. I be coiuuuttce will
be sent lo inn n n A prominent business men ol the i il\ in an effort lo
,.-, ure jobs, Dransks said
A de.k will be used for the purpose oi liliug Ihe name-, ol i .indulates
loi positions, and efforts will he
made b) the eiilplo) inenl lo sei lire a
telephone.
Alumnae of Sorority
Choose Sew Members
I he aiuinnae assm ialion ol h'psilon
lb-la I'hi sororil) reccntl) coiullicted
a meeting at the sororit) house.
Marion Roberts, Ml, is the newly
elected president. Helen l.hfti.n, '31,
will be treasurer.
BASKETBALL MEN
APPEAR FOR FIRST
PRACTICE OF YEAR
Twenty-four
men responded to
Coach Rutherford R. Baker's call for
basketball candidates, at the first practice of the season conducted last
Thursday afternoon in the gymnasium
of Rage hall. The squad is slightly
irger than that of last year, a rather
fortunate circumstance as several vacancies have been left in Ihe team
which must be filled from Ihe ranks
uf the newcomers.
The greatest loss to the team is that
of Richard Winston, captain of last
year's five, and Leo Allan, star guard. I
Both of these players graduated last j
June after four yea-s of varsity serv- j
let. i h e scholastic ineligibility ::f two
other men of the BJ2V combination I
makes the problem of rebuilding this
season's quintet a difficult one.
However,
with
Charles
Lyons,
hVank Olt and Krwin Clark, seniors, j
and Gilbert Delaura, and Benjamin
Ingraham, sophomores, all of whom ;
are experienced varsity players, as a
nucleus it appears as if Coach Baker
will again have a winning aggrega- |
tion to represent Ihe college.
Practices will be on Monday nights, j
and Tuesday, Thursday and Friday
afternoon until the first game.
A State college graduate was second in a field of 1,34 aspirants, representing 34 nations, who took part in
an examination conducted at the University of Grenoble, Switzerland, this
past summer, He is Richard O'Brien
who was graduated from State college in BJ20 and received the degree
of bachelor of science.
This summer while abroad, Mr.
O'Brien was awarded the "Diploma
des llautes Etudes" from the University of Grenoble. This degree was
awarded by the faculty as a result
of special work in addition to several
years of preparation.
fhe examination for ihe diploma
was of the European type and lasted
me week from 7:.Sll in the morning
mtil 6 o'clock at night, 'fhe examinations are open to the public and
are held in an auditorium Idled with
Half of the
teachers and students.
tests are oral and half written. A
critical analysis of Victor Hugo's
ivorks, a composition in French, ami
a trauslatioii of Thackeray's work,
were nn hided in the examination.
Alter bis graduation from Mate
college, Mr. O'Brien was a member
of the faculty of the Iv'igg-, private
si hool lor boys in ( ouuei tieui, where
be taught French.
Nine years ago
be reigned from ihere and affiliated
hiniseli with the Cilman university at
Hdliiinre, Mankind, where he is
proics.i r ol French at present.
IS H O N O R A R Y M E M B E R
Kappa
Delia sorority
welcomes
Miss \ irginia Smith, supervisor of
practn e tea. hing in Latin, into honorary membership.
T h e Best Pictures Hollywood '
Has Ever Made Are Beinff Shown
Right Now At Warner Brc
Theatres.
U T R AN
D
JOE E. BROWN
IN
"MAYBE IT'S LOVE"
48jS? PEARL ST
WITH
The 1929 All-American Football
Team
R iT Z
Back by Huge Popular Demand
EDDIE CANTOR
7 hen too they
moderately
are so
IN
"WHOOPEE"
priced,
all at
MADISON"
MADISON AND MAIN
TODAY
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
"SINS of the CHILDREN"
203 Central A v e n u e (near R o b i n )
Homemade Fie and Cake
Toasted Sandwiches
ALBANY
A NEW PICTURE
EVERY DAY
E v e r y s a n d w i c h m a d e u p fresh t o i n d i v i d u a l o r d e r
y
MORGAN BEAUTY CLUB
All Branches of Beauty Culture
Albany
5 Clinton Square
Smart
Coats - Hats - Dresses
^DOLLARS
MAT. 15c.
EVE. 2 5 c
KJDDIES ALWAYS 10c.
"I will make an end (f my dinner,
there's pippins and eheese to come11
We1!!
have the eheese
For
Girls and Misses
Gym Toys - 1 losiery
Steefel Brothers, Inc.
WESTERN A T Q U A I L
4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7,11930
STUDENTS TO GET
CLASS TEACHING
IN NEW SPORTS
TWO OF FACULTY
WRITE T E H BOOK
Book
One of Series Edited
Dr. A. R. Brubacher
and Miss Wheeling
Tljegymnasiutn departments of both
Milne high khool and State college
arc conducting'.classes, in 'horseman-1
ship.and swimming, according to Miss
Margaret R. Hitchcock, instructor- of
physical, education in Milne liibh
school;
The classes in swimming began last
night, when three different units met
for .instruction at the pool of the
Jewish Community Center, at 111
Washington avenue. The first group
was a class for beginners in swimming,
and met at 4 o'clock. At 5 o'clock
a class in life saving and advanced
swimming was taught. At 6 o'clock
a class in fancy diving met.
The
membership fee in this course is about
live dollars, Miss Hitchcock said.
By
Miss Katherine E. Wheeling, supervisor of English in Milne high school,
and President A. R. Brubacher, are
co-authors of "High School Composition and Grammar," of which book
one was issued in June by the Charles
E. Merrill Publishing company.
This book was written to replace
one by Brubacher and Snyder and is
not a revision of that book. Book
one is being used in the ninth and
tenth grades of Milne high school.
Book two, which is not yet completed,
will cover the work of the last two
senior high school grades.
The book is built on a plan of
diagnosing the difficulties of individuals with sufficiently rich materials
from which to chouse in meeting special needs. The principles of writing
are presented and illustrated by classical selections, followed by illustrative
compositions written by Milne high
school pupils.
There are exercises in which the
pupil puts into practice various principles occurring after each phase of
development.
The grammar section
includes all principles that may be
needed for correct speech and writing. |
Non-essentials have been omitted;
essentials have been interpreted in
the language of the pupil.
The book also contains diagnostic j
tests for grammar which enable the
teacher to select the part of the
grammar section applicable to her
needs. There are four illustrations
in color.
Mr. Winched, of the Charles J-:.
Merrill Co., said that the distinctive
feature of this book is that the responsibility for learning and for improvement is placed upon the pupil.
SCHOOR
i The initial practice of the Purple
AIKI Gold basketball men, revealed
i\\'p or three possible varsity candidates attiofjg the freshmen tryouts.
H o w e v e r , ' a s the drill was the first
of t'tie season, one cannot form
j u d g m e n t too hastily.
W h e n Richard Whiston and Leo
Allan graduated last June, the last
members of one of the best basketball quintets that Coach Baker
turned out since he has been at
State college, have passed into the
athletic history of the college.
Thirty
College Seniors Supervise
Extra-Curricular Work
in Milne High Unit
About thirty students will assist
with student activities in Milne high
school, according to Miss Marion
Conkliu, supervisor of practice teaching in English, and Miss Helen
Halter, assistant professor of social
science in Milne high school.
In the senior high school Carolyn
Kelley, '31, is chairman of the dramatics club. Annabelle McDonnell, Elsa
Peltleukc, Pearl Cook, and Edith
Hunt, seniors, will assist her. Alfred
Basch and Helen Otis, seniors, are in
charge of the writing chili.
The, ''freshmen team has some
very .promising, material and it is
quite' likely that several of the candidates' \\* ill be used in varsity
garlics if they continue to exhibit
Lawrence Xewcomb, '31, is in
It appears
The classes in horseback-riding be- their earlier promise.
lo he a much s t r o n g e r yearling charge of the assembly programs. In
gen |Wednesday and wll he conducted team than last , year's successful the junior high school, these programs
every Wednesday at 3:30 o'clock at aggregation,
are supervised by Dorothy Brandow
the armory on New Scotland avenue.
T h e policy of the coach will be and Margaret Mickey, seniors.
There will be ten classes in this sport;.; to devote more time and effort in
The coaches for the dramatic club
and the fee for the entire course will developing the first and second
will he Ruth Edmonds, Mary Goodell,
year men for future use, thus tryapproximately ten dollars.
Royal Knox, and N'etta Miller, sen"All those who are interested in ing to again build up a crack quinthese courses are urged to sign on the tet like the one he moulded in iors. Ruth Edmonds, '31, is in charge
1926-27.
Since
Lyons
and
Ott,
She
of the junior high dramatic
(lid's Athletic association bulletin
assisted 1:
Julia /-all and Helen
I seniors, will be lost to the team
board," Miss Hitchcock declared.
' after this season, and the junior I lenderson, .•uiors; and Helen Mead,
class is weak in varsity players.
Arnold lopping, '31, in is charge
The plan will not weaken the presHi" the radio club. Art will be superent chances of the team.
T h e addition of Middleburv col- vised by Agues Glenn and Margarethe
The freshmen basketball team prac- lege to the basketball schedule is a . Srhroeder, seniors. Uulh Hughes, '31,
ticed last week with the varsity squad \ good move on the part of manager is in charge of dancing. Stamp col
in preparation for this year's court llaswell. The V e r m o n t c r s usually j lecting will be supervised In Lena
campaign, under the tutelage of Frank ha\ e an excellent five; one which ' Martin, '31.
Ott, '31, varsity player. The try-mits | will test the ability of the Purple
Russell l.iidluiu is in charge of
for the team a r e : Thomas Garrett, and Gold players to the utmost.
aviation. The typewriting club will
Jack
Saunders,
Philip
Ricciardi,
be supervised b\ Gertrude Guyette
and Bernice Jacques, seniors. Helen
ger
Bancroft,
Osmer
Brooks,:
Bucban and Theresa Maurice, seniors,
Thomas Ryan, Charles Dunham, John
will he in charge of the nature club.
Benedict and Robert Myers.
Earl Bloomiugdale, '31, is in charge
(iarrett is the manager of the team.
of the science club.
He is arranging games with the Paramounts, Albany .Academy, Industrial
high school of Albany, Sacred Hearts
Lilly Nelson, '31. was elected presiof Troy, and a fraternity quintet of dent and Laura Stvn, '33, vice-presiUnion college. Some of the freshmen dent and treasurer of the Xew Voters'
contests will .be played as prelimi- unit of the League of Women Voters
naries to the varsity games, on Fri- at a meeting recently.
"Social Lion" is the name of the
day and Saturday nights while others
Plans were made to have Mrs. issue of the Lion appearing today.
will he played Monday nights, (iar- Eunice Rice Messent, '11, address the The next number which will he disrett announced.
group at the next meeting. Miss Nel- tributed around Christmas, will be the
son said. A campaign for new mem- educational number, satirizing all deVISITS SOCIETY
bers was launched. Those who wish partments of college, especially the
Rabbi Bernard Hamburger of the to join may sign up on the bulletin education department, according to
Temple Beth Kmcth was the guest board in the rotunda, she announced. Alfred I). Ba-ch '31. editor-in-chief.
speaker at the Menorah club reception conducted recently in the Lounge
of Richardson hall. His topic was
"How to Conduct Menorah Meetings."
A( la l.eiman,
'X\ was elected
secretary of the club at that meeting,
Lake A v e .
O p p o s i t e High
Schoo
Marion Weinberg, '31. | iresident, anuounced.
1934 Squad Practices
With Varsity Quintet\
Miss Katherine E Wheeling,
Dr. A. R. Brubacher
ahov
who ave cooperated to write a
HI g r a m m a r and conposir use in secondary schools,
ook is at present used in
High
school
English
HOWARD D.MANN
|
WILL REORGANIZE
\—*'
CHORUS FOR MEN Students in Chemistry
Plans for the revival of the men's
Join National Society
chorus this year have not yet been
definitely formulated, according to
Howard Maun, '32, student sponsor.
The voices will certainly be retested,
he said, and an attempt will be made
to arrange the chorus lor singing.
The chorus was (ir>t organized last
year by Mann and about thirty voices
were tested.
An unsuccessful endeavor was made to secure regular
college credit lor the participants.
Plans were formulated to combine the
men's unit with the women's chorus
for several public performances, but
the project was given up because of
lack of diversity of material.
With the advent of several fresh
men men singers, Maim believes that
the men's chorus will be a success.
Nothing definite will he done, however, until at a later date, he said.
BV.AL
SENIORS CONTROL
SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
Fifty members of the chemistry department have become associate members of the chemistry education division of the American Chemical society, according to Professor Barnard
S. Hrotison, head of the chemistry
department.
This was done through subscrip
lions to the liicial organ uf the so. ... Journal of Chemical
Education," of which Professor Bronsoii is a contributing editor, he announced.
NEW VOTER'S UNIT
ELECTS OFFICERS
AT FIRST MEETING]
Issue Appearing Today
Entitled "Social Lion'
THE HIGH 5CHCCL LUNCH
Cake
Sandwiches
PjeS
WELCOMES MEMBERS
Alpha kho sorority welcomes Dorothy Euteshouscr, '3.3, into full membership.
PALLADINO
Personality Bobs-Finger Waving - PermanenOWaving
H o m e S a v i n g s Bunk Bldg
13 N . Pearl St.
3-3632
Strand
133 N . PearlSt.
4-6280
L5Jne will always
stand out
MADISON SWEET SHOP
785 Madison
Avenue
Light Lunch and Ice Cream Parlor
Fine Homemade Candies
HEWETT'S
A
Reliable
Place
to Buy
Reliable Silks,
and Cottons
Hewitt's Silk Shop
8 0 - 8 2 N. Pearl St.
Woolens
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
Students and Groups at .State College
will be given special attention
Mills Art Press
m,m
meij Satisfy
Broadwi ay
4-2287
CHESTERFIELD CIGARETTES or* monufactur«d by LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.
mmMMMU^^
IS
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930
MEN TO DISCUSS
RELIGION SUNDAY
Conduct Trip
The first regular meeting of Spanish club was conducted yesterday in
the Lounge of Richardson hall. The
regular business meeting was followed by the presentation of a short
play, "El Doble Robo."
Martha
Hummel, '31, was chairman of entertainment.
Alfred Basch T o Lead Discussion
Of Y. M. C. A. G r o u p A t
K a p p a Delta R h o H o u s e
A discussion group will be conducted by the Young Men's Christian
association at the Kappa Delta Rho
house Sunday at three o'clock. The
discussion will be on "Judaism and
( hristianity" and will be led by Alfred I). Basch, '31. All Stale college
men are invited to attend according to
Walter Driscoll, '31, member of the
Y. M. C. A. council and chairman of
the Sunday discussion committee.
"Alfred Basch will give a very interesting description of the intricate
and little understood laws of the
Jewish religion," said Driscoll. "liesides the information I'asch can give
about Judaism, several men of the
College who have received theological
education will lie present who can tell
of the line differences between the
creeds ill Christianity," he added.
"An attempt will be.made to discover the basic ideas and ideals which
have caused the differences in practice among the different
groups.
Probably no final conclusions will be
reached, but the attempt will prove
very entertaining, I am sure," declared Driscoll.
Short News Notes
Were Weekend Guests
"<W
B.SlSROKSON
Professor Barnard S. Bronson,
head of the chemistry department, whose class in Chemistry
I made a tour through the Albany Filtration Plant.
CHEMISTRY CLASS
VISITS FILTRATION
PLANT IN ALBALY
Florence Potter, '28, Evelyn Travis,
'28, Margaret Wads worth, '30, Dorothy Quackenbush, '30, Evangeline Calkins, '29, and Marion Woolcock, '29,
were recent week-end guests at Beta
/ e t a sorority.
Announces Marriages
Psi Gamma announces the marriages of Helen Mines, '27, to Harold
Buckley of Albany Medical college;
Marorie Grcenman, '27, to Norman
Chatham of Albany Medical college;
and of Myra llartinan, '27, to John
13. Moore.
The chemistry 1 class visited the |
Albany filtration plant recently. The
P r e s e n t s Literary P r o g r a m
class was divided into two groups
A literary program will be presenwhich left the college at 9 o'clock
ted at a meeting of the Mcnorah club
and ID o'clock, respectively.
to be conducted Sunday afternoon in
The groups were accompanied by the Lounge of Richardson hall, acMr. Milton !•'. Prue and Mr. John cording to Bessie Levine, '32, viceJ. Sturm, instructors of chemistry. president.
Professor Barnard S. Bronson is the
The program will consist of a short
instructor of the class.
talk on Jewish history by Edith TepThe students were conducted by per, '33, and piano selections of Jewthe superintendent of the plant who ish composers by Vera Rudof, '34,
German club will have its annual explained and illustrated the various Miss Levine said.
mechanical
devices of the plant.
Kaffee Klatch tomorrow night from
7:31) until 10:00 o'clock in the ounge
Sorority E n t e r t a i n s
of Richardson ball, according to
Joyce House, '29, Catherine NicKlara Scbroeder, '31, president.
It
hols '29, Marion Fox, '29, Shirley
is expected that approximately twenllartinan, '29, and Marie Havko, '30,
ty-five members will attend.
The advanced dramatics class will were guests at Gamma Kappa Phi
Charlotte Calow, '33, is general
sorority
house recently.
chairman of the party.
Professor present its third play of the season
Winfred Decker, head of the German in the auditorium of Page ball on
Welcomes Into Membership
department, will speak ahuul bis trip Tuesdaj night, November 11, at IS:IS
to Germany last summer. Geza A. o'clock. Carolyn Kelley, '31, will act
Sigma Alpha sorority welcomes
Biro, graduate student, will discuss as director.
Anna A. Rurritt, Margaret H. Cole,
The play is a fantasy. The actors and Edna L. Hicks, sophomores, into
German student life. Miss Scbroeder,
president, will also address the group. I are Ruth Kdmonds, Ktliel Smith, and full membership.
Refreshments will he served, and, I ihlh limit, seniors, and Kalherine
games and songs will emu hide the I Moore, '.(.I
program for the evening. Mi^s i a- I The following committees have been
low and Rose Bergslein, '•>-'. will inn appointed: publicity, Jean Gillespie,
duet the games; Marion Weinberg, ',il : make-up, Ruth I lugbes, '31 : sets,
'31, will lead the singing ; and Mar- | Annabelle MeConnell, '31 ; properties,
garata Scbroeder, '31, will have b'loreni e I'rii'clinan, 'a-'; music, Elizabeth lad-son, '32; and clean-up, Isacharge of refreshments.
bel Peard, '32.
25 WILL ATTEND
PARTY OF GERMAN
CLUB IN LOUNGE
Third Dramatics Class
Play Will Be Tuesday
"Mother Goose" To Be
Y.W.C.A. Bazaar Theme
ENTERTAINED
.re.
uor
- ila
I la
Mother (JOI ,c wall he Hie ibeme of
the ba/.aar to he conduced la Ine
Y o u n g \V
n ' . i lna ii.in a- . . ia
l i o n next b r i d . n n i n h l . M i l d r e d I I . i l l
'31, general c h a i r m a n ..l the bazaar,
announced today.
Kadi I th will
represent a n u i - i n Home.
The entertainment will feature the
court of Old King l ole. There will
also be a grab bag e a r n ing out this,
scheme.
b'.d \cwcomh\s orchestral
has been sei tired In play lor dancing, I
Miss Hall said.
I
GUESTS
'311, Elizabeth I'ul\ .id, '2'l, and Mrs.
M v IT >. cs-'aJ i were
I'ln sorority house
Who Has The Banner? Question
of Members of Class of 1932
"Banner, banner, where is the
banner, who has the banner"; this
is the new game that several enthusiastic members of the junior
class have been playing as they
assiduously searched the College
buildings and premises ior the
yellow and white ensign.
The banner was brought to the
College on the night of campus
day by Annabelle MeConnell, '31,
chairman of the decorations, to use
in decorating the gymnasium. T h e
other class custodians failed to
bring their banners, therefore the
junior banner was not used, and
was left backstage. When Miss
MeConnell returned to recover the
banner, it had disappeared.
Already an org- lized search
party has been appointed to discover the whereabouts of the msigna, with unavailing
efforts,
thus far, according to M. Curtis
Rutcmher, president of the class.
Kutemher hopes to recover the
banner before the junior prom.
ATHLETIC COUNCIL
DISCUSSES SPORTS
AT LAST MEETING
Intra-mural sports were discussed
at a meeting of the athletic council
which was conducted Thursday, October 30. The major part of the meeting was devoted to discussion concerning the question of having one
manager for tennis and intra-mural
sports.
Tennis has been considered a minor
sport at the college for the past few
years, with a schedule of four to six
matches a season. On the other hand,
inter-class basketball has been the only
intra-mural sport successfully fostered
at the college.
The council appointed Ralph Harris, '33, manager of the 1931 baseball
team. Dr. Uonnal V. Smith, associate professor of history, and chairman of the athletic council, presided.
V-NECKLINE TO BE
STYLE OF STATE
CO-EDS' DRESSES
(Continued from pant 1, column 4) '
scrvation showed that the majority
were even lines."
A fashion report compiled from the
style magazines mentioned
above
shows that the feminine mode, which
is the leading one, is sub-divided into
the classic, the romantic, the dramatic,
the demure, and the sportif,
Although hair dressers are pushing
short hair, illustrations indicate a long
hair effect even when the hair is
short.
Hem line lengths arc from twelve
to fourteen inches from the floor of
daytime wear, and down to the ankles
for evening wear.
"The method of determining style
trends by actual count is the modern
way of setting styles. Fashion stylists
no longer push a certain style simply
because some prominent person has
been seen wearing it. They must
back the style up with observations,
indicating what percentage of a certain number of people seen at a certain place were seen wearing the
style," Mrs. Barsam said.
A phrase which is indicative of
this is one which is found constantly
in the Woman's Wear, which always
says "they are wearing thus and so,"
rather than "the style is."
"The study of styles which we have
made was conducted in the same manner in which styles are set," Mrs.
Barsam said. "Through this study,
we discovered what the style is at
State college, and by studying the
trend as shown by magazines, we
found that it closely parallels that of
other college girls in the country,"
she added.
1932 Elects Two Men
For Athletic Council
Harold Ilaswell and Robert Goodrich were elected representatives of
the men's athletic council at a meeting of the junior class conducted recently.
Mildred Smith was appointed chairman of a committee to investigate the
possibility of having a junior class
party soon, Curtiss Rulcnbur, president, announced.
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846 Madison
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IT
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I S
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER ;, 1930
Y.W.C.A. TO HAVE
STATE CONVENTION
Local
To Attend Meeting
Association
To
Send
Delegates T o Rochester
D e c e m b e r 5, 6, 7
A conference of the New York
State Young Woman's Christian association and Young Men's Christian
association will be conducted in
Rochester December 5, 6, and 7,
Carolyn Kelley, '31, a member of the
state committee for this conference
and president of the student Y. VV.
C. A., announced today. The theme
will be "Religious Ideals and Campus
Ideas." The sub-topics will be "Personal
Religious Growth,"
"Basic
Principles
of Personal
Religion,"
"Personal Ideals versus Campus Patterns," arid "Men, Women, and God."
The State college Y. W . C. A.
cabinet will finance the attendance of
D e a n A n n a E . P i e r c e w h o will
two seniors, three juniors, two sophoattend the annual conference of
mores, and one freshman, according
the N e w York State Association
to Miss Kelley. These delegates will
of Deans on N o v e m b e r 21 and
be chosen by the cabinet.
Anyone
22.
else willing to pay part of her expenses may go also.
Delegates will occupy a floor in the DEAN ANNA PIERCE
Hotel Seneca in Rochester.
12 CONTRIBUTORS
Haswell To Announce
MiuKatherineE. Wheeling
WRITE FOR ECHO,
Entire
Schedule
Soon
Will Be Chairman For Tea
The schedule for the 1930-1931
Miss Katherine E, Wheeling,
EDITOR ANNOUNCES
supervisor of English
practice
basketball season has not yet been
teaching in Milne high school, will
he the chairman of the weekly tea
to be conducted in the Lounge of
Richardson hall Wednesday afternoon from 3:15 to 5:00 o'clock.
Miss Wheeling will be assisted
by Miss Gertrude Douglas, ^assistant professor in biology; I Miss
Marion I I . Kilpatrick, instructor
of English; Miss Mary M. O s borne, instructor of English; Miss
Edith O Wallace, assistant professor of Latin; Mr. Clarence Hidley, professor of history, and M r s .
Hidley; Professor Clarenct F .
Hale, head of the physics depart
rncnt and Mrs. Hale; Professor
Winfred C. Decker, head of the
German department, and Mrs.
Decker.
completed manager Harold A. H a s well, '32, said but the following contests have been arranged: December
6, Maxwell Training of Brooklyn,
New Y o r k ; December 12, John Marshall College of Law of New Jersey;
fanuary 15, Middlebury college of
Vermont; February 22, Cooper Union
college of New York city; and February 27, New Jersey State College
for Teachers at Montclair, New Jersey. These games will all be played
in the Page hall gymnasium.
The annual New York trip will be
the second week in February, Haswell announced, and the State college five will meet Brooklyn Polycollege of New York, February 13;
Women Attend Recent
and New Jersey State College for
G.A.A. Moonlight Hike Teachers, at Montclair, New Jersey,
Nineteen women of the Girl's Ath- February 14.
letic association took a moonlight hike
TO MEET TUESDAY
recently. Starting from the College
There will be a meeting of Canterthey went over South Lake avenue
and then out New Scotland avenue bury d u b in the Lounge in Richardson hall Tuesday night at 7:30
to the city limits. There in a vacant
o'clock, according to Beatrice HertPLANS TO ATTEND
lot a friendship circle was formed wig, '31, president. Marion Larbey,
and the popular State songs were '32, will give a report of the conferALPHA PHI GAMMA
STATE CONVENTIONsung.
T h e circle broke up after sing- ence at Wellesley college which she
Dean Anna E. Pierce will attend ing the Alma Mater and the hike was
TO HAVE PLEDGE
attended last summer as the delegate
the annual conference of the New continued homewards.
of Canterbury club.
SERVICE MONDAYYork State association of cleans at
Alpha Phi Gamma, the national Syracuse November 21 and 22. The
honorary journalistic fraternity, will conference headquarters will be in the
conduct pledge service on Monday, Onondaga hotel, and Miss Sarah M.
November 10, at eight o'clock, according to Alfred Basch, '31, president. Sturtevant, professor of education at
Formal initiation will be on Monday the Teacher's college in Columbia
November 17.
university, will preside.
•The pledges a r e : Carolyn Kelley,
Dean Pierce will he a member of
'3.1, senior editor of the Echo; Rose
Last
Koren, '31, business manager of the the committee on resolutions.
Echo; Marion Gilbert, '31, business year the conference was in Troy.
manager of the Pedagogue; Edith Dean Pierce attended this meeting as
James, '31, editor of the Pedagogue;
Helen Mead, '32, junior editor of the a member of the committee on mem- |
Echo; Audrey Flowers, '32, adver- bership.
tising manager of the N E W S ; Andrew
This association of deans includes
Hritz, '32, finance manager of the deans of men and women, and adminN E W S ; and Alfred Schoor, '31, as- istrative deans. At this conference
sociate editor of the Lion and feature there will be round-table discussions
editor of the N E W S .
of problems to be met by deans.
New Research College
To Have No Set Rules
Approximately twelve students will
contribute to the first issue of the
Echo, which will be distributed N o vember 15th, according to Helen B.
Otis, '31, editor-in-chief.
T w o of
these students are freshmen.
The book section will be larger this
year and will contain a book review
by Miss Catherine Peltz, instructor in
English, Miss Otis announced.
There will be an article on Ruth
Draper who is coming to State college on November 17. T h e cover design will be changed this year, she
said.
There will he three other issues,
February, April, and June, the same
time at which it was distributed last
year.
Closed Season Forces
End Of Tennis Match
The final matches of the Girls Athletic association tennis tournament
cannot be played off because the
courts have been closed for the season, Beatrice Van Steenburgh, '31,
announced today.
Margaret Cussler, '31, tennis sport
captain, is leading in the matches
played so far and is the probable winner of the tournament, Miss Van
Steenburgh said.
F R A N K H.
N. S. F. A. D I S P A T C H , Nov. 5.
A new university, to be known as
T h e Institute of Advanced Study, will
be organized as a college virtually
without rules, according to Dr. Abraham Flexner, director. It will begin
its existence with a $5,000,000 endowment from Louis Bamberger and his
sister, Mrs. Felix Find.
Extra-curricular activities, athletics
and similar elements of college life
will he barred from the campus of
the new university, and every effort
will be turned toward establishing a
school of the highest rank, its founders hope.
Only professors of ability and reputation will be employed, the directors
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VISIT SORORITY
Mary Herlehy, '29, Margaret McCune, '29, and Helen Delay, '28, were
guests at the Gamma Phi Sigma
sorority house for the week-end.
W E R E RECENT GUESTS
Lorraine C.'ushman, '30, and Gladys
Newell, '30, recently visited Epsilon
Beta Phi sorority.
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