S t a t e College SEX A BIG PROBLEM,

advertisement
State College
NEW
X I I r. No. 13
VOL.
YORK
STATE COLLEGE
FOR TEACHERS
ALBANY, N . Y . WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER lit. li)2,S
10 cents per copy, $2.'2p
pfpy^liv
———-^—% ' j -
SEX A BIG PROBLEM,
DR. EDDY DECLARES
GREEKS MAKE PLANS
TO RUSH FRESHMEN;
BEGINS FEBRUARY 4
Raps Water Power Monopolies
And Student Docility
At Men's Dinner
for
Sororities
ten
will
days
ary A, the first
ter,
rush
freshman
beginning
Febru-
day of the second
semes-
council
ADOPT AMENDMENT
BAN ROTDNDA YOT
%
girls
Monday,
the tntersorority
TWO STARS OF DRAMA CLASS PLAYS
has
Personal Solicitation Is Now<jF
Illegal Without Sanction
Of Student Body
an-
nounced,
Sex
ing
relationship
out of
water
power,
leins
with
must
cope,
F.ddy,
and the danger
great
are the two
which
the
at a dinner
leria
Friday
night.
Eddy
asked
Dr.
questions
the
which
welfare
They
generation
for the Y.
I
the
real
true
he believes
nun
of l i f e ? "
in my
"Am
Dr.
F.ddy
asserted
must
first
that
learn
the problems of h i e
grips
with
cation
them.
did
students
comparing
lands,
a degree.
of America
them
who,
with
out.
dividual
they
degree
come
He
influence'
those
into
pointed
contact.
out
other
"We
must
strides
their
lake
made
Dr. Kddy
their
of
not seek
lliiug,
our relation
lion
have
Dr.
of
Kddy
great
[he individual
most
of his
In
besi
in order
"We
line
i l .•miiim-il
un I'HKI-
the
in-
is
The',tven,,o„
conducted
on theii
year
own
time.
ol
Diaper
small
central
tries
ficed
as pari
of
that
and
wis
t o the sessions
school
read
from
'.ill,
verse
ol
She
was
\ ail.
'29.
were
"
Eleanor
right,
animal
figures
on
origin,
were sacri-
~
pal o l the
M
The
led ihe
(,
Milne
Nelson,
education,
lege
al
\fin
"Cantique
" S i l l ul
de
plnn,
plan
oilier
l o represent
'.'J.
al W a l d e n ;
principal
alumni
W i d e
Dr
the
| |
cxpei I l o attend.
;;',','"\|, \ „ | J ,
lug
a stale
in the
to assist
ib p a i t i u e n l .
educational
al the Syracuse
Nelson
will
logelher
oilier
having
liot
attend
cidlege
similar
joining
these
College
night,
and
meeting.
Dr
when
iiorinal
meet
all
schools
reunions.
groups
will
will
at the "everynian's" dinner.
ml
«|
logelhei
as a cycle.
c
inelodi
haina
sel
the voutlli
assocating
Ihe
p
by
lb
lo In so perfectly
play
when
used
making
lie
Icon.
',,,'r'1'""
.«
1
Ihe
the
class
teams
i i.,,,1, „
I,
)t.k'
IIHIIBII, ( uihi-iii"
V\ • i
J;;^1,,
I I ' IIIS i l i
^ / / ^ ' ^/ucil.
Vai.
^
\l'^;!;Ui.
\ i „ , i,,i,in,.
' : " • V1]^'
U-wi»,
Hiiuu
Ii!
j„»epliinc
Maigueiile
Wiu.ai,
v
<:*"><\
Nuilhrup,
Utah
be guests
y>';.a BUYM*'i?»b»l' Meyw
'
with
liiliel
I .,.«!.>
illl
'-'J
Isijll
to keep
of
to
the
class
$250
voir
president,
has
been
ap-
l o r the class g i n
loaiuen
The
wilb
/,,»e|iliuie
and
viil,li..,l
c.u»
timed
pre, I-IOI
wlncii an
so i,,i,
u.,.
maid
sl.mdin
u n 11111,1, i l l ,
I .nil o
I'.llll
Iv'llev
app, .nance, and
a g
bv
tin
eahils
' ' ' ^
»
\ \ >t - 1 I I.ll
i'I
• s.vinpalhic
were
,,|
evo
l.uuv
'"'-'leha
. M ii.pblied
hi
Tin
particularly
I .11 i l l H H
\ an
k'uih
A l l ]l||l II
red
note
ami
beau
,,i age
liall;i ( :li
llie
was
as the
selling and cosiuniiiig
good, and
lighting
old
were
very
effective.
Miss
lulleier
and
llie
Cessfully
' plays.
lluee
class
extl elliel)
ill,
I
lo a l l , m l
„ m a , s
Tliela
li
duties
may be
so siic-
llltereslillg
bouse.
N.ii
wolk
and
quit
Ibe
college
ami
Miss
llueuza
town
themselves
ineul
will
was pro
December 7,
and
in llie
sec-
J . Kabul, '."J.
opposition.
Voles
ll
vver.e
bv members o l
January
Ivn.
\nna
Del,raff,
be ibe assisting
concert
in
bv
( bi.i.ellor's
I I . Dr.
instructor
My
has
Vlliuiv
arn-i
.,i
dm
the
women's
Hall,
h'ridav,
T . Frederick
in music,
DeDralf
according
soph,,
.,|ur,
l k
I I . I ami
has
studied
announce!.
abroad i m
ol
i audlyii.
gr.'llp-
m
lb,
ol sol , .
groups
program
will
In ibe women's
a-, lollows
I
Song,
I lokev
lbl
Dors
i.i
Down Among ibe Dead Men, king
lisb
M.i ( oloiube,
folksong,
will,
Ms,man
, in,I
descant
II.
(a)
i eltic
lbl
Music.
I ullabv,
When
Irt-h
I oil
Soli
ig
Voices Die.
i andl.v I I
i c)
Duo
Si rapbini,
\ iiloiua
111
la)
(bonis
oi
I'oloin liau
Maidens,
Borodin
ov er
when sin
lb)
llie
Tin
Ulu,
Sluileiils
lion
bolls, s
wben
ol ihree
I a I Night
housekeeping.
due lo llie
remainder
ci nsisi
b'edera
o l llie
lln ee
Candlvn
chorus,
when llie del.
look
to I lr.
pi i s, nl
and
I 'llivel'sit}
o l ( ohllllhla
w ill
The
ol
tickets
$|.5()
Danube,
vv ill
Strauss
be admitted
student
tax labels
w i l l be ai
ibe legal.n
and
sevenl)
live
on
preseiila
A l l other
prices nl
S-,
cents.
ill
delegates
duties
had assigned
as bouse
manager,
cook and sweeper, a la luune manage
made
vote o f
epedinnc.
S i mli-iil
bouse,
when al I ailgeineuts
for the
serving
o f meals
cafeteria in Columbia.
si.leis
bis post
wrote
11 lends,
to
'.ill,
bv l i e l l y
Margarel
chorus
Dr.
I'lll
igneil
boii-ekeegels
was closed
authori-
the regular
assembly,
I. Wolner.
without
harpist,
elect, il
al Student
vv.e
al
i l is proposed."
first
mid w inter
.she
at llie
coiiveiiti.ni
o l Cooking
The
.hills
'MK was
weekend
I America
Such
ALBANY HARPIST WILL
PLAY AT CHORUS SING
.iiiiinn,
n l lll.lllV.lsllrl
Missouri, lasl
meetings
authorization of
present
in which
Louis
the
skania.
,
is eh,-,-, ireasiirer,
Wolnel.
post
Delia
acting and delight
ilnilbiiglv
Ihe mournful
I ..ins
lo
in regular
be by a two-thirds
ond assembly
un n l ,
ilin
gale, lo ib,
I raged}
lr,
" "
Iliad
I imii
I wile.
«
eongialulated on having producnl
»ud F r a i i t e ^ l l e " ^ ;
Uliivel
than
association
shall
oi
changes l o
Acceptance of the amendment
Wolner "Honored" By Election
To Post Of Dishwasher At Meet
1,1.,li,in
proposed
may lie conducted at
members
, „,n , . , „ , ,
proposed by the cl'ss
kutenber
provided.
in" the next i l l
will
the) be allowed
„ „ „ . , „,.,,,. , , , „ ,
< urns
pro
shall
associa-
f o r officers
the express
posed in llie
I p Ian .
K.llhelllie
Mleull
,,l a g',1
l
' " " 'll'11""1
ailend a party
.ling
an l u l l
plav
' 'I'"
1
l b , a,ling
fust
made
Ma I servant
Hull,
I'oliceiuan,
Mali
-.veil
W III
i
\ \ ' I i.
Aiin'-Ut-
,
edv.
last
'""
raised
" K l T^i
K b , , I. plaved ,he g i r l exillllsitely. The
end IIV was siun rli
Cnuinarable
with
,
,
,
. . .
Steuben
i
«»•>•
l
" I be
places
Miss
l'"'Tity. i „ ,,„-,. | ; t , , „ . i n ., NvN | , „ „ i,, . , „ „ U ( . , |
' ' . 'N
'"'
or upon
with
those
J i l l s ne
lo"be
o f the
as hereinafter
_'. Voting
student
zation
burthree
the freshman
Traver,
iiisianee,
more
f o r officers o f
This
the class
low in the next
College.
accepted.
constitution
meetings
constitution
ihe
,l,h , | , •, i ibed , , , "liuisln-d
\ \ e llk,<I
'•>•»*»>»"• n l u l
Hjfwki.iK,
^
plav,
-.'. I,
Sebesla
Iluliey.
II.V,',',,,
' '
I", '!
no dead llioiinnls
a ,'
m l voice
Ma.j.aiu
ITinupah,
fiesluneii
\
Miig!...*
vV,'ls,V„ ' |.',','„ h,
M»'••;.
Miuuml,
moved
i.Vn,,; ' " ' "
'Haves.
DUKHII)
I'.uil.i.e
s,,,,!,,,,,,,,,, •»
.Wi.ail.
^
ll
l< N'ui lulioii
Woin',.''!'''!!ir'inui
anmel'.' u ' a , l „ „
!•,„,„,, \
| v , l , M.„„.,,, i fu..le.,
M'",-.
K.,»e K.aeu,
Jean
.Mi.i'in,
1
lies!
Cilberl
i'l„i",'m"e' ).a»'lT«',"iuiVi'.ii»'
" • • . Aoluh l»
Vl„,
S|,|a
' - "
l e i , , ciedilable
"W 1 ."'.."" 1 , 1 ; } : ' ! !
'"I"'.
, , „ i \ „i., l o , , ,
'I be
porira ii
l'- ,,,'ly
\l,o. ..inn. Ii, M-inuo.
N
l
l r
"''
" " 1 , l l " ' •1""1''
lou p l o i n n i , i.ll •
K ,' ,,,
lilnl
1
'
sallv
,1.1-j,
"Vil'jni,,"\"
budget,
. t.Xpeuse
ibis
lacking
of $825.
here.
atlempled
u
'Tor
opriated
eon
' ' »l"l'-.t'»'
/ " ' " , " ' '''
i an be n i o i
conducted
\\l"''>",imh',,»' , '\'iu,'h'r.r' , ."i.
Ii
'
,|
| ,,||,,rine
id.
Mvcrs
was
li;iV1
,,,
,,,,,-/'
Illinois
Horace
(modcll
nineteen
budgets ever adopted
"In
ol taxation
is
budget
class
,,,,,,
. " " "',
, " " , ' " '
" , | s l , n " « ' " I11",1
' " """.aved
I l „ w Inn ,,,-s , , , ,Lc back
will
except
only
fresh-
yearling
(Inly
dollars
irishman
|" " l' ' '
be
association,
year
read-:
voting
to this
passed and collected
the class
Evelyn
association or upon any
in regular
passed
thirteen
of the
last
weeks
association
oi
Amendment
amendment
1. A l l
consti-
several
student
vole
o f the
change
association
of any
years.
a
vva> a den
lie starts
coinpaiiv.
lei! ami
Miss
richest
in several
( July
as separal
The first
bad
I-
inolher,
l
ireshnian
the
new
Saturday
[dins.
the
o i tin perils that
o i today
with
go to Hazel
' " l i , , " . " ' . , , In',','.'],''' !• v'
ai.,1 II
and
S.SI2 collected, the present
one o i ihe largest
oi
Saturday
i .uii.u a s class
moduli
I
Jackson
l i o l j ^ . " ' { ' ^ ' j ^ Viesie!''' K,"e'lleiKMem
are
io think
elllilies, I'hev -,eeined
lo
h''
ass,, |
the i .inferences.
ol State
Friday
edu
in f o r m
research
nation
Aluinni
slate
captain
is being
|'l,',, „ i ,
\ l ; . . •suvals!,)
P l i
measurements
cation
loan
Friday
is the
amendment
'29, president
"Section
CHOOSE
manage
"f, ' ' " n ' . ' . V ]''."',
of \l.n> N
M.el.i
several
M l . , Vail
Kleeck
a.m
,
,
, ,
. i M
. .i , F
, ,
have been asked by D r W a r r e n
\ \
Coxe,
head of Ihe bureau
o l edllca
ti.mal
, .difficult
,l,ni.i,l,i
be chosen
\
I'. h'rench
and
personal
as was
was legalized
declaring
'30,
Kleeck,
S t a r ; [ students have faded to pay their class
l'i vvnoik
present
color-.
Hetty
pr.uiicc
K
superintendent
Harold
al Meuands,
prevent
such
the decision
meeting
With
man class
inplele
I'IV
Decora
Van
FRESHMEN SET MARK
IN PAYMENT OF DUES
llolv
.mil Frieda
ol l i e Irishman
col
F.dvvin
will
of ihe
other
bv Flea
violin.
will
.1.', w i l l
Ha-keih.dl
of
'.ill,
gam. s and
In captain
ol w i l l
prolcss.ir
in which it
Evening News)
Cornelia
presented
group
Noel,"
Night,
first
which
sustaining
this
Miss Goodell And Myers
Share Honors
MTV
le.nii
o i juniol
gil '
,l.r,
'.ill, will be Us man
, an election show,
lose
liaskiiball
prim i
School, ami
the c o n v e n t i o n .
Kleeck.
•bonis
High
assistant
Siege"
PLAYGOER PRAISES
3 ONE-ACT PLAYS
Mildred
accompanied
al ihe
Moore,
..e, i ,
with
head
"The
M i s s V a n K l e e c k Tragedy
CLASSES
Anne
leaders
and
i l l a tragedy,
Albany
and
~
,h
the p r i n
M . Sayles,
department
as " Z a n a b "
as " B i s h a r a , "
celebration, in
'.'0,
al ihe p i ;
'.ill,
(Curtesy,
Stephenson, '30, left,
nights,
camels, j
shown,
men was
the custom of
animals
in t hrisiinas
l o i n v.aiis
John
education
be authorized
of the members
meeting
ago by a vote
tion,
these
BASKETBALL CAPTAINS ^S^^Z^r^A.
principals,
I'rol'essor
Ihe
must
vole
in
be
','>
vaea
confer
action
of emer-
to the
is the
"Section
the course
the Bible.
sang
a
be the I tin I
where
administration
such vot-
in case
of votes
ihe student
oi
forests.
Sight."
TWQ
through
send
authorizing
It
posed
laniilies
of (Jerrnamc
when
Mathewsoii,
and
I ions
ea> I
r o i i f c r e i i i i s.
school boards
annually
Such
The
displayed!
wise
o i Indicia)
Cerinan
ior
altem
nl will
of the
,,i ihe
the slate
cipals
'2d,
adjus
stu-
Provision is
is now a p a r i .
11 ill 1
ol
Hill
sets during
declared
sehadriiiskv,
regular
the C h r i s t i n a s
associathan
which the n. vv amendment
A.
l o r schoo'
ineelings
for
meelings
Text
Reproductions of Joseph I
candles
I,,, ,k( 11 I.I 11
theme
uiajorily
out
ihe
The
to
changes
proposed.
in
replicas o l
among
Miss
replica
Ihe lime
j K. I ook,
period.
h'.ilucational
in
slate
the executives
are d u r i n g
lion
is l.ie only
in the
at w h i c h
il-
directly
of student
in a regular
Craves,
\s
men,
aimed
meetings.
a two-thirds
tution
c
I
i
•
•
Miss
Miriam
Snow,
supervisor
oi
Several a n n u m
W H O are now
orin
i
•
, . ..
i.-,,,,i, i
,,i ,,..,
.
i
i
-ii
i i
ni,ic i i v eat
g in Migllsli, jouic'l MA.
u p a s o s c i o n s w i attend the
nrly
, ,
i,
i
. , . , , ,
,,„.i,„i,.,i
'
, ,
.
•
, ,
,
libel'
acullv
members present im luileil
lourtli
annual
meeting
ol ihe A S M ,
^ |.]1(>n
^
^
N | | J
| | a / r |
k , , u l l . N
Dated
.Academic
Principals
in Svra
'
, , ,
..'.,,
..-'.;., i , . , , I , I ,
.
.
, ,
,
.' r . ,
- .
and Mi-s M.nv
l M i / a l i c l l i i onli.
cuse d u r i n g the weekend of Decenibei i
-
be
amendment
by the stu-
place other
Such amendment
practice'
Y. W . I ' .
in the making
Dill
Louise
ALUMNI WILL ATTEND
PRINCIPALS' MEETING
one
oiilside
.solicitation
Spain, Miss
o|
and the manger
said.
she
from
and
7
in any
association
gency.
the seventy
the
competition
sinnig
( hri.slmas
r i g h t . ; ice
1'
family
j hanging
pari
'Thing
•'. < i.luiiiii
was
election
officers
present
! colored.
to make tin
of whal is
visit
told
make
o i the figures
Ihe
conceptions
iiii.in
by
begin.
ruling,
and
Mary,
the I hrisl
Child,
lambs and the wise men were
faith
its rela
h i ' said,
religion
ihe
bv the following
not
attended
of her address.
assets.
discussing
air
holy
one o j the
anil
on the
new
on constitutional
made, however,
answers
will
supervisor
Spanish,
people
Hethlchem,
l i e showed tl
exertion
or
ing
lime the
in their
over
XKVVS.
voting
dent
a
I
svinbols,
breed sue
added,
f o r continual
is
Wednes-
of this
in the rotunda
Miss
"Self-satisfaction wi
need
who
being
lid
to the
and by
now
unanimously
prohibit
tion
!
I till,
students
the
lo us.
.ess",
witii
ceremonies
be-
in
Spanish
ami
rational
to sen
starting
period
Sunday.
a
i o r ever)1
explanations
f o r we must
rush
to t i n council
T.
impression
today
rotunda
would
Intersorority j
night.
associates.
of the
cognizance
in science
the
have sent
must
Alice
said.
leaders
a lasting
and
will
leaching
whom
relation to ourselves" be said.
must
in
colleges
dales, a c c o r d - |
of
I T tin- dale when bids are j
initiation
vespers
to
with
the studen.1
coaches who had left
(Mi
other
rules
Santa Clans does
ad
and in-
may
in the
association.
COLLEGE
NO SANTA IN SPAIN?
MISS HILL SO AVERS
docile,
are far in
almost
the student
such as was con-
last year to pass ihe new constitution, of
Asks For Faith in Science
great
sorority
freshmen.
in other
in initiative
calibre
the
Monday
gelling by
o f high
dent
edu
thinking.
Individuals
each
f o r the
A t the end
freshmen
I le assailed tin
he asserts,
vance o f Americans
any
of silence,
sent
I
period
party
Following
Are,ailing
students
morning,
to these parties should receive I
itiation
loo
Monday
year
solicitation
according
passed
upon
constitution
last
legal,
answers in
over
student o l
as being
personal
their
box
to the rush
week
and then to come to
merely
than
Invitations
to combat
that
ducted
not more
conducted
association
The amendment, proposed by the STATI-
day, February
to l i f e ? "
H e declared
not mean
and obtaining
the
how
from
preference
and
today
mail
the rush
council.
finding
and
leave
give a rush
ing
an educa-
relations
Voting
dates,
sorority
will
student
will
font
vital to
I
each
the
offer-
five
>he may select
from
to
31,
February 4.
everyone.
"Am
he sent
January
one invited
Freshmen
ihe
the type of per
to become:",
right
are
of
1 getting
purposes
and
M.
cafe
answered
I becoming
wish
each
which
will
Thursday,
During
and
"Am
tion?", " A m
son
in the college
and success
were
ing
to h i . Sherwood | three
lecturer
invitations
freshmen,
pro!)
( . A., who delivered ,i lecture In the
students
Form
notably
gnat
present
according
traveling
grow-
monopolies,
work
purely
since
vv el e
at
hoiioraiy, he
not
Because ol failure to pay then student
a
Wolner eon
he was
FRESHMEN OUST 2 MEN
WHO FAIL TO PAY TAX
pill
tax,
Finest
lioolh,
dent, and John
of
freshman
office,
to t i l l
F'leclions
the
vice
presi-
Delehauty, class manager
men's athletics, w i l l
will
vacancies.
be removed
soon
be
from
conducted
STATE COLLEGE NEWS DECEMBER 19, 1928
State College
News
Established in 1916 by the CUsj of 1918
The Undergraduate Newspaper of New York
State College for Teachers
By W . M . F
The Confederate
THE NEWS BOARD
WILLIAM M. FRENCH
son, J r .
• • . . .Editor-in-Chtef
Business Manager
12 Garfield Place, Dial 6-4874-K
_^_
Managing
L o u i s J. WOLNER
54 West Street, Dial 6-3595-K
MARGARET J. STEELE. ..:.'
Edttor
Associate Managing Editor
224 Jay Street, Dial 31780
MARGARET H E N N I N G E
Advertising
Newman Hall, 741 Madison Ave., Dial 6-6484
Manager
Privateers.
372 pages.
$4.
New H a v e n : Yale University-
Despite the threat of President Lincoln to hang them as
pirates, many a citizen of seceeded states in the Civil
applied
for
Jefferson
letters of
Davis.
marque and
War
reprisal as offered
W i t h the prospects of
by
a quick road
lo
wealth and at the same time of rendering a service to the
Confederacy, the prlvateersmen took over many practically
Senior associate editors, Genevieve Cole, '29; Rose Dransky, '29;
Bessie Lapedes, '29: Betty Pulver, '29. Junior associate editors,
Gladys Hates, '30; Dorothy Brimmer, rM i Alma Uolan, 30,
Edith T. Lawrence '30; Caroline M. K>trba, '30; ICHzabetl. Harris, '30; Shirley Wood, '30. Sports editor, Roy V. Sal Ivan, 29.
Reporters, Catherine liroderick, '31; Margaret Cussler, '31; Alee
1'asoldt, '31. Assistant business manager, Jane J, Formanck, .JO.
AsslstaAt advertising manager .Dorothy teffert, 30. Advertising
assistants. Dorothy llurclick, '31; Amu- Schneider, '30; Thurston
Scott, '30. Circulation staff, Ivleanor Welch, 29; Katherine Graham, '3U; Rose Handler, '3U.
worthless hulks and started on their adventures.
Not until the publication
The Confederate
touched
by Yale
Privateers
upon adequately,
University
Press of
has this phase of the war been
The
many
books
on
the
war
more praise to the blockade
form
of
enterprise.
But
runners, an entirely
it
was
different
the privateersmen
who
caused a panic in Northern shipping circles, and who caused
The NEWS does not necessarily endorse sentiments expressed in
contributions. No communications will be printed unless the writers
names are left with the Editor-in-Chief of the Naws. Anonymity
will be preserved if so desired. The NEWS does not guarantee to
print any or all communications.
Beginning with a discussion of the Declaration of Paris,
the author gives a thorough and scholarly account of the
privateers. Though writing from a Southern point of view,
he admits that the days of privateering were past before
the war began.
The book has all the thrills of sea warfare. The Sallie
and the Jefferson Davis incidents in particular are alive
with action. The bonk is a welcome addition to the Yale
series in American history.
PRINTED uv -MILLS Aar Paass. 394-396 firoadway—Dial 4-2287
December 19, l'J28 Vol. XIII, No. 13
WHAT ARE TRADITIONS?
A clear definition
of college traditions is needed, as is
shown by recent tilts between the freshman and sophomore
classes.
It wotdd seem that certain members of the stu-
dent association can not distinguish between college traditions and sophomore rules.
the difference
The difference
between obligation and
is g r e a t :
it is
imposition.
College traditions are the property of the whole student
body.
They
should
be observed
by all.
They should be
enforced by Myskania, which is duly authorized to enforce
them.
They should not be interpreted as license for battles
between freshman and sophomore classes.
A college tradi-
tion should command the respect and obedience of
all, as
long as it is a tradition.
Sophomore rules are a different matter.
Sophomore
rules exist as a direct challenge of the sophomores to the
freshmen. It is over these rules and other conduct of the
two classes that scraps should originate. Traditions should
not form a basis for interclass scraps.
Myskania alone
should enforce traditions. As long as it allows promiscous
enforcement of traditions, just that long will the traditions
be cheap and poorly regarded by freshmen.
And if Myskania does not care to enforce traditions, it should recommend their abolition to the student association. Those who
feel keenly on the subject, should report infraction of traditions to Myskania, which will, we feel sure, put into effect
the recent act of the student association in giving it power
to enforce traditions.
In the meantime, the sophomore class has not been constituted a strung arm of enforcement.
It has made ovn:
misstep in forcing upon a freshman the punishment for
breaking sophomore rules, when really she broke traditions.
Miss Bleeker may feel justified in demanding an apology
from the sophomores. And if justice were to prevail, the
sophomores would offer the apology.
Perhaps it will be
better to leave the matter as it now i s ; but in the future
the sophomores should constrain themselves to their rules;
and not infringe the rights and obligations of Myskania.
WHEN CLUBS WORK TOGETHER
The announcement that the French, German and Spanish
clubs will present a combined program shortly after vacation, lor the entertainment of members of the three clubs
is perhaps the most significant sign of life advanced by
these three departmental clubs this year. It shows that they
realize that they can be of value to each oilier; that they
realize their problems might be common ; that they realize
a combined meeting might have more to offer than three
peanut meetings, catering to only a small group.
We would not, of course, condemn a club because it appealed to but a small group ol people. A small group of
interested people is far belter than a huge group of qucstionable members.
Perhaps the greatest crime of the
French club has been its tendency to take in people who
were more interested in joining a club than in joining
French club. T h e result was a large membership of lioninterested students, whom the few interested members had
lo drag in the harness.
|ly the combination in presenting joint program-., each
club may be able to strengthen itsell and to make membership seem more like .omelhiug worth striving for. 11
(be clubs can unite lor the discussion of common interests,
•uid yet retain then individuality ' " affairs where ;t separate identity is besl, they will base taken ;i big stride for
ward.
TIIK MORONIC INTELLIGENTSIA
"Mechanics arc the nation's most intelligent class, while
clergymen, professors, actors and pyhsiciam rank lowest in
the intelligence scale among the on-morons, Dr, F . K. Free,
scientist, said last night in addressing the annual dinner
of the American Society of Mechanical Kngineers at the
Astor.
'The reason why actors, physicians, ministers and
professors are generally considered above average intelligence is that the standard intelligence tests usually fail
to discriminate between information and intelligence,' Ur.
Free ">aid.
"'Ministers, doctors and university professors are less
fortunate,' he said. 'Public opinion expects them to have
instant and definite opinions about many things concerning
which essential facts are unkown. Their intelligence gets
no exercise. They learn to confuse dogmatic plausibility
wilh t r u t h . ' " — N e w York H e r a l d Tribune, December 6,
VJ2U.
In between these periods the student
is thrown on his own resources a good
deal and is required to educate himself
in a sense that is quite unknown to the
American school boy and girl.
This characteristic runs through the
entire scheme of European education.
Instead of requiring attendance at lectures and laboratories and class periods,
there is a residence requirement which
is expressed in terms of the number of
meals eaten in the common dining hall.
This is the practice at Oxford and
Cambridge and it is the practice at the
Inns of Court. For example, in order to
qualify for the bar examination a student must have eaten a prescribed numberof meals in the hall of his particular
institution, whether it be the Inner temple of Lincoln's inn or the Middle temple.
If he has done so and has practically
ignored all the lectures he may still present himself lor the final examination.
On the other hand, if he has been faithful upon attendance at lectures ami has
not given evidence of residence by "dining in hall" he is not qualified for admission to the examination. This necessarily puts the responsibility upon the individual student for getting the materials
which prepare him for the final test.
referred to the privateersmen but incidentally, and gave far
Published every Friday in the college year by the Editorial Board
representing the Student Association. Subscriptions, 12.25 per year,
single copies, ten cents. Delivered anywhere in the United States.
Entered as second class matter at postoffice, Albany, N. Y,
Albany, N. Y.
[Editor's note: This is the third of a
scries of articles on contemporary European education written for the NEWS by
President A. It. Ilrubaeher, who inspected
continental and English schools last year.
The scries will he concluded In the next
issue of the NKWS.I
European education -places more responsibilities upon the student beginning
with the middle school and gives him
more freedom than is the practice in
American schools.
There arc not so
many and so frequent
examinations;
there is not the requirement of attendance upon school and college duties, the
test coming at the periods indicated,
namely, at the eleventh year, the sixteenth year, and the eighteenth year.
By William Morrison Robin-
Press.
Kappa Delta Rho House, 480 Morns St„ Dial 6-4314
THOMAS P. FALLON
European Students Have Chance At Self Education;
Social Contacts Found Valuable, Dr. Brubacher Says
NEW EDITION OF "DRUMS" SCORES
HIT WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY WYETH
many
Union
merchantmen
to
lie
transferred
lo
foreign
registry.
The Constitution of tlie United Stales.
By Bertha Haines.
326 pages. ?2. New York: F. S. Crofts and Company.
Every American citizen should have a thorough knowledge of the constitution under which he lives; lie should
know the powers of the national government as contrasted
with those of the s t a t e ; he should know the source from
which the constitution sprang.
This is one of the basiccriteria for the good citizen.
While this text on the constitution does nut present the
document in any new or startling light, it does present it
in a straight-forward, thorough manner.
Starting witli
the backgrounds of political and social democracy in the
colonies, the author leads the reader through the revolutionary and criticil periods to the calling of a convention
at Philadelphia.
Rightly, the greater part of the book is
given over to ill-: constitution and its amendments.
One
good feature is the placing of the part of an amendment in
the same chapter in which it is discussed.
One might wish for a more thorough account of the
compromises of die constitution, which arc barely mentioned. This cutting of the compromises is probably the
penalty to pay for such a concise book of but 320 pages.
The adoption of checks and balances is adequately interpreted. Lists of supplementary readings and a few selected
questions on the constitution are appended to each chapter.
This would make an excellent handbook for the use of
students.
This Man Adams.
By Samuel McCoy, i i i pages. $J.50.
New York: Brentano's.
That John Adams never died is the declaration of his
newest biographer. It is,_ indeed, a difficult lask for a man
to set before himself to find a new viewpoint about so well
known a character as John A d a m s ; about a man whose
edited diary fills volumes of no mean iiroportions. But the
author of this book has indeed found a new point of view
of A d a m s : the point of view of Adams still haunting his
New England binhplacc, and his opinions on modern problems. This is, of course, conjectural history. As much as
we should like lo believe that John himself were alive, we
know it could not be. For this reason, we are a bit likely
to look upon Mr. McCoy's book as fantastical.
But we
wager that John Adams would express himself long and
vigorously—to his famous diary, of course—if he were
alive today.
11 Would be interesting to see how well his
writings would compare with those Mr. McCoy's attributes
to him.
Adams is portrayed as ceding to Jefferson tin- honor of
writing the Declaration of Independence, since he knew that
Jefferson would carry more weight with tin soulh than
would Adams, the New Fnglailder.
The author deplores the lack of good old fashioned diary
keeping on the part of his fellow Americans of llle present
age.
"It's the sign of the great, nevertheless, lo keep a
diary, The reason is, that your great man i-, invariably a
Mi: III.HI. lie thinks about himself, constantly, l i e has to,
it he's going to gel anywhere. * * * "
The selection m Adams papers is good. This book has
dune its bit to keep John Adams from "dying."
It is quite apparent from the foregoing that the educational ideals of the
European place more value upon the social contacts between student and student
than does the American, and the number of students who work for degrees or
for honors is relatively much smaller,
"2 Yeart To Finish Buildings;"
---Promise Made 2 Years Ago
I
|
He believes that the problem of the small college is for
it to increase the facilities in its education department, so
that it may supplement the somewhat limited facilities of
the teachers colleges,
H e points out that the latter are
often hampered by lack of funds or equipment, due to
lack of stale support,
T h e liberal arts college can, he
declares, turn out teachers without any direct cost to the
state, in this day ol mounting educational expenses.
But
these small colleges ruusl reach the standards set by the
slate and by the Carnegie foundation, if they are to be of
service. H e would reserve the teachers colleges as pacemakers and as institutions for graduate study.
This is a problem that students of a teachers college
should study. It is of particular interest In students of this
college, where liberal arts and teaching theory are so well
correlated,
VACATION PROGRAMS
OF FACULTY MEMBERS
ITliis department seeks to present each
Dean William II. Melzler will spend
ueck a lew sentences from tiles of the
part of the vacation in New York al
NEWS for 1926-27,
When Necessary, a
short explanation will he appended. Sentending the meetings of the American
tcnces in quotation marks arc copied verbatim.— Kdilor. I
Association
for
the Advancement
oi
F r o m t h e N e w s for December 17, 1926 Science and affiliated associations.
"Nearly two years will he necessary
President A, R. Brubacher has made
to complete the new group of buildings
no plans for spending ihe vacali
in
for State College."
of
"Rumors ,.l all night orgies in which
college co-eds
took part
were also
brotiht out in oiher testimony of the
day."
i In Mr. David Hutchison's annual trial in government class,)
the city.
Dean Anna
York
COMMUNICATIONS
Kdilur,
Sum
I •I.I.CI.I:
and
K
icrn,
ill,-
prc-elll
•-,
are
not.
Then why make ohjeetions to Ihe present
culms? h'uitlieriiiorc, they represent die Ha
.htiunnl college ,„l„.s our colors, purple and
Hold.
A,.) freshman .main to he
ml lo
near tln.ni.
\ - to their shape, that is ihe
present slylc
(II ei.ui.se if this is ol.jectlon
he
-
olio,
11-ine.lie.l
h.- l
"willl
,1 lie
n<KI
lunch at
sialr
Male
In
each
II.,
>cai,
a n d ...ay he
III... I
Hi,' ii
lu-pi
lo rest.
the Christmas
She
and uill
Inn.
Snow,
in
supervisor
to in,omc" used p. «'-.
" 1 , | r " " ' " " 1 *''"" ""•> " i '
noli,,,- \| Kiiiialu, iii
> ' " , ai i- i mill
,1
he
Vm
., i . s
, u l i , Hi.-I
il,,lliakll.N
I h e h . -.in..,, inen
s i i l i j c , I l l u i n l „ i nil, n l c o .
,l> M a l ' 1 . , l l e K . i . r s l
-II
vacation
Due to the illness ,,l
in Albany.
Professor
Aiue
his family
expects lo pass the holiday -
in Albany.
Mr,
Siuioiiiii
has
IIUIIIII.I
lislll.
Miss
Alice
F.
Kyder,
illstruclol
I
e ecu
mis, will visit her home
Newport, k. I.
ill
il
Me,-, Minnie II. Scotland, iiislnicloi m
biology, plans lo he .it home in ( oboes
tile
lll'Sl
Week
ol
VaCallol
fl, simian
l,„|o. s
pi,n.c
nhjeel
"i
weal
lllelll
is l o
.,, nlciillly
linn,
I s h o u l d s a y Hull
Dr. i'. ( aniline < n.asdalc, pn.iess.u
ol hygiene, is planning to spend I 'hi 1st
in,is v>iih her parents in Philadelphia
Profess,,i W. ( , deckel, head ol ihe
Herman department and Mrs. Decki i in
h ml lo spend ( hiistinas al Mis. Dei kei's
home III Susquehanna, IVmisvKuuia
I
Professor l l o u a r d A. Dobi'll, assistant
professor ol mathematics, will attend
I the meeting ol lite Ann ricui Mathein.i
lical SocieH in New York Cily.
Mr-. (Jiieene I Ionian | , , u , i . iiislrinloi
in Lining,, i, iiiiccil.on concerning bei
plans for ihe \ acalioii
ihe nl.jcct is pi.inai.ly ihe forinei. Inn that il
s l i o . d d he I h e l a l l e l
A less «l,.,,lly headljcai
A i . u l . l s i n e t h e l a l l i ' i l l l l l p i . s e ,'ls w e l l a s III,,
) c l l , , w il.nl p i t . p i e n o w s i - i v c i h e f u n n e l ' .
Vim in... H - U ' I thai some j c a i s ,.«,. the
pi< -senI senna .„. n vti-n. fu.nishcl Willi red
and »liill' caps, uinl a lew days lute ,, local
ice . icam cnnpaii) d.sl. ili.iicd si.uila. caps lo
•ill Ihe ii,-.,,!,,,), ami iu«miiiilliii« in Albany,
It i i ' i u u d ) u a s not a compliment In Ihe fresh
men lo inccl M-y.-ial of the ice nc.nu hais.
Sianil.i.di/ali,.,. ,,f culun, was a urea! slip
hXr^i,:/'-,,- ijrt trtn'v
slai.,|.ir,iiA.i,i,n,
oi
h'.nglisb, will spend
li.llc||e
ficslinlnn
wean.iK college ii.siK,na oil
Al.-,., the iiiui.hr.
en al
increases
Pickwick
Miriam
practice teaching
y e a . , a s d e s i l eil | d l l l l l l g
Hi. aler in the noil luiuic, al nhieli lime tin
i.jqii,' I'u.iiiii! Mociii can he lo it. . a p p i c .
,'lteil
and
purple ,n,| i will aueuo a com clltioii of the Alllcl
,.i,.,.„,,-d. Alhanians will lean A s s o c ;
the Advaiicenicnl ..I
ihe siaudaol Science in Neu York City dm me Ihe
the
'•>e,ii| n I,
llu- campus.
friends
will stay at Ihe Hotel Picadilly
dee Sinioiiin, oi ihe French department,
XK.VS:
Tin-, i- in reply hi ihe editorial on fresh
in .to tuques in Insi neck's NEWS, l-'imi "f all,
I fail to sec why uciiriuti a purple and Hold
toque makes a lellon look like Santa I latis
II i» movei sully hclicvcd thai Santa I lauscs
u.ai led and mem. If previous toques we.e
led
K. Pierce will go to New
lo visit
Miss
Id
Small Colleges and Teacher Training.
By Jacob (i. Meyer.
ltd pages. ( 1 ,
Bloumington, Illinois. Public School
Publishing Co.
Whether the small liberal arts college should attempt to
train secondary school teachers is the problem of this thesis.
The author, who is dean of education al Manchester Col
lege, Indiana, declares that the small college is a public
institution, in that it admits students ol good standing,
without regard to faith or creed. As a public institution,
it should attempt to render the greatest service possible lo
the state and nation.
He believes that a large number of
students, especially men, are attracted to leaching by the
curricula of the liberal a r t s college, although lliey would
not or could not enter a teachers college.
while the number of those who wish to
obtain the social values, as expressed by
the student relationships, by undergraduate activities, by which is called in
America "extra curricula activities," that
is, those that are known as "pass men,"
is much greater.
In England, especially, the traditions of
the great public schools, represented best,
perhaps, by Eaton or Rugby or Winchester or Harrow, and by the ancient
universities of Oxford and Cambridge,
continue to hold the highest place oi
honor.
These schools and universities continue
to give chief emphasis to linguistic, historical and philosophical studies.
The
sciences have, of course, claimed their
place in the scheme, but what we know
in America as "the vocational ideal" is
quite beyond the pale.
The high schools conducted by the
London county council, and also by private or religious agencies, have adopted
somewhat more modern programs. They
divide the work in the same way as the
public schools but the content is more
practical and more modern.
There is, therefore, a difference in atmosphere which is quite remarkable as
one passes from one of the ancient pub
lie schools to the county council schools.
In Eaton, for example, the atmosphere
is created by traditions that go back a
thousand years.
When one sees the thousands of initials carved upon the panaled walls of
class rooms, the desks, and benches, in
halls and stairways; when one sees that
some of these initials are those of fain
ous statesmen, jurists, diplomatist, oi
great nobles and even of the royal per
sons, he feels the influences of mediaeval
conditions.
The furniture, the school
equipment, the educational apparatus m
these schools is that of ancient days.
The old guild schools are still represented in one or two instances. For ex
ample, the Merchant Taylors school,
founded in 1560, is today a nourishing
middle school, taking children from the
eleventh year through the eighteenth
year, and sending annually a small representative group up to the great universities.
lVil.ap- .cdiu.iinn of the yel
NEXT NEWS JANUAKY 11
No N'I-A - Mill be published I iday,
January -1 the set mid day loll. wing
Ihe lesiin pin,n ol classes .ill.- the
( III Isllll.ls recess. This is in a Cold
with the ii.hcy ol the N'l.Hs II llol
requiring its staff members in work
during vai all..lis. riie next issin will
be Friday January II.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, DECEMBER 19, lf28
SEX A BIG PROBLEM,
PEACE PACT WILL BE
ELECT NEW OFFICERS
Sad Tale Of Scotch Salesman;
GOOD WILL INFLUENCE
Professor Brown's Favorite OF ALPHA PHI GAMMA
- - - D R . RISLEY
Raps Student Docility
SPEAKER TELLS MEN
Man And W o m a n Relationship
Is Important B u t Neglected,
Dr. Eddy Avers
(Continued from Pane l, Column l)
gained (roni experience and from others,
and organize life on that basis. That is
religion."
That much essential knowledge of <ex
life and problems is withheld from young
people with harm fid results is very evident, according to Dr. Kdcly. l i e declared that the relationship between men
and women is one of the most important
of present day problems and that ii is
among the most neglected of all.
A d v o c a t e s Staple Sex Education
"I believe in sound and stable sex education in proportion to the needs of the
individual" he continued. He pointed out
that deep impulses either make or break
the individual, depending upon the way
in which they are utilized. There exists
a need to check impulses and to discipline the mind and hodv, according to
Dr. Eddy. Lack of this is responsible
for the divorce rale of lBfi.OIHI a \car,
he said.
Danger from monopolies is .ureal, he
Paul Malefvl, l.miis Sweel, Kilivnril
declared, telling thai 05 per eeni of the I li.-ml}.
M' iv. John I oilis, Saiiini-I Pranskv, Diianr
water power resources of Mew York ll.-il.er, 1,1 .our P. Nice, Isiael K.-iplan", Charles
slate is in the hands of private individ- Kissam, IrvoiK Mumlore, Kccneili Miller,
Sao.II, Simon Uaslin, Merrill Tavlor,
uals, and corporations, control of uhiih .lack
ll.'ii..PI lla-in-ll, loanklin
Clark,
ller'nanl
is in the bands of about six men. Aneiharli. \ ,„e, nl I-Ysla, William M. Kreneh,
838,000,000 a year is spent to distribute llaiohl U.e.l. I la I C o r , Primal,I S|.,„.
propaganda to aid the monopolists retain I hope. A l h e i l llaseh, I r v i i i K M e C o n n e l l .
W a n c n Coeluaio, Clniuml
Pnrke, Kail
control. Propaganda is even being ear I l!l„..ninm,lale,
( linimi Wallttork, Umlolph S y
ried into schools and colleges, Dr. Eddy ' " ' « . I hi, I, - Worsiall. Wallace Strevell,
rhoiiias
Palloli,
l,eoi
e
Amlolina,
John Kloily,
K
charged.
William Sawu-i, lohn Sleim, Kiehai.l WilisDr. B r u b a c h e r Speaks
t.ai, Paul U.,I, in,an, I ail Wateoiian, KmUalph
President lirubaclier spoke on the !anuel Coeeii, Kenneth Carpenter,
Sianlev, I-.,.|,.re Ural,kin, Sam Cooper, Francis
value of a student Y. M. (". A. here. | Kohiiisnii, KJwanl <ish,,,,i. Anthony Harone,
Coach Rutherford Baker commended the IP i c , l e i ii k W I iiimli, Ahiaham I-'alck, l.co
spirit of the men, declaring he has noted j Ulan, I-' I. Him h, l.awrene, Xewcomh,
an, Uoheil Goodrich, Charles
a greal improvement in it since be came J.istpl, Sil\
Pi.ink o n , loscph llerney, Ik-maid
to the college five years ago. Warren
ll, P a n I aniphell.
Cochrane was loaslmasler.
ill,,i. Aches,,,,. Ileii',,,,1 Smith, l.ouis
i i s Ki
her, Kohert Koss, StanOther speakers were Dr. Adiin \V. lev 11 vis,I n i Pas
lllnn,, Louis Klson, l-'redeiick
Risley, head of ihe hislors department ; \|,|,|c MI. |,,lm I.MIIIS, f a i l Tarhox, Knicst
|.„
l„hias,
P
.
a o u s llaru
I. C. La
loscph llernev, '2'), and Wallace II.
C a n . \lllh,oi) Kuezvnski, Louis Klein,
Strevell, '29
I 'I'lmmpsoii, Kenuelli Carpenter, Kaurii,
|{.
nl Hi.
I I lake i
Marshal D. Williams, acliiiK sn-n-iai y of il.
< cutral V. M C. A.; ( |,-,miu- I'aln
hership secretary of ihe (Ymt.-il \ '. " \ l . ' i
A.; Louis C. Ilvati, of ilie New Y. iik Sial
ell
National Hank; II Ray
s e e r eilary
l a r y for
f o r th
the 'V. M.' I
A „ and Dr. A , i n . ,
W. Risley, heail nf the liisloiy ,l,|,,i.
nl
".indents atiemlinij were: John J, I lelc
...
Unil.aelii-r;
Coach
KmI
-sj.J ;t)4or ami John
While the Kellogg-Briand peace pact
docs not outlaw war, it will he a Huge
moral Influence for "peace on earth,
Rood will to man," Dr. Adna VV. Risley,
head of the history department, told the
first assembly Friday.
War for self defense is allowable under the new treaty, Dr. Risley said.
Difficulty of determining the aggressor
is the one great danger of allowing war
for defense, he pointed out.
He believes that the United States
will adhere to the pact, as many other
nations have already done. Adherence
will not mean recognition of Russia, he
said, since a precedent exists by which
the United States declaretl in signing another pact that its adherence should not
be interpreted as recognition of the soviet regime. Dr. Risley declared he is in
favor of adoption of the proposed
treaty.
NEWMAN CLUBS ELECT
MISS DYER TREASURER
Mary Dyer, '30, was elected treasurer
of the central New York province of
Newman club at its annual convention
in Albany last weekend. Delegates from
Russell Sage, Syracuse, Hamilton, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University
•if Pennsylvania, McUill University, City
College (if New York and State College
attended breakfast Sunday. Miss Anna
K. Pierce, dean of women, was a guest
of honor.
The main activity of the
clubs should be religious, with social and
intellectual affairs subordinated, speakers
told the members at the conferences.
Normanskill Farm Dairy
Kennedy.
PLAN FOR JUNIOR WEEK E N D
Arrangements for junior weekend,
early in February, will soon be completed, according to Alice Walsh, '30,
general chairman.
If it's made
IF VOU ARK
an Evangelical Christian and desire
t o w o r k for Christ w h i l e in State
C o l l e g e y o u are invited t o c o operate w i t h th e
of
ALBANY
GOSPEL TABERNACLE
RUBBER
A Community Church
649-651 W A S H I N G T O N A V E .
Sunday Services:
10:45 and 7:30
We Have It
Rev. F. L. Squires, Pastor
Lucille Beauty
Salon
ALLING RUBBER CO.
SPECIAL
Permanent Wave $7.00
Shampooing
and Waving for
Long Hair
- - $1.76
For Bobbed Hair - $1,50
Manicuring
f/Oc.,
FacialMamage$l.
451 Broadway
Visit The New
AMERICAN AND CHINESE
Velvet
Open 11 until 2 A. M.
ICE
D A VV
HARPER
Phone 3-5943
METHOD
BROWNELL'S BEAUTY SHOP
271 L A R K S T R E E T
Wholesale Price to Parties
FREDERIC'S PERMANENT WAVING
Phone
4-3618
Open e v e n i n g s by a p p o i n t m e n t
SON'S
PATRONIZE T H E
American Clrmtrrsi mxft Dyers
MEN' S SHOP
P h o n e '1-3775
D a n c i n g 10:30 till 1 A . M„ E x c e p t S u n d a y
44 State St.
CREAM
FW.OWKR • H O P
STEUBEN STREET
Corner James
(Drtental and (Dtttrfrntal lUsiaurant
Bottled Milk and Cream
cApollon
Tea Room
Phone 6-3933
We Clean and Dye all kinds of Ladies' and IVlen's
Wearing Apparel
811A MADISON AVENUE
Phone 6-0723
2 5 ) CKXTHALAVENUE
AMES-ASWAD CANDY SHOP, Inc.
222 CENTRAL AVENUE
The Modei
Way to Write
HOME MADE CANDIES and DELICIOUS ICE CREAM
is on a
SANDW1CI ;i:.S, COFFEE AND PASTRY
H E complete a n d inc o m p a r a b l e little writing m a c h i n e . Fits in u
case only four inches high
— t h e smallest a n d lightest portable w i t h s t a n d a r d
keyboard. Call In a n d let
us s h o w y o u this wonderful time and labor saver.
By Professor Barnard Bronson
of the Chemistry Department
The representative of a Scotch firm
was calling on his trade at Saranac
Lake, when he became snowbound.
With no place to stay save at an expensive hotel, he telegraphed his firm
for instructions.
The reply came
hack: "Start vacation without pay,
beginning yesterday."
LUCILLE A L T O P E D A
Final Parlor on Central Are.
IIV Solicit your
I'utronaije
Remington
Portable
T
Four officers of Alpha Phi Gamma,
national honor fraternity in journalism,
were elected at a meeting last weekend.
Josephine Brown, '29, is the new vicepresident ; Margaret Henninge, '30, secretary; Florence M. Gormley, '29, treasurer; Rose Dransky, '29, bailiff,
Miss
Dransky succeeds Bettiria Aizarito, '29,
as bailiff, and Miss Henninge succeeds
William M. French, '29, as secretary.
Bessie Lapcdes, '29, was recently elected
president of the local chapter,
[This is one of a scries of favorite
jokes of faculty members.
This scries
will he a regular feature of the NEWS for
several weeks.— Kditor.l
208 Q U A I L S T . i R i c e Bldjj>
Dial 6-5787
215 Central Avenue
"Dependable
Flowers''
We Telegraph Flowers to all J'url.< home of I lulu ml Cold Lunches
Candy and lee Cream
Of the World
I
3
"JUST AROUND THE CORNER ABOVE ROBIN STREET"
ALSO
B. M STRASSE^
542 B R O A D W A Y
V E R Y S N A P P Y FELT, METALLIC A N D
VELVET DRESS H A T S
Telephone 4-2014
A R K A Y FLORIST
A. G. BLICHFELDT, P h G .
<gut-|?rirr jPrni|fltgt
PRESCRIPTIONS
373 Madison Ave., Cor. Dove
Cicu
H
Iruiiry
A
Ten K y c k Motel liuildinu
PHONE 3-4439
SPECIALTY
Albany, N. Y.
Phone
u-7613
Branch
15 S o . Pearl S t r e e t
Smart
Coats - Hats - Dresses
For
Girls and Misses
Jgmthnuu-ft (gafetarta
198 Central Avenue- at Robin
Albany, N. Y.
ciym Togs - Hosiery
Steefel Brothers, Inc.
STATE COLLEGE NEWtf,'DECEMBER 19. 1928
DR. SOUTH EXTENDS
WORK IN MEASURING
Varsity To Face Alumni In First Game Of New Year;
Now Who Hat First Aid Book?
FRENCH WILL ADDRESS
'31-'32 In Alphonte-Gaiton Act Kuczynski And Herney Star In Win Over Coast Guard
STAFF OF NEW PAPER
"Merry Christmas'', said the freshBY ROY V. SULLIVAN
Sports Editor, STATE L'UM.KUK NEWS
Roland sank a field to even the scene
William M. French, '29, editor in chief
but Carr counted on another two pointer oi the STATIC Cou.r.<;i-: NKWS, will speak
In the first game of the new year, the immediately to give State a lead which to the journalism club of the high school
varsity basketball team will face the was never wiped out. State led at half at Owego tomorrow afternoon oil the
Tests And Measurement Classes
alumni live. The game will take place t.uie by a 14-0 score.
worth of journalism in the secondary
Administer Examinations
Saturday night, January 5, in the gymschools. The invitation for him to speak
Little Scoring in Last Half
In Albany Schools
nasium. The former State College stars In the second half, the play slowed was extended by Sara H. Barkley, '27,
who are expected to give the present down a bit and little scoring took place. former associate managing editor of the
team a run for its money include several Play continued to be hard and also NKWS, who is now faculty adviser of the
An extensive project in administerformer captains. Among these are John- rough at times. At the end of the game new newspaper at the high school. Miss
ing educational tests has been mapped
son, Hornung, Gainor and Fitzgerald. with the Purple and Gold second team Barkley is teaching mathematics in
out for liis education courses by Dr.
Griflin and Guff of last year's team are in the game it resembled a football game Owego.
Earl B. South, assistant professor of
also expected to play.
I more than a basketball game. When the
education, and is being- executed by
Varsity Improves Technique
final whistle blew there were about six
Showing a much improved brand of or seven men piled up on the floor,
students in liis classes.
basketball over that of the first game, hrank Ott and his man had a bit of an
The tests are being administered in
the varsity quintet won its second game argument under the basket and were
the Albany public schools, in the Alof the season Friday night by triumph- wrestling around as if they enjoyed each
ing over the United States Coast Guard other's company. The referee 'called a
bany Academy for Girls, the Albany
Academy five by a 20-8 score. 'I he double foul and Ott obliged by sinking
Hospital, Albany Orphan Asylum and CORR BREAKS HIS TOE
game was marked more by a steady air his attempt while his man failed. That
HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE
in the grade and high schools at
defense than by any hrillant shoot- allowed the second team to outscore the
IN GYMNASIUM CLASS tight
Spencerport.
ing on the part of either team.'
AND
academy by 1-0 count.
MON. TUES. WED.
The inclusion of this program in the Daniel P. Corr, '.31, suffered a broken
The visitors by using a five man zone
DEC.
I7-IB-I9
Albany public school system is re- toe and a sprained ankle in an indoor defense made it a very hard job for the NEW ALPHA RHO MEMBERS
POLA NEGRI
garded by members of the education football game in the gymnasium Friday home players to score from the floor.
•THE WOMAN FROM MOSCOW
Alpha Rho welcomes into honorary
THUff., FBI., SAT.
department as a signal achievement, between freshmen and sophomores, dar- In the second half the scorers on both membership Miss Marian Redway inDEC.
20-21
22
since the theory gained in class is ap- ling a gymnasium class conducted by teams were so effectively tied up that structor in library science, and into' full
L1LI DAMITA
the two teams scored but-eight points in
In 'FORBIDDEN LOVE"
plied in the actual administration of
membership Gertrude H. Frenier, '30.
the
entire
period.
Coach
Rutherford
Baker.
the tests. This is the first year that
Corr was taken home in a taxi and ^ The visitors failed to account for a
college classes have administered tests
single point in the last ten minutes of
DIRECTION
STANLEY
COMPANY
OF
AMERICA
in the local schools.
was attended by Dr. John McCormick, the first half and the first ten of the
MARK
f—V
chief,-surgeon
at
St.
Peter's
Hospital.
second. Tony Kuczynski and Captain
Tests at Academy for Girls
MAPK"7
Students from both Education 112 Two X-rays were necessary to deter- Joe Herney starred for the State outfit.
Tony scored eight points and was the
and 105A have been helping test 150 mine the extent of Corr's injuries,
heart of the offense of this team. Herpupils from the Albany Academy for
WEEK OF DEC. 24
The accident occurred when Corr, ney played a hard game and was mixed
WEEK OF DEC. 24
Girls. State College students may
continue to work in co-operation with holding the ball, was making a substan- up in nearly every play. Whiston put
aee and Hear every character
Warner Bros.
the academy in helping keep the test tial gain for his team and was forced to up some very good defensive work playin the picture
"100% All Talkie"
records up to date. These students turn out of his path by an intercepting ing at back guard.
have also participated in the testing freshman and ran into a post.
Seventh Straight Win
The passwork was much better than
program of the nurses training class
spite of his injuries, Corr is attend- in the St. Michaels game. This game
in the Albany Hospital. Mrs. Gene- ingInclasses.
is the seventh straight victory in basketw!th
vieve Clark, who attended summer sesball for State since the defeat by St. Pauline Fredericks and Bert Lytell
sion here last summer and who is a
Bonaveiiture last winter.
member of the state nurses examinaMovietone
Vltaphona
Pathe Sound with
News
Vltaphone
As the game opened both teams were
tion board, is interested in making a PARK LAKE AVAILABLE
Acts
Net Costello-Antonio Acts
Helene
Moreno
putting up such fine defenses that it was
study of the nurses training classes in
FOR
STUDENT
SKATING
some
minutes
before
Kuczynski
scored
the' hospital and the St. Joseph's HosALSO
OPERATING
ALBANY
AND
REGENT
pital.
Certain
intelligence tests,
Washington park lake will be avail- the first points of the game on a nice
THEATRES IN ALBANY
achievement tests and personality able for skating this winter, according field from near the basket. The visitors
measures are being used in the study. to an announcement by John Bo>d fouled three times in the first five minThese measures are similar in type to thacher, 2nd, mayor of Albany. A utes of play hut the home men seemed
FEATURING THE SILENT DRAMA
those which are being used in the temporary wooden house will be erected unable to make good on their free
study of the freshmen at State College. for the skaters to replace the old lake throws.
Problem Cases at Asylum
house torn down recently. A previous
WEEK
Tests which were begun last year report was to the effect that the lake
DLC. 24th
in the Albany Orphan Asylum have would remain drained- this winter and
been continued this year. The number that no opportunity would be offered for
HOME OF FILM CLAM1CS
of students thus far tested in this in- skating there.
stitution, including the work of both
FACLUSJVE' I'JCTl'RFS
years, is about seventy. The material
obtained from the asylum has been HUSTED HALL SPORTS
o(S,
very helpful as problem and case ma"NAME THE
1PP
terial in Education 105A, according to
EVERGREEN AND HOLLY
WOMAN"
Dr. South.
Decorations of evergreen and holly
With
Children at the orphan asylum may were placed in the corridors of Hustid
be used as subjects for special tests in Hall last week by members of the Home
Anita Stewurt
GEO.
O'BRIEN
in
charge
of
Ruth
GoldEconomics
club
the two courses, according to Dr
and LOIS MORAN
South. In other years, when the smith, '32; Carol Sinnott, '31; Florence
classes wished to administer such tests Marx, '30, and Florence Fischer, '29.
1 "PRETTY CLOTHES
as the Staiiford-Binet, it was found
I
with Joulynn Ralston
difficult to obtain subjects.
The class in education 112 is doing
ALL
2*C
the greater part of the work. It is
2 5 c | Mat. 20c
Night 25c
DAY
composed of thirteen upperclassmen
C. H. B U C K L E Y Owner
and graduate .students. This class has
given test in eo-opcration with Dr. C.
80-82 No. Pearl Street
Edward Jones, city superintendent of
Cor. Columbia
schools, and John H, Kingsley, research director in the Albany public A Reliable Place to B u y
schools,
R E L I A B L E - SILKS
The das* lias given the tests, scored
CLEANERS
AND DYERS
WOOLENS- COTTONS
them and assisted in interpreting the
CRETONNES and
432 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
results. .Mr. Kingsley is expected to
INTERIOR
ask the assistance;)!' the education department for future assistance in testFURNISHINGS
298 Lark St.
Dial 3-5191
ing.
men Friday, as they handed Russell
Ludlu'.n, president of the sophomore
class, a book on first aid, immediately
after the epic struggle between the
two classes on the greensward of the
college.
"And a happy- New Year," responded Ludlum, as he returned the
book in a second tussle between the
classes Monday.
According to authentic information
today received by the NKWS, the
freshmen were ready to trade the
first-aid book for several cushions in
any condition, but could find nobody
willing to do business. Sophomores
needed their pillows, it was said.
PROCTOR'S
Grand
S
R I TZ.
TRANU
Or; Trial"
A\idpigbt
T&xi
LELAND
CLINTON
SQUARE
You will enjoy the
HOME COOKING
served at
HEWETT'S
SILK SHOP
Mrs. VAN'S
Dining Room
BUCHHEIMS
QUALITY
PALLADINO
Your friends will meet you at
Boulevard
Personality Bobs - Finger Waving-Permanent Waving
L A D I E S SPECIALTY S H O P
49 Central Avenue
NOVELTY
SHOES,
5
Door«
We«t of No. Manning Hlvd
HOSIERY
AND SILK
203 Central Avenue (near Robin)
Salads - Pastry and Toasted Sandwiches
fcvery landwlch made up fresh to Individual order
BOULEVARD DAIRY CO., Inc.
3-3632
DANKER
"SA Y ITLaneWITH FLOWERS"
40 and 42 Maiden
.Albany, N . V
A GIFT from Van Heusen Charles
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
MEANS MORE
Students and Groups at the Slate College fur Teachers
will be given special attention
H
The Van Heusen Charles Company
23 I Third Street, Albany, N. Y.
Telephone iiU)H
Strand
I.U N. Pearl St.
i -6280
LINGERIE
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
Produced and distributed un
der ideal conditions, Teachers
particularly and the public generally welcomed at all times.
home Suvinus Bunk MIIIK
1J N, Pearl St.
470 Broadway
Albany, N. Y.
Mills Art Press
394-396 Broadway
4- 22d7
Printers of State College New*
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