S t a t e College News NEWS CELEBRATES A DOUBLE VICTORY

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State College News
N E W Y O R K S T A T E COLLEGE F O R TEACHERS
Voh. XT. Ho, 26
NEWS CELEBRATES
A DOUBLE VICTORY
Paper Is Second In 13 Classes
And also In Contest For
Teachers Colleges
VAN KLEECK IS HONORED
Appoint Editor To Association's
Executive C o m m i t t e e
For N e x t Year
A certificate showing that it won second place in tile national contest to determine America's best teachers college
newspaper is expected in a week or two
by the STACK (JOM.Btw N K W S .
When it
arrives from the Columbia Scholastic
Press association at Columbia university, New York city, it will be framed
and hung ill the XKWS' office
Tuesday night members of the staff
observed with a dinner the winning of
the award.
Thirty-two attended the dinner which
was ai the New Ketimore hotel, North
I'earl street, Guests of honor were Dr.
Marry \ \ . Hastings, chairman of the
English department, and Mrs. Hustings.
Katherine Saxlnti, '28, assistant business
manager of the NKWS, was chairman of
arrangements.
Delegates found the N'nws office decorated with cartoons, and with purple and
gold crepe paper. A sign similarly draped
hitim over the door, announcing the news.
Word of the victory reached the College Kriday morning through New York
city papers and by telegrams, llertha
Zujnn, '27, president of the student association and herself a member of the
NKWS' staff, announced the award to the
two assemblies.
N e w s Rated 97 P e r Cent
In addition to winning second place in
the teacher college publications contest,
the NKWS also was given the second
highest rating in any of the thirteen
different contests conducted at the convention. Officials of the convention said
that the percentage rating of ninetyseven Riven the NKWS was not only the
second highest rating in the teachers
college and normal school section hut
also in all of the thirteen different
classes of papers ranging down to kindergarten folders. Some four hundred
college and school papers from every
part of the country were entered. All
were judged by the same graded standards.
Van Klecck was named one of an executive committee of three which will
administer the affairs of the teacher
training division of the press association
this year.
The other members a r e :
Miss Elizabeth Roscngarten, faculty adviser of the "Norm," magazine of the
Philadelphia Normal school; and John
A. Ivinncman, faculty adviser of the
Green Stone, newspaper of the Westchester Normal school, Pa.
The luuior College Journal of the
lunior ' Teachers
college,
Cleveland
School of Education, Cleveland, Ohio,
won for the second year, first prize in
the teachers college contest. It received
ninety-nine
points.
The
STATU
COLLKGI;
NKWS was given ninety-seven. The only
other paper which approached closely
this number of points was the winner of
the contest for large senior high schools.
This paper had ninety-six points,
Breadth of N e w s P r a i s e d
Detailed points of judging in which
the NKWS received perfect credit were:
Breadth of news field, including coverage of various activities of school, related outside news; news writing, including structure of news stories, "leads,"
organization; literary material, quality,
type; editorials, including subject matter
and appeal; humor, proportion, source,
whether old-timers or original; sports
writing, including absence of extreme
partisanship, absence of cheap slang, proportion lo other news, fact articles not
"dope;" advertising, including absence of
complimentary ads, appearance of ads,
proportion, readability, etc. The NKWS
lost a total of three from a possible
forty points in three other fields, bringing its total score to ninety-seven of
Kit) points. This is the first year the
NKWS was entered in the contest. _ The
NKWS is the only newspaper published
east of Ohio to" win a prize in the
teachers college class this year or last
year.
(taut
10 cents per copy, $.100 per year
AI.HANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, MARCH 18, W2
three- Col. one)
CALENDAR
Today
11:110 A, M. Double A s s e m b l y - -
Auditorium.
4:30 P. M. Week-end Party—
(.'amp Cogswell,
9:00 P. M. S o p h o m o r e Soiree—
Gymnasium,
8:15 P. M. Louise Closscr Hale's
Lecture—Chancellor's hall.
Tomorrow
5:30 P. M. Men's Basketball
Dinner—Cafeteria.
T u e s d a y , March 22
-1:00 P. M. French Club—Room
n.
ACTRESS TO SPEAK
ON DRAMA TONIGHT
Louise Closser Hale Will Read
In Character, Demonstrate
Art of MaKe-up
PLAYED IN " P E E R
GYNT*
Considered America's Leading
Character Actress, Women's
Magazine Say
6:00 P. M. Senior Get-together.
T h u r s d a y , March 24
7:45 A. M. I'niou Lenten Service Room H.
F r i d a y , M a r c h 25
8:15 P, M. G. A. A. Musical
C o m e d y Institute of History and
Art.
Louise Closser Hale, who will lecture on " T h e Art of Make-up" tonight
at
Chancellor's
hall, under the
auspices of the
Dramatics
and
Art
association,
is an actress, a
m e m b e r of the
1 : ^**:?
ij&<:
theater
bureau,
" -4.i>§i i>? l a l
and a lecturer.
"Miss Hale is
an actress in the
tradition of dignity; and good
milliners, and a
More than seventy men will attend
comedian of high
Mrs. I lulu
he men's dinner in the cafeteria tomorrank."
Miss
row evening al 5:30 o'clock. All men
Mary Grahn, in,i' lb,' College. Milne High school and
structor in Engthe faculty may attend, The men's bas- lish said "She is I he cleverest character
ketball team, t lytic Slociim, its manager, actress mi the American stage today."
Mrs. Hale will read in character and
and l o a c h Rutherford \i, linker will he give a demonstration of theatrical
guests of honor.
make-up tonight,
Thomas P. Fallon, 'JO, and LcRoy SulShe has played t h e part of Willie's
livan, 'J' 1 , arranged a program of talks mother in Rachel Crothefs' play, " E x pressing
Willie," which Miss Crotbors
to be followed h\ a basketball game in
read here last fall; ll sen's " P e e r
the gymnasium.
G y n t , " a n d the nurtli <> in Sidney
.Lloyd Pishbaiigh, '28, will he loast- H o w a r d ' s " T h e Silver Cord" which
master, Talks will be given by Presi- has been mentioned for the Pulitzer
dent A. R, Hrubacher, Coach Baker, prize in drama.
A d m i t t a n c e will be without charge
Professor R, II. Kirtland, Captain Claron student tax tickets. O t h e r tickets
ence Nephew, of ibis year's victorious may be obtained in (he rotunda or al
basketball team, his successor, the eap- d u e t t ' s music store for seventy-live
laiu-elecl of basketball, and others. In L-ents. Reserved seals will be sold for
'he basketball game the College fresh- me dollar each.
men will play a return game with the
Miss Grahn's Opinion
Silver L..ars.
Ruth Lane, '28, is general chairman.
EXPECT 70 MEN AT
BASKETBALL DINNER
TOMORROW AT 5:30
Before the dinner the letter men of G e r t r u d e Hall, '20, is in charge of
the baseball and basketball teams will tickets; Charlotte Jones, '28, advertisniecl and elect their captains. The ing;
Eleanor Harrison, '27, posters;
names of the new captains will be an- •mil Evelyn Graves, '2'), patronesses,
nounced during the dinner and the men " M i s s Hale is witty and charming
will speak briefly.
and should talk capably,' Miss Grahn
said. " T h e student body should be
especially interested in hearing her
read in her make-up for various parts."
MISS AVERY WILL HAVE
LEAVE FOR ly2 YEARS
Miss Blanche M. Avery, instructor in
commerce, who has been ill for several
weeks, will be absent from her duties for
about a year and a half, according to
Professor George M. York, head of the
commerce department.
Professor York and Miss Elizabeth
D. Anderson, instructor in commerce,
will take some of Miss Avery's classes.
Substitutes are to be hired for tile other
classes.
Constance Baumann, '27, t:
teaching Miss Avery's class in commercial arithmetic temporarily.
Miss Avery was graduated
from
Stale College in lOlfi and began teaching
here in September of the same year.
'29 AND '30 TO SING
IN TODAY'S ASSEMBLY
The sophomore-freshman sing will
take place in the single assembly this
morning at 10:55 o'clock T h e winning
class will be awarded live points in the
Inter-class rivalry contest.
Judges for the sing will be three
oeople well known in musical circles
here, according to Bertha Zajan, president of the student association. In accordance with the past custom, the names
are kept secret.
Points on which the songs are judged
are lyrical and musical composition;
poet'eal quality; musical technique; ensemble rendering, including enunciation
and spirit.
The class song leaders are Grace Chippendale, '20, and Mary Nelson, '30.
Mrs. H a l e A n A u t h o r
C o n c e r n i n g Miss Hale the W o m e n ' s
Home Companion said, "Louise Closser Hale is the foremost character
actress on the American stage, as well
as a writer of distinction. H e r portrayal of the g r a n d m o t h e r in Zona
Gale's 'Miss Lulu Belt' a n d the
m o t h e r in Rachel C r o t h e r s ' ' E x p r e s s ing Willie' stand a m o n g the finest
things oi their kind in the American
theatre."
2,3%SENIORSSCORE,
LEAD HIGH HONORS
Vivian Backus, Senior, Died At
Home In Schenectady Wednesday
Vivian M. Backus, '27, died W e d nesday at her h o m e in Schenectady,
according (o word received yesterday by her sorority, Phi Delta.
Miss Backus had not been at College since the beginning of the
semester.
She w a s born at Moriah, and
prepared for College at the Schenectady High school.
H e r home
was at 1001 Delniost avenue, Schenectady,
Junior Class Ranks First In
Honors; Sophomores Are
Third; '30 Is Last
14
TAKE
HIGH
HONORS
Sorority Averages Will Not Be
Announced For Week,
Registrar Says
The senior class leads in the percentage
of students on the high honors list for
the first semester, according to a list
I'Tiueral services will be this aftermade public today by Miss Elizabeth
noon al 2 o'clock. A delegation
Van Deiiburgh, registrar.
The junior
of Phi Delta m e m b e r s will attend.
class has the greatest number on the
Another
group
went
to Miss
honor list.
Backus' h o m e last night.
The sorority averages will not be announced for one more week, according
lo Miss Anna !•'. Kantian of President
A. R. Brubacber's office.
The class percentages a r e : high hotiirs—seniors, 2..\ per cent of the class;
.uiiiors, .4 per cent; sophomores, 1.6 per
cent; freshmen, .<> per cent. The honor
.isi : seniors, 11.0 per cent; juniors, 12.7;
sophomores, 0.(1; freshmen, 0,8 per cent,
The new staff of STATK COI.I.KOK NKWS
'I he complete honor roll is:
and Quarterly will be announced during
llllill IIUMlKS
Clans iif l'JJ7
the latter part of April or the first part Ayci.s,
Carrie
'•iisU'r, Aniline
if May. according lo Edwin Villi Klecck,
lei'Mrnier, Merle
Dura, I''.' Ifcloii'
'27, editor-in-chief of the N K W S , and Pee. Until
Julia Pay, '27, editor-in-chief of the
..Hie. Kmh
Quarterly.
"Twenty editorial cubs have been
Mil
hum
Mueller,' Praiici
already dropped from the NKWS. Of the
M
"
•
%'*"'
thirty remaining only fifteen will be
KiiiK, UenrgTaiW
chosen as reporters," Sara H. llarkley,
'27, who has charge of the News club,
Wmlswnrlh, Miu-Biirel While, (lenet
said,
I HINDU
iif PL!')
Claw Kallierlni
of ltl»
Andrews, (Daily*
Promotions on both the business and Cornish,
Amine, Alexander
K
editorial staff of the NKWS will be made llaessler, I.ntU'11
!!;'m'di;., Kran,-es
Vivian
lliownhn'rdt, Mildred
purely on a basis of work done, it was CIleum.
n e , IJiuli
l!iCunaldilie.
.Mary
announced.
OnnJcli, Uertriula
The Quarterly promotions a r c also Moyle, (.owls
llllill, l.njs
I osjuo, Margaret
based on the number of contributions and Iliiiglnml,
Itlnnelie
Pfi.natjan, Marwii'ct
I he work done.
I IttliiiKfin, Until
The new Pedagogue board will lie lialvin, M.IIV
(illberr, Ncltlo
i.niiiijiT. Murcnco
chosen from a list submitted to the junior Kimball, Jcanelte
Hilda
r.'i'i'.'ie'v, Mildred
class al the class elections May 0. The Kllnliliarl,
<wi|i|>, MaiMiirei
Mclinwail. Catherine
Mieneci, Mary
list will comprise juniors, who since Kuruiiackcr, Arthur
l.eimnle. Until
Mnlli
Mm
September have been trying out for the l.ocUiard, Uiilh
Silverman. I„se|,h
M.IKCV. I'ivelyn
Pedagogue. The class of '28 will elect Alaslrlaiinl, Mary
•in editor-in-chief and business manager. iisliein. Klhel '
Oslrander, draco
The rest of the board will be chosen from Pane, Uo/illa
I'rnvnsf, Mnrgiircl
f i l V l l ' s , Al III ICi
llie eligible list by these officers.
Salmon, .losejili
Wilder, Marion
Constance Baumann, '27, is editor-in- Viets.
Helm
chief of the 1027 Pedagogue and Janet \ \ iM,iir ii. K l h c l
Wood, Sara
Handler, Ugje
Gow, '27, business manager.
VUIIIIK, Ihm.lhy
llarriiiclim, Catherine
llavko, Marie
ri,-i, of I'.
WILL NAME STAFFS
OF 3 PUBLICATIONS
IN APRIL AND MAY
SSfe
*8A
" BUS
pa;s ••
&"k&
PLAN FOR 150 COUPLES
AT '29 DANCE TONIGHT
i<ii'ise'lla."''ni«inas
lleelie, ileum
Robinson, P. Uiplon
.About 150 couples arc expected to at- (Vhi'a'ne,' Calvin
Conway, ficrlrmle
tend the sophomore soiree tonight in (be
gymnasium, according to Thomas P . Fallon, president.
Miss Betty Eaton is
chairman for the dance. Faculty members will be patrons and patronesses.
T h e Ladies H o m e J o u r n a l said, " I t
.'s allotted to few of us to write and
act well.
Mrs. H a l e is a m o n g the
small group to whom this gift has been
awarded.
Most of you never saw
her as Prossv in the first presentation
of George Bernard Shaw's 'Candida'
on this side of the water. W e did, and
we shan't ever forget it."
Since her stage debut as Prossy in
George Bernard Shaw's "Candida"
Mrs, Hale has created m a n y famous
stage personalities. W h e n the New- A meeting of the senior class will be
York Theatre Guild presented Ibsen's held in room B directly after assembly.
great drama " P e e r G y n t " it was A revole will be taken for the office of
Louise Closser H a l e wdio played the historian now lied between Arthur Laym o t h e r , Asa. When Zona Gale's
Other
prize winning play "Miss Lulu Belt" man and Edwin Van Klecck.
was first produced on the stage it was business will be taken up.
Louise Closser H a l e w h o played the
Lillian Ducll is in charge of a senior
querulous old mother, Grandma Bett. parly for Tuesday evening. The affair
In Eugene O'Neill's first long play to
reach production, " O n the Horizon," will start with a dinner in the cafeteria
Louise Closser Hale created the role ;it 5:30 o'clock. The dinner will cost
of the mother,
Quite a different fifty cents. Nettie Gilbert has secured
m o t h e r and now one of the oustanding special music. Helen Hynes has charge
characters in recent stage literature
was the role in Rachel Crothers' if the menu. After the dinner, the class
comedy "Expressing Willie" which was members will attend an informal getcreated by Mrs. Hale.
together party until 0:30 o'clock,
SENIORS VOTE TODAY;
HAVE PARTY TUESDAY
Wold] Shirley
/hum rmiiri. Esther
Sayles, areola
WILL CHOOSE VARSITY
DEBATE TEAM FRIDAY
Tryouts for positions on the debating team which will deflate Union colgc April 22 will be held next Friday
afternoon, beginning at 3:50 o'clock
in room 250. All men and women
students of all four classes a r e eligible
for the team.
Those who try out
will give live-niinule speeches on the
ubject, " R e s o l v e d ; T h a t an a m e n d ment to the federal constitution should
adopted giving C o n g r e s s t h e power
to enact marriage and divorce laws,"
Tryouts may speak on either side of
the question.
T h e debating council this week w a s
till awaiting formal acceptance by
Union of the exact subject of the debate. T h e council comprises President A. R, Hrubacher, Dr. H a r o l d W ,
Thompson, professor of English; M e -
lanie Grant, '27; Julia Fay, '27, and
Dcjvvin Van Klecck, '27, chairman.
STATE COLLEGE NESVB, MARCH 18, 1927
State College News
Est.uiLisiiEn DV THE'CLASS OF 1918
Tlid Undergraduate N'ewapnpcr of New York
State College for Tenchera
THE NEWS BOARD
SBNIOR ASSOCIATE KDITORS
KATHARINE BLKNIS, '27
JULIA FAY, '27
THELMA L. BRKZEE, '27
LOUISE l>. GUNN, '27
JUNIOR ASSOCIATE KDITORS
ADELAIDE HOLLISTER, '28
I-KI.A VAN SCHAICK, '28
MA*Y JUDITH LANODON, '28
DOROTHY WATTS, '28
REPORTERS
RUTH H. MCNUTT, '27
ROSE DRANSKY, '29
KENT PEASE, '27
MOLLIS KAUFMAN, '29
MAROARET PROVOST, '27
. , „ . . . ,,„_„ „.„
MAV
BERTHA ZAIAN, '27
^'«W*M. 29
KATHLEEN UOUOIITY, '28
FLORENCE KOKN, '29
RUTH FLANAGAN, '28
UESSIE I.AI-EDES, '29
MILDRED GABEL, '28
LORENA MARCUS, '29
RUTH G. MOORE, '28
F.LIZAIIETII PULVER, '29
GERTRUDE HRASLOW, '29
CAROLINE SCIILEICII, '29
VERA BELLE WELLOTT, '29
ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGERS
KRWIN L. BAKER, '27
DOROTHY HANDLON, '27
THOMAS P. FALLON, '29
ANNE HOLROYD, '28
FRANCIS 12, GRIFEIN, '28
MILDRED LANSLEY, 29
KATIIERINE SAXTON, '28
RUTH KEI.LEY, Assistant Subscription Manager
WILLIAM M, FRENCH, Director of Headline ami Copy-Heading C'asscs
SARA HARKLEY, Director of News Writing Class
WILLIAM M. 1'HK.VCII, Desk Editor
THELMA I.. MHKZEE, President, News Club; KIITII MOOIIB Vice-
Secretary-Treasurer
I'uh Ished every Friday In the college year by the Fditorial Board
Subscription, $.1.00 per
retires tiling (he Student Association.
ingle copies ten cents.
Delivered anywhere in the United
Entered as second class matter tit postofficc, Albany, N. V.
Slates
The News does not necessarily endorse sentiments expressed In
contributions. No communications will be printed unless the writers'
names are left with the Editor-in-Chief of the News. Anonymity
will be preserved if so desired.
SECOND
P R I Z E AS " A M E R I C A ' S B E S T TEACHERS
NEWSPAPER," C. S. P . A., 1927.
COLLEGE
PRINTED nv MILLS ART PRESS, 394-396 Broadway
Vol. X I , No. 25
ALBANY', N. Y., March 18, 1027
A SERVICE TO TEACHERS
The round titbit! conference of vicinity school men and
women to which the College will be host ;t week
front
tomorrow is a new custom which has proved its worth.
The conference was established three years ago by President
Brubacher,
ft is a short
meeting, lasting only
the morning and early afternoon.
Actual
COLLEGE BRIEFS
This Relieving World.
By Lewis Browne. $150. 347 pp.
New Y o r k : Macmillan.
Mr. Browne dedicates his remarkably interesting volume
to H. G. Wells. One finds much to prove that the author
is doing his model more than mere lip-service. For Wells
peeps out all over the book. T h e point of view is Wellsian;
so are some phases of the style; so is the thing as a whole.
The sub-title is "A Simple Account of the Great Religions
of Mankind." Of all of the many who in recent years have
attempted the popularization of subjects usually regarded as
difficult, few have done belter than Mr. Browne. Mis narrative style is forceful; one wishes for much more of the
same sort of thing. The author's conception of how religion
began is followed by a description of its development _ in
the ancient world, down through Judaism and the Christian
era. T h e authority of several scholars is given as additional evidence of the account's technical authenticity.
Miss Hazel Rowley, instructor in physics, spoke before Mathematics club
Thursday afternoon, concerning the life
of Sir Isaac Newton. The meeting was
largely social, being a St. Patrick's day
party. Refreshments were served,
_
EDWIN VAN KLEECK
Editor-in-Chief
Kappa Delta Kilo House, West 4314
HELEN ZIMMERMAN
Business Manager
858 MaillMcm Avenue, West 4046-R
VIRGINIA HicdfNS
Managing Editor
560 Washington Avenue, West 2006-J
SARA BARKI.EV
Associate Managing
Editor
5!) So. Lake Avenue, West 1695-J
THELMA TEMPLE
Subscription Manager
Psl Gamma House, West 2752
President; ANNE STAFFORD,'2U,
FOUR SPRING BOOKS, ALL DIFFERENT
BUT ALL OF THEM WORTH YOUR TIME
through
discussion of
existing problems rather than theorizing has been emphasized, and this is doubtless one reason why teachers are
willing to come to a conference on Saturday.
Aside from the benefit which the teaching profession is
undoubtedly receiving from these meetings, the College
itself gains.
State is well adapted to sponsor the conference and by
so doing it assumes another task that is reaping fruits.
The College gains in prestige and influence. It cannot do
too much of this sort of work.
Without distracting its
efforts from its main business of training prospective
teachers, it can give this aid and other similar help to
teachers in active service.
Undergraduates will do well
to attend as many of the sessions as they can.
"POUND FOOLISH"
State College students a r e more affluent than usually supposed, if the experience of the lost and found committee of
the campus commission is a reliable index. T h e committee
is finding it almost impossible to get the losers of fountain
pens, handbags, articles of dress, and even cash, to apply
for their possessions. The committee has less trouble urging those who find objects to turn them in than it has in
persuading those who have lost articles to apply for them.
Students have every right of course to be as careless as
they please with their belongings. And even after these
are lost, if students had rather go without them than sec
if they have been found, that is the students' privilege.
Hut it betokens a carelessness, a lack of economy, a waste
of valuable property.
THE BASKETBALL SEASON
The attendance predicted for the men's basketball dinner
tomorrow night is a testimonial to the pride which the
College feels in the unusually successful record of this
year's varsity basketball team. I t is no small achievement
to win eleven of twelve games. I t means much more than
the forty minutes spent on the floor in the actual games, I t
means hours of practice, observance of training rules, selfdenial and a high spirit of team play. T h e team and its
coach are to be congratulated upon their work.
SEE AND HEAR MRS. HALE
A n o t h e r o p p o r t u n i t y to h e a r w i t h o u t cost a valuable
and interesting lecture is offered S t a t e College s t u d e n t s
this evening. N o n e w h o follows t h e n e w s of t h e A m e r i can theater is unfamiliar with t h e n a m e of Louise Closser Hale, t h e talented c h a r a c t e r a c t r e s s , w h o will give
a popular lecture on " T h e A r t of M a k e - u p " t o n i g h t at
Chancellor's hall, T h e lecture is to be illustrated by
Mrs. Hale w h o will make up for several of h e r m o s t
successful stage parts and will depict short scenes from
these plays.
Children of the Morning.
By W . ' I . . George. $2.01). 305
pp. New Y o r k :
Putnam's.
We stayed up all night to read this book, a fact submitted
as indicative of the power of the story. We are still debating the degree of probability in Mr. George's hypothesis
of how civilization evolved—which suggests that there is
more than a story to this new novel. One hates to use the
word "gripping," yet it exactly fits this posthumous work.
Briefly, the tale is of the foundering off the coast of South
America of a small steamer which is carrying to safety the
refugees front a disaster. One boat, containing about
seventy children, is cast off before any adult can embark.
The children a r e the only survivors. They drift, living on
biscuit and water, till they run ashore on a deserted island
which a volcanic eruption, unknown to civilization, has
transformed from a swamp into a fruitful paradise with a
perfect climate. Fifty-nine children, aged between five and
eight, actually disembark.
I low they grow to maturity,
developing their own laws, their own conventions and customs, and their own language makes a (ale that is a miniature for what George believes (he world has done.
The Life ami Times of Martini llefflcthimiite.
By Frank
Sullivan. $2.00. 224 pp. New York: Botti and Liveright,
Being as how Frank Sullivan is a home-town product almost, having been raised up in Saratoga county, it is considerable of a relief to he able lo say without uiuhw poetic
license lhat the stock headline about "Local Boy Makes
Good in Big City" can be used again. The adventures of
Miss Hepplethwaite make the greatest appeal to our distorted sense of humor of anything we have read Ihis season
(with the possible exception of another little offering to be
noticed next week). W e advise you n o t ' t o be deceived
because Sullivan has chosen lo group all his newspaper
columns concerning Marlha I fepplethwaite into the first
third of this book and then to call the volume after her.
The meat of the nut isn't there. The best stuff is in the
assorted selections from his work for lite Ncn> York World
which fill the other two-thirds of the volume. Stale t Allege maidens who have acquaintances with inmates of the
institution on the hill in Troy, ,-r#d those who like to pretend the acquaintance, will he especially interested in the
skit entitled " T h e Handsomest Senior," recounting the history of Angus Mellinger Titwallow, handsomest senior in
the "Troy School of Mines," in 1027 and also in 1021, and
al (he Rhincheck Business college in 1018,
Hellnrioii.
By Rafael Sabalini. $2.50. 440 pp. Boston:
Houghton, Mifflin.
Having never readied the stage where we can either lake
or leave our Sabalini, we are not exactly the niosl dispassionate judge of liis latest effusion. Admitting in advance
everything you may be templed to say about Sabatini, we
slill maintain that he is a good vacation from the psctidohighbrow drivel that is clogging up the presses nowadays.
Sabatini did better with "Captain Blood' and "Searantottche"
than he has with "llellarion the Magnificent," hut nevertheless he has done well indeed with the latest. And "llellarion" is a welcome relief after " T h e Life of Cesarc
Borgia," Sabatini's much-lamented excursion from straight
romance into a biographical path, "llellarion" has been allowed to fill a few too many pages, but the author's gift
for holding suspense conquers even this handicap. The
extra length, however, makes this plot, even more than his
others, beyond condensation into a brief summary, The setting is Italy; the lime, the fifteenth century.
T H E S T U D E N T PRESS A S S O C I A T I O N
(From the Chrhniar Science Monitor)
But in behalf of 'he so-called scholastic press, entirely
apart from its professional standing and classification, it
may be said that il is accomplishing in its particular field
much that should he commended and encouraged, First of
all, it is qualifying both its editors and readers properly to
appreciate the standards which journalism has established,
and to discriminate, probably more keenly than would otherwise be possible, between the indifferent or vicious and the
worthy or excellent. It is wcrth much to the rising generation of Americans, as well as lo the people of the world
at large, to learn lhat the newspaper, as a finished product,
does not simply "happen," Il reflects, as an entity, as well
as day by day, some ideal, si me purpose, to which those
responsible for its publication are more than casually committed and for which they continuously and cheerfully work.
The soldier of fortune seldom unreservedly enlists in
journalism.
He realizes thai whatever rewards may be
earned therein come only after years of unselfish aiui devoted service. T h e desire for what some unwisely call the
privilege of self-expression attracts many for a 'lime, but
satisfying realization comes only to those who see in their
Opportunity that which is greater than an indulgence in saving something which they hope someone will read. It may
be said concerning the m„'-ing of newspapers, as concerning the making of hooks, that of it there is no end.
No doubt it will be agreed lhat the young men and voting
women in the colleges, universities and high schools' who
have been associated with the publication of scholastic
p.'pcrs and magazines will be, after their graduation, if not
before, the really diseriminalJi• readers of current literature. The background gained by even a brief experience
as editors and contributors will afford a proper and true
perspective from which they can view and appraise more
pretentious journals. As their numbers increase they will
be able to dictate, in no small degree, the character of' those
publications which seek to appeal for their favor and patronage. Already this j u r y is one of formidable proportions,
A special meeting of the club was
called this week lo approve of candidates
for membership,
B a u m a n n S p e a k s a t Services
Meiiorah society conducted the lenteu
services yesterday morning at 7:45
o'clock in Room D. Constance Baumann, '27, had charge.
The Jewish interpretation of the subject, "All Races Have a Form of yVorship," was the topic Miss Baumann primarily stressed ethics.
Be.la flyman, '27, sting heforc and
.liter the services.
i?ead C h e m i s t r y P a p e r s
Anaesthesia was explained to the
Chemistry club last Friday by Felix
e'esta, '^8. Nina Handy, '2,7, read a
paper on the hydrogen atom and Francis E, Griffin, '28, described the effect
of Chemistry in medicine.
MYSKANIA DETERMINES
STATUS OF SOCIETIES
Sectet societies here are divided inio
three classes by a new ruling of My.
skauia, the honorary governing body.
They a r e :
Myskauia in one class;
Otnicroii Nu. the honorary secret society of students of home economics, and
the Herodotus club composed of a
limited number of history students, in a
second class. The third class includes
sororities and fraternities.
Departmental honor secret societies
will all be placed in the second class.
T h e need for the definition of the
status was due lo the difficulty of classifying the secret societies in the Pedagogue, Ruth H. McNutt, '27, a member
of Myskauia, told the senior-sophomore
assembly
Friday.
The classification
tinder the ruling will he first made in
the 1928 Pedagogue, she said.
KIRTLAND ERECTS BOX
FOR FROSH QUESTIONS
A question box for freshmen has been
placed on the wall near the door lo
room 111 by .Professor R. II. Kirlland
of the education department. Questions
on religion and evolution a r c excluded.
Other questions puzzling the freshmen
will be discussed in the division of the
freshman orientation course from which
Visit D u d l e y O b s e r v a t o r y
they come.
Professor Kirtlaiitl thinks
Canterbury
club
and the Voting thai this system will clear up many subjects
not
understood
by entering students.
People's Fellowship society of St, Andrew's
Protestant
Episcopal
church
/(sited the Dudley observatory last eveu,ng and examined the sky through the
.argc telescope there.
TTIE ^HEATED
-1 P l a y g o e r A V
By
W o r k for Merit B a d g e s
'I he citizen scout troop will start
work on (he pioneer merit-badge WedThe tragedy "Mansions" by I hide
nesday evening at 7:30 o'clock, under the garde Planner, presented by' the ad
direction of Miss J. Isabella Johnston, in- winced dramatics class last week re
structor in physical education and scout deemed itself at the lasl moment by a
captain, and Dorothy Hoyt, '24. Any remarkable effective
closing.
As a
College girl may attend the meetings, whole, however, the play lacked the in
according to Mildred Wilson, '27, scout creasing tension of tragedy; ihe pace was
i.eiitenant,
jerky and unsatisfying.
Jane Greene.
[27, as "Lydia" was sincere'and ennvinc
L e a v e for C a m p Cogswell
ng in her good moments, Her somewhat
however,
Another group of members of the laborious type of diction,
Girls' Athletic association will leave to- seemed to he responsible for the lack of
variety in her speeches.
Lois Dunn.
day for Camp Cogswell.
"Now that spring has come the hiking '27, in the role of "Aunt Harriet" preat the camp should he especially enticing," sented an adequate interpretation, while
'27, chairman of Ward Cole, '30, as "Joe' managed a
Helen
Tompkins,
somewhat difficult pari very well. The
G. A. A, week-end parties, said,
play was well cast.
In "Matinata" by Lawrence Laiutner,
Play at Theater
The orchestra of Dorothy Rabie, '28, sprightly dialogue combined with (lie
ever-popular
Pierrot-Columbine theme lo
is appearing all this week as an added
attraction at the Eagle moving picture afford a restless college atitleiice a play
theater, Eagle street and Hudson avenue. of ready appeal. Beatrice Wright, '28, as
The orchestra is comprised of five mu- Columbine twinkled through the charming role with a good deal of success; ;,ud,
sicians, all women.
playing opposite, Lillian Eckier, '11, as
lazy 1'ierrot, drew almost a full meat,
A l u m n a Visits H e r e
lire of laughs, In the role of Harlequin,
Mrs. Harold Blessing, Schenectady, the pleasing diction of Edna Wolfe, '28,
formerly Beth Oglebee, '20, and Mrs. combined with a wry satisfying inter
James
McGec of South
Belhlehein nrcialioii offered a good charactorizaliou
(Alice Houghton, ' 2 5 ) , visited the home of ihe traditional phantasy villain.
economics department Tuesday,
Tins PLAVOOKH
Is Teaching Instinct Hereditary? Parents
And Sisters Of Many Students Here Teach
If your father or your mother or both
were teachers, it is a safe guess lhat this
is one reason why you chose State College for your Alma Mater. Whether or
not a fondness for teaching is itself inherited, the atmosphere of a family one
or both parents of which have taught is
conducive to the desire to secure a college education, and indirectly to practicing teaching as a profession.
One of the examples of an hereditary
leaching instinct is found in Adelaide 1.
Hollister, '27, of Corinth, whose father
.s now a superintendent of schools and
whose maternal grandmother and several great-aunts attended State College
when it was a normal school.
Both parents of Lilian M. MacGrcgor,
'28, of Johnson City have taught. Mrs,
Clarence Shu. the former Eva Deitz, '28,
had two teachers among her immediate
family. They were her mother and her
mother's sister. The same is true of
Alma and Lucy Terpentine, '27, of Albany.
Interesting are the cases in which
teachers arc found in one branch of a
family and not in the other.
Dorothy
Geclncy, '28, of Cocyman's Hollow, and
Lucy Milas, '20, of Amsterdam, furnish
examples of this kind. Miss Gcdnev's
grandmother, her grandmother's sister
and her grandmother's two children, a
boy and a girl, all have taught.
Miss
Gedncy's brother also has taught. Miss
M.las had three great-uncles
maternal aunts in the profession.
Two students, Wanda Mallin, '28, of
Schenectady, and Helen Bcehee, '28, of
Sag Harbor, have sisters who are teaching.
Many students here have had
sisters graduated from State College.
F.thclyn Wilkins, '20, of Newburgh;
Margaret Bitmap, '30, of Old Forge;
Phcbe Mersereau, '30, of I'.ndicoti; and
Ruth Lentmle, '27, of Albany, arc among
the number.
Helen M. Kilhurn, '28, of Lowvilh
belongs to the class win have a in ib
cousins, and more distant relatives ii
the field.
From the limited examples which have
been listed, it is obvious that a really
thorough and extended search of records
would bear out the theory of hereditary
and environmental influence of relatives
who are teachers upon Stale College students.
Music courses will probably be omitted
from the curriculum of the .summer session', according to Professor Winfred C.
Decker, head of the German department
and director of the summer session. The
library school will offer courses for
school librarians at the Stale Education
building, he announced.
"Plans and appropriations for Ihe summer session a r e along ihe same lines as
hist year," he declared. " T h e summer
session is fundamentally for teachers in
the service."
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 18, 1927
HOW STATE COLLEGE PRODUCES THE SECOND BEST TEACHERS COLLEGE NEWSPAPER IN THE UNITED STATES
State Readers Like Poetry, Drama Best;
Students Read Etiquette Boohs Steadily
Stale College students arc interest yd in
books oilier than their ordinary texts, according in a survey made by Miss Alary
l£, 1,'ohh, librarian.
"Aside from regular collateral reading, students here seem to like poetry
and drama best," explained Miss Cobb,
Wednesday.
"Diogrnpliy, psychol >gy,
and mythology are much in demand,
while books on such subjects as musical
appreciation, stunts, and etiquette have
a steady circulation."
The most popular literary magazines
are: Atlantic Monthly, Harpers, Scribncrs, and The Century. Of tile weekly
reviews the Literary Digest, the N'at.ou,
and the Outlook- are used most.
Among the monthlies and quarterlies
Current History Magazine, Review of
i Reviews, World's Work, North America
Review and the Yale Review take ihe
lead. Others such as The Theatre,
Drama, Scientific American, and the National Geographic are used extensively.
"The most popular text books depend
entirely on "quizzes and papers assigned,"
explained Miss Cobb. "History 2 mill
Education 1 have the largest circulation.
Other classes have periods of great library activity, and then periods of depression. One day the demand is for
'Smith's Industrial and Commercial
Geography,' Another day it might be
Chubb's 'Teaching of Knglish,' Jiryce's
or 'American Commonwealth,'
Home Economics Seniors Learn Home Duties;
Entertain, Tend Furnace And Prepare Meals
News Delegates Interview Dr. John Finley;
Van Kleech Discusses Publication Financing
at Ihe next convention, The prizes will
he for writers.
The new contest- will n ward the
writers of the best news f ,ry, short
fiction story, poem, essay and editorial
published during the coming year in
magazines or newspapers which are
members of the association.
The convention voted to hold its next
conference at Columbia in March, 1928,
and to continue the officers who have
guided it since its organization.
(Coiiiinueil from I'liito Olio)
The Journal will receive a silver lov-| the NEWS delegate
„
-jimcclecl with the
big cup. The NTws and the winnei
lilorial deportment, Van Kleeck, Miss
first and second honorable mention will liarkley and Miss llrez.ee, were chosen
be given certificates. First honorable for Ibis work. All three contributed
mention went to the College Chronicle, signed stories of speeches given at the
St. Cloud Teachers college, St. Cloud, convention.
Minn. Second went to the Eagle, lliadFinancial problems of teachers college
ron State Normal college, Chadrou, Neb. papers predominated at the round-table
The preliminary judges for the 1927 discussion for the normal school and
e intest were Edith Simpson and Harry teachers college papers, led by Van
K. Dorsclt, Teachers college; Laurence Kleeck. Mechanical details of publicali. Goodrich and L. .1. Reeverls, Colum- tion, subscription and circulation probbia university; Gallic Turner, Margaret lems were also discussed.
M. Ilrophy' and Marion A. O'Ncil,
in
The News Hound, the NEWS' "house
I'alcrson, N. I., and fane Shouba, Jun- irgan," published an enlarged issue this
ior High school, New Rochelle, N. j .
week including details of a icw of the
Final judges were Edith M. Penney, several score of speeches delivered to
llronxvillc High school; II. Wilson Ihe convention by speakers nationally
Lloyd, "The llronxvillc Press;'' Robert prominent in school and professional
Creswoll, of the Gerald Tribune; F. j journalism.
44 No. Pearl
Eraser lloiid, professor of journalism,
Dr. John If. Finley, former president
Columbia university; lloxie X. Fair- if the Slate College trustees and former
child, professor of English, Columbia state education commissioner, was prinuniversity; Dorothy .Scarborough, pro- cipal speaker at the convention dinner
fessor of English, Columbia university, Friday night at the iFftb Avenue resand Ida M. Rodgers, elementary super- taurant. He sought out the Stale Colvisor, Mount Vernon, N. V.
lege delegates and chatted with them
Values at $ 6 . 5 0
The most distant entries in the con- for some time. Dr. Finley is on the
tests were from Hawaii, Alaska and X'KWS' mailing list and he surprised the
England. The prize winning issues of delegates by inquiring concerning ihe
the NKWS, those of January 14, 21 and outcome of the paper's editorial campaign
If you see ONE
2.S, were exhibited with several hun- against the Intcrsorority ruling. He
You'll Know It's a
dred copies of the -Kill other papers en- said he had been following the progress
tered. Some of the other entries in the of the campaign.
teachers college class which were chose
The delegates stopped at the Hotel
for exhibit were from Virginia, South McAlpin. Thursday night they attended
at 18 Steuben St.
Dakota, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Dis- George White's "Scandals." Saturday
Whether it's a Shingle Bob
trict of Columbia, North Carolina and afternoon some saw the special performA Swirl Bob or
Minnesota.
ance of "Hetty Behave," the Columbia
A Peacock Bob
The total attendance at the conven- Varsity show for 1027, at the Waldorftion reached 1,150 students. From these Astoria. Friday night after the con- We Specialize in Hot Oil Scalp and
about twenty were picked to edit the vention dinner the)' made a bus tour of
Hair Treatment
Saturday special convention edition of Manhattan, followed by a trip through Two (2) Expert Marcellers Always in
the Columbia Spectator, the Columbia the plant of the New York Times.
Attendance
college daily newspaper. The three of
Five additional prizes will be awarded
For Appointment, Call Main 7034
SPRING STYLE
FEAREY'S
are stunning
Seniors in the home economies de- >f ihe records, and supervises the other
partment learn how to care for the horn, workers.
of a family In moderate circumstances,
The assistant manager has complete
at the practice house of the home ecocare of the living area of the house, .if
nomics department.
the porches and the steps. She cares
The house is maintained for the pur- for the cleaning equipment, supervises
pose of developing an appreciation of special cleaning, looks after house launhomo life, Guilt standards of courtesy,
hospitality, and social graces, or what dry, assists the manager with marketing
constitutes an approved standard of liv- and helps wash dishes.
The housekeeper prepares (he meals,
ing.
takes care of food, the kitchen, pantry
I lie house and lurnishings represent a.id icebox.
the type of home which might he estabThe assistant housekeeper assists in the
lished by a family of moderate means
with ideals calling fur a good standard preparation of meals, looks after dining
room, silver and extra linen. She also
of living.
acts as waitress and assists in dish washThe resident students cannot devote ing.
their entire time to duties of the home
'1 hose duties are rotated so that each
because they are required to continue student
has practice in each position.
their other studies. An average of two
The
girls are allowed to invite guests
hours a day is allowed for house work. and occasionally
The number of duties corresponds and large groups. they entertain faculty
with the number of girls in the resiThe house is operated on a budget
dence. At present the house has a
and all expenditures are limited.
manager, an assistant manager, a plan
All
such as telephone and food are
housekeeper and an assistant house- paid bills
by the manager during her term and
keeper. The manager acts as host- records
are kept in permanent form,
ess, handles the money, tends the
le house is self-supporting as the stufurnace, does the pruchasing, takes care dents pay for their room and board.
ONE DOLLAR AND ONE MINUTE!
THERE is no QUICKER place or no BETTER way to
start S A V I N G than to come to our New Account window T O D A Y — J U S T
give the man
in charge
Your
N A M E — Y o u r M O N E Y a n d in O N E minute YOU will
have a Savings Account E A R N I N G for YOU!
Interest rate 4 J/2 per cent, c o m p o u n d e d quarterly from
the day of deposit.
First Q U A R T E R L Y
period
April 1st.
LEONE
CITY SAVINGS BANK
100 State Street,
Albany, N. Y.
TBACH FROM LIFE,
PROFESSOR URGES
WAS CHAIRMAN FOR NEWMAN CAfcE SALE
Miss Winched Sees'Uhe Child
Development Movement
As Significant
Thinking teachers realize their work
is not limited to teaching reading, writing and arithmetic, but that the social
life of the school
room and playground could be
one of the best
means of teaching
the essentials of
good citizenship,
according to Professor Florence E.
Winchcll, head of
the home economics department.
'
"The child dcL
MMiJL A
velopmcnt and par"** a^aa^ 'sm e „t education movcProfossor Winchell
men
t
Helen Zimmerman, '27,
Vice-President
of
Newman Club.
who
.Had Charge of
Its Annual
St Patrick's Day
Sale
Yesterday
is bound to
set us thinking," Miss Winchell said.
"Of course mothers of growing children
arc immediately aroused because of their
present problems. They never have questioned their responsibility for training
their own children.
"The old psychology, however, gave
them some comfort at discouraging perCourtesy Albany Evening News
iods in that heredity settled irrevocably
much of the personality of the individual,
Whatever went amiss with the child
OFFER $25,000 PRIZES
could be laid at the door of "an uncle
Two awards of $25,000 each are
on his father's side" or "a queer streak"
offered to the young men and women
in some other hereditary strain.
j
in the United States for the best essays
"The new experimental psychology, on
the other hand, is making a very differon
"Vyiiat Woodrow Wilson Means to
Jennie Alatbias, '84, is superintendent
ent distribution of credit and blame for
Me." The essays must not be more than
of
a
Spanish
school
at
Los
Angeles,
Cal.,
the development of the individual peroperated by the Women's Home -Mis- 2,500 words in length and should seek
sonality.
society of the Methodist Epis- to appraise the ideals and principles of
"But now we find we must go sli sionary
copal church. The school offers a Wilson from the writer's standpoint.
further. Every mother knows that what- twelve
year
course to about 125 Mexican
ever her skill and elTorts may achieve girls. Uue to
The awards will be made by the
the supervision of reports
in management of her children all may and the preparation
the reopening Woodrow Wilson foundation of New
go for naught because of the lack of of the school buildingsforeach
York
city.
year,
Miss
understanding of other members of her Mathias has too short a vacation to perfamily. Father, sisters and brothers, mit a trip east to College reunions.
grandparents,, employed help, guests in
MARION CONKLIN, '29,
the home, all make up the family life
that molds the child from birth. A Teaches Negro Girls
COMPOSES NEW MUSIC
Sabrina
Gaylord,
'17,
has
charge
of
mother, however intelligent and painstaking cannot single handed do justice the teacher training class in Allen home,
Marion
Conklin, '29, now has the dito the training of her children. To get an accredited high school for negro stinction of being a composer as well
results she must have the understanding girls in Asheville, N. C. This is her as a talented musician. Miss Conklin,
cooperation of all who come in contact first year in the field after training at a member of the harmony class taught by
the Foltz Mission institute, Herkimer.
with the child.
T. Frederick II. Caudlyn, instructor in
"The study of family life as an edumusic, wrote the best music to the words
Surveys
Pittsburgh
Schools
cational situation is coming rapidly to
of "O My Deir llert," taken from the
Thomas E. Fiuegan, '89, is conducting Oxford Hook of Poems, At the Music
the attention of the public. Clinics for
the examination of problems arising in a survey of the Pittsburgh schools, The association concert, February 17, in the
the lives of children from all types of aim is to obtain the best judgment pos- College auditorium, Miss Conklin played
homes have been established in connection sible for the practices and policies which her song, which Grace Chippendale sang.
are being carried out in the school adwith many colleges and universities,"
As a reason for her ability to coinministration.
pose, Miss Conklin said, "1 love music
and get much enjoyment out of it."
VARSITY WON'T PLAY
Writes on Theology
C. Stuart Gager, '97, has recently
GET YOUR SODAS AFTER
R. P. I. NEXT SEASON written
a book, "The Relation Between
THE GAME
State College for Teachers' basketball Science and Theology; How to Think
schedule for the early part of next sea- About it." "It is well enough," Dr.
at the
son is already complete and the Teachers Gager says, "to leave it to the evolutionwill therefore be unable to play Rens- ist to tell us whence we came and to the
THE
COLLEGE
selaer Polytechnic institute at Troy De- theologian to tell us whither we arc
cember 10, as the Troy management had going. Of course neither one knows
PHARMACY
requested. This announcement was made inything about it; but the scientist has
today by Thomas P. Fallon, assistant learned something about how we origiThe Corner Drug Store
manager of the Purple and Gold. Fal- nated. If we arc wise we shall eagerly
lon has notified the Troy management tccept all that he can tell us; it is none
Open Nights Until 12 o'clock
that the State team will be glad to play too much," Dr. Gager received his
Western and Lake Aves.
doctor's degree from Cornell in l'J02.
R. P. I. later in the season.
One Block West
COLLEGE BRIEFS
PRAISES COMMISSION
"PLENTY TO DO" IS
The NEWS has received the following
MRS. FREAR'S VIEW
letter from Mildred A, Wilson, '27, director of the campus commission:
ON WAY TO FRANCE
"t wish to thank you for helping juake
Professor Florence E. Winchell, head
the campaign of the campus commission of the home economics department, rea success by your indispcnsiblc NEWS ceived a letter from Mrs. Florence D.
Frear, instructor in home economics,
articles.
who with her daughter is on sabbatical
"f wish to pass oil the congratulations leave
in Europe.
given the campus commission by Dr.
Describing the voyage to Prance, Mrs.
Urubachcr.
Frear said: "I cannot believe we have
had six line days like this. It could not
be possible in mid-winter.
LIBRARY GETS "WHO'S
"A jazz band, an orchestra, two packof magazines, two books, and ten
WHO," OTHER BOOKS ages
pounds of nuts and candy have proSeveral new books, including the vided plenty to do. What more could
latest edition of "Who's Who in mortals desire?"
During the latter part of the trip the
America," have been added to the College library. The list announced by sea was rather rough, and to solve the
Miss Alary Elizabeth Cobb, librarian, in- diflicully Mrs. Frear tells how the
cludes: Bradford's "Darwin," Drigg's stewards placed rocks and wet table
"Curriculum Problems," Gorman's "A cloths on the table to keep dishes from
Victorian American," Lindsay's "Going slipping,
Victorian American," Lindsay's "GoIn concluding her letter Mrs. Frear
iiig-To-thc-Stars," Lodge's "Relativ- said, "Much love lo each and all of you
ity." Reave's "Pupil Adjustment in and greetings to our dear home economJunior and Senior High Schools," ics girls. May this semester be the best
"Easy Lessons in Einstein," Other in pleasure and profit they have ever
books recently purchased are Teasdale's
"Dark of the Moon," Terman and
Lima's "Children's Reading," Uhl's
"Principles of Secondary Education,"
"Who's Who in America, 1926-27,"
Wilde's "Eight Comedies for Little
Theatres,'1 The history 5 class has preRELIABLE MEATS
sented Hughes' "George Washington."
L. A. BOOKHIEM
CLASS USES DINING ROOM
Sophomores in the foods class who
are unable to do their laboratory work
at home are allowed to use the small
dining room at College.
Three
"families," each composed of two students and four faculty members, dine
there Monday, Tuesday and Friday
nights.
and FRESH KILLED
POULTRY
Special Attention. Given
to Sorority Houses
West 1837
846 Madison Ave,
Cor. Ontario St.
STUDENTS ATTENTION
Use your spare hours and have profitable steadily
increasing income selling highclass articles worn by everybody. You can establish steady well paying trade among
your fellow students as well as others.
N. Y. CITY
153 WEST 72nd. ST. BOSTON1AN Mfg. Co.
CLOTHES
Ready-mad*
And Cut to Ordar
ESTABLISHED ENGLISH UNIVERSITY
STYLES, TAILORED OVER YOUTHFUL
CHARTS SOLELY FOR DISTINGUISHED
SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES.
;(fUwtevJ§ott*e
Suits and Topooala
•40, »45, *50
Flaming College Youth" Version Not True"'Dependable Flowers"
At State; Most Students Utilize Free Time
We Telegraph Flowers to all Parts
''Flaming college youth," is not quite
so hot as it is painted, according to the
average student at State College. While
college life is sometimes painted as a
four-year loaf with an occasional attendance at classes, if the student wakes
up early enough in the morning, a series
of all night parties and other social
events, the student body here is unable
to discover among its ranks any group
that is able to enjoy these spices of
life.
More than 75 per cent of the student
body are in some way or another employed in free hours from college. One
ambitious youth is a substitute teacher
in the Albany High school every morning for five full periods, instructs
Americanization classes in night school,
teaches two history quiz divisions on
Saturday morning and still finds time
to attend classes and make his grades.
Several of the men students are employed as "soda dingers" in the various
confectionery emporiums of the city and
not a fjew are nurse-maids to furnaces.
One of the chief occupations of the women is what is known as "babying" or
taking care of children in the afternoon
or evening when their mothers are enjoying a few hours' recreation.
A large percentage of the women also
work for their board and room by cooking, washing dishes or helping with general housework in the homes in which
they reside and still others are employed
by the College in various capacities.
Some as secretaries, others as telephone
operators and still others in the cafeteria.
Several of the men are employed as
chauffeurs, one is serving an apprenticeship in a local printing establishment,
while others work in the laboratories
of the College arranging apparatus and
cleaning up after the classes are through.
One young man is a recreational director in charge of a group of boys.
Local newspapers employ students to
serve as correspondents to keep them
posted on the doings of the student body.
Almost every student at State has
three or four classes to attend every day
and to prepare for by outside study and
reading each night and very few, if any
students, find time to enjoy the gay life
of the story book collegian,
Of the World
BY SPECIAL
APPOINTMENT
OUR STORE IS THE
(Jtmrtev louse
STEUBEN STREET
Corner James
Phone Main 3775
OF ALBANY,
WINTER SPORT GOODS
Sweaters
Hiking Breeches
Riding Habits
Towers college slickers
C. H. GILLEN'S
I
The character of the suits and
overcoats tailored by Charter House
will earn your most sincere liking.
Steefel Brothers
INC.
Next to Post Office
ARMY-NAVY-CAMP
SmSmm
*
jj
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 18, 1927
ALUMNA DIES
Mrs. Sherman L, lidding (Mary
I.ukens, '92), a charter member of
Delia Omega, died at her home, 375
M.uith Manning Boulevard, Thursday,
March 10. She was the mother of
Kuiily Belding, '24, Mrs. Melding was
graduated from the kindergarten
training department of the Slate Normal
College, Funeral services were Satur-
17 WINS IS STATE'S
GREEK NOTES FLANAGAN COMPOSES
MUSIC FOR COMEDY
RECORD IN 18 GAMES
Delta Omega entertained Ellen Watson, ex-'25, over the week-end. Miss
vvatsou is dietitian at Cornell ltnivcr-
Griffin I s Outstanding S t a r
In Buffalo ; Meet, Roughest £
Annoimce Engagement
Of Season Here
Till1 victory Saturday nighl of the
varsity basketball team over .Buffalo
Stak' Teachers College marked (lie
seventeenth win of the Purple and Gold
in its last eighteen games. It also closed
victoriously the most successful season
(lie College leant has had in years A
good-sized crowd saw the game in the
College gymnasium. It was Suite's
eleventh victory in a row lli'is season.
Stale also won the last six games of
last year's schedule.
After living held on virtually even
terms in the fir's I half, Stale entered
the last sianza with a rush, scoring a
27 to 1-1 victory. The Purple and Cold
romped away in the second half, outplaying and otitscoring its opponents.
'I he game was the roilghtesl played on
llie court litis year.
The first half was marked by frequent passing, each side breaking up il
rivals attack time and again, until about
the middle of the period when Buffalo
scored the first field basket. The battle
continued 10 be a see-saw affair, first
one team having the edge and then the
other taking the lead, 'flic half ended
with the Purple and Cold leading by one
point, III in D,
Crillin, Stale's right forward, was
the outstanding player in point scoring,
account-iiu I'm' six field baskets. Kuczvnski, Klein and ('arr also played well.
Klein preventing llie Bisons from scoring
., number of limes. Bell collected seven
points for Buffalo.
The Bunnies defeated llie Young Men s
Hebrew association juniors by a score
of IS to 1.1 in a preliminary game.
FACULTY NEWS
T. Prederick II. Caucllyn, Instructor
in music, with the hoys' choir of St.
Pauls Kpiscop;,l church took pail in llie
•ouimunitv sing at Chancellor's hall
.Monday. '
To Meet Child Study Group
Mi-s Elizabeth II. Morris, assistant
professor of philosophy, will mcel the
child study group of the American University Women's society Tuesday, to
answer ipieslioiis based on her lecture
Menorali society may present a play Lfiven before II I'Vbrnary 22.
ibis spring if proposals discussed at flic
meeting of the society Wednesday are
carried out, No definite plans have been Chaperone Milne Dance
John M. Sayles, professor of seconmade. Mildred I.. I'awel, the president,
dary education and principal of Milne
said.
High
school, Miss Anne I., dishing, and
Dr. Myron W. Jacobs of 'I roy will
speak It) the Mi rah society Wednesday, .\I is^ Katheriiie E. Wheeling, supervisors
if practice leaching, chaperoned die
March ,30,
„ ,
"Whv Europe Dislikes the Jew by Q. 'I'. S. A. dance in the gymnasium
Isatlore Bard is the title of an article Friday night.
in the current issue of Harper's magazine, which was summarized and com- Miss Winchell To Broadcast
Professor Florence E, Winchell, head
mented upon by Bertha Pitkin, '29, at
the society's meeting Wednesday in of ihe home economics department, will
broadcast
from station WGY, Schenec• room B.
.
Dorothy Warshaw, '30, summarized tady. April 7, at 2:45 o'clock. Her
tin KiKiiilu ui.-e and promise :;l lilt Me topic will lie, "Homes—Kilts or Safely
iiorali conference In Id recently in New Zones." 'flu's will be the first of a
York City. She used as her source a series of six talks given under the ausreport in llie Menorali Journal, a paper p'ces of Ihe eastern district of Ihe Home
of nation circulation among college Jew- Economics association.
ish organizations.
The subject of I'un'in was enlarged Dean Gives Education Course
Dean William H. Melzlcr conducts
upon by Elizabeth friend, '28,
a course in tin: "Philosophy of Education" in Albany.
MENORAH MAY GIVE
PLAY THIS SPRING;
JACOBS WILL SPEAK
WILL ISSUE WARNINGS
AFTER MID-SEMESTERS TO HOLD ORAL CREDIT
Warning notices from the dean's office
TESTS THIS AFTERNOON
will he issued about two weeks alter the
mid-semesler examinations, according to
Dean William II. MeUler.
The examinations were begun tins
week, and will continue nest week. No
definite time for the tests is set by llie
administrative officers.
SKINNER'S
Fay, Street, Temple, McNutt
Write Principal Parts Of
"OnT he Fence".
I'.la I •In" sorority announces the enRuth Mc.Vult, '27, director of the
gagement ol Aileeii A. Wallace, '2-1, to
c.harlcs li. Button, '-M, University of musical comedy "On the Fence," said
Vermont. Miss Wallace is leaching in yesterday it will have one of the largest
casts ever to present a State College
iVliddletown,
production, The show will be next Friday anil Saturday nights. A feature of
Kappa Delta Rho Alumni Dine
J hirtceii alumni of Camilla chapter .he production will be that it is entirely
Peg
of Kappa Delta Rho fraternity met a Slate College undertaking.
.Saturday afternoon for dinner at the I'lanagan, '27, editor-in-chief of the Stale
United Fraternity clubs, New York city, u'on has written the music and arranged
fhey attended a theater parly after the .he orchestration. The theiile song is
dinner. Edwin Van Klceck, '27, repre- "Then You'll Eciiieinber.' Julia bay,
sented the active chapter,
27; iVIarcella Street, '27; Thehna Temple, '27; and J<!u(h Mi;.\ull, '27, were the
irincipals in the writing and constructPi Alpha Tau Initiates
I'i Alpha Tail welcomes into full nieni- ing of ihe plot. Miss McNittt is Ihe director
and is assisted by Kuili Kelley,
oersh.p licrtrudc Uloeckner, '30, Mae
Jlocekner, ',«); Kose Handler, MO; Gert- 28. Miss Pay is stage manager and is
rude Holtman, '29; Bertha Nathan, '30; assisted by Chrissie Curtis, '28,
I'rieda Sliadrinsky, '30; Sally Shapiro,
Miss Elanagan will have a leading
.it); ami into pledge membership, Ida male pari. Marjoric Young, '28, and
V'encr, '30.
Helen Slone, '29, will also have important parts.
Phi Delta Entertains
The program, in part is; Dancing,
Miss Mary Gtlince, who was a week- jhorus, the St reel Cleaners; chorus, Reend guesl at the Phi Delia house, was ducers; chorus, Co-op stall'. Solos will
jiilcrlaincd al bridge Saturday afternoon je given by the following: Miss Slone,
iy the members of Alpha chapter. Miss Miss Young, and Miss I'lanagan,
iiu'iiie is president of the Beta chapter
.Students will not be admitted on tax
of Phi Delta al New York university.
.ickels. Reserved seals will be sold for
nfty cents, and noil-reserved for thirty-
The state examination for oral credit
in modern languages will be this afternoon from 1:15 lo -I o'clock in rooms
302 and 303, according to Professor
Charlotte Loch, head of the French
department.
6
TWO IRISH PLAYS ARE
PRESENTED BY CLASS
The advanced dramatics class presented two Irish plays last night in the
i.tidiloriuin. "In the Shadow of the
lien," written by .1. M. Synge was directed by Julia Pay, '27. The cast injltitled Arvid Unrkc, '28; Mary Calvin,
'27; l.ouis WVilner, '30; and~Michae!
I'cpcdino, '2'J. "In ihe Land of Heart's
Desire" by William Butler Yeats, was
die oilier play. Agnes Holleran, '27, directed Ihe play. Melaiiie Grant, '27:
Ruth Lane, '28; Mary Merchant, '27;
lareiice Nephew, '28; Robert Shillingl:iw. '27: and Wallace Strevell, '29, were
the cast.
REV. SWAN ENDS TALKS
ON ANCIENT RELIGIONS
The Rev. Harry J. Swan, assistant
pastor of the Fourth Presbyterian church,
completed a series of lectures on ancient
creeds with a lecture on Confucianism
and Mohammedanism, before the College
Y. W. C. A., Thursday evening, March
10, at 7:30 o'clock.
Mr. Swan discussed the life of Confucius, his beliefs, his teachings, and
"The Great Learning.''
Mohammed and a comparison of the
Koran wilh the Bible were also considered by Mr, Swan.
ARTISTIC PLEATING
I STITCHING CO.
We Do
Hemstitching, All Kinds of Pleating, Buttonholes, Rhinestones,
Hand Embroidery
58 Columbia St.
Cor. No. Pearl St.
NAMES MARSHALS FOR
ASSEMBLY REGULATION
EXCLUSIVE
Albany, N. Y.
PRINTING
To facilitate passing from the weekly
assemblies, two marshals have been appointed from each class by Myskania.
These marshals will have charge of their
Tspective classes when the classes leave
issemhl.'es. The presiding officer In the
.iscmbly will give (he passing signals to
"GOOD EVENING, UNCLE llie
marshals who will be in charge of
classes.
BEN" IS SHOW'S TITLE their
Those appointed are: Margaret Pabsl,
"Good Evening, Uncle Ben" i: l he '27: Gertrude Swetimaiin, '27: Kdna
336 C E N T R A L A V E .
play to be presented by llie men's n i i i i Wolfe, '28; Dorothy Rowland, '28; Mary
•irels troupe, April 23. Rehearsal a i'i Hart, '20; Agues McGarly, '20; Mary
Phone W e s t 2037
now being held. Alexander Amine '27. Nelson, '3D; and Katheriiie Walkins, '30.
and Lloyd Pishhaugh, '28, will give
solos. Gilbert E. Gauniig, '28, wi II be
interlocutor.
A medley of college songs will open
the program, and a uiu'cpic act wi. I be
;iccii by a saxophone quartet and I anjo
AMERICAN AND
CHINESE
icconipaninieiit. The names of lliose who
will lake part ill ibis act will nol be (lis11
until
2
A.
M.
Open
.dosed according to Eoburt .1. Shil
law, '29, president of llie troupe. liugDunciiiK 10:30 till I A. M„ Except Sunday
"The minstrels troupe lias tint yel
Phone Main 7187
•ecognized by Myskania," he said. been 44 State St
1
(Omnia! mid (Occidental lUstanmt
' I T IS NEW AND WE HAVE I T '
THE
1234-
"MULE
PUMP"
as pictured
in glistening
Satin
or
Ebony Patent
$*700
INCH
HEELS
BOOKSTORE
Established 1890
Cards for Easter
Lenten Reading and Imported Paper
Cor. Steuben and James
Albany, N. Y.
Klein Market
331 CENTRAL AVENUE
Choice Meats, Poultry
and Vegetables
Special Attention To
School Organizations
PALLADINO
ALBANY'S LARGEST BEAUTY SHOPPE
Hnir Rnhhinp
Finger Waving
Ereeni
Permanent Waving
7 Master Barbers
Strand Shoppe
9 Beauticians
133 No Pearl St.
Phone Main 6280
Opp, Clinton Square
YOU'LL FIND THE
NEWEST PATTERNS IN
THE LEADING SHADES
FOR SPRING AT
Our Shoes are the pride
of the West. We have those
beautiful Hollywood Style's
with that pretty short vamp.
Miller Wohl Co.
29 N. Pearl St.
Albany, N. Y.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 18, 1927
8
HISS KEIM, MOORE Editor Of Survey To Speak At Conference;
ARE STAR SCORERS Birchenough And Miss Loeb Announce Topics
Joseph K, Hart, former professor of
economics in Reed college, Oregon, and
now editor of Survey, will be a luncheon
Miss Huyek Leads Faculty Band speaker at the round-table conference
And Directs The Cheers
here Saturday, March 26. Mr Hart is a
noted lecturer and writer on educational
In Game Saturday
subjects, He is author of "Democracy
and Education."
BY KATHLEEN DOUGHTY
The Black and Blue team, as the facSection conferences will be given in
ulty women's basketball team is known, mathematics under the direction of 1'".
showed results of the practices it has Eugene Seymour of tjie state education
been having regularly, The agility and department. The subject will be "new
syllabus in elementary algebra," Professpeed the faculty displayed in a game sor Harry Birchenough, head of the
with the girls' varsity Saturday afternoon mathematics department, announced.
was surprising to those who had witThe conference in modern languages
will be under the direction of Professor
nessed last year's game.
Charlotte Loch, head of (lie French deThe score at first half was 16 to 2 in partment. The topic will be "Dictation
favor of the varsity. The final score and Oral Comprehension Tests." The
modern language association will attend.
was 28 to 10.
The Latin teachers will discuss "ProbA band led by Miss Lucy Iiuyck,
lems of the High School Latin Teacher"
assistant librarian, who used the black under
the leadership of Harold G.
Courtesy Albany Evening News
and blue faculty banner as a baton, es- Thompson.
corted the team to the floor. ThroughThe library section will meet in room lish prgram will be a playlet directed by
out the game Miss Huyck as song and 323.r)f the State Education building. The. Julia Fay, '27. The playlet is from
cheer leader, led the faculty rooters in subject will be "The New Library "Maiiiu'ken and Minnikeii,'' Milne High
School and the High School Librarian." school pupils will participate.
original songs and cheers to the team
The topic for the history department
"Modern Lighting for (he Home" will
and individual players.
round-table, in charge of Dr. A cilia VV, be the subject of the talk at the luncheon
Miss Anna Randolph Kcim, assistant Risley, is "Bridging the Gap Between of the round table conference of the
professor of home economics, was the History Teaching in High School and home economics department at lite Colony
College." A representative of the state
only scorer for the faculty, making five education department, several teachers Plaza Saturday, March 26. The speaker
will be from the Edison company plant
field baskets.
of history, and two State College iinclcr- at Elizabeth, N, J. He will illustrate
Miss Jcanetta Wright and Miss Alice ,'jr.adualcs will contribute to the prelimi- the talk with slides. Miss J. Corinuc
Troy of the home economics department
Gooding, both of whom were in guard nary discussion.
Programs and speakers have been an- is chairman of the luncheon. Officers of
positions, held their forwards down to
nounced in home economics, junior high the eastern district of the Vocational
few baskets.
school, science, commerce, history, and association will be elected after the
Anne Moore, '30, center forward, was English, An added feature in the Eng- luncheon.
high scorer for the varsity with six field
baskets.
The varsity line-up was: Neville, McGarty, DuBois, and Swettmann, for- FROSH TRIM RICHMOND; LION GOES TO PRESS
wards; Moore, center-forward; I lavko,
STOP WINNING STREAKAll copy for the Easter issue of the
Maar, Doughty, and Kmpie, guards;
Lion, the humor magazine started this
Luyster, center. The faculty line-up
The freshman men's basketball team
was: Stokes, Kcim, and Rowley, for- stopped the winning streak of the Rich- year, will go to print Monday morning.
Hcnriette Francois, '20, has been added
wards; Wright, center; Gooding and
mond Five of Walervliet last Friday
Johnston, guards.
to the business staff.
Florence Craddock and Dorothea night, defeating them 38 to 17 on the
Dietz, two alumnae, were referees.
College court. Until their meeting with
A stunt was presented between the the cubs, the visitors had won sixteen
.halves, under direction of Charlotte
Jones, '28. Miss Jones and Gilbert H, games and lost none, and had defeated
Ganong, '28, played the leading parts. A many secondary school teams in the
partly-modern adoption of the balcony Capita! district.
scene from "Romeo and Juliet," with
Thomson starred for the freshmen and
musical accompaniment, featured the led the scoring with fifteen points. The
stunt.
One block
cubs showed up the best in this game 84 Robin
Although men were admitted this year that they have this season. Their passStreet
from the College
for the first time, few attended.
work was fast and accurate and they
wire particularly good on (he offense,
M
up many of the visitors' plays.
CLASSICAL CLUB HAS breaking
The freshmen will play in the College
J. COSTANZO
gymnasium tomorrow night after the
DEBATE ON "CAESAR" men's
PROPRIETOR
basketball dinner.
"Resolved; That the teaching of
Shoe Shining ami Repairing
Caesar should be abolished in high
schools'' was debated in Classical club
meeting Wednesday afternoon by Josephine Klepser, '27; Zuella Under, '27;
Phone Main 152«>
and Anne Cowan, '27, for the negative;
and Frances Bowman, '28; Sara Wood,
CONFECTIONERY
'27; and Blanche Robbins, '27, for the
affirmative. No decision was given.
We Supply Candyto
Each member answered roll call with
the description of a Roman custom.
The Co-Op, Fresh Daily
New members attending the club meeting for the first time were: Helen Zeh,
96 Madison Ave.
'28; Marion Woolcock, '2iT; Marion Fox,
Cor. Franklyn St,
'29; Adelaide llollister, '27; lilsie HutCHOICE MEATS
chinson, '27; Velnia Licbi, '28; Sarah
Phone Main 1571-J
Law, '28; Therressa Colvin, '28; Evelyn
McNickle, '29; Georgians King, '29;
86 SOUTH PEARL STREET
Irene Ashley, '30; Alice Bingham, 29;
Ethel Cashman, '29 f Mildred Stone, '28;
Margaret Martin, '28.
DESCRIBE INSECT L I F E
Bee-keeping was described to Professor C. A. VVoodard's zoology class
this week by John Floyd, '29, Floyd
owns several colonies of bees, and
raises them for breeding purposes.
William M. French, '29, presented
a paper on the periodical cicada at
Tuesday's meeting of the class. Emily
Czurles, '29, read an article on the
war between man and insects recently.
CAPITOL -'ALBANY
Today and Tomorrow
Matinees Daily
DODGE, SALMON START
CHESS, CHECKER CLUBt.
A chess and checker club may be or
gauized here to make a study of the
games. Emphasis will be placed on
checkers, according lo Seward H, Dodge
'28, one of the organizers. Meeting?
may be held twice a month. Membership i: open to all students. Prospective
members may sign the list on the main
bill lei in board.
IVofcssor Clifford E. VVoodard, head
if the biology department, has been
asked to be faculty adviser. The organizers of the club are Dodge and Joseph E. Salmon, '27.
THE
FAMOUS
COMEDY WITH
MUSIC
Kosher
Kitty
Kelly"
POPULAR PRICES
Eves: 50c, to $1,10
Mats. 25c. and 50c,
CLINTON
SQUARE
LELAND
HOME OF FILM CLASSICS
EXCLUSI. VE PICTUttES
C. H. BUCKLEY, Owner
NOW PLAYING
NOW
PLAYING
Corrine Griffith
'Rose of The
Tenements"
"3 HOURS"
and Charlie Chaplin
with
Shirley Mason
and Johnny Harron
"SHOULDER ARMS"
COMING MONDAY
"The Understanding
Heart"
'Lost At Sea"
by Peter B. Kyne
Nights 25c
Matinees 15c-20c
Matinees 15c
Nights 25c
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIRING
James H. Murray
NEW YORK STATE NATIONAL BANK
ALBANY, N. Y.
69 STATE STREET
"We Understand Eyes "
SmTfAuMt
EYEGLASSES
OPTOMETRIST
50 N. Peari St.
Albany, N.Y.
OPTICIAN
Western Reef House
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
H
203 Central Avenue (near Robin)
TRY OUR TOASTED SADWICHES
F. Wayland Bailey, Secy
Willard W. Andrews, Pres.
ALBANY TEAOHEES' AGENCY, Inc.
Wo rocotve calls for touchers from every state In tlio union and can certainly be of service to those
who wish to toHch and WHO ARK QUAUiPIKD 'J'O 1)0 GOOD WORK. Early registration detlrable
74 C H A P S L STBEET,
ALBANY. N. Y.
Correspondence and Interviews Invited
EVERY TEACHER
Should Visit the Home of
Boulevard
Milk
Better soiree without a man
than without a marcel.
How about calling
JHiglf jejuni
Students and Groups at the State College for Teachers
will be given special attention
H
Hlodel College Skop
MSoPearlSlAllamjJl.llJ
Cluhti that art DMiMlvt iul ntt ExfHiiv
Geo. D. Jeoney
9 North Lake Avenue
Phone West 914-M
Phone West 7613
This company extends an especially
cordial invitation, to those engaged
in educational work. Our pfant is
one of the most modern and complete in the country—-a truly model
dairy of unique interest to you personally as well as professionally
Boulevard Dairy Co., Inc.
231 Third St., Albany
Telephone West 1314
"The Sunlight Dairy"
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
198 Central Avenue - at Robin
Albany, N. Y.
Branch of the Boulevard Restaurant 106-1 10 State Street
Mills Art Press
Proverb No. 3
394-396 Broadway Main 2287
Printers of State College News
There's a Time and a Place for everything.
The place to look for bargain hints is
the NEWS ADS
The time to look is NOW.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Business Department
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