S t a t e College Ne%s

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S t a t e College Ne%s
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NEW YORK S T A T E COLLEGE F O R TTEEA
AC
CH
HEER
RSS
_
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.,
NO. 10
ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1925
FRESHMAN QUINTET
TRIMS RENSSELAER
DRAMATICS CLASS TO ARRANGEMENTS MADE
GIVE PLAYS IN JAN. TO LIMIT NUMBER OF
Under supervision of Miss Agnes E.
BIDS TO JUNIOR PROM
Futtcrer, dramatics instructor, the ele-
VOL.X
Varsity Holds Signal Practice,
Preparing For Jamaica
Teachers
FIRST GAME DECEMBER 5
The freshman basketball team Saturday night November 14, trimmed the
Rensselaer High School quintet in the
college gym, LI-12. It was the yearling's
first game on home grounds, and they
set the pace throughout the contest.
Carr, versatile player of the frosh, was
llif individual star. His basket, in the
last minute of play, won the game for
the cubs, and he scored on four oilier
occasions making ten of the fourteen
points for his team.
The freshmen
showed great weakness on the free throw
line, missing twelve out of twelve, The
ability of (he high school hoys in locating (he basket on free trys kept them
within striking distance till the final
whistle.
Varsity basketball is developing very
rapidly. Scrimmages and signal practice
took the place of the work on fundamentals in the past week
(.'(inch
rcpnrls, "I have f itmd fine material in
the new class. We will have a good
team this season, and, with a well balanced schedule, should make a better
showing than we did last 'year. The
freshman game; have brought to my attention the ability of the new men."
When the coach was askc I who would
probably start the game against the Jamaica Teachers, he said ''I don't know
a- el would I'I say if I did No o r e wil
know till the nisht before the o p e n e r "
Captain Hornting. Kuczy ski, Xcphew
Griffin, doff, Herney Kcrnhaw a**cl Car:
is the group frrm whi h the coach wi'
pick a team to start the first j ame Th
varsity meets Jamaica Teachers Iter
Saturday, December 5.
MISS FUTTERER READS
MONSIEUR BEAUCAIRE
Miss Agnes I7., Futtcrer read Booth
'Parking-ton's "Monsieur Beaucairc" in
the auditorium on Friday evening under
the auspices of the Y. VV. C. A., before a
large audience made up of Albany
drama-lovers as well as of college
students.
The splendid interpretation of the
story proved again Miss
Futtercr's
genuine power in the field of dramatic
reading. Better comment on Miss Futtercr's presentation of this slory can not
be made than that which Mr. Lemuel
13. C. Josephs of the American Academy
of Dramatic Art has said of it. "Your
reading of 'Monsieur Beaucairc' was
most unusual in that it sustained a c intinuity of spirit throughout, a dramatic
ace mplihmcnt that is as gratifying as
it is rare."
me iiary dramatics class is preparing its
annual presentation of plays for January. This year, contrary to the usual
'custom, there will he a presentation two
nights in the hall of the Albany Institute
and Historical and Art Society, instead
of a single ui Ill's performance al the
V'incenlian Institute.
The plays which have been selected
are a fantasy, " H i e Shoes thai Danced,"
by Anna Hempstead limned, Iryouts for
which were Wednesday night; a comedy,
"Fancy Free," by Stanley Houghton,
Iryoiiis for which were yesterday afternoon, and "Tickless Time," a larce by
Susan Clasped and George Cram Cook.
Tht' Iryoiiis for ibis play are to he
November 23.
'I be following committees have been organized : I louse, Louise ( limn, chairman ;
Ruth Lcmnile, Helen Knowles, Fvelyn
Middle, Marcclla Street, Marion Gilbooly,
Mclaiiic Grant, Marion Tilley, Margaret
Provost, Theua Obnstead, Agues Holloran, Margaret Koen, and Frances I ladsell. Advertising;, Bertha Zajau, chairman; Ime'da Si. Denis, Helen Deans,
Lois Dunn, Lillian F.ckicr, Mary Merclifl"(,
itilia
h'ay. Frances
Smith,
Catherine Rogers, ,\I, Schoonover and
The'ma Brczce.
Slage and Lighting,
Helen Zimmerman, chairman; Vivian
Ijaeehus, Constance
Bauniami,
Ruth
Kmpie Kud ra Lampman, Irene Yortoii,
Marjorie Oil, Katharine Blenis, Ruth
McN'uil. Alma Turpening, and S. I'eck
Prop., Sara Barklcy chairman; Rlai'che
K'igbiud, Fslhcr Morris, Louise Nottingh'un, Reii'ia I'errauli Fvelyn Palmer
)livc Ounckenhiish, Helen Quackenbush,
Helen Barber, and T. Wallermire. CMSume Helen I lyies, chairman; Rnlb
'olbiiru, Mildred Graves, Flva Johnson,
'lele'i Mout'.'omery, Blanche Ribbins.
bristiua Sweeney. Sara Wood, and
dive Scolcs. Music, Mary Rdein,
The fit's I slage of preparations for the
junior class Prom was completed today
by Miss iJoftha J. Zajau, vice-president
of the class and general chairman for
the dance, The general outline of arrangements as prepared by the junior
class committee has been approved by the
faculty.
The dance will be conducted
February 5 in the ball room of the Ten
Lyck h ilel. Besides the ballroom, (he
committee has engaged a private checkroom and two dressing rooms. Guests
if honor will be the members of Myskania, four officers of each of the three
tiller classes, honorary faculty members
and other faculty members who will be
patrons and patronesses.
These a r e :
President A. R. Hrubacber, I lean William II. Melzlcr, Miss Anna F. Pierce,
lean of women; Mrs. (Jliecue I Ionian
Faust, instructor
in biology;
Miss
Catherine Pell/, instru'tor in Fuglish;
Dr. Marion Collins, college physician;
Miss Marion Fleming, instructor in
home economics.
Music will he by the Oriental Sere
nailers, The orchestra will be of eight
pieces, including four string instruments,
•axophoiie, piano, etc
ll comes from
the Keith Circuit and is comprised of
musicians also members of MeyerholT's
and Fink's orchestra. Michael lio/./.i of
S he'ieclady is leader.
The favors have been selected and the
irders placed. Their ideilify is being
' epi seerel Refreshments have also been
lelcrniinecl upon.
he 'li ice will be limited to 250 couple.'
Since (here are 272 juniors, no member
f other classes will' be allowed 1
for the dance until all juniors have had
me opportunity. Then seniors will lie
given I he i banco, if any of the bids are
slid available.
The committees expect to dis.-niitimic
meetings for abolll a month, when they
will lake up the details again.
Junior Year Best In College Is Verdict Of Seniors;
F.rsf And Second Out Of Favor With Upperclassmen
The junior year is the best in college
ife according to leading senior students.
Nine of twelve members of Myskania.
who were among those interviewed,
chose the junior year as the one they
prefer.
The chief reason given for the popularity of the junior year was that, by
then, the student has come to a real
understanding of COIICJC life.
As
Mary Flanigan said, "1 like the junior
year best, I think, because one is such
in integral part of college activity in
general. One knows the ropes, and his
friendships reach both fre hme'i and
seniors. Prom and Moving-up Day have
a real significance" The main point in
Harry S. Godfrey's argument is that
"The end of college life is not rear
enough lo overshadow any joys ore n r y
experience and the beginning is !;>"
cooir h bchh'd to be forgotten if it has
held any failure-; or disappointments."
According to i.orena Shaffer, "Junior
year is the busiest and best year. A
belter understanding of college methods
of study together with an active interest
in college functions makes the junior
year a 'jolly' one."
.
L
<^ \ , » ,
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A
',_-
SENIOR G I R L S ' ?
FROM SOPHS,' 18%,
H e i g h t Of Senior Guards Is
Contributing Factor
In Victory
SOPHS MAKE HARD FIGHT
In a fast game, Monday afternoon,
the senior girls' team rolled up a score
of 18-6 against the sophomores. The
sophs made a good fight, hill the height
of the senior guards helped that class.
Dorothy Rowland's long passes were
snatched up nine limes out of ten by I he
long-reaching seniors.
Seeger scored
heaviest for the sophs, making four of
the six points, while Tuell scored for
the seniors. J. Wright held li. Wright
scoreless, and Strong rolled two in from
the foul line, Despite the uneven score,
the game was Interesting. The line-up
follows:
SK.VIORS
Wright, J.
Mihuiiie
Raynor
('oiien
Tuell
Smith
SOPHOMORES
Cohen, Lea
Josselau
Rowland
Strong, Poller
Wright, I!.
Seeger
RECESS TO COMMENCE
WEDNESDAY EVENING
Dr. Bruhacher has announced, following a recent meeting of the faculty, that
he Thanksgiving recess will begin Wednesday evening November 25 al 5:50
and will end Monday, November .30 at
8:10 a. m. "Student absences either
directly before or after die recess will
he subject to double penally unless the
student has been previously excused byspecial permission of the official excusing officer," Dr. Bruhacher said.
QUARTERLY CONTAINS
NO JOKES THIS YEAR
"The first issue of the Quarterly wil,
be in the hands of students the day before
The president of the senior class, S.
Thanksgiving recess begins," Miss Olga
Miles I laight, agrees, "The freshman
Hampel. editor-in-chief of the Stale
year bands the post-adolescent an awful
ColFge Quarterly announced.
It is to
thrill; (he soph year is a waste of nahave a new cover design. There will be
t u r e ; the senior year is the after-glow
if a misspent youth, but the junior year no joke section, because Miss Hampel
is fascinating and Hatters us into self- believes "the proper place for good jokes
is in the Pedagogue; and poor jokes,
confidence."
Muriel L. Weirzel expresses her ideas such as the razzing of instructors and
• HI the subject, saying, "I like the junior administrators have no proper place in
year in college the best. One has re- c o l l c e publications."
covered by that time from his freshman
Many former contributors will be
ignorance and has outgrown the over- represented and several new writers will
bearing attitude which seems natural to be introduced to Quarterly readers whose
die sophomore year, at the
e same
same time
time one
one | i a m e . a r c 1U)l tf) b e t , v i o l | s | ||
! ,
ms not (be leehng of responsibility and i „ T , K , „•„, ( ) f ( | ) c e c I i t ^ r s i s to'maintain *
(Continued On Page 21
I i-,j |, i-|,. f p. r ,| i-, r m - ' i ' v "
V/v
*'
mmmmmmmmm
MOMNHnHNM
Pago Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVUMMKK 20, ll)2fl
9taU (&allt#t Jfaroa
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
Vol X
mm
No. 10
Nov. 20, 1925
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, N e w York.
The subscription rate is three dollars
per year. Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager.
Editor-in-Chief
HARRV
S.
GODFREY,
'26
Managing Editor
E D W I N V A N KLEECK,
'27
Business Manager
H E L E N E. ELLIOTT,
Subscription
'26
Manager
H E L E N BARCLAY,
'26
Copy Reader
MARGARET B E N J A M I N ,
'26
Assistant Business Managers
M Y R A H A R T M A N , '27
H E L E N Z I M M E R M A N , '27
Assistant Subscription Manager
TIIELMA
TEMPLE,
'27
Assistant Copy Reader
JULIA FAY,
'27
Associate Editors
Sara B a r k l e y , '27
Louise Gil tin, '27
K a t h a r i n e Blcnis, '27 Anna Koff '26
Joyce P e r s o n s , '26
Reporters
Leah Cohen
MacMullcn Elizabeth
T h e l m a Brczce Lela Van Schaick
Virginia H i g g i n s (Catherine Saxton
Adelaide Hollistcr D o r o t h y W a t t s
Elnah K r i c g
Bertha Zajan
CHANGE IN READING
At the close of the World War the
literary taste of the American public
took a decided slump.
The demand
seemed to turn away from classical and
educative literature to fiction of the
lightest type. Tin's demand came from
professional men all over the country,
from lawyers, doctors and state employees,
The soldiers who had just returned from
the front lines seemed to have developed,
as Mr, Tracey, director of the library
a t . t h e Young Men's Christian Association expressed it, "A moving picture
mind." These men could not concentrate;
they demanded something easy to read,
something that was thrilling and alive.
Naturally they turned to the wild west
type of story, to the vividly pictured
love novel to satisfy their desire. As
a result, hooks on education, philosophy,
art, music, and the like remained on the
shelves of our public, libraries untouched.
At the present time, -dl over the
country, if reports are to he believed,
and many of these reports are hacked by
statistics, there is gradually coining
about a decided change in the tone of
our reading. This change has been especially noted in the libraries of Albany,
according to statements made by M i / ' 1
Elizabeth M. Smith, director of Albany
public libraries
Albanians seem to desire reading which at one time they would
have considered too "heavy."
(f there is such a movement started, it
is part of our duty as college students
to lend our help and support,
ll has
often been said that the reading done by
c o l l c c people is too superficial.
The .
acquisition of a certain amount of well
organized knowledge concerning the
best literature of the past and the prescit
should be part of our educational aim
and we sll""'rl nol stop with the ifniui''g
of the knowledge, but we should endeavor
to educate those with wlnm we come •'••
contact to really appreciate and study
the many mastcrpie-es which our pub''c
libraries afford.
If a nation is to be
judged by its literary taste, let u< <••d e a v r to put A merica among those
which will rank
first.
i
SENIORS ARE REQUIRED AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
SENIORS LIKE THIRD
YEAR IN COLLEGE BEST TO ANSWER QUESTIONS WOMEN MEET AT STATE
TO SECURE POSITIONS The Albany Chapter of the American
(Continued From Page 1)
In a few months the seniors will be Association of University Wowen will
the dread of the fast-approaching end of
his college days which comes with the teaching "on their own" what they are meet at State College on Saturday, Nobeing
taught now. We wonder how they vember 21, at 2:30 in Room 161 of the
senior year."
Miriam I!. Snow says, "The junior obtain their positions. Let's ask. See, Science building.
Graduates of Slate
year is unqualifiedly my favorite. By then here are some blanks they have to fill
College and members of the Stale Colthe students have learned just when to out to get positions in the state high
study and when to play, and how to schools. These blanks ask for almost .cgc faculty who arc members of the
chapter will be hostesses on this occastudy and how to play, They are workeverything under educational profesing whole-heartedly for the organization
sion. Miss Anne Stockwell is chairman
which they have found most worth sional and academic career. They ask of reception committee. Assisting will
while and are not yet overwhelmed with for everything from mathematics to
iie
Mrs. Clifford A. Woodard, Miss
athletics. The personal data concerns
responsibilities. It's the freest year."
Marion Chesebrotigh's reason is that the year of birth, permanent address if Eunice A. ferine, Miss Agues Futterer,
she had "almost as many friends in this married, what location is preferred, Miss Minnie Scotland, Miss Hazel Rowheight, weight, eyes, hair and complexion. ley, Miss Sophia Cohen, Miss Julia
year but fewer responsibilities,"
Elizabeth Mi'lniine looks at the ques- And next comes the subjects.
The Coffey, Miss Helen O'Dcll, Miss Marion
tion from the point of view that the seniors have to mark the subjects they Fleiumiiig, Miss Anna R, Keim and Miss
most pleasure is obtained in helping have studied, those they may safely atThe choice of
others. She says, "After two years of tempt to teach as minors and those sub- Florence E. Wincholl.
subjects for special study selected by the
more or less getting acquainted yourjects for which special prenaratioii for
self, you have a chance to start your
chapter is as follows: One group for
freshman sister right.
Tliere arc so leaching has been made. Then the sub- i.ilcruatloual relationships and a second
many ways to help and so many things jects taught as majors and minors have
lo rlo in the junior year which cannot to he underscored, also the positions they for child study. At this meeting Mrs.
have occupied, such as, principal, bend Marion Miller, assistant director of the
be done in any other year."
. hild Study Association of America will
Marjoric T. Bellows said, "By the of den rttneut, supervisor, critic, in
junior year you have more confidence struetoi and secretary. Look, here we iddrcss the group. Following this there
in yourself and feel more a part of have a blank asking for the training will be a social hour .alter which the
college."
which the seniors have had, the inclu- .•hild study group will he organized. All
The new-comers at college were sive dates, principal subjects, the school, .voineii graduates of State College arc
unanimous in upholding the superiority college and university.
Particulars of
irged to attend the meeting and join the
of (heir class.
diplomas and de/rees are wanted. We
The freshman president, Dave Smurl, , must also not foreet the experience. issocialiou at the close of tin's meeting.
said, "When a person enters college he i Under this comes the kind of position
views his new Alma Mater with a spirit
| the subjects and the name and location
of awe. He hardly dares to form or at
least express any opinion, for he is still ] of institution. References are last, and
.o insignificant,
However, I like the : we know about them for they must he C H R I S T I N A A L B E R T A ' S F A T H E R
freshman year partly because the ensu- outside of the Stale Colic re for TeachBy
ing three years are blanks lo me, Hut ers and we've heard (he rc'.iiors ask each
H. G. Wells
then, I have every reason to he pleased ' other for names of prominent men.
with my frosh year for my class has
Mr. Wells has written another thesis;iven me a great honor, and thus far
uovel in his latest book, "Christina Al1 have made no enemies, I hope, ami
berta's Father," He has taken a topic
many friends.
This last fact goes an
inestimable way towards making not
well in accord with his scope of mind
only the first year but all of a person's j The regular meeting of the French in the adventures of little Mr. Preemby,
life pleasant."
i club was held Wednesday afternoon, M : ss the ex-laundry man who had an unusuEvelyn Graves, vice-president of the i Isabella Pludc, president, in the chair.
ally keen appreciation of his oneness
freshman class, prefers it because "it is | The meeting was for business purposes
the year when wisdom is given to you by | and reports of the rmimilteoi were with life in general and with Saigon,
the sophomores, you acquire a junior {given. Miss Mildred Hubert, chairman King of Kings in particular. Given his
sister or brother, and the seniors help ,of the plays committee, was anpointcd delightful opportunity he unmercifully
you learn the traditions of the college." j by Miss Pludc to see Miss Malcolm, of flays the unsympathetically "sane" people
The three other freshmen gave these i the French department, concerning the
;
selection of plays to be presented by the who view insanity with contempt and
"opinions'' as follows:
Miss Plude had suggested to Jic.r own condition with complacency.
Vera Wellott:
"Freshman year is club
:
After a series of adventures, including
best since everything is new and differ- Professor Simonin that the club put on
ent and so many people seem to love to ! its annual performance in conjunction t Dickens-like period in an asylum,
Preemby
comes to the realization which
! with the Albany branch of the Alliance
give each other a good time."
Frances Kadding: "I think I shall like I'rancaise. of which a number of the ad- vV'clls has been engineering .all through
my frosh year in college the best of all vanced French students are members. the book: "1 am Sargou, but not EXfour.
After you recover from the This was put to a vote of the club yes- C L U S I V E L Y Sargon. You are Sargou
too. His blood is in our veins. We are
strange feeling, you find that you are terday and agreed upon
having a wonderful time learning new
Members of the club discussed the ci-heirs. . . . W e are all descended
things, knowing new people, and making picture which goes into the Ped. and from Sargon, just as we are all dcnew friends."
| decided it would be more representative cended irom Caesar—just as nearly all
Pauline A r n o t t ; "Frosh year is best, if just the officers of the club were in English and Americans are descended
I think, since it is all new. Von make the nicture. This idea has been tried r m Will.am the Conqueror. . . .
new acquaintances, form new habits and , out by other colleges and seems worth Of course, when I called myself Sargon,
while adopting.
If a majority of the j'l'g of Kings, and proposed to rule all
in general enjoy yourself."
the world, I was S Y M B O L I Z I N G . Of
In backing the final year, Marion clubs of tlie college vote in favor of c iiirse, everybody is really Sargou and
O'Connor said, "I like it best because in ; the idea, it will be adopted by State.
All those who wish in be c-cfidcrcd everybody ought to take hold of all the
this year I can see the fulfillment of a
world and save it and rule it just as 1
s
long and cherished desire to be a members of the French club must pay have got to do."
'school inarm,' and because the friend- j their dues immediately to Evelyn i'aimer,
A matter apparently secondary to
[
treasurer.
A
list
of
the
members
will
ships which started in my first year are
Wells, hut of great interest to his
being cemc" led now to last, I hope, be published in the near future
| The program meeting will be held readers, is the adventure of Christina
through life."
Alberta herself. She is as deeply perI
November
25.
Special
arrangcme'it-i
are
Margaret Benjamin said, "So far my
plexed with this riddle of life as arty
•enior year has been the happiest of the I being made by the social committee,
American youth—and solves it much the
four. ( P , T. is'yet to come'.) By then, headed by Kathleen O'Malley, chairman.
same way. If (he story of her ininiicif ever, one begins to see slight indicaable Daddy leaves you rather cold, you
tions of an ability to adopt oneself to busy being welcomed; during the second
will still find a wealth of attraction in
conditions; and that ability is, after all, year, too rushed gathering counts and
the Youth Movement of England as
life's air cushion."
wisdom; when a junior, too thrilled Wells sees it in his heroine.
Helen E. Elliott, when questioned, initiating freshmen to determine ,•«!
If you are looking for a vacation novel,
said, "Comparisons are odious because codify one's sensations; as a senior, it is
t is impossible to judge such entirely all a hectic grab after everything. Per- stay away from "C. A.'s Father," but if
you
want something between your teeth
different thiivs as my college years have haps fifty years from now I'll be able
read Well's latest.
been. In the freshman year one is too to tell."
Kent Pease, '27.
BOOK-ENDS
FRENCH CLUBPLANS
TO PRESENT PLAYS
7 t
STATU VOUSCiV, NEWS, NOVEMBER 'JO. I!'jr>
jf>
Page Throe
j
^QU*, Printer
NAME BOARD MEMBERS COLLEGE NEWS NEW EXCUSE SYSTEM
TO HAVE CHARGE OF
AT A GLANCE
WORKING ADMIRABLY, The Gateway Press
QUALITY WINTERS
BUILDING DORMITORY Delia Omega entertained the other
BRUBACHER SAYS
At a meeting of die residence hall committee of the alumni association, a motion was made and passed atitli iriziii'-T
the chairman, Professor John M, Sayle.i,
principal of Milne High School, to appoint a committee to take chafpc of the
building of the residence hall dormitory.
The committee is to he comprised of a
representative of (he citizens of Alhai y,
a member of the hoard of trustees of
the college, and two representatives of
the alumni association.
In accordance with these directions.
Mr. Sayles today announced the following names of those whom he has appointed lo assist him: John 'I'. I), Blackhunt, to represent the citizens of Albany;
Dr, Erilstus Corning, board of trustees
of the College; Mrs. Lynn J. Arnold and
Dean Anna I''.. Pierce to rcprese.it the
alumni,
The duties of the committee provide
for the orderly collection of investments,
I he care of the financial details, the approval of plans and contracts and the
supervision of the construction and completion of the building.
HOLD HARE AND HOUND
CHASE TOMORROW
At last G. A. A. council meeting the
following business was transacted:
Evelyn Bacilc, '28, was elected assistant
swimming captain, to aid Helen Tompkins, captain, and Bertha Zajan and
Elizabeth Bender, assistants.
The dates for the three annual gym
frolics, conducted under the auspices of
G, A. A. have been a"rccd upon They
will be January 8, February 1'), and
April 16. The Spring Indian Ladder
hike will he held May 15 Saturday,
November 21, (',. A. A. will hold a hike
in the form of a I fare a"d II u d chase,
in place of the annual fall hike to
Indian Ladder which was postponed hecause of inclement weather.
Council members of G, A. A joi-cd
[he hand of Citizen Senilis on a campirrr
trip, last vveek-e-d to the t'.irl S -outs'
camp. .Anna Ray:ior. clriirman of ill
committee of amvgcme 'ts. was assisted
by [Catherine Blcnis, Mildred YVi's-ni
and Mildred l.oman. I >r Croasdale and
Miss Isahclle Johnston acted as diaperones.
CALENDAR
Today
7:30 P. M. Mathematics Club
Initiation—Gym.
Sunday. November ?2
4:30 P. M. Y. W. C. A. VespersRotunda.
Tuesday, Movprrber 24
6:60-8:30 P. M, Political Science
Club Banquet—Cafeteria.
Wednesday. November 25
4:00 P. M. French Club—Room B.
5:00 P. M. Thanksgiving Recess
Begins.
Tuesday. December 1
4:00 P. M. Political Science Club
—Room 101.
4:00 P M Meoorah—Room B.
Wedn'-sdav Derem^T 2
4:00 P. M. Newman Club—Auditorium.
Thursday D<v"i,mH»r 3
4:00 P. M. Spanish Club—Room
103.
7:15 P M. Y. W. C. A. Meeting
—Room n .
Fr'-'a" December A
2:00-11:00 P. M. Y. W. C. A.
Bazaar
iomritics at bridge Saturday afternoon.
Mildred llahcock, '26, president of Delia
Omega, was hostess. Adelaide Barber,
26, was general chairman. Tea was
served. Marjorie Bellows, '26, Jcanetta
Aright, '26, and Marion Benedict, '27,
were prize winners.
Miss Edith Spencer, '17, head dietician
if I he Metropolitan Life Insurance Company's sauitorium at Mount MacCregor,
pen I the week-end with Miss Eunice
'critic, head of the Fine Arts department.
Miss Dorothy Finder, '18, now teaching in Tn y, and Miss Bertha A, Parks,
'13, teaching in I'lica, were callers at
.'ollege Saturday, November 1-1.
Pi Alpha Tail welcomes into honorary
membership Miss Frances l'oskanzer,
iss l'oskanzer was graduated from the
Troy Conservatory of Music and is now
i special student at Slate College.
The new and much more stringent attendance rules which were put into effect
this year arc working "unusually well"
and only a negligible proportion of Ihc
students show any de.ure to violate
either (he spirit or the Idler of the rules,
Dr. A. PL Urubacher, president, announced today.
Dr. Bruharher said the present excuse
system which banishes all "cut" rules
at,\d makes attendance al all classes j
obligatory except for unusual reasons, i
is based on the proposition (hilt the attendance officers lake (he sludeiU's Word
for the reason of his absence. The per- |
centare of those who do nol attend ;
classes has been cut very low, he said,
and there is nothing lo indicate that the
rule is nol working admirably.
At your ell^v T W^s> > 2b37
m C c r i t ^ ^ v e * - ^ '••' ,
IHayh H. (Srauee >.., '
845 Madiion A»e/?
' j -
DRUGS and PHARMACEUTICALS
Telephone West 3462-3463
WHITTLE &RIGGS
FLORISTS
BROADWAY-MAIDEN LANE
ESTABLISHED 1905
ECONOMY
DRESS GOODS STORE
STATE ALUMNI BRANCH 215
Central Ave.
Phone W-37J1-M
ELECTS CABINET
Silk - Woolen - Cotton
Hemstitching and Trimming
The annual elect ion of officers of the
Miss Jean Dardcss, '2-1. spent the
OPEN EVENINGS
veek-end al Ihc Chi Sigma Thcta house. Eastern Branch Alumni association nl
Ihc Mew York Stale College for
Ind-e Daniel Nayl
a senior member I Teachers was held recently, following a
Present your mother with a real
of (he firm of Naylon, Robinson, May- : dinner in Ihc ralelena. I he following
iard and Bates of Schenectady, has been 1members
were cho-en lo fill Ihc offices jood photograph of yourself in a
1
hl
:!ccted trustee of State College to sue-: '" ' ' ' coming year: president. Miss frame, We can offer you a $10 value
coed the late fudge James Tracy, fudge I Emily Bclding, ol Imy; vice-president, 'or 55.
.Niaylon is a distinguished lawyer and Mrs. F. McClurc of Albany; treasurer,
in eminent jurist and is esteemed a most Miss Elizabeth Anderson, Stale College;
Ming successor lo Judge Tracy, who corresponding secretary, Miss .Anne
Special Rates to Students
Quitrlcy, Albany Nigh School.
las been trustee since 1919.
"The retiring officers are: president,
Books
hrcsiimeu!
, . lor
,,., the
,,„ Thanks
, „,,,,,•.. Miss Mary
. Whish. of Albany; vicciving re-ess may be taken Wednesday president, Mrs. Archibald Kighmey, of
loon1 from the library and mav be kept Cnhoes; treasurer. Miss Elizabeth Ani' r e V! H< Monday, November 30. person, Stale Collco; corresponding
Reserves for these books will be taken secretary, Miss Maud Malcolm, Slate
d:.y, November 23.
College; recording secretary, Mrs. Mary
5 NORTH PEARL ALBANY
. ,
! Richardson, Saratoga Springs.
i Alpha Tau was entertained recently
» • Male ilm Harris, pastor of ihc
•
Unitarian church, addressed the meeting. ]
imc of Mrs,
L, Mayersohn.
His talk was concerned with ideals and ;
Announcement has been made of the interests of teachiii" Dr. T. Frederick
engagement of Miss Beth Oglehy, '26, If. Candlyn, music director of the college,
Mr. Harold Blessing, graduate „f j was in charge oI the music program.
Harvard. '25. Mr. Blessing is' the son I
if Mayor-elect Blessing of Schenectady.
MENORAH HAS BANQUET
Kappa Delia welcomes Edna. Wolfe, j Monorail held its initiation hanonel
'"neday, in the cafeteria. Miss l.oeb.
'28, as a pledge member.
Cdadys Mersercau, '25, visited the! 'acuity member, gave an address of
welcme to the freshmen. Stunts given
Kappa Delia house Sunday.
'•y the initiates were lead by the followThe advanced dramatics class pre- ing captains: Lorena Marcus. Mollie
sented a one-act play of Irish life Tues- 'autumn, Morris Auerbach and Bertha
day evenincr, in the auditorium. Anne
KrifF was the director and the cast was
Mary Flanigan, Marion O'Connor, Sara
Drauiizski and Julia Fay.
QDlnmaita §tnitfn
WE DELIVER
OWEN'S
« ICE
CREAM
State College
Cafeteria
Frn'Ti's Griffin, president of the sophomore class, wishes all sophomores interested in debating to communicate with
Ir'in at once, as preparations must be Luncheon or dinner I 1:15 — 1:30
made for the sophomore-senior debate.
All boolcs which have been ordered
since October 1, at the Co-op, will be
returned to the publishers unless called
for before the Thanksgiving vacation.
All students wishing books they have
ordered must therefore call for them
before that date.
Mrs. Emma Cooke Chase of Montic'l'o. was elected secretary of the New
York Association of District School
Superintendents at the meeting of that
nr'anization. Mrs. Chase is an alumna
of State College, class of 1800.
Lou J. Cook, also a graduate, is a
member of the new executive committee
of the organization, Mr, Cook was
graduated in 1802.
To Particular People
Are You Particular?
Phone West 3530
803 MADISON AVE
CAPITOLTUT SHOP
111 STATE S T
ALBANY
Bffias
NO HAT OVER
S T A T E C O L L E G E N E W S , N O V E M B E R 20. l!>'2f>
Page Four
Y. W. VESPER SERVICE UNDERCLASSMEN LEAD FIFTY MORE STUDENTS
SUNDAY AFTERNOON IN PAYING PROMPTLY AT STATE THIS YEAR
Y. W. will have a vesper service Sunday, November 22, at 4:30 o'clock, The
speaker will be Dr. Richardson, Following the service, tea will be served and a
social hour will be enjoyed.
At the meeting of Y. VV. Thursday,
December 3, which will be held in the
auditorium, Elmer A. Tidmarsh, who is
conductor of the Albany Community
Chorus and of the choir of All Saint's
Cathedral, and also organist at All
Saint's Cathedral and First Presbyterian
Church, will speak on "Hymn Singing,"
and will lead the singing for the Y. W.
meeting.
At the regular meeting of Y. W. last
Wednesday, Mrs. William Chccvcr Ely
talked on "Personality."
INFANTS'
GIFTS
WEAR
-
HOSIERY
Distinctive Gifts for All Occasions
Do Your Christmas Shopping Early at
The Kraft S t o p
Central A v.
Get A Hair Bob At The
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
The appointed days for the collection
of the student tax have passed, and the
finance board reports that about twentyseven per cent of the students have not
yet paid. The sophomores lead with
eighty-one per cent; while the freshmen
are a close second with eighty per cent of
the members of the class holding tax tickets, The juniors are seventy-three per
cent paid, and the seniors are lowest, only
sixty per cent of the members having
paid. This is about on a par with the
collections in other years.
Additional days will be set aside by
the finance board for collection of the
remaining tax.
There are now, 1,118 students attending College, Dr. [irubachcr, prosii'siil;
announced today, following coinpilatio'
of the final figures on the semester's
attendance. This is more than fifty in
excess of the number of students who
attended last year, and makes the c lrollment 318 students or about fifty per cent
in excess of the institution's normal
capacity of 750, The 1,118 stticle 'Is an
livided as follows: graduate students
sixteen; seniors, 215; juniors, 247:
sophomores, 262; freshmen, ,'22; out of
course, fifty-six.
West Lawrence
Shoe Repairing Shop E. A . Beaumont Co.
SHOE SHINE
MATTEO LAVENIA
71 State St.
STETSON SHOES
G. W. WEYRICH
BARBER
DANKER
Roses
(Drtentnl and ©tridental
299 ONTARIO STREET
Special attention to college students
lUsiaurant
82 ROBIN S T R E E T
44 S T A T E S T R E E T
40-42 M A I D E N L A N E
Albany, N . Y.
COLLEGE OXFORDS
At Luries
Cheerful Service Shop
The last word in comfort and style
WOMEN'S PURE THREAD
JOS. A. WALSH, Prop.
$3.95—14.45—$4.95
SILK, FULL FASHIONED
WANTED COLORS
$1.29
Velvet, Patent and Satin with new
Cut Steel, Celluloid and Rhine Stone
Buckles
See Our Window Displays
Open evenings
60 No. Pearl St.
PARK BRANCH
Y. M. C. A. Bldg.
200 Washington Ave.
"Ideal Service"
"Ideal Food"
IDEAL RESTAURANT
George F, Hamp, Prop.
208 WASHINGTON AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y
PHONE CONNECTION
Regular Dinner 40c
11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Distinctive Photography
Hosiery for
People Who
Care
L I N G E R I E — G E N T H FUKNISIIINGS
5% T o College Students
Have you seen the new fancy
silk gloves, and the slipper
back hosiery, all shades.
Main 991
Albany, N. Y.
ITlociel College Shop
14 SoPearl SI Albany ,n.l|. J
CLOTHES OF QUALITY
Authentically
Collegiate in Style
"Clothes that arc Distinctive
hut not Expensive"
07 Genual
7 doors below
O U R PARK B R A N C H
Ave.
Lexington
Ave.
WELCOMES
the Accounts of State College
MIKE'S BARBER SHOP
Students
WE SPECIALIZE IN LADIES' HAIR BOBBING
NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
BANK and TRUST CO.
255 Central Ave.
of the Problem
Send Your Picture as a
CHRISTMAS GREETING
48 North Pearl Street
STOCKINGS IN ALL
Showing of
THE SOLUTION
Albany Art Union
10:31 P. M.
I A. M.
Dancing Every Evening until
Women's Strip Pumps
Note how it relieves
that stuffy feeling
jfilfgfflgfy
after hearty eating.
' ™-"'
Sweetens the
breath, removes <
food particles
from the teeth,
Hives new vigor
in tired nerves.
Comes to you
fresh, clean and
full-flavored.
Cor. West Lawrence & Western Ave
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
ENDICOTT-JOHNSON
makes your food do you
more good.
SPECIAL CHICKEN DINNER
SUNDAYS 60c
Supper 40c
5 p. m. to 8 p n
MOST UP-TO-DATE APARTMENT ON THE HILL
PRIVA1E R O J M FOR LADIES
» } CENTRAL AVE.
PHONE W. 60JS-J
PATRONISE THK
Amertratt CIranarra nnfo SDgere
;j We Clean and Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Men's
Wearing Apparel
•
811 MADISON AVENUE
Phone West 273
MILLS ART PRESS
394-396 BROADWAY
SOCIETY
ALBANY, N. Y.
'RINflNG
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