State College Ne%$ W^HINGTON OUR HERO fyfi

advertisement
State College Ne%$
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL. IX No, 18
* * fyfi
ALBANY, N. Y. FEBRUARY 27, 1925
$3.00 per year
W^HINGTON Blackburn Leader
VARSITY VICTORIOUS
OUR HERO Of Dormitory Drive
OVER CORTLAND FIVE
Senior Hop Proves To Play Rochester
To Be Big Success
Tomorrow Night
Lecture By Risley
Broadcasted by WGY
"Washington is our national heritage/' said Professor Risley at the
evening services of the First Presbyterian Church, Sunday evening, February 22, broadcasted from station
WGY, Schenectady.
The cherry tree and hatchet story
may be traced to the writings of the
parson, Steems, a writer during
Revolutionary times. Professor Risley
said that, of course, Steems liked ornate phrases better than facts, but
Washington, even as a boy, was too
much of a farmer to cut down a
cherry tree. However, if Washington
did not wield the hatchet, Professor
Risley used it to advantage in his talk.
The legendary hatchet figured ill every
phase of Washington's life,
The hatchet was first used by Washington to cut through the forests on
his expedition from Williamsburg tn
Lake Uric. At Great Meadows he
won his lirst victory.
"The hatchet," continued Professor
Risley, "had a keen edge. It cut.
Washington coidd say things to the
point, and sharply, yet his reprimand
to Arnold was clothed in the gentlest
terms.
The hatchet struck to the heart of the
tree when Washington spoke on the
matter of patriotism:
'Men may
speculate; they may talk of patriotism.
I know patriotism exists,
and I know it has done much
in the present contest, but a great
and lasting war can never be
supported on this principle alone. It
must be aided by a prospect of interest
or some reward.' "
Washington served his country in
live distinct ways: first, as a colonel
in the French and Indian wars; second, as a helper in developing the
Revolutionary philosophy; third, as
commander-in-chief of the Revolutionary forces; fourth, as a great moral
force in the Reconstruction period;
fifth, as a builder of a new nation.
"Washington," said Professor Risley, "was very human. He swore appropriately, he flirted, he danced, be
bred and rode horses, he was an outof-doors man, and a boy scout." In
conclusion, Professor Risley quoted a
paragraph from C. H. Van Tync:
"As men looked back over the years
of strife, they saw clearly that the
chief reason why the American cause
was not lost before France came to
its aid was the personal leadership of
Washington. If we seek to explain,
it was not his great mind, for Franklin's was greater; not his force,
energy, or ingenuity, for Benedict
Arnold surpassed him in these qualities; not his military experience, for
Charles Lee's was far more extensive;
but it was the strength of character
which day by day won the love of his
soldiers and the perfect confidence of
bis countrymen. The absence of a
mean ambition, the one desire of
Who woidd have recognized the
gym in all its regalia last Saturday
evening at the Senior Hop? Red crepe
paper turned the lights into softly
glowing lanterns, and twisted with the
while crepe paper, worked out the
class colors artistically in the gymnasium. Sorority and class banners,
palms and drapes gave a gay. collegiate spirit to the affair. With the
music softly or spiritedly played by
the Staley orchestra, all problems of
graduation and teaching positions
were forgotten.
Dr. Croastlale, Miss Filliiigham, and
Miss Rowley acted as chaperons.
TEACHERS CONFERENCE
Attendance at the conference, March
21, of Capitol District high school
faculties, called by President llrubacher, to consider how the colleges
and high schools of the state may work
in closer harmony, will exceed 200, it
has been announced.
Courtesy Albany Bvonlns Nows
Response to invitations to the round
and Albany RVIMIIIIC .Jonrnnl
table conference, under the college
auspices,
has been large. Highest atJohn T. D. Blackburn, Albanv
merchant, who leads drive for $400,000 tendance may reach 400 to 500
teachers, superintendents, and princifor girls' Residence Hall.
pals.
G. A. A. Frolic To Be Dramatic Critic To
Staged Tonight Lecture On March 6
G. A. A. officials have planned a
royal good time, served country style
with all the trimmings for the frolic
tonight. It is rumored that a "dark
horse" will appear in the stunt which
will be put on by the combined efforts
of juniors and freshmen. The VirTinin Reel will share the honors with
the fox trot for the rest of the evening.
A business meeting will precede the
entertainment. At this time amendments to the G. A. A. constitution,
concerning the time of election of
officers will be put to vote. These
proposed changes arc posted on
•he G. A. A. bulletin board and should
he given due consideration. To pass
or reject these, an attendance of at
least one hundred and fifty is necessary, Therefore, members should be
in the gym at eight o'clock sharp.
The student body will do well to
heed the invitation, "Young folks, old
folks, everybody come." Come in
couples, in costume as Mi randy and
Hiram or young Mary and Bill, all
ready for the big barn dance down at
Hickville.
serving well his country and his fcllowmen, the faithfulness that could
not be driven from its task through
jealousy or resentment, these were
the traits that gave him a unique and
solitary place among the world's
heroes."
"Enchanted Aisles," a lecture review of the modem theater, will be
given by Alexander Woolcott, dramatic critic of the New York Sun and
of Vanity Fair, on Friday, March 6,
at Chancellor's Hall. Mr. Woolcott
is presented by the Dramatic and Art
Association and his appearance in Albany is indeed a splendid achievement
on the part of this organization.
Arrangements regarding the sale of
reserved seat tickets will be announced
later. Students will be admitted free,
on presentation of tax ticket.
On Saturday evening, March 14, the
Dramatic and Art Association will
present Miss Agnes F. Futtcrer in a
reading, "The Great Divide," by William Vaughn Moody. Miss Futtcrer
will read in Chancellor's Hall.
DRAMATICS CLASS PLAYS
Rehearsals are under way for two
plays to be given by the Advanced
Dramatics class Wednesday evening,
March 4, at 8:15, in the college auditorium.
The cast of the play,
directed by Dorothy McAlley, includes: Mr. Owen, Goldena Bills,
and Frances Price. The cast of the
play directed by Mary Vedder, includes Vivian Hart, Mary O'Harc,
Eciwin Van Kleeck, and Niles Haight,
all familiar to the college audience.
STATE
ROCHESTER
Howard
R. F,
L. F.
Alvcrsou
C.
Simonsen
Gainor
R. G.
Hildrelh
Juckett
Nephew
L.G.
Bordwell
Rochester College of Optometry will
invade Slate College tomorrow night
for the closing game of the 1924-25
basketball season. With a siring of
live victories to its credit, the Purple
and Gold will go Into the game in
lop form determined to break the
tie that now exists between its victories and defeats for the season. The
lineup of the two colleges will be as
above,
Cortland Normal fell victim to the
speed of the varsity last Friday night
before the biggest crowd of the year,
in a 20 lo 11 defeat in the gymnasium,
Coach Baker pounded away at the
squad this week to insure prime condition tomorrow, The last practice
of the year was yesterday afternoon.
Baker's announced lineup is that which
started the game last week,
Slate won the Cortland game in the
second half, practically in the filial
quarter. Trailing behind the visitors
9 to 8 at half time, the Purple and
Cold scored two baskets against the
opponents' foul point in the third
quarter, and in the last period they
swept the opposition off its feet, running up eight more points and holding
Cortland to another foul.
The game was fast all the w;. and
was cleanly played. Close guarding
kept the sphere milling in the opening
quarter, In the second quarter Cortland found the basket and ran into the
lead while State missed some heartbreaking shots,
Captain
Gainor
started the scoring spree of the final
period almost on the opening whistle
with a sensational basket, following
with a foul. Then Nephew sunk two,
and although Cortland substituted
twice to turn the tide the game ended
with State on the long end of the
score. Cortland had won its two previous games.
The score:
CORTLAND
fb. l|>. tp.
Blair, rf
1
.3
1
Bassctt, If
1
3
1
Wratten, If
0
0
0
Stevens, c
0
1
1
Reed, lg
0
0
0
Dexter, rg
1
2
4
Foster, lg
0
0
0
l l or nung
Kuczynski
.3
Totals
STAT!
Hornung, rf .
Kuczynski, If
Gainor, c . . . .
Juckett, rg ..
Nephew, lg ..
Griffin, lg
Totals
fb.
0
1
?
0
5
0
5
11
fp. tp.
0
0
3
0
0
1
0
2
7
0
10
1
20
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 27, 1925
Pago Two
&iate ffluUwj? %m#
Vol. IX
Feb, 27, 1925
N o . 18
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars
per year. Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager.
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the editors before Monday of the week of publication.)
Editor-in-Chief
KATHLEEN E. F U R M A N ,
'25
Managing Editor
I-IARRY S. GODFREY,
'26
Business Manager
R U T H BARTON,
'25
Subscription Manager
GWENDOLYN J O N E S ,
'25
Assistant Business Managers
L o i s MOORE, '25
E L I S E BOWER, '25
Assistant Subscription Manager
H E L E N BARCLAY,
'26
Associate Editors
FLORENCE PLATNEK, '25
H E L E N ELLIOTT, '26
JOYCE PERSONS, '26
MARGARET B E N J A M I N , '26
Reporters
SARA BARKLEY, '27
J U L I A F A Y , '27
K A T H R V N B L E N I S , '27
A N N A KOFP, '26
E D W I N V A N KLEECK, '27
LOUISE G U N N , '27
OUR DUTY
Our college is a slate institution,
supported by the voters of the state.
As such it belongs to us and we should
feel a certain pride of ownership in
it. Although candy and gum is sold
in the Co-op, thai does not necessarily
imply that \YC may t h r o w the w r a p pings wherever we choose, ft rather
implies that we should show our a p preciation of the service of (he Co-op
by putting stray papers in waste baskets, where they belong.
Untidiness,
especially in the lower halls has been
particularly noticeable lately.
This
untidiness is probably due not to lack
of pride in our buildings, but to
thoughtlessness.
If we, personally,
are not at fault, let us reprimand our
friends. Let us feel a little s y m p a t h y
for our janitors and do a little j a n i t o r
work ourselves by picking up stray
pieces of orange peel and of paper
laying about the building,
L e t us
try to realize that Alma M a t e r m e a n s
loving mother, then perhaps we will
be more concretely a w a r e of the respect and deference which should be
shown her.
ARTISTS
ENTERTAIN
T h e Music Club held a most enjoyable meeting on T h u r s d a y afternoon, February 19, in the auditorium.
A motion was carried to increase the
vearly dues of the club from t w e n t y live cents to fifty cents.
After the
business meeting Felix Festa played
three excellent violin solos, " L c Carnival do Venice," ' ' O r i e n t a l e , " and
"Sarabaude."
Anne Holroyd
sang
two soprano solos " U n e x p r e s s e d " and
"If Love Were All." Ruth R a y n e r
and Ruth Van Zand! played a piano
duet, "March of the U h l a n s . "
ON COLLEGE HABITS
R I S L E Y A D D R E S S E S P O L L SCI.
H o w often it is said, " Y e s , college
did it." Careless habits, and slovenly
ways, for these, college, life gets the
blame. Since colleges first existed the
tendency has been in this same direction, and t h e t r a g e d y of it all is
that much of the criticism is justly
given,
H o w little of it, however,
makes even the s e m b l a n c e of an impression I T h e college man finishes
his course, receives his degree, and
goes forth c a r r y i n g his habits, now
fully grown m o r e firmly fixed, out
into* the world which is all too ready
to pick Haws.
T h e question then arises as to how
this evil is to be overcome. T h e solution is simple.
It but requires a
change of attitude which is to be
maintained
throughout
the college
career, a careful survey of actions and
motives. T h e c o n d i t i o n s which now
exist especially in the men's locker
room are absolutely unnecessary. A
little care and thought exercised by
each man would remove the cause. 11
would call for personal observation of
one's self and of others,
W h y no!
start such a reform, if reform it need
be called? Without d o u b t it will require educating the pupils from Millie
High as to their duly bill il will be
worth the effort.
A good example
set by the college men will do as much
as a n y t h i n g in Ibis direction.
Cooperation and a spirit of reform can
transform the locker r o o m from a disgraceful wreck to an example of careful and judicious conduct on the part
of the majority of its frequenters, an
example which will explode the theory
usually advanced r e g a r d i n g the habits
of college men.
At an evening meeting of the P o litical Science Club, Wednesday, February IS, Professor Risley addressed
a large assembly on the subject,
"fl.-ily and the Fascisli."
LOYALTY
W h a t is loyally? _ It is a feeling
which everyone Ivjfl for e v e r y t h i n g to
which he belongs. I k n o w thai every
State College s t u d e n t has that feeling
for his college.
W h y doesn't each
one show it? Why doesn't be or she
a t t e n d the functions given for the enj o y m e n t of all, not for a few?
1 heard the r e m a r k the o t h e r day
that the various e n t e r t a i n m e n t s were
"dead." W h a t m a k e s them so?
students themselves. T h e y c o m e with
he idea that they a r e not g o i n g to
have a good lime, instead of c o m i n g
with the idea that they are g o i n g lo
help the others, as well as themselves,
to make the occasion an enjoyable
one. T h e result is inevitable. S o m e
students .no away disgusted.
A n o t h e r t h i n g is class loyalty, fl is
especially noticeable a m o n g the freshmen that they lack class loyalty.
W h e n e v e r a class m e e t i n g is called,
s o m e feel it a c u m b e r s o m e d u l y to
a t t e n d it, and do not realize that they
are being disloyal to their class.
T h e s e people are slackers, who fail in
their tasks, for il is just as much a
person's task to do what is expected
of him in college, as il is a laborer's
task to do what is expected of
him on his particular j o b .
A famous excuse for all Ibis disloyalty is, "I can't come, for I have
too much s t u d y i n g to d o . "
T o those who say this, let me repeat
the old, old adage, "All w o r k and no
play makes Jack a dull boy."
MISS P E R I N E T O A T T E N D
TEACHERS ASSOCIATION
MEETING
Miss Ferine, head ol the Art Dcpartment, is expecting to a t t e n d the
Eastern A r t s T e a c h e r s Association,
which will meet in Springfield, Massachuselts. about April l-l.
Several large, and brightly colored
posters were arrayed on curtains, pictures which the Fascist! party in Italy
used to advertise the elections. One
poster represented a Fascisli soldier,
blind, his eyes burnt out by the
C o m m u n i s t s , s t a m p i n g upon the red
flag of the C o m m u n i s t s , T h i s Fascist!
boy wore the famous black shirt, I he
sign of his party.
Professor Risley had the opportunity of witnessing the celebration of
the elections, favorable to the Fascist!, which had taken place four days
before, F i r s t came the g r a n d march
of (he Fascisli, (heir quick thrilling
step, their inspiring song, and their yell
of "Fga-ola-ola."
They carried the
flag of Italy, and each soldier saluted
al the place where Mussolini appeared
later.
Mussolini then appeared and
.poke to the gathering in a quick,
loud, vibrating voice. This adopted
son of Rome is particularly insistent
mi discipline.
In c o n t r a s t i n g the lime between
1919, (he end of the war and August 30,
1922, when Mussolini was summoned
by (he King lo lake over the government, and the time which has elapserl
since A u g u s t , 1922, one is struck by
the c h a n g e . In the lirsl period after
the war, when the C o m m u n i s t s were
in power, the country was in a terrible
condition: men were out of work, railroads were not running, there were
no harvests, and " t e r r o r was the order
of the d a y s ; " travel is easy today,
under Fascisli rule, to all parts of Daly,
the c o u n t r y is al peace, contentment,
people singing aboul their work is
the "order of the day."
W h o is this man Mussolini? Today
he is the Prime Minister of Italy, His
father was a blacksmith in northern
Italy. Mussolini is a veteran, literally
scarred by a hundred wounds, an
editor, student, teacher, author, and
writer, has black hair, dark olive skir
a hawklike nose, an a n g u l a r chin, and
is tall as compared with most flaii.'jn
chested, and speaks in ;i resonant, vibrating voice.
T h e question today Is, how permanent is this parly lo be?
Professor
Risley says that permanency, as far
he can see, depends upon the unselfishness of (he aims of ihe Fascisti
and Mussolini.
IN MEMORIAM
Miss Martinez is sl'll a living memory a m o n g Slate College students, as
proved In' a drive carried on under
the auspices of (he Spanish Club, with
A u n e Steidinpcr, '27, acting as chairman. T h e drive, taking the form of
tag-selling, has as its aim the raising
of the necessary finances lo purchase
a memorial in h o n o r of Miss Marline/..
T h i s memorial will probably
lake the form of a window in the
auditorium. T h e entire college should
be vitally interested and anxious lo
assist in such a project.
ART
CLASSES TO
VISIT
N.
Y.
T h e Art classes are p l a n n i n g lo
make a (rip to the Metropolitan Muiim in New Y o r k t ' i l v about the
j time of F a s t e r vacation. T h o s e of ih,
Art D e p a r t m e n t who wish lo take ad
| vantage of this trip see M r s . South
I wood T u e s d a y or T h u r s d a y al nine
I o'clock in room 208.
Elise Bovver, 25, has accepted a
teaching position at fthaca, for the
rest of the semester.
She will be
graduated in J u n e with her class,
Miss Marguerite N e l s o n , of New
York City was the week-end guest of
Myra Haftirmnn, '27, at P.si Gamma
house.
Viola Holmes, '23, spent the weekend at Ihe Eta Phi house.
On Saturday afternoon, February
20, ihe sophomores at the Eta Phi
house entertained at a bridge parly.
Miss Jean S a u n d e r s and Miss Jessie
Mitchell were visitors at Ihe Eta Phi
house lasl week-end.
Margaret Meyers, '23, spent the
week-end at her h o m e in .Albany.
Marion II. C h c s e b r o u g h , '26, spent
Ihe week-end in Greenwich,
New
York.
Fla Phi welcomes F r a n c e s Buckley, '27, as a pledge m e m b e r .
On Saturday afternoon,
February
14, Fla Phi gave an informal s h o w e r
for Harriet Harms, '2$, whose engagement has recently been a n n o u n c e d ,
Sybell Maclay, '26, has resumed her
studies after an illness which has conlined her lo her home for a few weeks.
Rita Cowan, '2d, is now living at the
I Kappa Delta house.
|
Erva I.illell, '23, was a recent gitesl
i al the Kappa Delia house.
Manila Van Gelder, '2-1, spent the
week-end al the Kappa Delia house.
She is now teaching in tin.' T r o y High
hoof
Miss Fannie Kill' of T r o y spent Ihe
.•ek-eiid al ihe Delta O m e g a house
I as ihe guest of Helen Means, '25.
Gladys Weaver, '24, spent the week| end al ihe Delta O m e g a house.
|
Miss Marion Duliois of Greenporl,
- Long Island, spent the week-end visitI Ing her sisters, Frances Duliois, '25,
and Ethel DuHois, '27.
Beta Zela welcomes Mildred Hubert,
'20 into full m e m b e r s h i p .
Cora Reed. '25, spent the week-end
I in I'lica.
Beta Chapter of O m i c r o u Nil, the
National H o n o r a r y Society of H o m e
Economies, a n n o u n c e s the election of
Mildred Babcock, '26, as a pledge
member.
Mary Nolan, '26, who has been suffering from an attack of the grippe
is somewhat improved.
Alpha F.psilon Phi entertained her
alumnae al a theater p a r t y S a t u r d a y
night at the Capitol T h e a t e r , and al a
gathering at 392 N e w Scotland Avej mi", on Sunday afternoon.
I A new student house has been
opened at 219 Ontario Street. At present six girls and a housekeeper are
living' there. T h e r e a r e still vacancies
for those who need to c h a n g e ,
inquiries about rooms at this house m a y
be made in' Dean Pierce's office.
Dr. VVillard D. J o h n s o n of Albany,
a Slate College g r a d u a t e , w h o has been
engaged in school w o r k in N e w Yorkstate for nearly fifty years and w h o
| has been employed by t h e S t a t e E d u cation Department for
twenty-one
I years, will retire Ibis m o n t h , accordi in!-:' to an a n n o u n c e m e n t by the Edu! cation Department.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, EEJ3RUAEV '-'7, 1025
College Cullings
T h e College in Pine Mills raised the
cup of victory to its lips Friday night
and d r a n k deeply again. It was live
times in a b o u t as m a n y weeks that a
P u r p l e and Gold basketball team had
conquered, and a cheering crowd
yelled as C o r t l a n d ' s sun rose to its
zenith, waned and set back of the hill
of a 20 to 11 defeat, T o m o r r o w night
the team will end the most meritorious athletic season it has been State's
fortune to attain in years.
T h e success should not go unrecognized. T h e college is showing its approval of its work in cheers and
a t t e n d a n c e , in spirit and pride, but
s o m e t h i n g should be done to express
this in m o r e lasting form. The varsity S will go to the men and with it
should go purple basketball sweaters.
In limes past this mark of appreciation
has been given the athletic teams;
a l t h o u g h for two years Ibis has not
been done, it seems lining to revise
the c u s t o m now.
Coach Baker has
promised his men a dinner if they win
thi' final g a m e ; the athletic council
should seel; to give them
either
s w e a t e r s o r gold basketball charms.
T h i s c o m m e n t from Dean Fierce
who has had enough experience with
college girls to know whereof she
speaks, proves that the modern girl
is lar from hopeless:
" / believe in the modern girl.
I
think
she
is
as
IIIHHI as
her
iiwllier
mid grandmother.
I
think she dresses mure sensibly
than they; I think she is n
healthier e/irl. I hnaw she is a
delightful person with ivhom in
work."
Q T U D E N T S who enjoyed the Senior
f l o p last week can sympathize
with the u n f o r t u n a t e y o u n g ladies of
11 tinier College's g r a d u a t i n g class of
lael year. T h e y didn't have the Senior
H o p because they didn't have the
beaux.
H u n t e r ' s class of '25 have
been using the lesson as an incentive
to their s t u d e n t s to sign up for this
year's affair.
The
names
of
Clarenee
Nephctv, '28 and Tony
Kuczynski, '28, of the varsity basketball
ham appeared conspicuously as
choices of Albany court fans for
positions
on an all-star
city
amateur
team this week and
last, in a poll conducted by a
city neivspapcr.
On the first
eleven mythical teams
selected,
Nephew's name appeared as first
choice center nine limes and substitute center once.
He plays
also with the Company C and
Polish A. C. outfits.
Women's Varsity To
Play Russell Sage
Stale's women's varsity will begin
the season with tlic Russell Sage game
scheduled for March 7. T h e contest,
called for three o'clock, will be held
in the V. VV. C. A. gym at Troy.
A r r a n g e m e n t s are being completed to
charier special cars to convey State's
rooters.
Four seniors of last year's squad,
Ruth Moore, Florence Craddock, Dot
l i o y l , and Margaret llulchius, form
a seasoned nucleus for this squad and
the iuterclass games of the year have
furnished some promising recruits in
the field. Miss Johnston, the coach,
is not ready to slate the final lineup.
Reports from the rival college predict
a fast, close game.
H. E. D E P A R T M E N T
Miss Cora M. Winchell, Professor
of Household Arts Education, TeachC'oll
lumbia
University,
visited the i II, • Friday afternoon
anil spent lb
k-end in Albany.
T h e four
four seniors in (he Home
Manage meiit
House together with
Miss
Fillingham
entertained
the
M isses Winchell at dinner on Friday
evening
Miss Nye was also Invited
but was forced to leave on the 6:10
train for Syracuse.
Miss Claribe! Nye, New York Slate
Demonstration Leader, spoke to the
seniors and juniors in H o m e Economics at four o'clock on Friday, She
outlined the types of positions available in the Extension Service in New
York Slate and the general organization of the farm women in relation to
the county demonstration agents and
the stale leaders.
On Friday evening, March 6, the
H o m e Economics Club will give its
annual initiation party.
H o m e Economics freshmen and members of the
other classes not already members of
the club, are invited.
PUZZLERS
REAPPEAR
GAMMA K A P P A P H I
Page Three
REUNION
A T R^JSS^LL
•*/$
SAGE
A*
T h e alumnae of G a m m a Kappa Phi
conducted their fourth annual reunion
over the week-end at the sorority
house in Quail street.
Miss Vera
Comstoek, the president, presided at
the business session, Officers for the
year were elected as follows:
President, Miss Susan Collier; vice-president, Miss Eleanor GilTen; recording
secretary, Miss Dorothy W e s i e r m a n ;
corresponding secretaries, Miss Marion ('line and Miss Pauline Baker;
treasurer, Miss J a n e Scullen.
The
guests attended the matinee after
luncheon. At a dinner S a t u r d a y night
in tlic H a m p t o n , Miss Susan Collier
was toastinistress.
Miss Vera Coinstock spoke for the alumnae .of (lie
sororky.
Ailecn Cage and
Anne
Evans represented the active sorority
in the college.
T h e girls' varsilyj.rlas'Vc.tball team of
S t a t e a n s w e r H i i ^ s o l P l ^ i g e ^ challenge
next S a t u r d a y a^ternafuifjM^rch 7, in
T r o y . T h e s e are rjfa fft$T» f i f u i c m ory of past e x p e r i e h c ^ t l f c ^ ^ a r | f r * ^ i lion of them makes the cn(y:cf'Jitatc
College s t u d e n t body the •ffefeu<faii&,
L a s t year Russell S a g e , ' e n n i n s S e ^
met State's challenge.
Specif
d i w Y
were chartered, fines imposed
on^O1!
impose
"•
delinquent supporters, if any, and the
entire college full of pep and spirit,
on the qui vive to respond to cheer
and song leaders came to State. W i t h
this in view what other alternative is
there for State but to carry on by
going to T r o y next Saturday, giving
the team rousing support—and m a k i n g
the c o n t e s t count for State?
Plan for it, cheer for it and G O !
'26.
Sunday afternoon the active members gave a lea for the alumnae at
(he house.
T w o events were scheduled in the
calendar of Citizen Scouts last week.
On W e d n e s d a y night, at the regular
meeting, Miss Ltteicr, registered nurse,
gave a talk on First Aid accompanied
by
a
practical
demonstration
of
bandaging.
T r o o p I also participated in the
Scout Rally held at Chancellor's Hall
S a t u r d a y night.
Lorena Shaffer, '26,
led the singing find Elizabeth Bender,
'27, was bugler. Several of the scouts
from T r o o p I received merit badges
and Mildred Wilson, '27, as captain
of T r o o p 17 was awarded the badge
of merit for exceptional service to
scouting. Miss Mabel T a l m a d g c was
also t h u s honored. O t h e r m e m b e r s of
T r o o p 1 were engaged in keeping
order and taking roll call.
JUNIOR CLASS MEETS
A meeting of the junior class was
held February 20, to elect a successor
(o Margaret Heiijauiin, class representative on the (I. A. A. council, who
was forced lo resign because of exCeLorena Shaffer
was
line
elected lo
mplete the unexpired
term,
Mildred llamersley, '25, edilor-incbief of (his year's "Pod," requested
that the class take action by m e a n s
of which the editor-in-chief and business manager of the 1626 year book
may receive training. As a result of
her plea, m e m b e r s of the class of 1926
voted to have volunteers from the
class try out for these positions, under
the direction of the present board.
T h o s e m e m b e r s of '26 interested
should hand their names to Muriel
Wenzel, class president,
CO-OP
WITH
THE
CITIZEN
STRAY
SCOUTS
BITS
S e n i o r s : Sign up now for Comm e n c e m e n t a n n o u n c e m e n t s on the
Senior Bulletin Board. T h e final
o r d e r will be placed by March 6.
REDUCTIONS
T h e Co-op has some new linen
envelopes to match the forty cent
tablets with college seal. T h e envelopes may be purchased for twenty
cents without the seal, or thirty cents
with purple seal like that on the
tablets.
'fbe fifty cent boxes of plain stationery, assorted colors, are a real
bargain, as they are being sold for
only twenty-live cents. T h e r e is nothing w r o n g with the paper. It is only
the soiled boxes that is causing it to
be sold at such a reduction.
H a v e you seen the dainty g r e e t i n g
cards?
Not only for birthdays, but
for various occasions and purposes,
the Co-op has in its a s s o r t m e n t appropriate greetings in the very best
taste.
If nothing in the display
pleases you, ask to see the others that
are behind the counter. ,
As a result of the freshman election
held last week D o r o t h y Rabie was
chosen s o n g leader. T h e r e will be a
revote for cheer leader between K.
Doughty and C, E m e r y ,
.Sophomore Soiree approaches, T h e
list is a l r e a d y a w a i t i n g signatures and
three dollar bids, for such a gay event
as this Soiree is to- he, are certainly
bargains. Friday the thirteenth sounds
o m i n o u s , but everyone is urged to bury
his superstitions and "trip the light
fantastic" on that date—that is, every
s o p h o m o r e or class officer.
A m o n g those a l u m n a e who visited
State College last M o n d a y
were,
Elizabeth Budd, '23, D o r o t h y Bcnnit,
'24, M a r g e Bayliss, '24, Viola H o l m e s ,
'23, M a r g a r e t U n d e r w o o d , '22, Helen
S h e p a r d s o n , '23, and Nellie Maxim, '24.
T h e cross-word puzzlers of the
senior-sophomore stunt reappeared at
(be parly recently given by Y. W .
to the industrial clubs of the city
Y. W. C. A. M a c N a m a r a ' s Russian
band rendered several touching selections, and in other words Helen
T h o m p s o n and Gertrude Olds presented scenes from childhood. Dancing and the disposal of refreshments
occupied the rest of the evening's
entertainment which ended with a
series of group s o n g s .
T h e affair, it is hoped, will be a precedent for m a n y similar meetings of
I O O K r N G back i u ' o the files of the the industrial clubs with the college
y College N e w s for 1916-17 one " Y . "
finds these a n n o u n c e m e n t s :
Y. W . T O G I V E T A B L E A U X
"A good omen this year is the presP R E S I D E N T GIVES TALK
M a r y S w a r t , w h o is in charge of the
ence of more than 60 men in the
SOCIAL SERVICE WORK
President
Brubachcr
spoke
last
Y. W . m e e t i n g for next Tuesday, reentering class.
From about 10 to 1
in the girls' favor a few years ago it T h u r s d a y at the informal conference
Girls who are interested in social ports t h a t it is to consist of a scries
of health education specialists at Cin- service work along the gymnastic line of
tableaux
representing
famous
has n o w reached the 5 to 1 mark."
cinnati.
are urged to see Iva Hinniau at once. women of the Bible.
" I ' r o f e s s o r Harold W . T h o m p s o n
of Albany and Miss Jean
Alma
S a u n d e r s were married September 6
at H a m i l t o n College."
" M i s s J a c k W i l b u r and Mr. Edwy n
J o h n s t o n e will conduct dancing classes
in the gym T u e s d a y and Friday aftern o o n s a n d will give a prize at the em\
394-396 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.
of their season for the best imitation
of their position, form and step-work
in the social dance."
125 Central A v e at L e x i n g t o n
Special Attention Given
" T h e S l a t e College basketball team
Printers of State College
''efeated Rensselaer Polytechnic InstiSociety Work
Open
E
v
e
n
i
n
g
s
N
e
w
s
tute varsity in A l b a n y . "
KOHN BROS.
"A Good Place to Buy"
SHOES
MILLS ART PRESS
PRINTING
+
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 27, 1025
Page Four
PRITCHARD SPEAKS AT Y. W.
American education is failing to
develop leaders, the Rev, H. A, Pritcliard, dean of the Cathedra! of St.
John the Divine, New York, declared
Tuesday afternoon, addressing the
Y, W. C. A. at its weekly meeting.
Present practices are resulting in the
production from publics and private
schools and colleges of a student
whose mind is filled with a jumble of
loosely correlated information on
many subjects and thorough knowledge of nothing, he said.
'Creating the British method of
teaching which inaugurates specialization in study at an early age, the
speaker appealed to the students to
use their influence to bring about a
new system "so that the mistake of
leveling all minds to the same standard type .may not go on."
School teachers should not be
afraid to frankly discuss the Bible
with pupils who question them, Dr.
Pritchard declared, adding that it is
impossible to "bluff modern children,"
and that "teachers should not ask
(hem to believe stories probably not
literally true."
BIOLOGY CLUB HIKE
The firsl Biology Club hike was
held Saturday morning, February 2\,
at °:,30. The'start was made at Magazine Street on the Country Club car
line, Dr. Douglas led the party over
sandy country roads, and through
wooded fields for over two hours, and
many trees and shrubs and other
specimens of interest were identified
by her. She told many interesting
facts about some of them and everyone felt w.'ll repaid for having taken
the trip. The members who attended
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Miss Clarabelle Nye of Cornell was
presented to the student assembly,
Friday, February 20, by Miss Winched, head of the Koine Economics
Department of State College. Miss
Winched made the statement that it
is no longer the desire of teachers
to "teach school," but to teach boys
and girls. In order to teach children,
it is necessary to be familiar with
their homes, communities, and the organizations of the communities, ft
was on the subject of "organizations
at work in the state" that Miss Nye
spoke.
"There are more organizations in a
small community than there are days
in the week," said Miss Nye. "These
organizations are usually for (he purpose of instructing and benefiting their
members." In 1900, the unique idea
was born that "One is never to old to
learn." As a result postal cards were
sent to farmers' wives asking those
wdio were interested in saving steps
to reply. Thousands of women re'••irmlcd.
Since that time Home
Bureaus have been established in
Rochester, Syracuse, anil Buffalo,
which help women to help themselves,
The women tire taught lo make budgets ami to systematize their liousevvrrk, Home Bureau workers are paid
• rrv well, the salaries ranging from
$1 800 to $,3,000 a year. Any college
graduate can greatly help her community by entering this line of work.
CALENDAR
Friday, February 27
It Pays To Advertise in These
8:00 P. M. Gym Frolic—GymnaColumns
sium.
Saturday, February 28
8:00 P. M. Basketball—Rochester
School of Optometry
Gymnasium.
Sunday, March 1
.1:00 P. M. Y. VV. C. A. Vespers—
Rotunda.
"The Family Store"
Tuesday March 3
1116 Madison Ave., Cor. Allen
.1:00 P. M. Y. VV. C, A.—Auditorium,
Phone West 1*6
TOO P. M. French Club,
N.
W.
DHKKS
and M. T. Stone, Prop.
7:M) P. M. roscph Henry Meeting
— Room 150.
Wednesday, March 4
•1:00 P. M. Newman Club—Room
211.
We Use Best Oak Leather
8.15 I'. M. Advanced Dramatics
Class Plays.
Good Year Rubber Heels
Thursday, March 5
4:00 P. M. Mathematics Club— and O'Sullivan Rubber Heels
Room 201.
250 Central A v e . 2 doors from Liiko Ave
DORMITORY DRIVE CAMPAIGN
The Citizens Committee for the
C. P. LOWRY
Dormitory Drive to be staged in AlWatchm&ker and Jeweler
bany and vicinity in the near future
is rapidly being organized with John
171 Central cAvemie
T. D. Blackburn, prominent business
Albany, <5\.. Y.
man of this cilv, as chairman. The
'.T.jccl to raise $150000 has been
Phone Wtst
3756-J
favorably received by the citizens of
Albany. A meeting of the committee
including alumnae, representing the
different districts of the stale, is to
l;e held Monday night at the Hampton Hotel, at which time plans for
were Florence Gillett, Mildred Wilson, the campaign will be formulated,
ECONOMY STORE 215 CENTRAL AV.
Madeline Uctien, Ruth Dean, D«rotbv
Dress Goods Trimmings
Wickwire, Ethel Wilburn, Christie
Bartholomew, Alice Gooding, Burton
Hemstitching
and Pleating
Sngc, Harold Ferguson, Harold Perry,
•,ni Arthur Kurlznocker.
OPEN EVENINGS
RESTAURANT
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL DINNERS
40and50cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
PINE HILLS PHARMACY
Shoe Repairing
Try Me Out
Cleanses mouth and
teeth and aids digestion.
R e l i e v e s that overeaten feeling and acid
mouth.
Its 1-a-s-t-I-n-g flavor
satisfies the craving lor
sweets.
Wrlgley's Is double
value In the benefit and
pleasure It provides.
Compliments
of
College Candy Shop
West Lawrence
Shoe Repairing Shop
SHOE SHINE
MATTEO LAVENIA
MEAL TICKETS SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER 60c
Telephone
206 Washington Ave.
4 doors above Lark St.
West 3464
Cor. West Lawrence & Western Ave.
SPORTING GOODS
ATTENTION
Radio Supplies
SENIORS AND FACULTY WRITE M E - I HAVE A MESSAGE
FOR YOU
HOWARD A.
467 Broadway
Open Evenings
ALBANY AUTO SUPPLY, INC.
SHEARER
West 1616
Albany
145 Central Avenue
BARBER SHOP
Remaining Stock of Silk and Wool Hosiery COLLEGE
CONRAD HE YES, Prop.
at $1.25
T V
New Silks
WOOLENS
& COTTONS
Drop in between Classes
a pair
V A L U E S UP TO | 3 , o o
,9 CENTRAL AVENUE
^KtTJCft S l f f l p
H. E. STAHLER'S RESTAURANT
82 ROBIN STREET
State College
Cafeteria
307 CENTRAL <AVE. cAlbany, &C Y.
OverKre.se. B-l00
e
l
Store
HeWBtt'S S i l k SIlOD
I E I T NORTH
UflDTU PEARL
DCADI
15-17
Luncheon or dinner 11:15—1:30
LAST <BUT 3COT LEAS!
Compliments of
The Gateway Press
" T H E BEST TS NONE TO GOOD"
Candies, Ice Cream, Soda, Cigars
For Quality Merchandise and Courteous Treatment Visit
Chapman #tmm>?i
<Phone West 6448 ( g l a s s &iitftfii
QUALITY TRINTERS
AT YOVR ELBOW—WEST 2037
336 Central Avenue
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