State College News LECTURE A SUCCESS

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE F O R TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF I 9 L
VOL. IX
No. 16
ALBANY, N. Y. FEBRUARY 13, 1925
$3.00 per year
CONCERT
! Library Seeks To
IMany Degrees Given
W I N S F A M E l Serve Student Body; Faculty By College
!
Harmanus
Harmanus
Bleecker
Bleeclrcr
Library auLibrary
a i 1 . / ^ e u l y - s i x members of the college
LECTURE A
SUCCESS
n i l l y l,;,VL
have 1r eeciVQt!
jliiouuces
- ~ «a further
'««•"» extension
< — of
- coop<— ; '.aeully
' '
*mm fro"'
Noted Quartet T o
[ oration with the students of Slate .Slate. College, a recent poll shows. Farrar Welcomed To
Play H e r e in April College in the eslahlishment of a re- Twenty-one of those instructors re-
Capitol District
serve shelf in History. The follow- ceived their first degrees from State
Under the competent and experl- ing list, prepared
.._i
,, " J-Jts%
l i I 0 . and live others earned honors here
especially
for
John Farrar, introduced by Miss
diced direction of Prof. T. Frederick | tory ,i," will be found on reserve in after gelling bachelor's degrees else- Agnes Futterer as editor of the BookI. Candlyn, the second concert of the Reference Room throughout lb. where. This is live limes as many as man, and author of two recent Broad(•lie Music Association was held last course: Babcock, Rise of American the nc.xl highest college, Columbia way offerings, and who is soon to hold
Friday night in Chancellor's Hall, and Nationality: Bassell, The Federalist university, which has four representa- a responsible position with the Doran
the young musicians won and earned ;System; Uogar, Economic History; tives on the faculty.
Publishing Company, delighted his
Miss fierce heads Hie Slate College Albany admirers in the auditorium
Hie plaudits of a large and responsive Chatlvvick, Causes of the Civil War;
and others are the Misses
audience.
Channing, JelTersonian System; Gar- graduates
Rowley, Fillingham, dishing, Shaver, Saturday evening, February 7. Mr.
Tbe orchestra did some very cruclit- riscm, Westward Extension; Mart, •"til 1 i'i( r. Scotland, Johnson,_,Johnston,
.,„,„, Farrar .nave helpful advice and sugAbolition and Slavery; Mac Donald, Wallace, Bctz, Avery, Wcrlh, I'eltz, gestions to those who are planning
able and altogether pleasing work.
The choral numbers by the mixed | , , | ; , ( l l , j a l l Democracy; McLaughlin, ' ) l i l l c o l m ' R i " , ^'"""'"{f- i l l u l H'jniiin,
,..,.,...
and woman's choruses were well sung Confederation and Constitution; Tur- | . ' S j ,
'
'" "'
'
"''>"yone,"
said
Mr. Farrar,
and showed careful preparation. The I lwr< pjSL, ,,f , ] u , New West; Van Tyne. | Professor Sayles, Miss Ferine, Fro- I " writes a play sooner or Inter, whether
S!i 1
lss
Anderson, Mr. j be expects to, or not. Children are
various numbers were splendidly re- I American Revolution; West, American | ^• °. .' M'ityir, .'^
ceived and met with the cordial appro- History and Government.
( andlyn, Miss Loeb, are others hav- playwrights by nature, but education
Aboul thirty other books listed in '"g degrees from the college.
.
, .
. , j
the Syllabus are in the circulation,. Those with Columbia university inhibits this play instinct in (heir lives.
They are taught not to 'show off,
i ins is an aueinpi on ine pan 01 , •' •>-»» >,
vvouuaru, uronson, ami I n you write a play, clout put it in
tn violinist, who at once enthralled I Hie Library lo extend its services to Miss Frear, Colgate is in third place a trunk and leave it [here for vou
is listeners with his superb renditions, benefit Slate College students.
If with Professors Sayles, Pislcv, audi ,,.,„.,,, i„. .,,,, ,, , ,. v o (l,, a t!
J ,
Ir, Szekely is a thoroughly trained }JIIH -service is appreciated and used In York. Cornell has Professor Hircl,- |
/'
' '
V™ ' f
•
. , .
.
the proper manner much may be done enough and Dr. Collins, University of: wtitten « masterpiece, 11 is better to
rust, evokes a most luscious tone 1() i n r o v ( , ( , u , m m i
fat-ilitu-.s. [f Michigan has Professors Walker 'and lake il to a lilerarv critic at once, and
•on, lus instrument and what is more l | ) i s ( I o M | 1 ( | | w n | . | c 0 ( J l n t | v t t i n a g c o u a I y i I Kirlland, Syracuse university has I'm- I find out that you 'haven't, Then foras an mipccciiDle leciiuupie.
the matter will be dropped,
' fessor Kennedy and Miss Cobb, Dr, got everything about your play. There
lie Is atoyoung
surely
]±
Hastings and Professor
Slinard claim will be many changes made, but don't
destined
win aman,
frontwho
rankis in
hi
l nBrown as their Alma
'"""I
winsuch
a front
m his I
CONFERENCE CALLED
' •'•-•- vl
"Mater.
-'i ....'..
i othem. •It• •is wise
• to
• liml
••' . a star
cstlned toand
profession,
great rank
conductors
"Big
Three"
are
represented !l11
•ll"1 '" become acquainted with her,
The
A movement to bring colleges and as follows: Vale by President
as Mengelberg Goossers and GahriloUrnthings «•*<•' possible, Imd out what
witsch regard him as an artist of rare high schools into closer relationship baeber, Harvard by Dr. Painter, and l<md of play she wants, and then write
gifls and predict a most brilliant fu- will be launched in Albany March 21, Princeton by Dr. Conwell.
it.
Or, go by yourself, think through
ture for this talented musician who when Dr. Brubachcr will call a conThe resl of the faculty cheers as your play, and then write It. What is
made his initial appearance in this ference of school principals and follows: Dean Mef/lcr for the Uni- l i k c c l b>' IIR ' so-called 'provinces' is
teachers of 150 high schools in the
vcrsity of Toronto; Dr. Richardson, not generally liked by New York,
^Professor c S ' n was accompanist | W T D U t r f c t " and " C ^ Z ^ u ^ . I $ f f i ^ ^ ' E s Perl^Holfd, 1 ' I vou ^ n f f l l J ^ l r ^ n m l ^ r V " V
, the artist and WillardE, Retal- IW.njlc discussion of the methods ! ln ' n t ' l n h u i r y V & s 0 ^ ^ , h ^ t ' C . r ' , New
'* a ° a
lick
furnished hmhlv
highly artistic
artistic accom-I
accom by which the interlocking of interest McGIII university Miss Steel Un way1
ck furnished
paninienls to the choral numbers, 11 between the two fields of education, U r s i t y o f Nebraska; Dr. Hale,' Wcs'fci'weiio O'Neil is among the tewas altogether a splendid concert.
as well as o other anus of the con- !,,,,,,; Professor Mabar, Union co - U r l a i . l playwrights. 11" i a f -in, Professor Candlytl has booked the fee,cc, must be postponed for the |,,,,, ,),, P o w
romantic character, vl o, like
Ll„iversity of Ro- - V
famous London String Quartet for a
I
; Hi
' r , ! ' '','" "'"I''' r l,L,S,cr r : 1) ''' T h 0 »'P8"". Hamilton col- Charles Chaplin, complc ely also
daic in April.
e also said that .1 is hoped to make lege; Dr. Beik, Grinned college; Dr. the problems of the world lakes
" held in//"the
'2ollea Sbuildings.
d i n J """ |i M,
^ ' ^ Ph.Ihps,
" ' " TOhio
^ university;
"' Oklahoma
''"gedy Into
bis gives
hear,, and
in h
PRESIDENT BRUBACHER
lu.Jn.ld
the college
Miss I! masterful
way,
full ,'hen
expression
ss
:
xtension courses for school tea-'iREAPPOINTED CHAIRMAN crs in the Capitol District are he .g Keim. Fredericksburg college; Miss to it. h you come to New York, it
Thompson. Simmons college; Coach i would be well to see "Hie Guards1'resident Brubachcr has been reap- taught this year by members of the Baker, Temple university; Miss An- lm 'ii, 'What Price Glory, ' P e p , and
pointed chairman of the committee on faculty uurler the college's direction, dersou, Skidmore college; Miss Mor- "''he Fire Dragon, which is really
teacher recruiting of the New York Teachers in several nearby communi- ris Welleslev; Dr. Croasdalc, Wo- mmismg. ' Pigs,' is one of the clean
Slate Teachers Association, now the ties are enrolled in the courses.
men's Medical College of Philadelphia; plays of the season."
second largest association of its kind
Miss Loeb, Vassar; Professor Simonin,
The Dramatics and Arts Association
in the United States. The organizaINTERSORORITY BALL
University of Nancy, France; Mr. is to be highly complimented for
tion has 29,595 members. At t'.ie reCandlyn,
University
of
Durham,
Engaffording such an enjoyable entertainSpringtime, Maytime, and on to land. '
cent annual meeting of the executive
ment
committee in Syracuse " " of every dance time which is from nine o'clock
until
I
wo
al
the
Ten
Eyck
on
the
first
.
honorable means of pn
ig the repeal of the equal pay la
,.•> pledged. dav of May, 1925— [ntersororily Ball, j COLLEGE STUDENT HAS RE
The following chairmen are even) PORTS IN RECENT BULLETIN
now busily holding meetings to make |
PLAYS HAVE BEEN CAST
this year's^ hall the best ever in the j Three ease studies in diagnosin
Marion Bessette. '26, of the Dra- history of Slate College:
Dane,
matics clans, has announced this cast orders—Alpha Epsilon Phi, Ruby Her- pupils' needs, made by Helen C. Bar- j Tonight's basketball game with
mini, '27, are given a full-page report j Brooklyn Pharmacy has been canfor the one-act play to be presented man,
'26;
refreshments—Gamma
February 16: Ruth H. McNutt, '27, Kappa Phi, Mary Cornell, '25; ar- in a recent number of the official bullc- celled. Tomorrow night at 8 o'clock,
Mclanie Grant. '27, Olga A. Hampei, raugemen ts—Chi Sigma Theta, Marion tin of the University of the State of the varsity will play Oswego Normal
New York. The studies were based | in Hie gymnasium,
'26 Sara Dranitszki. '26, DeWitt C. M. O'Conncr, '26; invitations—Beta on
dala contained in (he Stanford ' Brooklyn, Coach Baker said, canZch, '27. The cast for the play to be Zcla, Mildred Loman, '26; t a x i s - Achievement
Tests and were carried ! celled the game this week,
directed by Ethel Persk, '26, February Eta Phi, Gertrude Coleman, '25; on on three pupils
il) a rural school to j There are two oilier games sched2.1, will be Ruth L. Moore, '25, Ed- music, Kappa Delia, Thyra licVier, determine bow much
understanding of tiled, one with Cortland Normal and
mund H, Crane, '25, and Edwin Van '26;
and decorations—Psi Gamma, the individual pupil could be obtained (one with the Rochester School of
Kleeck, '27.
Elise Bower, '25.
from careful study of such tests.
I Optometry.
Varsity Game Sat.
Brooklyn Cancelled
Page Two
&tafr dhtlkgt Sfama
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 18, 1925
REACTION
Marks arc out! There is the usual
rush for envelopes of yellow cards,
the usual slow turning away, the
usual exclamation of surprise, joyous
or otherwise. There are the usual reactions, the usual slightly complacent
rejoicing about A's, the usual half resentful gloom about E's, and all the
grades and shadings between—tpiitc
as usual.
All quite as usual—hut why? Why
should an A demand self-complacency
and an E resentment against the instructor, the course, the college, as a
whole? If the instructor and the
course, particularly the instructor, get
the blame for all E's, why shouldn't
they also get the praise for A's? Is
it fair always to say, " He gave me
an E," hut " 1 got an A?" Of course
not. But nearly everyone does it
After all, is "give," in third person
the proper verb to connect with
marks? "Giving" implies a donation,
with no payment of any sort on the
part of the recipient. Is that the v ay
we gol our marks? Do the instructors just hand us our marks, drawn
from some grab-hag of letters from
A lo I1'. inclusive? No, We get,
usually, just about what we earn, not
much more and not much less. Of
course, no one wants lo go around
saying " I earned—" in front of every
mark, even though it is true. Hut
there is a need for some substitute for
" Me gave me." There is a lot to he
said perhaps, for the slangy, but vivid
" I pulled—." At least it uses a pronoun in I he first person as the subject
of a verb of action, which is what is
needed.
However, whatever verb we use,
let's remember that the one we really
mean is1 " earn." Whether it's an A
or an I ',, let's take the responsibility
ourselves. If we want to be responsible for E's next June, now's the
lime to start. Do we?
S. B., '27.
AMONG- THE LAWYERS
A graduate of State College and a
former faculty member was the first
Vol. IX
Fob. 13, 1925
No. 16
woman lawyer in New York slate, it
was learned recently when the story of
Published weekly during the college
Miss Kate Stoiieinan, was made pubyear by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
lic. It required a special act of the
Albany, New York.
New York state legislature lo secure
The subscription rate is three dollars
her admittance to the bar in 1886.
Alpha Delta Omicroii announces the
per year. Advertising rates may be had
Miss Stoneman had previously been marriage of Edith Jensen, '2-1, lo
on application to the business manager.
graduated from State, then the Slate Robert Carpenter of Dartmouth Col(Articles, manuscripts, etc, must be
Normal school, and was for forty con- lege.
in the hands of the editors before Monday of the week of publication,)
secutive years a member of the facutly.
Epsilon of Pi Alpha Tan welcomes
"All the time I taught school," says Mrs. L. Mayersohn, a graduate of the
Editor-in-Chief
Miss Stoneman, "hut during the sum- Teacher Training School of New York,
KATHLEEN E. FURMAN, '25
mer and al night and over week-ends as an honorary member.
Managing Editor
I read law. After three years of this,
HARRY S. GODFREY, '26
Caroline Ferris, '28, of Page I fall,
when I became executrix of a relative's spent Hie week-end with friends in
Business Manager
estate,
f
decided
to
take
my
bar
examiRUTH BARTON, '25
Latham, New York.
nation, although I knew of one woman
Subscription Manager
Dorothy Hoover, 28, of Page Hall.
GWENDOLYN JONES, '25
who had tried lo take the examination returned to Albany, Friday.
The
Assistant Business Managers
and had failed."
heavy snowfall in the northern section
Lois MOORE, '25
What happened then is unique in
ELISE BOVVER, '25
the annals of the state. Miss Stone- of the stale was the cause of her delay.
Assistant Subscription Manager
Dorothy Kniskcrii, '27, of Page
ham took her oral and written examiHELEN BARCLAY, '26
nations and passed both creditably, but Hall, spenI the week-end in N'yaek,
Associate Editors
was refused admission to the bar be- with friends.
FLORENCE PLATNF.R, '25
cause she was a woman by three SuAnne Cowan, '27, of Page Hall, spent
HELEN ELLIOTT, '26
preme Court justices who gave as their
the week-end with friends in New
reasons:
JOYCE PERSONS, '26
" No precedent,"
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
York City.
" No English precedent."
Rev. Loyal A. Bigelow, a Civil War
Reporters
" No necessity."
SARA BARKLEY, '27
" T h e New York slate legislature veteran, member of the class ol IHo'J
JULIA FAY, '27
was in session then under Governor of Stale College, teacher in a school
KATHRYN BLENIS, '27
Hill," says Miss Stoneman. " 11 was for the blind al New York City and
ANNA KOFF, '26
late, the latter part of June, and at any Nashville, Tennessee, and a Methodisl
EDWIN VAN KLF.ECK, '27
day the legislature, as well as the Su- minister was killed on Wednesday,
LOUISE GUNN, '27
preme Court might adjourn.
But
suffrage workers and educators took February 4, at Orlando, Florida, by
S T Y L E VERSUS B R A I N S
up my cause and within a day a bill an auto, Mr. Bigelow was the ureal
College styles and college slang
had been passed through both houses, uncle of Mary Hitchcock, '26,
have aroused a great deal of comment
with hardly a dissenting vole.
Mildred Schmitlcr, '27, and Mary
That same afternoon we visited the
lately. .Sonic people are even so foolgovernor and the secretary of slate Mellon, '27, spent the week-end with
ish as to believe that boll-bottom
and they signed the hill. The next friends in Schenectady.
trousers and brains can not possibly
morning, on the day that the Supreme
Gamma Kappa Phi welcomes Olive
be found in connection with the same
Court adjourned, I went before them, Seholes. '27, into full membership,
individual. Certain it is however that
presented the signed bill and was duly
Miss Ada Marks, '28, is in the Alyellow slickers, bell bottoms, felt hats
admitted lo the bar."
While Miss Stoneman was teaching bany Hospital, where she has recently
and flannel scarfs are regarded by
she completed the three year course undergone a minor operation. Miss
SENIOR HOP
co-eds with almost as much respect
at the Albany Law school and received Marks is now on the road to recoveryas intelligence. Although in the busiThe senior class took action last her degree of L.L.H.
ness world they may brand the clon- Monday to make the Hop, scheduled
Miss Cobb left last Friday 1" • i"
nerr. as "a set of dull conceited asses, for February 21, informal for both
Syracuse, where she was lo attend a
who confuse their brains in college men and women. The gifts of the REDUCTIONS IN THE CO-OP meeting of the Normal School LibrarThe Co-op aims to make greatest
classes;" to the college world they class to the College have also been
voted upon, but they will be kept reductions on supplies used in great- ians.
are big items. College slang too, secret until Moviug-Up Day.
Mis.-, Ethel DuBois, '27, who has
est
quantities by the students. Stuseems to have gained unmerited reIf proof were needed that the junior dents can liclp in this by buying the been ill for the last two weeks, is now
pute. College vernacular, although Prom was a success, a comment from ,i8()6 note hook paper in larger quansuperior to street vernacular, neverthe- a student of one of the large univer- tities, three for twenty-five cents, six in the Albany Hospital.
Dr. C. F, Dale, head of the physics
less must he rated as high-grade sities has furnished it. In a letter for fifty cents or only ninety cents a
department, addressed members ol
slang. Even college professors, ac- received by one of the students, he dozen.
compliments the management on the
History and art students should Headquarters company, Fifty-third incording to general reports, are occa- arrangements at the Ten Eyck, the
sionally caught in its meshes in their music, and decorations. He not only not miss the collection of pamphlets fantry brigade, on " Elements of Elecillustrating the history of civilization. tricity " last week in Albany. The
efforts to he ultra-modern.
found these things excellent, but he They contain excellent reproductions
lecture was one of a series.
We admit we are proud of our also was charmed by the femininity of some of the finest works of art.
Francis Griffin, '28, varsity substiEveryone should have a box of the
styles; we admit, too, we are guilty of of Slate's fair sex. The faculty, too,
came
in
for
its
share
of
praise.
In
new correspondence cards with the tute basketball player, regular on the
a college slang. If we are extreme
along either line, we would remind closing, he said, "The affair was college seal. They are being sold at freshman team, will be prevented from
criticizcrs that there are always ex- truly a brilliant event. The New York- the most reasonable price of fifty-live
playing this season as a result of intreme dressers or extreme talkers, Stale College for Teachers may resl cents.
whether in or out of college. If we assured that she stands with the best."
The Co-op has a few exquisite juries lo his knee.
are charged with over-emphasizing
sketches of the most picturesque secMiss Pierce made a hurried trip in
dress and under-emphasizing intellitions of France. Every art student, the interest of the Residence Hall camMOVIES AND HISTORY
gence and character, we merely grin
especially, and all who are interested
Moving Pictures as an asset to in France, should sec these interesting paign last week-end.
She visited
humorously and ignore the charge;
Buffalo, Syracuse, and Utica, meeting
for down In our hearts we all feel education have always been under pictures.
controversy.
Professor
Rislcy,
in
his
sure we are capable of estimating real
members of the alumni groups in each
worth and willing to pay homage to class in American History, called the
city.
attention of the students to the Yale
it.
Chronicle Series lately shown at the
Old Mother Hubbarc went to her
The Psi Gamma Alumnae held a
Pine Hills Theater. These pictures
cupboard
meeting before the general alumni
were reported by some of his history
meeting Saturday, February 7. Elsie
For icr children just had to be fed
Nex Tuesdaj ', Dr. John Henry
students as very enjoyable and profitLeonard, '2,i, was elected President.
When she got there the ci pboard
w II a< dress the Y. W. meeting on
able.
A group of chemistry students in
was
bare
the wo rk of the churcl . Dr Henrv
Professor Risley expressed the hope
charge of Professor William G. KenSo s he gave them instead,
IS at | resent pa stor o f the Church
that some day State College might
The
best
book
to
he
:ead—
nedy,
visited the General Electric
of All Nations, New York City.
afford the opportunity of putting on
A b and new 1925 " PED."
Company's plant at Schenectady, last
moving pictures.
Friday.
STATU COL I
College Cullings
V O U ' l ' l l clid the e n t e r t a i n i n g laal
week at State. Friday night cfline
Zoltan Szekcly, aged nineteen, by
testimony of T. F . II. Candlyn, to play
his violin.
Saturday b r o u g h t John
Farrar, twenty-eighl, to laik of the
theater,
Ssekely, by the way, says his
name is pronounced
something
like Chekily with the stress on
the first syllabic,
Unlike the
famous (ieratdine, John h'arrar
fronaunces the first " a " in his
name as in " rare." The result
is " Tairrar."
Mr. Farrar says that a Few years
ago he was at pains to o v e r c o m e the
impression of extrehte youth he gained
through publicity as " the youngest
m a g a z i n e editor in .America."
Now,
he b e m o a n s , people have forgotten that
episode, for they assume that T h e
B o o k m a n ' s editor must be on the untalkcd-of side of forty.
The merger last week oj two
Albany newspapers recalled that
the late Judge Lynn John Arnold, Sr., was a Slate
College
graduate. Mr. Arnold who combined several
newspapers
to
form the Knickerbocker
Press
ami whose son has gone even
jarlher in journal building, was
a member of the same class as
I wan fierce.
Both were graduated in '84.
P R O F E S S O R K I S L F Y'S c o m m e n t s
on the European political situation
which the College News printed last
fall are now being duplicated by observers of this country and England,
Sir Philip Gibbs, war correspondent
par-excellence, has begun a series of
copyrighted articles in a national
weekly, the first of which almost
echoed Mr. Risley's r e m a r k s of half
a year ago.
E'RIDAY, the thirteenth, is the dale
for the so'diomorc soiree. As one's
point of view directs, tin's m a y be
seized upon as an omen favorable, to
either '27 or '2ti. T h e men of the
latter class although uninvited arc expected to attend the dance.
Which brings to mind incidents of a [civ years ago zvhen
excitement
over possession
of
banners
led sophomores
and
freshmen to a nocturnal
sorlic
into Issues comity, a subsequent
call for police aid there, and still
later an unsuccessful raid upon
a train at Cohoes by the losers
of the banner.
March 7 is another dale of
interest to Slate, for it marks the
first anniversary of the college's
entrance
into
inter-collegiate
girls' basketball.
The
Purple
and Gold team made its debut
about a year ago that lime in a
game with Russell Sage College
of Troy. Stale won, 45 to 32.
This year the ijame zvill be at
Troy.
P I - I E M I S T R Y and c h a r a c t e r were
linked closely by Professor Bronson in a paper he read to several
audiences recently.
Chemistry, he
avers, determines whether we a r e long
or short, fat or thin, long headed or
square headed, nervous or placid,
radical or conservative; in
short,
normal or a b n o r m a l .
SLEIGH RIDE A
SUCCESS
A large number turned out for the
Citizen Scout sleigh ride Saturday
evening, February 7. T h e sleigh ride
left college about seven o'clock and
after traveling out the Country Club
road lor a couple of hours, returned
to Albany and unloaded at Miss
J o h n s t o n ' s house.
liert Zajan, J Jot
l l o y l , and Dot Lasher played for
dancing. One of the features of the
evening was " T h e Clyde," a new
dance step as exhibited by Miss J o h n ston and Billy Wilson.
This step
made a decided hit on its first appearance at Stale and bids fair to become
very popular during the next few
m o u t h s . Crossword puzzles engrossed
many for a time, but toward the end
of the evening all gave their undivided
attention to the sandwiches and hot
chocolate which began lo appear in
huge quantities.
T h e evening was
concluded by a practical d e m o n s t r a tion of hoiueinaking in the kitchen.
At the next meeting of the Citizen
Scunis, February IK, a demonstration
of first aid is to be given.
EXTENSION
Page Three
NEWS, FEBRUARY Hi, 1925
COURSES
Faculty members of Stale College
for Teachers are included a m o n g the
teachers who are instructing in the
extension courses of New York University in Albany this winter.
Professor George iVI. York, head of the
Commercial Education department, is
teaching office management and commercial law; Professor Anicdee Shnoiiill of the French department is giving
courses in French; Dr. Arthur K, Beik,
professor of education, conducts a
course in psychology; Dr. Marry VV.
Hastings, professor of English, instructs in the modern novel.
MORE CULLINGS
JSj()\V that posterity has President
Coolidge's views on wide bottomed
trousers it may have ours, VVe had
been waiting for Mr. Coolidge to take
a conscientious New England stand
on the important matter of Irouser
b o t t o m s and the—er—essential m a t t e r
of belts and suspenders. But now Ids
dictum is published we are disappointed in the President. H e was not
firm
enough.
With
commendable
Yankee courtesy he asked the visiting
Princetonians
why
their
trousers
slumped that way and then allowed
them to know he didn't approve.
T h a t was all very well. But then Mr.
Coolidge compromised.
He posed
with them for pictures, wide b o t t o m s
and all. H e should not have clone
that, or at least he. should have insisted on bust length photos only.
Much as we approve the President's
policies in affairs of stale we feel that
his opponents will make political capital out of this.
Hut we can be grateful that
the conntry doesn't pick presidents on the belts or galluses
issue.
KOHN BROS.
Great Progress Made At State Since 1889;
Dr. Brubacher Carries Program Forward
William J. Milne, Stale College's
eighth president, is the o u t s t a n d i n g
11 is term of
iigure in its history.
service, extending over a quarter of
a century (1889-191-1), saw the college's development from the normal
school of lifly-six years to a normal
college with power to confer degrees
in Pedagogy (1890); saw the subsequent abandonment of courses preparing teachers for the g r a d e schools;
the change to a liberal a r t s college
with a four year course (1905); and
paved the way for (he c h a n g e in 1914
to the New 'York Slate College for
Teachers, the institution of to-day,
Milne did more. H e b r o u g h t about,
a sweeping change in the scope and
character of the college's work. T h e
practice leaching d e p a r t m e n t s were
reorganized and the s t a n d a r d of admission was raised appreciably.
A social awakening look place.
Belter courses, all enlarged faculty,
college degrees and standing brought
college graduates and university students, In 1890, the first sorority was
established, Delia Omega, in the fifteen years following four more spranp
up; and in 1905 (he first fraternity wa
founded, Kappa D c l t a R h o . President
Milne's efforts for the college's scholastic advancement were rivaled onlj
by bis solicitude for its social progri
lie encouraged
the formation of
athletic clubs and sponsored college
activities and organizations of all
sorts.
I n 1894 be presided over the college's seiiii-ceiilennial jubilee,
More
than one thousand former students
from all parts of the country flocked
back to the college, T h r e e days of
speech making and banqueting, with
the foremost dignitaries of stale education
in attendance
marked
the
ceremonies.
In 1895, Dr. Leonard W o o d s Richardson, professor of Greek and Latin,
and dean in point of years of service,
became a leacher here.
April .10, 1914, the board of regents
m a d e the State Normal College the
New York State College for Teachers.
T h a t same year Dr. Milne died,
February I, 1915, Dr. Brubache.
became president.
Only the briefest s u m m a r y of the
events of the decade of his leadership
can be given.
Continuance of the
forward work of President Milne,
ACCORDING TO
HISTORY
With prancing steeds and jingling
bells, thirty-one of Miss Fay's history
students explored the outskirts and
" inskirts " of " o u r c i t y " on a sleigh
ride T h u r s d a y night.
W i t h Lillian
Fckler at the end of the reins m a n y
expected to return more quickly than
they went, but n u m e r o u s detours,
unavoidable and unaccountable, increased (he appetites of the singing or
shrieking crowd.
And were those
wa flics and coffee at Mac's done
justice?
T h e freshmen formed a m o d e r n tea
wagon service and earned m a n y times
l''e nickels (hat were fed the piano.
with wide changes to meet the g r o w ing i m p o r t a n c e of the college were his
contribution.
In
1915 came
the
reorganization of the faculty upon a
college basis, with the establishment
of professorships, assistant professorships, and a corps of instructors and
a s s i s t a n t s . In 1917, came the founding of Myskania; in the same year the
college News was first
published.
T h a t year also, the first s u m m e r session w a s conducted with a registration
of 253 students, since g r o w n to 1,022.
T h e college's regular Session registration m a d e strides also notable.
A sequel was made (o State's Civil
W a r record. In April, 1917, when the
U n i t e d States declared w a r on Germ a n y , t h e r e were 155 men s t u d e n t s in
the college.
By September of that
year, 153 had voluntarily enlisted in
b r a n c h e s of t h e g o v e r n m e n t ' s armed
forces. T h e two male s t u d e n t s who
did nut enlist were both boys, under
the minimum age and unable to enroll. T h e record is believed unsurpassed and probably unique a m o n g
eastern colleges.
'I he last lew years have seen the
lTorts
11 1
for Iilia('."'
'' '
i l , n '. s i , ( k ' l U 'f l , l a l , s ; " " d1 cefforts
! '.V'"'
Pun
e n l a r g e m e n t near realization
f ihc two and o n e - q u a r t e r
if land west of the college has
been
effected
and
Dr.
Brubacher
secured two years ago a g r a n t of
$7S,()00 from the legislature for the
foundations for a Ihrce building addition,
1925 will see work on these
begun and may see also the g r a n t by
the s l a t e of $250,000 to begin construction of the buildings proper,
In J u n e , 1920, llie college had its
seventy-fifth anniversary jubilee, ati nded again by h u n d r e d s of alumni,
m e m b e r s of the alumni association
which had been established in 1849.
In 1923 the college was admitted to
the American Association of Colleges
and Universities.
December IK, 1924, the college entered n|
its ninth decade, with a
record e n r o l l m e n t of 1057 s t u d e n t s .
T h e s e notes on Slate's history have
brought the story lip lo date. A bigger c h a p t e r remains to be (old, but
it will be written in deeds, not words.
W h e n in 1944 the centcnial passes
I here is reason to believe that the
years '24 to '44 will have meant much.
THE
END
ALUMNI MEET
I he Eastern Branch of the Alumni
Association held its regular meeting
S a t u r d a y , February 7. A dinner in
the cafeteria at 6:30, in charge of Miss
T h o m p s o n , was followed by a s h o r t
business
meeting, at which
Miss
W h i s h , the president, presided.
Professor Sayles m a d e a plea for the
Resilience Hall fund, and P r e s i d e n t
Brubacher gave a short talk.
Miss
Wallace gave t h e report of the legislative c o m m i t t e e , and Miss A n d e r s o n ,
t h e treasurer's report. A n o t h o r r e p o r t
was given by M a r y R o b e r t s Richardson, '14. T h e meeting was then adj o u r n e d to the auditorium to hear the
lecture on " Modern D r a m a , " by J o h n
h'arrar.
" A Good Place to Buy"
MILLS ART PRESS
SHOES
3 9 4 - 3 9 6 Broadway, Albany, N. Y .
125 Central A v e at L e x i n g t o n
Open E v e n i n g s
Printers of State College
News
PRINTING
Special Attention Given
Society W o r k
Page Four
STATE COLLEGE'N15VVS, EEBRUAKY l.'l, 1025
COMMENT FROM T H E PRESS
NEWMAN CLUB
Following the College News' ediNewman Club held its regular meettorial appeal last week to students to ing on Wednesday, February II, al
use every influence to hring the needs, four o'clock in Room 211, Plans for
of Slate College home to I he members
conference of the Albany Province
of the legislature, the newspapers of the
1Albany joined in support of the Byrne o Newman Clubs to held in Ibis city
hill, now before I he lawmakers. The during April, were discussed and apKnickerbocker Press, The Albany proved by the club. Committees in
Evening News, and the Albany Times- charge of I he annual cake and candy
Union in strong editorials stressed
sale scheduled for March 17, also
the state's duty to the college,
The Times-Union also commented brought forward many propositions
upon the addition as "a memorial which will undoubtedly make (his
worthy of William .1, Milne, for whom event a great success. The dale for
it will be named."
the third Quarterly Communion of
The Evening News under I he capNewman Club has not been decided
tion "Support Stale College," said:
"Senator Byrne's bill In provide upon but will he announced as soon
new buildings for the Slate College as possible.
for Teachers should have favorable
Immediately following the business
aelion, Here is something in which
there should be no hesitation.
meeting, Rev, Joseph A. Diiuney
" For three years the number of addressed the club on "A Study of
students has exceeded the capacity of the Human instincts ami Their Relathe college, There is room for' 750
and there are l,l)5() students, Dr. tion lo a Philosophy of Fife." Father
A. R. lirubacber, bead of the college, Dunney, in the second of the new
declares that overcrowding has come series of lectures for ibis year, conlo a point where it is extremely neces- tinued his discussion and introduced
sary for aelion. The gymnasium is in a uiosl interesting and skillful way
imlil and all departments are conthe religious element in the psychogested.
"Slate College is doing great work logical topic mentioned.
and it is doing il under difficulties,
AFTER EVERY MEAL
lis influence is nol for to-day but for
a IOUL; period and il is cumulative.
I'. K. Wrigle.v has been elected
" Dr. lirubacber cites that the state president of the Win. Wriglcy, Ir.
spends less on Ibis college than il does Co., ihe $90,000,000 chewing gum coron the College of Agriculture al Cor- poral ion.
nell, on the Forestry college al SyraI1. K. is jus I past thirty and one of
cuse or on the Veterinary college. the youngest presidents of a large
Mere is an institution training teach- manufacturing concern in the United
ers for (be stale of New York, 11 States.
should have ever facility. The state
He started his business career by
should be most liberal."
pulling Wrigley's on ibe map in
The Knickerbocker Press in an edi- Australia and has been vice-presidenl
torial entitled " Deadening Status of the American Company since l'JIS,
Quo," aligned the stale's policy toward except for two years in Ibe United
Slate College with attitude general States Naval Aviation service during
toward mailer-, educational and con- the war.
cerned with culture, Il contrasted the
His father, Win, Wriglcy, jr., now
money spent for needed educational becomes Chairman of tlie Hoard of
advanceuienl with that which goes Directors.
for political expediency, continuing;
Incidentally the Wriglcy Company
" N'ow comes Dr. Ahram R, liru- has advertised in the College News
bacber, president of the Stale College for several years past.
lor Teachers, with the disclosure of
an untenable situation, and a most
appropriate characterization of (he capacity of ihe college has been excondition arising from (he indifference ecedeel by lifly per cent, The appur- |
uf the legislature lo thai vital subject, tenanccs and facilities of the college j
art! crowded past all reason. The
education.
" 'Progress eanuoi come to New, state has land ready for a new buildYork slate under this petrifying in- | ing and has already approprialed some
lluenee. The status quo here has been money lo begin work on such a builddeadening,' says Dr. I'rubacber, refer- ing. Common sense and good judgring to 'the policy of succeeding ment would dictate compliance with
legislatures to permit no extension of the obvi .us demands of the situation.
Mere is a matter thai touches, potenany kind.'
"And il appears from Dr. Bru- tially, every child of the stale for another
generation. VV'II it be pushed
hacber's statistics that he has a ease
which well supports Senator Byrne's into a corner in favor of something
hill for adequate appropriation. The more politically profitable?"
STATE MAY E N T E R MEET
CALENDAR
Friday, February 13
State College for Teachers track
•1:00 P. M. Chemistry Club—Room athletes may lake part in the tourna250.
ment lo be conducted soon by the
Saturday, February 14
Albany Cenlrdi Y. M. C. A„ for colt 2:30-5:.«! I.', M, Y, VV. C. A. Social lege and other athletes of the city.
Service Party— Gym,
M. D. Williams, executive secretary
8:00 I1. M. Basketball—State vs. of Ihe association in charge of the
(iswego Normal—Gym.
meet, has invited the college through
Monday, February 16
U:I5 I'. M. Advanced Dramatics Rutherford R. Baker, athletic coach,
lo enter men in the college relay race.
Class I'lay—Auditorium.
Teams of live men from State College,
Tuesday, February 17
3:00 P. M. Y. W. C. A.- Audi- ihe College of Pharmacy, Ihe Medical
college, the Law school, and the Busitorium.
ness college will race,
•1:00 P. M. French Club.
7:30-10:00 I*. M. Y. W. C. A.
Sleigh ride and Party,
Shoe Repairing
SOCIAL SERVICE PARTY
We Us:.1 Best Oak Leather
Saturday afternoon, February 14, a
Good Year Rubber Heels
social service parly will be given here
al ihe college for the Albany orphans, and O'Sullivan Rubber Heels
i'nr children belween eight and eleven 250 Central Ave. 2 doors from Luke Ave
years of age. The event, which is lo
lake the form of a Valentine's parly,
will be under the auspices of (he V. VV,
C. P. LOWRY
social service work, with Edna FilzWatchmaker
and Jeweler
palrick acting' as chairman.
171 Central cAmemic
cAlbany, &i. Y.
Phone
I Chew it after
1 evert/ meal
It s t i m u l a t e s
appetite aad
aids digestion.
It m a k e s y o u r
lood d o y o u m o r e
iri g o o d . Note h o w
It r e l i e v e s tbat s t u l l y f e e l i n g
alter nearly eating.
w Whlteno t c c i b .
Iw c eIen»
b r e a t h and
RESTAURANT
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL
DINNERS
40and50cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
MEAL TICKETS SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER 60c
Telephone
206 Washington Ave.
4 doors above Lark St.
West 3464
3756-)
PINE HILLS PHARMACY
"The Family Store"
1116 Madison Ave., Cor. Allen
Phone West 156
N, W. HrigtfH and M. T. Stone, Prop.
Compliments
of
College Candy Shop
it's the goody
[that
Is-a-a-t-s.
COTRELL & LEONARD
Albany, N . V .
Caps—Gowns—Hoods
FOK ALL DEGKEES
SPORTING GOODS
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CONRAD HE YES, Prop.
D r o p in between Classes
82 ROBIN STREET
KIMBALL'S
West
State College
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner 11:15— 1:30
Radio Supplies
ALBANY AUTO SUPPLY, INC.
West 1616
Quality Store
145 Central Avenue
QUALITY SILKS
WEARWELL CREPE SATINS in
all the new Fall colors. 40 inch 269 yd
W E A R W E L L FLAT CREPES in all
the new Fall colors 40 inch 225 yd
Those two fabiics tiro unmntehable in value
for the price. 'The wanteil colors in new Fall
r « i o c e - Hewett's Silk Shop
Store
219 C E N T R A L A V E N U E
Ladies' and C h i l d r e n ' s
Ready-to-Wear
Clothing
Open Kvenings
16-17 NORTH PEARL
LAST <BUT ZKOT LEAS1
The Gateway Press
QUALITY PRINTERS
AT YOIFR ELBOW-WEST 2037
336 Central Avenue
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