State College News V. No. 19 ~ ~ N. Y., 10, 1921 $3.00

advertisement
State College News
NEW
YORK
STATE
COLLEGE FOR
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF
VOL.
V. No. 19
~
~
ALBANY,
N. Y.,
MARCH
TEACHERS
1918
10, 1921
$3.00
PER YEAR
STATE BREAKS E V E N ON
NORTHERN TRIP
MUSICAL CLUBS
Hamilton to be Presented Friday
Evening
The Sigma Nil Kappa Fraternity will present the Hamilton
Glee Club Friday, evening in the
college auditorium. The Hamilton Glee Club is one of I'lic best in
intercollegiate circles, and the concert promises lo he a great success. The program, which is comprised of a remarkable variety of
numbers, is given In combination
with selections by the Girls' Glee
Club of Slate College,
The Hamilton Glee Club has
given several well received concerts including one on the Hill and
at (he Knox School in Cooperstown.
Following tlie Albany trip the
Glee Club plans to appear at Gtica,
New Rochclle, Jamaica, Elizabeth,
Jersey City and at the Plaza Hotel,
New York Cily,
A general admission of one dollar will be charged with a special
price to college students of fifty
cents.
Dancing in the college
gymnasium will follow the concert.
OMICRON NU ELECTS
JUNIOR MEMBERS
The Beta Chapter of Omicron
Nil held its pledge service Tuesday
afternoon at college. Those elected
to membership arc, Marion Benedict, Hazel Crill, Georgia Koch,
and Eldyth Proper.
Quintet Defeats Clarkson in Fast
Contest — Loses to St. Lawrence
in Overtime Game
FIRST WIRELESS
CONCERT AROUSES
GREAT INTEREST
State College Wireless Station in
Working Order
Last Thursday evening more
than a score of interested people
listened to the Victrola concert
furnished by the Radio Club of
Union College. A large part of the
audience was composed of men in
the evening class in electricity,
taught by Prof. Bryan O. Burgiu
S O P H O M O R E C L A S S P R E - at
the Albany High School. A
S E N T S " C L O S E - U P " O F number of State College students
were also present.
INAUGURATION
The concert was received on the
apparatus
set up at the Physics DeIn student assembly on March partment office.
Due to recent de4th the class of '23 did "some velopments in radio
the
stunting," The sophs marched to usual head phones were.science
not needed
cliapcl lo a lively tune and were except for tuning. The
sounds
distinguished by their banner and were so amplified that they could
green tics,
be heard by means of an ordinary
The tlienic of the farce was in- phonograph 'horn.
auguration. 11 was portrayed in
The first part of the concert was
four scenes. In the first scene we given
at S o'clock and lasted till
were transported to the nominating 8:30.
second part began at 9
convention. No one would deny o'clockThe
lasted till 9:45. The
that the " green derby" and the . program and
was
composed of a wide
"lapel bouquets" of the delegates variety of selections,
both vocal
had a momentous influence on the and instrumental, from grand
opera
convention. A modern air was
Continued on page 4,
created in the session by the presence of a "feminine rosebud."
Cox and his one adherent made an SENIOR DANCE
impression, but Harding's man was
SCHEDULED FOR
the hit. The convention atoned
APRIL 1
for its past evils by preserving the
ancient refinement of the Greek
At a meeting of the senior class
style of voting.
Tuesday, at 4:55 in Room 101, it
In the second scene wc were ac- was decided to have a semi-formal
quainted with the joys of a presi- class dance April 1, Alida Ballagh
dential campaign. Even "Delia" was appointed general chairman.
began to pity the harassed Hard- The other people on the committee
ing.
However, the president's are: Amy Clwbley, Elton Hakes,
problems are all solved when he Esther Cramer, and Florence
accepts Mary O'Callahan as Secre- Fitch.
tary of State,
The senior debating team was
In the third scene President and also elected. Members of the team
Mrs. Harding are enjoying their are: _ Mary Graftn, Dorothy Adams,
vacation at Palm Beach. We feel Marjorie Potter, and Margarcit
sure that the "solicitous wife" Crane, alternate. The junior-senior
will prevent the President from too debate will be held during the
Continued on page 4.
chapel hour, April 22.
On its second week-end trip the
Purple and Gold quintet defeated
Clarkson on the tech court at Potsdam by a score of 21 to 18, and lost
out to St. Lawrence at Canton in an
overtime game by a count of 34 to
27. Both games were fast and the
issue in each case was undecided
until the final whistle.
In the Clarkson game Friday
night State cut loose with the
sound li the whistle. Hathorn
netted the first field basket in the
first minute of play. The Purple
and Gold held Ibis lead in spite of
the strong opposition of the Clarkson five and at half time the score
was 10 to 6 in their favor,
In the second half the Tech
team came back strong and live
minutes before the end of the period
THE DEPARTMENT OF
cut State's lead down to one point.
Cassavant sent the ball through the
HYGIENE
net, however, increasing it two
points. Clarkson came back with a
Federal Assistance Withdrawn
neat field basket making the score
17 to 16. At this critical point II.
The Federal Government has dis- Polt cut through the Clarkson decontinued the Interdepartmental fense and, receiving a pass over his
Social Hygiene Board. During the shoulder, dropped the ball through
war and up lo and through the the net, The Tech five rallied, and
present college year, the Federal MacGuiggan cut the lead down
Board has carried on extensive again, caging the ball on a long
work in 1 lygiene in many colleges pass. With ten seconds to play
and universities throughout the Hathorn took the ball under the
United
Stales,
Stale
College basket on a neat pass and scored
shared in this work, as did Cornell, again, Before the ball was put into
Harvard, University of Pennsyl- play again the whistle sounded.
vania, and a score of other colleges.
Hathorn and Cassavant featured
The discontinuance of the Federal for State, while MacGuiggan and
appropriation will necessitate im- Wilson were the chief point getters
portant changes. Either the sev- for Clarkson.
eral States must assume the finanScore:
cial burden of the work or the work
must be discontinued.
STATE COLLEGE
It is quite probable that most
colleges where the work was or- Name and position
fb. fp. tp.
ganized by the Social (-lygiene Cassavant, rf
3 3 9
B'bard, will continue the work. Johnson, If
0 0 0
This is due to the excellent results Hathorn, c
4 0 8
obtained so far. In every case the Polt, rg
2 0 4
work has proved very satisfactory. Baker, "Ig
0 0 0
The work of the State College Hygiene department was singled out
9 3 21
Continued on page 3.
Continued on page 4.
S T A T E M E E T S MASS.
AGGIES S A T U R D A Y
Tn what will probably be one of
the best exhibitions of basketball
on local courts this season, Stale
will pit her strength against the
clever Mass, Aggie quintet in the
A. H. S. gymnasium next Saturday
night. A game was scheduled with
Hohart for this date, but owing to
cancellation of other games, thus
making the trip impracticable, the
Orange and Purple team was unable
to meet State. Manager Bliss,
'however, was able to book the
strong Aggie team in its place.
The Massachusetts team has won
favorable notice because of its
speedy floorwork, clever passing,
and accurate shooting. It ranks
among the best college fives in this
section.
COACH S N A V E L Y HAS
COACHING COURSE
P. E. 16 Gives Fundamentals of
Athletics
Fourteen students have enrolled in Coach Snavcly's new
course, P. E, 16. This course is
an entirely new idea and is proving of great interest._ It consists
of intensive training in the coaching of football, basketball and baseball. Both lectures and field work
are carried on in connection with
the course. The training will be
of special benefit to the students
for use in future coaching.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 10, 1921
Page Two ,
State College Reios
Vol.V
March 10
No. 19
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the New York State
College for Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rate is three
dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc, must be
in the hands of the Editor before
Monday of the week of publication.
Editor-in-Chief,
F. Reginald Bruce, '21
Managing Editor,
Florence Stanbro, '21
Business Manager,
Edna Lowerree, '21
Subscription Manager,
Mary Whish, '21
Assistant Business Managers
Ethel Huyck, '22
Alice O'Connor
Associate Editors,
Hope Persons, '22
Louise Persons, '22
Helen Dangremond, '22
Reporters
Vera Nolan, '23
Warren Gray, '23
Eira Williams, '23
FLUX
State College seems to 'have a
facility for making traditions. Wc
sit down, roll up our sleeves, and
say, "Go to it, now, let us make a
tradition." And then we make one.
We let it age for one year, grow
hoary in a second, and bury it in
the third, And then wc sit down
again and fabricate another. People wonder, meanwhile, why we arc
such a young college and lack distinctive customs,
Wc have several examples of our
delightful habit within this ' one
year. The Myskania key was
changed — the old one resembled
the Phi Beta Kappa key too much.
Wc snarled against the carelessness which permitted such a mistake to be made, and submitted to
the change. Just at present the
college ring is being standardized
— for the second time in our history, And now come suggestions
for improving our college colors.
Fire prep schools have similar
ones. They should be considered
first, of course. The colors arc
hard to secure in athletic supplies.
The purple and gold has been used
for over ten years, and yet this is
the first time that complaint has
been heard,
It seems as though traditions
count for nothing here. Individuality can lose itself while wc
progress. Let's be different every
year. Let's change everything.
Let's change Charles.
'21.
MUSIC CLUB
There will be a special business
meeting of the club on Friday,
March 11, in room 111, at 4:15.
Among' the subjects to be discussed will be that concerning our
part}', Do you want one? Jf so,
come and help us arrange for it.
All members arc asked to be
present-at this meeting,
The musical program for Friday will be announced on the bulletin board,
THE COLLEGE MAN
In the "Saturday Evening Post,"
for February 5, Nathaniel Butler
has an interesting discussion on
" What a Man Gains in Going to
College," Admitting first of all
that there are some for whom a
college education is economically
out of the question, sonic " whose
full measure of culture and attainment, so far as school can help
them at all, is reached before the
college stage," and some who because of mental or physical feebleness should be excluded from
higher, institutions, lie still effectively answers those who think,
that a college education is a waste
of time, and true instruction commences with graduation,
in clinching his point that higher
training is worth while, Mr, Butler
first proves that a college education has actual money value. From
statistics compiled by the United
States. Bureau of Education he
shows that the college men receive
the highest average wages in all
fields of commercial and industrial
enterprises, He cites Mr. Charles
Sabitt, president of one of the
largest trust companies, as saying:..
"Every employer is looking for
t'hc man who not only can think,
bill will tiiink, One can hire any
number of people marvelbttsly
skilled in routine or in detail — human machines that will run on
splendidly as lung as motor power
is supplied 'and nothing unusual
turns up in the work, ft has been
impressed upon me through many
years of contact with college graduates in business and in banking
that
the
well-trained
college
man grasps intricate situations and
reduces them to essentials much
more quickly than the equally
well-trained man who has not had
'lie advantage of the broader
fundamental education which the
college should give."
Then in the second place Mr.
Butler proves a college training develops a man's ability to live with
others as a neighbor and citizen,
lie quotes Professor
William
James, Dr. Richard C, Cabot, and
also former President Hyde, of
Bowdoin College, Mr. Hyde left
on record a classical enumeration
of what a man gains in this respect from going to college:
" T o be at home in all lands and
all ages; to count Nature a familiar
acquaintance and Art an intimate
friend; to gain a standard for the
appreciation of oilier men's work
and the criticism of one's own; to
carry the keys of the world's library in one's pocket, and feel its
resources behind one in whatever
task he undertakes; to make hosts
of friends among the men of one's
own age who arc lo be leaders in
all walks of life; to lose oneself in
generous enthusiasms and cooperate with others for common
ends; to learn manners from students who arc gentlemen; and to
form character under professors
who arc Christians — these are the
returns of a college for the best
four years of one's life."
Mr. Butler goes on himself to
say:
" The characteristics which are
sometimes regarded peculiar to the
college boy—indifference, vanity,
egoism, argument, slang — are in
fact those of youth, whether in or
out of college. There is room for
a wide difference of opinion as to
whether between the ages of eighteen' and twenty-four t'hc " youth
gets these things knocked out of
him and gets some sense knocked
into him more effectively in busb
ness or in college."
.- ':
And in conclusion he sums up as
follows;
"Statistics of college attendance
and of college endowments, the
judgment of leading men in commerce and industry, the expressions of confidence of the American
people in their colleges, and the
degree in which the graduates of
American colleges have led in
every walk of public find private
life testify lo what a man gains in
going to college, in his ability to
get llie ibest tilings out of life, to
stand for t'he best things in life, to
find his place and do ins work."
LET'S GO, STATE
Are you a dope, reader?
Yes?
Well, don't read this
article, then.
Are you full of pep and game for
a night of fun? Well, then, things
are breaking your way, for the
Hamilton College Glec_ Club is
coming Friday, and its fifty members arc the " Cream of Wheat."
Hamilton iiad never beard of
" S t a t e " previous to their engagement here, and we want to make a
showing I hat they won't forget.
Hamilton men are full of the old
ginger. So we'll have lo step high,
wide and handsome, They're all
young, single, and good looking,
so it's up to you, girls. When Friday high I comes put on your best
bib and tucker with the little lace
" whatyoueallils " on it, snap out.
of i|, and step out for the time of
your lives. But don't forget, if
you're a dope or a grind and can't
enjoy life, youth and music, stay
home and go to bed.
We want pep al State!
PRINCETON MORALS
IN STUDENTS' CARE
Faculty Gives Senior Council Power
to Dismiss Unworthy Undergraduates
SEQUEL TO HONOR SYSTEM
Cheating at Examinations Almost
Unheard Of in the Last
28 Years
Princeton, Feb. 26.—Princeton University this week took a long step toward complete student control of the
morals of the undergraduates when
the Faculty unanimously approved a
resolution giving to the Senior Council, the student governing body scIccteer by the undergraduates, power
of dismissal from the university
without a statement of cause to the
Discipline Committee or any other
body connected with the Faculty.
The Princeton Senior Council under
this ruling will have power to deal
unmolested and without re-porting any
evidence with any cases which in
their estimation " tend to lower the
moral tone and good name of Princeton."
President Hibben to-day issued a
statement commending the new plan.
The resolution adopted by the Faculty on the subject requires a threequarters majority of the Council vote
to^convict a student,
That the erring undergraduate will
find no easy jury to face him when
he is brought to trial by the fifteen
members of the Council is to be seen
from the severe nature of the penalties which arc always inflicted by the
undergraduates. Dean McClenahan,
in commenting on the new rule, said:
• "Their'attitude toward their fellow-studcnL is exactly what one
would expect, They are, on the
whole, more severe in their judgments than are the members of the
Faculty, and are even more bloodthirsty than I,"
This drastic action is the result of
the gradual development of the
Princeton honor system, established
twenty-eight years ago, Under this
system all examinations are conducted without Faculty supervision,
and the student is at liberty to talk
with others during the examination,
or even to leave the examination
hall for a smoke or to get the morning mail at his room, the only restriction being a signed pledge of
honesty at the end of the paper, A
student committee deals with all suspected cases of cheating, and Dean
.McClenahan, the chief disciplinarian
of (he university, recently staled that
in the entire twenty-eight years "llie
number of provon cases of dishonesty might almost be counted on llie
fingers of two hands," in (he same
statement the Dean, who was an undergraduate at the time of the inception of the honor system, dubbed
cribbing as "one of Princeton's favorite indoor sports" prior to (his
lime.
—New York Times.
*
i
WHO'S WHO
" Y " HOUSE NEWS
The, " V " House hasn't a bit of
exciiement lo give llie " N e w s "
Ibis week. We had llie usual number of week-enders, and the usual
number of nightmares and neardemises following our Sunday
night W'clsll rarebit feast, bill
otherwise we seem stalled in a
deadly calm. Cela sufilt.
SYDDUM HALL
Jane McKennan, Dorothy McGownn, .Marion Marshall, Irene
Ganigall, Florence Dorscy, and
Myra Shaw spent the week-end at
their homes.
The girls at the bouse enjoyed a
theatre party on Saturday evening.
Florence Dorsey has returned lo
college after her recent illness.
Mrs. Henderson entertained the
upperclassm~n of Hie Mall ;il a
supper party recently,
HOME ECONOMICS
The advanced dressmaking class
with Miss Giliett, Miss FCcim, and
Miss Tempany, visited llie Children's Home on Friday in view of
a clothing project for the institution. This project involves designing of children's clothing, (he selection and lesliug of materials,
and the rapid construction of garments. The firm of W. M. Whit-
i
Steefel Bros.
Girls Shop
Quality and Mod erate Prices
I "A
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,
ncy & Co, is c o o p e r a t i n g generously in this plan,
E n c o u r a g i n g word has been received c o n c e r n i n g the condition of
iVIiss E d i t h M, Novvell, m a n a g e r of
the lunch room, Miss No-well will
be able to return lo college the
latter part of this m o n t h ,
Mr, and Airs. Allen L. Gillctt arc
h a p p y over the arrival of a d a u g h ter on March 3. Mrs. Gillctt is a
g r a d u a t e of S l a t e College, class of
1918. Mr. Gillctt was a s t u d e n t
here for two years before enlisting
for the war.
College, Danville, Ky., because
they pray before entering c o n t e s t s
and because t'hey come from Kenlucky where colonels abound.
The
Flying
Cadets — Virginia
military Institute, Lexington, Va,,
because they are military cadets
and have a fast team.
T h e Generals — W a s h i n g t o n and
Lee University, Lexington, Va,,
because their university was n a m e d
for Generals W a s h i n g t o n and Lee.
T h e Fighting V o l u n t e e r s — U n i versity of Tennessee, KnoxviTIc,
Tem'i.j because of the title of the
V o l u n t e e r Stale earned by T e n n e s see in the Mexican W a r ,
A n
T h e C o m m o d o r e s — Vanderbilt
W e arc glad to welcome CharUniversity, Nashville, Tenth, belotte L y n c h , '22, as a pledge memcause
their institution was named
ber,
alter C o m m o d o r e Vanderbilt,
Almeida Decker, '21, spent the
week-end as (he guest of Mrs. AlTiie F-rafeheiitcs—George W a s h mond C. Brock way, at Richfield
ington
University,
Washington,
Springs.
I ). t'„ because of "the little episode
Catharine D r u r y , '22, spent the
George W a s h i n g t o n had with a
week-end in S c h e n e c t a d y .
hatchet and a cherry tree, according to popular storv.
Lillian ISussy, 'lr>, was the guest
T h e Indians—William and Marv
of G e r t r u d e Jiussy last week-end,
College, Vyilliamshurg, Va„ because the institution was founded
back in Indian limes.
Georgia Koch, '22, and Margaret
The Plain-men — A l a b a m a PolyM e y e r s , '22, spent the week at (he
technic institute, Auburn, Ala., heHouse,
M a r g a r e t Kirlland, '22, spent (he I cause the institute is situated on
I the plains of Alabama.
week-end at the House.
The
Hilltoppers—Georgetown
Ethel liuyek, '22, was a dinner j
University, W a s h i n g t o n , D. ('., beguest al the Practice House Suncause ihe university stands on the
day.
lop of ;, hill,
E s t h e r Lou Cramer, '21, spent
T h - Gulden T o r n a d o — Georgia
T h u r s d a y at the I fousc.
Polytechnic- Institute, Atlanta. Ga.,
,{, p
b e m u s e of !he swiftness of i i , team
and its school's e dors.
Kathryn
Mall, '21. spent the
week-end al her home in I 'hester.
T h e Pin pie I lurricane— F u r m a n
University, Greenville, S. C , beAlida Curry, '22, has been absent
cause of its university colors and
from college the past week on acits fa-;! team.
count of illiu ss.
T h e Crimson Tide — University
Glcnnon
Lasmen, '2,1, was a
of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala., beguest of friends in Schenectady the
cause of its colors and the faith in
past week,
its team's s t r e n g t h .
Also called
Queen Roman,^ '2,1 spent the
the Thin Red Line in other years,
week-end in Unadilla.
when its team was not so s t r o n g
The Mamons—Mississippi
A.
K A
and M. College, Agricultural Collulna Chappell, ' 1 " , and Olive
lege, Miss., because of its colors.
W r i g h t , '2D, spent the week-end at
the House.
I I
X S 0
.Martha Parry, '22. spent the
week-end at her home in Little
Falls.
X i; O is sorry to lose her house
m o t h e r , Mrs. W a k e , who has been
obliged lo take a rest because of
illness. Miss Patterson will lake
her place temporarily.
Anna O'Neill, '22, was ;\ weekend .yuest al the I louse,
A E '!•
Anne Rccback, '22, spent the
week-end al her home in Newburgh,
Ruth C. Grecnhlath, '21, attended
the Kappa N'u s l e k ' h n d c at R. P. f.
Fannie 'Pepper. '23, was the guest
of Fannie Schulmau, '22, over the
week-end.
Mrs, A. Field-man, of Red Hook,
was the guest of her d a u g h t e r ,
Nellie Fielclman, '23, for the past
week.
Rose K e r s h b e r g , '23, entertained
Marion Levitt, 'IS, at a dinner
party.
STUDENTS IN SOUTH
NICKNAME
TEAMS
By the Associated Press.
' A T L A N T A , Ga., Feb. 2 6 . — S t u dents of southern universities and
colleges delight in a t t a c h i n g to
their football and baseball t e a m s
some picturesque nicknames. T h e
reason for some of these n a m e s is
easily fathomable, but for o t h e r s
cannot be determined, except that
they have been used for y e a r s ,
T h e list of nicknames and s o m e
of the reasons for them include:
T h e P r a y i n g Colonels — Centre
MARCH 10, 1921
sour, the head swim and the feet
get flat,
T h e hopeless 'human is as w o r t h less as an exploded boiler and as
useless as three tails,
T h e useful man thinks success,
the happy man helps success, the
healthy man works for success, and
remember, you cannot think well,
help much or work right without
this eternal hope.
Daylight
manages
lo
peep
t h r o u g h the smallest hole.
Even a man 'that: is h a n g i n g
hopes the rope will break.
— Exchange.
DEPT. OF HYGIENE
Continued from page 1.
for special commendation by the
Federal authorities who pronounce
the course here and at H a r v a r d to
be nearest the desired standard.
It is t o o early to speak of the
completed plans for the Stale College d e p a r t m e n t but it is possible
lo say that the work in Hygiene
will be continued. T h e course will
he modified under the new plan,
giving g r e a t e r emphasis lo the
recreational and athletic interests
of the college students, both men
and w o m e n ; but less attention will
he given lo the training of Physical
Education supervisors and special
teachers.
T h e Stale will probably relax its
efforts in physical education, withd r a w i n g Certain compulsory features in the high schools.
This
may result in a reduced demand for
special teachers of physical education. I'm there will he even g r e a t e r
demand for high school teachers
who can lead and direct the athletic
and recreational
work- of high
school students. It is this demand
thai State College will continue to
Students who have elected majors
or minors in physical education
will complete these courses under
the present catalogue requirements,
T h e new outline of courses will
provide for a wider range of recreational interest in our own student
body. T h e H a r v a r d and Yale plan
RENSSELAER H. S.
will he in vogue, a plan by which
DEFEATS STATE
every student is required to elect
COLLEGE RESERVES some phase of athletic activity, appropriate to each season. In this
way the student's own health will
The
State
College
Reserve
he p r o m o t e d and his or her knowlbasketball learn journeyed lo Reiisedge of athletics will qualify for the
selaer Saturday night.
T h e colsupervision of high school athletics
lege team met the Rensselaer High
for boys or girls. T h e activities to
School quintet in a fast ami exbe offered for s t u d e n t choice a r e :
citing g a m e . 1 luring the first half football, soccer, cross-country, tenthe Reserves were handicapped by
uis, for a u t u m n ; basketball, hockey,
the size «i the court. In this hall
skiing, snows'hoeing, for winter;
the high school hoys managed to
baseball, tennis, field hockey, track
obtain a substantial lead.
In the
and hiking, for spring. S w i m m i n g
second half the Reserves came
may he elected in any or each of the
hack s t r o n g and set a fast pace
seasons.
that lasted till the final whistleT h e indoor g y m n a s i u m work will
But in spite of their hard work they
he continued for freshmen ami
were unable lo o v e r c o m e the early
s
o
p h o m o r e s , with heavy g y m n a s t i c s
lead of the East Side team. Linck
and aesthetic dancing for juniors
was the leading point g e t t e r for
and
seniors. .Some of the technical
Slate. T h o s e who played on the
courses for Physical
Education
Reserve team
were:
Raid win.
specialists will be w i t h d r a w n in
Strain, Donahue, Reilly, Linck, and
102-h T h e g y m n a s i u m staff will reMacFarlanc.
main about the same while the medical staff will he reduced, T h e dep a r t m e n t will seek the beneficial
and the physical upbuildrecreation
THE FIRES OF HOPE
ing of o u r s t u d e n t body, including
such corrective work as may be
possible; and it will enable State
When
failure
confronts
you,
College g r a d u a t e s to g o out into the
when disappointment faces you,
high school as leaders of the school
when disaster t h r e a t e n s you, the
athletic and recreational activities,
only hope you have is hope.
as well as of the classroom work.
A vain hope is a fool's income,
but a reasonable hope is the only
T h e courses in Commercial E d u s u p p o r t in a s t o r m .
cation and Household E c o n o m i c s
It is within The power of every
are in no w a y affected 'by t h e a p man to dispense to himself the
propriation for 1921. T h e s e debest tonic in all the world. A
p a r t m e n t s are doing excellent w o r k
hopeful mind.
in State College and will have increased r a t h e r than decreased supW i t h o u t hope in the heart the
port.
heart would break, the s t o m a c h
Page Three
STAHLER'S
Ice Cream and Confectionery
MUSIC
299 Central Avenue
-:•
Albany, N. Y.
Cotrell & Leonard
472.478 Broadway
Albany, N. Y.
WEARABLES FOR
WOMEN
Shoes
Furs
Frocks
Suits
Tailored Hats
Luggage
FRANK II.
EVOIIY & CO.
.'Id n m l . ' i S ISnnyer S l r e i W _
Same Line of Merchandise with
New Additions
COLLEGE PHARMACY
Cor. Western and No. Lnke Aves.
Mac's Restaurant
Half Fried Chicken*
W h e a t Cakes
Oysters and Clams
Country Sausage
Steaks and Chops
ALWAYS OPEN
295 Central Ave.
Enst of Theatre
ORCHIDS
ROSES
EYRES
FLORIST
SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
TELEPHONE
MAIM 5 5 0 0
1 0 6 STATE STREET
A L B A N Y , N. Y.
STATE COLLEGE N E W S , . MARCH 10, 1921
Page Four
SOCKET FIT SHOES
MUSCLE BUILDERS
•> 1
Score:
ST. LAWRENCE
Name and position
fb. fp. tp.
Barker, rf
2 3 7
13
Weller, If
5
6
Shtdwcll, c
3
4
Atwood, rg
2
4
Bird, lg.
J
Connory, rg
0_
14
The muscles of the feet like those of the
hands need proper exercise to develop
and strengthen them.
___wt_mmmmm
Socket Fit Shoes are flexible, allowing
absolute freedom to tho foot.
J. B. Lyon Company
General Printers and Publishers
Albany, N. Y.
Summary: Score at half time, St.
Lawrence, 14; State College, 14.
Albany, N. Y. Scorer, Shcrlcy. Time of halves,
twenlj' minutes.
STATE BREAKS EVEN
Continued from page 1.
CLARKSON
Name and position
fb. fp.
Randal], rf
1 0
Wilson, rf
2 2
Felew, c
0 0
Bezio, rg
0 0
MacGuiggan, lg, , . ; . . . 4 0
MacDonald, c
0 0
Simmons, rg
1 0
8
tp,
2
6
0
0
8
0
2
2 18
i
Summary: Score at half time,
State, 10; Clarkson, 6. Referee,
Sisson. Fouls committed, Clarkson, 9; State, 8. Time of periods,
twenty-five minutes.
St, Lawrence started out with a
whirlwind attack in the Saturday
night tilt, and scored five points^before State got her bearings. The
Purple and Gold, however, lightened its defensive and opened up
an offensive which took the St.
Lawrence five off their feet and
gave State a three-point lead. This
advantage did not change until
near the end of the half when St.
Lawrence spurted and tied the
score at 12 all. Cassavant broke
this deadlock in favor of State with
a long shot, but Weller came
through for the home team evening things up again. The score remained tied at 14 all until the end
o. the period.
The second half opened with
some fast floorwork. S,tate worked
up a three-point lead, but lost it
after about seven minutes play
when St. Lawrence forged ahead
by S points. Baker started a rally
for State when he dropped in a
clean basket from the middle of
the court. With the score 25 to
21 in favor of the home team,
Johnson was fouled while shooting, The goal was counted, and
Cassavant made good on the two
foul tries, tieing the score. Hathorn sent State to the front again
from the field. St Lawrence lied
again on a long shot and score remained at 27 all until the final
whistle. Towards the end of the
half Polt was fouled out on personals, and Dobris replaced him
at guard.
In the extra five minutes the fast
game of the night before, and the
speedy pace set by the St. Lawrence team had its effect. State's
defensive went to pieces, and the
home team was able to score seven
points in quick succession, The
best the Purple and Gold could do
was one foul shot,- and they were
forced to admit defeat by a count
of 34 to 27.
Weller and Barker were the big
guns for St. Lawrence, Cassavant and Hafhorn played a bang-up
game for State
Edward C. Carrlnaton, Treasurer
6 34
STATE COLLEGE
Name and position
fb. fp. .tp.
Cassavant, rf
2
Johnson, If
2
Hat-horn; c
3
Polt, rg
2
Baker, lg
1
Debris, rg
__?__
10 7 27
McAuliff ft Gtllahger
22-24 Hiatal St.
Campbell Carrinaton, Secretary
Charles M. Winchester, President
Email A. BarvoeM, Vice-President
" C L O S E - U P " OP
INAUGURATION
Continued from Page 1.
strenuous appliance to cither golf
or Federal affairs,
Inauguration was the subject of
the final scene, The band, the
cabinet, dignified, as well as undignified friends, the old maid, and
the tease were all there. Even
Cox, though mentally deranged,
did his share by selling _" extra's."
During the parade the wife of the
President as befitting one of her
importance was drawn about hy
coach and four. The judge so impressed Harding that he not only
kissed the "Bible," but read his
favorite passages. The inaugural
speech was voted a great success,
but the crowd could say with Harding, "Darned, if I know, do you?"
The stunt committee included
Dorothy Dangremnnd, Grace Maguirc, Gladys ffayncr, Maybclle
Jochtnnscii, Adrian Johnson, and
Charles Reilly,
The committee -thanks the class
for its cooperation in making the
stunt a success.
WIRELESS CONCERT
Continued from page 1,
to jazz. Under the expert manipulation of Mr. Long the set' was
tuned so that the high, clear notes
of Mme, Galli-C'urci, soprano, the
full rich tones of Emilio Dc Gorgorza, baritone, and the noisy conglomeration of sounds produced by
the Dixieland jazy. Band were
heard as distinctly as if the Victrola were in the room. One of the
operators announced each selection before it was given. The program was well balanced with
classical, semi-classical and popular
music.
After the concert was over, most
of those present waited till 10
o'clock to the get the correct time
signal from the navy station at
Arlington, Va. Following this the
reports of weather conditions along
the Atlantic coast were received.
A few college students who were
present decided to find the limit of
audibility of the signals. According to them the signals could be
plainly heard in the auditorium.
This fact is remarkable and shows
the rapid advance that has been
made along wireless lines since the
war.
An event of this sort is a novelty
to State College, but it is hoped
that more students will become interested. At future concerts there
should be a greater number of college people present to enjoy this
seeming miracle of science. Much
credit is due to Mr. Long and the
other members of the Physics Department for their enabling State
College to have a real wireless station of its own.
A Complete Plant for Compoiitien, Electrotyping, Engraving, Preisworlc,
Binding, and Blank Book Manufacturing
ALBANY ART UNION
Distinctive Photography
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
REMEMBRANCE
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
BUSINESS USE
Special Rales to Students
48 No. Pearl Street
Dank er
We Grow
Our Own
P h o n e Main 991
JOHN T. D. BLACKBURN
Retail—COAL—Wholesale
"Say it with
Flowers"
Principal Office "and Docka
I29 Water Street
Tel. 998 Main
40 and 42 Maiden Lane
THE
HAMILTON
PRINTING
CO.
PRODUCERS OF T H E BETTER C L A S S O F
*r
BOOKLETS. CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS A N D
DIRECT BY M A I L ADVERTISING
/
PRINTERS OF THE 8TATK COLLtam
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
JVfH/a
i\
ALBANY, N. Y.
HOME ECONOMICS S. O. S.
E C H O E S F R O M 1920
The Textile Classes in the Home
Economics Department arc making an intensive study of silk which
will culminate in Silk Week, March
14 to 18th. A talk on silk will be
given by one of the authorities on
silk in the business world, a moving picture of the processes of
manufacture will be shown during
the week, and an exhibit of interesting silk products will be open to
the public. The cal goes out — S.
O, S,— " See Our Silks " on Friday,
March 18th, in Science Building,
Rooms 158 and 161.
Freshmen Win Junior-Frosh Debate.
State Breaks Even on New York
Trip.
Manhattan Loses to Varsity 34
to 10.
Aggies Win Close Game 23 to
22.
Omicron Nu Pledges Juniors.
Mr. Long Lectures About Wireless.
Physical Education Society Initiates New Members.
Seniors Win Two Games From
Frosh.
\
* i
r
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