State College News 1922 JUNIOR PROM AT THE TEN EYCK

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF
VOL.
V. No. 15
1918
ALBANY, N. Y., FEBRUARY 10,
1921
$3.00 PER YEAR
1922 JUNIOR PROM AT THE TEN EYCK
CLASS BANQUET A NOVELTY
JUNIOR BANQUET AT
HAMPTON
New Feature of Junior Weck-End
Instead of the usual junior reception, a class banquet ill the
Hampton opened Ihe junior festivities Thursday, February 3. As
guests of honor '22 entertained Dr.
and Airs. Brubacher, Mr, and .Mrs.
Long-, .Miss Card, Miss Phillips,
Aliss Scotland, and .Miss Wallace.
Dinner was served in I'he lattice
room, and the table arrangements
were tnosl attractive, The favors
consisted of while roses for the
faculty and speakers, and bunches
of violets for I lie other members of
the class.
After the banquet class songs
were sung and the following toasts
were enjoyed: " T o Our faculty."
by Eunice Rice with a response by
Continued on page 4
JOHN
DRINKWATER
LECTURES
Over One Hundred Twenty-five
Couples Attend Junior Prom
The junior promenade was held
Friday evening in the Ten Eyck
ball room. Post-exam jubilees and
banquets had not diminished Ihe
junior pep—-,'11111 exams were over!
Ihe crer-dancing Stale College
slippers Mvinklcd unusually merrily
lo Xiia's six-piece orchestra, The
whole evening furnished but one
regret.—•" the end"—it conies so
quickly.
The receiving line included Dr.
and Mrs, llrubacher, Dean Pierce,
Mr. and Mrs. Long, Frances Stil.loii, president of '22, and Edward
Linck, vice-president.
The patronesses were as follows:
Mrs. llrubacher, Mrs. Homer, Miss
Pierce, Miss Phillips, Miss Scotland, Miss Wallace, Miss Bennett,
Miss Card, and Mrs, Long.
The prom committee consisted of
Edward Linck, chairman, Ethel
lluyck. Hope Persons, Gladys
Thompson. I.eland Foster, and Isa'lore Lire slaw.
Among those present were: AImeda Becker, Gertrude 1'ijssy,
Mnrjorlc Smith, Frances Keeks,
Alida Balbigh, Marion Hunter,
Carol Traver, Xellie Parkburst,
Catharine Drury, Myfainvy Williams, Elizabeth Archi'bold, Georgia
Koch, Ethel lluyck, .Margaret
Meyer, Margaret Kirlland, Florence Stniibro, Florence Van Mess,
Helen VanAken, Sybil Palme, Cora
The Dramatic and Art Association seems to be doing a lot for
State College this v-car. Last Tuesday I bey gave us the opportunity to
hear Mr. John Drinkvvatcr's lecture
on Abraham Lincoln. A large
crowd was present at Chancellor's
Hall, and everyone enjoyed the lecture very much. The complete report will appear on another page
of Ihe " News."
The next event on ihe program
of the association is an exhibition of
Colored prints, which will include
the greaiesl paintings of the world
which can he used for home decoration. These will be shown in Ihe
rotunda and halls of the main
GRADS LOSE TO
building for the next two weeks,
'VARSITY
starling Sunday, February 13. On
Sunday the exhibit will last from
Many
Alumni
Witness Annual
2 until 6 o'clock, and on other days
Clash
from 9 lo 5 and from 7 to 9 in Ihe
evening.
The public as well as the student
Mani" Stale College Alumni saw
body is cordially invited, and no ad- their team go down to a 32 lo 23
mission fee will he charged. Any defeal in (lie annual tilt with the
pictures shown may be ordered at 'Varsity last Saturday in the A. H.
the exhibition at prices ranging S. gymnasium. The game was hard
fnvm thirty-five cents to eighteen
fought from start to finish, and the
dollars.
gratis, although forced to remain in
ihe background throughout, pressed
at the heels of the 'Varsity.
STATE COLLEGE GIRL hard
The 'Varsity went into the lead
SAILS FOR FRANCE
early in the first half and was never
headed, Qissavanl scored three
Elisa Rigouard, '22, left last Mon- times from the field and three times
day to spend a few days at her from the foul line, while Hathorn
home before going to France. She caged two double headers in this
will sail February 19. After spend- period. "Little Filz" netted three
ing five months of study there in baskets from the scrimmage and
the University of Paris she will re- " Big Filz" two from the penalty
turn to college next fall to be grad- line for the Alumni. At half time
the score hoard read 13 to 8 in favor
uated. We shall miss her very much
hut hope to hear good things from of the 'Varsity.
her often in her absence. College
In the second half the old timers
extends lo Elisa best wishes for a
were unable lo keep up with the
happy trip.
Continued on page 4.
A](.'serve, Ethel Cuminings, Jane
Seullen, Florence Fitch, Helen
Mel/, Marjorie Stidworlliy, Laura
Ebel,
Dorothy
Daiigreinond,
Augusta Knupp, .Eunice Pice, Elisa
Kigoiiard,
Gladys
Thompson,
Charlotte Bush, .Marion Benedict,
Lola Cnckcncr, Glennoii Gasman,
Grace McGwire, Domiiriy Palter
son, Myni Shaw, Margaret Smith,
Florence Dorsey, Margaret Eaton,
Mary M.TIKT, Dora O'Slfitligh.ncssey, Mnrjnric
Sliinof, Marlon
.Newell,
Mary
Baxter,
Edna
Maueth, Helen O'Brien, Gertrude
Burns, Martha l'ar''y, Elizabeth
Carey, Alice O'Con ior, Kulhcriiic
McGarriiban, Alice Clear, Helen
Walsh, Marion Brcnneii, Helen
Hayes, Mary Hayes, Laura McCarthy, Helen Sbepa.rdson, k'alhcrine
Stralton,
Path
Callisou,
Marion Beale, Alice Bn'ggs, Ruth
Ellis, Dorothy Jones, Lillian Johnson, Madeline Lcitzell, Elizabeth
Stronp, Twybill Purely, Ailccn Mac
Dotigall, Harriet Rising, Clara
I''alms tuck, Virginia Wallace, Jane
Green, Helen Guld'i, Helen Leary,
Delia lladsell. Helen Voelcker,
Pauline George, Edna Trumbull,
Hope Persons, Louise Persons,
Dorothy Baker, Martha Bailey,
Sylvia Potter,
The gentlemen included: StanIcy Conway, Henry Eighmey, Dean
Ciinpleau, Leland Alosher, Franklin
('oiiiinued on page 3
STATE TROUNCES
MANHATTAN
'Varsity Scores 25 to U Victory
The Purple and Gold quintet defeated Manhattan in Ihe A. H. S,
gymnasium January 22 by a score
of 2.S to 11.
The 'first half was one-sided and
unexciting. T, Cassavant scored the
first point for State from the fifteenfoot mark, The home team then
wen I rapidly in the lead, scoring 1-1
points before Manhattan found the
basket. Coach Suavely put in his
second string men toward the an(\
of the first period, and the New
Vnrkcrs were able to break the ice
with two field baskets, making the
count 15 lo 4 at the end of this half.
In the second half State started
with the regulars again.. Manhattan
put up a faster game, forcing Ihe
Purple and Gold to travel at top
speed in order to keep their lead. Tn
spire of the efforts of the New York
five, the final whistle found State
still on the long end of the score,
Continued on Page 4
POST-EXAM
JUBILEE
State Celebrates Completion of
Exams
Whether or no we starred during
the past two weeks' celebrities, we all
were at our best on Wednesday, the
second day of the second month of
this year, 1921, lo commemorate the
death for another six months of
"Worry" and in celebrate the revival of "Hope" for the future.
Everyone who had the talent to
louse himself from the haunting
thoughts of a deserting Prom man,
an unfinished gown, or perchance
one last test on the morrow, and in
spite of long midnight sessions previous, still existed, entered into the
festivities of the first Post-Exam,
jubilee.
The funeral procession, consisting
of the corpse of Text Books and
mourners of the dear departed, was
preceded by the Ornery orchestra,
which rendered solemn music for the
occasion. Professor Ruth Ellis directed the playing, It was pathetic.
The Right Reverent] Reginald Bruce
and the Honorable Harold Holmes
officiated in the service, which was
Continued on page 2
OMICRON
NU
Beta Alumnae Chapter Meets
Fifteen members of Beta Alumnae
Chapter of Omicrou Nu attended the
winter meeting of the Chapter at
the Women's City Club, December
29th, This was the third meeting of
Ihe Chapter since its formation last
spring. Although the members are
scattered throughout the State, they
make an effort to return for the
meetings or at least send some message. The membership of the group
already numbers more than thirty.
At the December meeting twelve
Continued on page 3
SIGMA NU OPENS FRAT
HOUSE
Sigma Nu Kappa Fraternity formally opened its new fraternity
home on Thursday, February 3d,
with a smoker-banquet for its alumni members, The building, which
has recently been completed, was
suitably decorated for the occasion with banners, relics and streamers contributed by the members for
the opening night.
Professor Risley, in an extemporaneous speech, give a highly-amusing account of his college days and
of a few of his subsequent experiences.
The affair was well attended and
the prevailing enthusiasm and good
fellowship augurs an era of unprecedented prosperity
for the
organization.
,
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 10, 1921
State college i?eu>s
Vol. V
February 10
No. 15
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the New York State
College for Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rate is three
dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the Editor before
Monday of the week of publication.
Editor-in-Chief,
F, Reginald Bruce, '21
Managing Editor,
Florence Stanbro, '21
Business Manager,
Edna Lowerree, '21
Subscription Manager,
Mary Whish, '21
Assistant Business Managers
Ethel Huyck, '22
Alice O'Connor
Associate Editors,
Hope Persons, '22
Louise Persons, '22
Helen Dangremond, '22
Reporters
Vera Nolan, '23
Warren Gray, '23
Eira Williams, '23
JOLLY
JUNIORS"
Where, oh where, are the "Jolly
Juniors?" Well, they have been having one round of good times and
fun, and showing Statu what a lot
of "pep" they've got. They went
into exams, with a zeal which nearly
surpassed any of the other classes,
and then they were off to make
Junior week-end the best ever. They
were at the Post-Exam. Jubilee in
full force and helped to make some
of the noise which was so prevalent
there. Then on Thusday night they
did something (|iiite out of the ordinary and betook themselves to the
Hampton where they ate as no other
junior class ever ate. And last, but
not least, they went to their own
Prom, which was the best Prom
State has ever seen. On Saturday
night they finished up a busy week by
going to the Alumni Slate game and
the dancing afterwards. And this
week they're all back at college,
just as full of "pep" as ever — if
not more so. They're all ready to
start the second semester even better
than the first and show their Alma
Mater what they can do.
Isn't 1922 the best junior class
ever?
Where, oh where, are the "Jolly
Juniors?"
A CHALLENGE
This is the beginning week of the
second semester. It is a week
which brings a challenge for every
student in college. Exams arc over,
and there is the temptation to lie
down on the job until another
" cramming season." However, let
us all make " new-semester " resolutions; to prepare our work daily,
to put ourselves into our work, and
to be alert to the many educational
possibilities of the curriculum.
Neither must we allow ourselves to
be'"swallowed up " by our desire
for learning. There are the social
functions which must be supported.
No one cares for " the grind " any
more than he cares for the frivolous
" gad-about." The frosh can now
become 'more enthusiastic over
their prospective success now that
the effects of the first terrible
" reign of terror " have " almost "
vanished, and we give the seniors
their one last chance to contribute
thc_ very best tiliat is in them to
their Alma Mater. The sophs are
egotistical, and the juniors are gay
according to tradition, but they will
expend their energy in making this
a live institution. At the end of
litis, a successful year, may we all
he able to shoiit: Hurrah for State
College!
ANOTHER
"DON'T"
We are proud of our Alma Mater,
t re n't we?
We have lots of college spirit
here at Stale, ton, haven't we?
And we know that there is no
better place to display this spirit
than at a basketball game, don't
Uc?
Well, then, cheer as though you
meant it, and when the ball does a
neat little turn around the edge of
the basket and doesn't go in, don't
groan!
'22.
HOME-TIME HOURS TO
BE COUDUCTED BY
CLASS OF '.23
This Sunday afternoon, February
I3t.li, the college home-time hours
will be in charge of the class of '2,3.
The green and red rooms will be
ppei, as usual at 2:30 o'clock when
the students can read or write or
pass the lime in any way I hat suits
their fancy. Al 4 o'clock, vesper
services will be held in the chapel
al which time Dr. Richardson will
speak.
After Services lea will be served
in the green room, and there will
be a delightful social hour with
reading aloud until 6:IS. •
All students are cordially invited
lo conic and.enjoy the afternoon,
STATE
OPENS HOCKEY
SEASON
The first game of the season
opened with R. I1. I. at Troy on
Saturday of the first week of
exams. The Stale College team
showed up well on the ice. Inclement weather has interfered considerably with any concerted practice of the team but nevertheless
each man was on his job and ready
for light throughout the game. The
final score of the game was. 5 to 0
in favor of the "Tutc." The second
half of the game was especially fast.
In tihat R. P. I. scored only one
goal. The State College lined up
as follows:
J. Cassavant
Goal
I lathorne
Point
Johnson
Cover Point
Kaag
Right Wing
Gray
Left Wing
N'euner
Center
T. Cassavant
Rover
Foster
Right Wing
WHO'S WHO
Katheryn Ball, '21, Kathryn Shipman, '23, and Ruth Tefft, '23, spent
last week at their homes.
Alice Briggs, '21, has accepted a
position as French teacher at New
Lebanon, Mass.
Marjorie Finn, '20, spent the
week-end at the house.
Lela Cackener, '22, is at her home
in Hudson Falls, recovering from
an attack of tonsililis.
A (2
A formal tea was held at the
house Sunday afternoon for our
alumni of the Capitol district.
X S 0
Marjorie Sinnott, '23, attended
the junior prom at Hamilton College last week.
Mary Kinselia, '18, was a guest
at tile lodge on Saturday.
u e are glad to welcome Caroline
Berbcrick, '23, hack to college after
her illness,
Several of the girls attended the
tea in honor of Mrs. Miller given
by I lie Catholic Women's Service
League on Saturday afternoon.
r K <i>
.Miss Josephine Brown, '19, of
Beacon and Miss Mildred Carswell,
'1°, of Greenwich spent a few days
with Catharine and Susan Collier,
'21 and '23.
.Mary Smith, '23, spenl the weekend with Eluiina Ctirric, '23, at
Amsterdam, N. Y.
Ethel Cummings, '23, entertained
Miss Mildred Johnston of Highland
the past week.
We extend our sympathy to
Monica Cardiff Archer, '19, on the
death of her mother.
II <l>
Peggy Van Ness, '20, spent the
week-end at the house.
Georgia Koch, '22, and Margaret
Meyer, '22, spchl the past week at
I he house.
Helen Leary was a guest of Ira
Williams Thursday night.
Elizabeth Archibolcl, '211, was al
I lie house Friday.
ICthel Huyck, '22, has recovered
from her recent illness.
" Y " House
Elisa Rigouard. '22, left last .Monday. We shall miss her very much
during her live months' stay in
France where she will study,
Elsie Kennedy, '20, spent Saturday night with 'Elisa Rigouard, '22.
Marion Moore, '20, was a dinner
guest Sunday.
Lovisa Vecldcr, '211, called Saturday afternoon.
We, are glad to have Charlotte
Benedict, '21, hack al college after
her recent illness.
POST-EXAM JUBILEE
Continued from Page 1
attended by a very appreciative and
appropriate audience,
This scene was in deep contrast lo
the following ones when the orchestra took their seats, and the gathering assembled about them to' watcli
the class stunts.
The seniors showed in a striking
manner the career of a girl through
her college course. How well they
pictured to us the "bugbears" o'f
each successive year! The frosh put
up a hard struggle with required
courses. History II and Mathematics
I proved almost fatal, but English I
came along to save her from the severe initiation. Brcese's sophomore
psychology and Painter's little child
had lo be encountered during the
second year. The junior struggled
with required education and methods.
The senior battled incessantly with
practice teaching, which forever followed her about. Not even little
green bugology, the senior's friend,
who had remained with her from her
freshman year, could separate the
pest from her. The senior bravely
passed through a course in higher
education and psychology till graduation finally seized and threw her out
to battle in the world,
The juniors presented a tragedy.
The whole scene was very dramatic.
Court was held and we experienced
the trial and execution of Frank
•
Pierpout Graves, William Billings
Aspinwald, and Faith Hope Disappointment,
Graves was convicted
and pleaded guilty of writing "A
Student's History of Education,"
and Aspinwald was convicted and
pleaded guilty of writing "Outlines
of tlie History of Education," Disappointment was convicted and
pleaded guilty of the crime of being
the sixth Prom, man to desert one
hopeful junior girl. The three cabbage heads were severed and the
judge and executioners took part in
a death march about the victims.
The sophomore stunt was successful in 'amusing the audience. A
freshman and sophomore, upon entering the Dean's office to obtain
their marks, were completely dazed
to learn lhat they were to take another lest, Dr. I. Knowthenuts, from
the Slate Asylum, liad come lo examine (he students, The frosh and
sophomore were put through very
strenuous intelligence tests. Thenmarks were then given out. One A
was given to the sophomore; four
li'.t went to the sophomore; two C's,
three U'x, and one /•' went lo the
freshman. The letters appeared in
groups, and were exhibited by study,
song, dance, comedy, and mourning,
respectively.
The freshmen gave the winning
stunl. They cleverly staged two lectures, Dean Pierce's famous Wednesday aftcnoou lecture and Professor Rislcy's History II kciure.
The class showed remarkable skill in
impersonation not only, but readiness
to respond to the instruction derived
from the lectures. We foretell for
them a bright and prosperous future.
The rest of the evening was given
over lo each one present, who
amused himself with whistles, crickels, lollypops, peanuts, kisses, Billy's
beer, toddling, etc. We were assured before going that there would
be plenty of noise, and there were
noises of various kinds. Elaborate
caps were furnished to each one.
which may well be saved as a symbol of the gaiety of the evening.
Everyone was dressed in a costume
to represent how happy he was thai
exams were over. The prize costume was lhat worn by Mary Whish,
'21. Confetti was plentiful throughoul the evening.
During the course of the dancing
we were drawn lo one side of the
gym, where a senior was making a
desperate effort to auction off a
basket of things received in the
"lost and found" box. The bidders
were quite quick to respond, for the
money was to he used to help pay
the ear fare for the frosh who would
be sent home.
We were glad that several of the
faculty could resist staying home to
correct exam, papers in order to enjoy with us (lie festivities of the
Steefel Bros.
Girls Shop
Quality and Moderate Prices
f
)
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 10, 1921
Page Three
STAHLER'S
How is a Wireless
Message Received?
E
V E R Y incandescent lamp has a filament. M o u n t a metal
plate on a wire in the lamp near t h e filament. A current
f
leaps the space between the filament a n d t h e plate when
the filament glows.
Edison first observed this phenomenon in 1883. Hence it was
called t h e " E d i s o n effect."
Scientists long studied t h e "effect" b u t they could not explain
it satisfactorily. Now, after years of experimenting with Crookes
tubes, X-ray tubes and radium, it is known t h a t t h e current t h a t
leaps across is a stream of "electrons"—exceedingly minute particles negatively charged with electricity.
These electrons play a n i m p o r t a n t p a r t in wireless communication. When a wire grid is interposed between t h e filament a n d t h e
plate a n d charged positively, the plate is aided in drawing electrons
across; b u t when t h e grid is charged negatively it drives back the
electrons. A very small charge applied t o the grid, as small as t h a t
received from a feeble wireless wave, is enough to vary the electron
stream.
So the grid in the t u b e enables a faint wireless impulse to control
the very much greater a m o u n t of energy in the flow of electrons,
and so radio signals too weak to be perceived b y other means become perceptible b y t h e effects t h a t they produce. J u s t as the
movement of a throttle controls a great locomotive in motion, so
a wireless wave, b y means of the grid, affects the powerful electron
stream.
All this followed from studying the mysterious " E d i s o n effect"—
a purely scientific discovery.
N o one can foresee w h a t results will follow from research in pure
science. Sooner or later t h e world m u s t benefit practically from the
discovery of new facts.
For this reason t h e Research Laboratories of t h e General Electric
Company are concerned as much with investigations in pure science
as they a r e with t h e improvement of industrial processes a n d products. They, too, have studied t h e " E d i s o n effect" scientifically.
T h e result has been a new form of electron tube, known as the
" p l i o t r o n " , a t y p e of X - r a y tube free from t h e vagaries of the old
t u b e ; a n d the " k e n e t r o n " , which is called b y electrical engineers a
"rectifier" because it h a s t h e property of changing an alternating
into a direct current.
All these improvements followed because t h e Research Laboratories t r y t o discover t h e " h o w " of things. P u r e science always
justifies itself.
m®[email protected]!®(Sftirii<s
G e n e r a l Office C @ S M P S L f f H V
evening. Dean Pierce, Professor
Risley, Miss Martinez and Miss
Phillips chaperoned.
We hope thai this jubilee will be
the precedent for annual Post-Exam.
Jubilees. We like Myskania's idea
of a Rood time.
together the 0micron Nu girls who
have been onl of college for some
time, Their experiences are broad
and varied and they form a stronglyorganized group, whose common purpose is to further the interests of
Home Economics.
OMICRON NU
Continued from Page 1.
new members were received into the
Chapter. There was a discussion
of the relation of the Alumnae Chapter to the active Chapter, The
Alumnae Chapter is working with
the active Chapter in planning an
open meeting to he held the week of
March 28th in Albany. Plans are
being made for the joint Chapters to
assume the care of a needy child in
the vicinity of Albany. A Marion
Payne memorial fund lias been
started, to lie used for some educational purpose.
•
The Alumnae Chapter is drawing
JUNIOR PROM
Continued from Pac;e 1.
Butts, Donald Packer
' Whitbeck, Lorrcl Nichols,
ernach,
Harold Dunn, James . .^Uonough,
Earl Mcdlin, Basil Moore, Frank
McClure, John Baker, Gene Rankin, Lelan'd Poster, Warren Rosebrooke, Frank Soeco, Andrew
Davidson, Harold P.aldvvin, Joseph
Murphy, Harold Becbe, Kirkwood
Personius, Robert Laffin, Edward
Linck, Irving Whltmorc, Kenneth
llolcombe, • Frederick
O'Hara,
Robert Lawlcr, Scott Osborne,
Albert Wade, LeRoy Gill, Reginald
Davies, L, Jones, M, Brint'horp,
Ice Cream and Confectionery
MUSIC
299 Central Avenue
-:-
Albany, N. V.
Cotrell & Leonard
472-478 Broadway
Albany, N. Y.
WEARABLES FOR
WOMEN
Shoes
Furs
Frocks
Suits
Tailored Hats
Luggage
F R A N K II.
EVO'RY & CO.
Printers
:U1 itml :\H Hi. B vi.r Ht.>»«
Same Line of Merchandise with
New Additions
COLLEGE PHARMACY
Cor, Western niul No. Luke Avei .
Mac's R e s t a u r a n t
Half Fiied Chickens
Wheat Cakes
Oyster* and Clama
Country Sausage Steaks and Chops
ALWAYS OPEN
295 Central Ave.
East of Theatre
EYRES
FLORIST
SAY IT W I T H FLOWERS
WRrGLEYS
Schenectady, N. Y.
William Jamieson, Lynden Hulbert,
Luther Auslunoody, G, Schrangraw, Mark Brinthaupt, Henry
Hopkins, Malhew Devitt, Harold
Sehafer, Hilton MacCaffrcy, Ed
Leary, Edgar Dunning, Leo JlcKcnna, Fred Dennison, Hugh Butler, Morris Kay Cantwell, Charles
Walker, Jack Dcvine, Elmer 11 iedorf, Jerry Tyne, Earl Dorwaldi,
Leo Shepard'Son, Walter Fuller,
Henry McNeil, Arthur Taber,
Maurice llathonie, Jack Johnson,
George Hilman, Theodore Cassavant, Robert iMcFarlane, Al Brody,
Sumner Rome, William Strain.
David Strain, Earl Sutherland,
Dewitt Towscnd, R. Ffohaus, Martin Barry, Ralph Baker, Fred
Parker, D. Gidlcy, Zekc Davis,
John Moore, Stanley Harrison,
Klrtlnncl Kenyou, Rupert Thorpe,
Howard Maguire, Fred Links, John
Malonc, John Neuner, J. Lewis,
R, Cote, Harold Frasicr, Burton
Slilson, David Brockway.
Aids to <ood looks, coond Matt,
cuer appetite and healthy diMtloo
are only Sc a package. _
Sealed
TtahtKert
Right
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, .FEBRUARY 10, 1921
Page Four
Socket-Fit Shoes for Women
If women would use
ordinary d i s c r e t i o n
and wear''SOCivETF I T , " flexible arch
support! ngshoes when
they are going to be
on their feet a n y
length of time, they
could then wear the
fancy foitwear with
p l e a s u r e for real
dressy occasoni.
.12 S 32
Summary: Score at half time—
'Varsity, 13; Alumni, 8, R e f e r e e Hill. Umpire—Powers. Scorers—
Hofmann and Holmes, Timekeepers
—Sutherland and Bliss. Time of
periods—Twenty minutes.
" SOCKETF I T " Shoes
• up part the
bones of the feet
properly and illlow no undue
pressure on the
nerve centers.
McAuliff & Gallahger
22-24 Slcnbra St.
VARSITY
Name and Position.
Fb, Fp, Tp,
T, Cassavant, R.F
7 8 22
fohnson, L.F
';,,..
1 0 2
Hathorne, C
4 0 8
II. Poll, R.G.
0 (I 0
Uobris, L.G
0 0 0
Baker, L.G
,. 0 0 0
Sherlock, R.G
0 0' 0
Albany, N.
JUNIOR BANQUET
(Continued from page 1)
Dr. Brubacher; " To Our Class " by
Ruth
lleminover;
"To
Our
Future" by Alice Clear; and " T o
Our Alma Mater" by Isadore
Breslaw. Class spirit was very evident throughout tlie evening, and
everyone highly approved of this
pleasant opportunity for a "get-together." It is hoped that all future
classes will follow this precedent
and will enjoy as "peppy" a time
as '22 did.
The committee consisting of
Marion Hunter, chairman, Margaret Meyers, and Katlicrinc Stratton deserves much credit, for the
success of the affair.
Besides those already' mentioned,
the following attended: Frances
Stilson, Louise Persons, Augusta
Knapp, Helen Van Aken, Winifred
Dunn, Frances Otis, Helen Shepard'son, Hope Persons, Catharine
Drury, Elizabeth Carey, Margaret
l.letz, Elisa Rigoiiard, Alice O'Connor, Ethel Huyck, Anna O'Neill,
Ismena Frazer, Eleanor Guiltinan,
Gladys Thompson, Gladys Ingalls,
Martha Parry, Gladys Lodge,
Pauline Baker, Catharine Pelt/,
Carol Traver, Arlinc VVer'th, Hilda
Hayes, Pauline George, Malwina
Lcmmle, lielen Walsh, Marion
Brennan, Fannie Schulman, Mildred Stetson, Twybill Purdy, Margaret O'Donncll, Lorine Lavell,
Catherine Merchant, and Edward
I.inch.
GRADS LOSE TO 'VARSITY
(Continued from page 1)
fast pace set by the youngsters. As
a result the 'Varsity increased their
lead to 9 points. Cassavant played
a sensational game in this half, caging the ball four times from the
Hoor. Springmann and both " Fitz's "
also played a iiard offensive game
for the grads,
T. Cassavant showed fine form for.
the winners, scoring 22 points. Captain Hathorne shared the individual
honors with him.
"Little Fitz"
showed all his old-time speed and
cleverness, making 10 points for the
Grads. Springmann also played a
hard game for the losers.
Score:
ALUMNF
.Vamc and Position.
Fb. Fp. Tp.
F. Fitzgerald, R.F
S 0 10
S. Fitzgerald, L . F . . . . . .
1 S 7
Springmann, C
3 0 6
Curtin, 'R.G
0 0 0
Hohaus, L.G
0 0 0
Lobdcll, L.G. ..,
0 0 0
9
5 23
STATE BEATS MANHATTAN
(.Continued from page U
Score:
MANHATTAN
Name and Position.
Fb. Fp. Tp.
Hayes, R.F
0 0 0
McCarthy, L.F
0 0 0
Hamlin, C
2 0 4
Mahoney, R.G.
1 1 3
Zimmerman, R.F
0 0 0
MeCarty, L.G
0 2 2
Hanley, L.F
1 0.2
4
Charles M. Winchester, President
Campbell Carrington, Secretary
Ernest A. Bnrvoets, Vice-President
Edward C. Carrington, Treasures
J. B. Lyon Company
General Printers and Publishers
Albany, N. Y.
A Complete Plant for Composition, Electrotyping, Engraving, Prestwork,
Binding, and Blank Book Manufacturing
3 11
S T A T E COLLEGE
Fb. Fp.
Name and Position,
T. Cassavant, R.F
2 11
fohnson, L.F
2 0
Halhorn, C
1 0
Baker, L.G
(1 0
II. Polt, R.G
2 0
Sherlock, L.G., C
0 0
Linck, R.F
0 0
Strain, L.G
0 0
Tp.
15
4
2
C
4
0
0
0
7 11 25
S u m m a r y : Score at half t i m e Slate College, 15; Manhattan, 4.
Referee—Metz. Time of halves—
Twenty minutes.
ALBANY ART UNION
Distinctive 'Photography
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REMEMBRANCE
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48 No. Pearl Street
Phone Main 991
JOHN T. D. BLACKBURN
Dank er
We Grow
DRINKWATER GIVES
LECTURE IN ALBANY
Large Audience Hears English
Dramatist's Address on
" Abraham Lincoln."
Our Own
"Say it with
1
Flowers"
Principal Oflic,
40 and 42 Maiden Lane
THE
Retail—COAL—Wholesale
nd Docks
129 Water Street
HAMILTON
PRINTING
Tel. 998 Main
CO.
PRODUCERS OF T H E BETTER C L A S S OF
"The two outstanding personages of the last live hundred
years, among the English-speaking
peoples, were Oliver Cromwell and
Abraham
Lincoln,'" said John
Drinkwater, English dramatist and
poet, to a large audience
at Chancellor's Hall Tucsda3r night in the
course of his lecture on "An English Dramatist's Point of View of
Abraham Lincoln." The lecture
was given under the direction of the
Dramatic and Arts Association of
t'hc State -College for Teachers.
Prefacing his discussion of Lincoln as a character to appeal to the
dramatist, Mr, Drinkwater enunciated his conception of the artist's
creed. It is that he sees in the
lives of real or imaginary people
characteristics, instincts and trends;
that he translates Ihese into terms
that appeal to readers or hearers
and that he is only a good artist so
long as he is faithful to this idea.
The writer who "gives the public
what it wants " n e e d not necessarily be an inferior artist, he said,
but often is an excellent one who
prostitutes his art to his idea of
popularity,
Drinkwater, a young Englishman
of fine presence and diction, spoke
of Lincoln as a man who added to
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great qualities of statesmanship the
urge of a big mioral idea — the
quality, lie said, that marks the
highest type of statesman. He defined democracy not as "one man
as good as another," hut as the opportunity of all living in it to mould
their characters so as to be as good
as anyone. Lincoln, he said, exemplified the highest expression of
democracy in that sense.
The dramatist's talk was concerned little with the play of
"Abraham Lincoln," but rather
with Lincoln as an abstract personage who appeals to the artist
interpreting his Ideal. Tt was
ALBANY, N. Y.
largely analytical, quite impersonal
and, as he said, "not John Drinkwater's or any special man's idea
of Lincoln," but that of an artist
Gliding in Lincoln material for
making a great personage real to
people in general,
Drinkwater prefaced his lecture
with a reading from several of his
poems which met with appreciative
applause, and he concluded with
excerpts from the poems that are
read by the "Interpreter" 'before
each act of his play. Dr. Abram
R. Brubacher, president of the
State College for Teadhers, introduced Mr. Drinkwater,
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