State College News Ill No. 6

advertisement
State College News
NEW
VORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS or
VOL.
Ill
No. 6
ALBANY, N. Y.,
TEACHERS
1918
NOVEMBER 21,
1918
$1.50
PER YEAR
FIRST MEETING OF
NEWMAN CLUB
NOTICE TO SCHOLARSHIP HOLDERS
'* Marshal Ferdinand Focli is every inch a man, every inch a soldier, every inch a patriot, every
inch a commander, and was
worthy of I he greatest responsibility *vcr held by mortal man."
This tribute to the generalissimo of the Allied armies, and
now the idol of the civilized world,
was given last Friday afternoon
in an address by the Rev. Joseph
A. Dunncy, superintendent of the
parochial schools of the Albany
diocese, at the first meeting of the
Newman Club of the State College
for Teachers. The meeting, conducted in the college auditorium,
was the first of the regular fortnightly meetings.
Scholarship holders are requested to consult the bulletin board
for official
notice
concerning
scholarships which will be paid
Friday' afternoon, Nov. 22, between 2 and 4 o'clock.
COLLEGE CALENDAR
RADICALLY CHANGED
In order to make up for the
time lost during „thc epidemic
many striking changes in the college calendar have been made.
The vacation at Thanksgiving
time will cover only Thanksgiving
Day. Christmas vacation will lie
shortened by three days.
Midyear's exams will be entirely
omitted, daily marks and test
marks making the averages for
the semester.
Puller notice will be found on
page two.
ATTENTION!
277 .students have paid their
blanket tax; but there are 84 Seniors, 65 juniors, 66 Sophomores
and 110 Freshmen who have not
yet come across!
If you take pride in your college, if you want it to be one of
the best, if you enjoy college life
and college activities, yon will
pay your tax. If you're not enjoying college life, pay your tax
and you'll get into the spirit.
You have the privilege of paying your five dollars Monday,
November 25, from 9 to 12 a. m.,
and from 2 to 4 p. m.
CAFETERIA
OPENS
The Home Economics Department has opened a cafeteria in
Room " T , " in the basement of the
Science Building, for the purpose
of serving lunch to the faculty and
students of the college. Soups,
sandwiches, milk, or other beverages, salads, and hot dishes of various kinds will be obtainable.
Continued on Page 4
MISS S P R I N G S T E E D
GRANTED LEAVE
OF ABSENCE
Miss Clara Belle Springstccd,
instructor in German at State College, has been granted a leave of
absence for this year to become
assistant to Mr. W. C. Smith, director of foreign education in New
York State.
Continued on Page 3
S. A. T. C. W E L C O M E S
NEW LEADER
State College S. A. T. C. Barracks
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Y . M. C. A . Leader SpeailiSv
Student Assembly Friday was
given over to the great Allied
drive. Or. lirubacher first introduced Professor Docker, who is
chairman of the War Committee
of State College. The latter then
explained the purpose of the drive
iii brief and incidentally related
the excellent part which State College took' in the war drive of last
winter. State College was fourth
on the list, headed by Columbia,
S. A. T. C. N O T E S
Training of Men to be Continued
Until Further Notice
After the parade on Monday
many (if the men began to talk' of
demobilization and release — but
so far no orders have been received other than that the training is
to lie continued for the present
and regular college work resumed.
In Company A bayonet work
was started last week with Lieutenant Knighton as instructor.
Many of the men enjoyed weekend passes at home,
Companies B and C have been
issued uniforms, rifles and bayonets.
Continued on Page ,3
S O N G C O N T E S T I N G. A. A.
The old songs are quite worn
out. We, and alumnae before us,
have sung " Ain't She Neat, Ha,
Ha!", etc., upon so many varying
occasions that whatever charm
they may have had seems to belong to the past.
So we are proposing a contest.
Write your song, full of sentiment, or pep, or both, and hand it
to Agnes Nolan, '20, by November
29 th.
Every song, whether a prize
song or not, will be kept and sung.
So do your part and try one of the
prizes — first, a war savings
stamp; second, two dollars in
thrift stamps; third, one dollar in
thrift stamps,
The judges arc: Miss Pierce,
Miss Bennett, chairman; Miss
Card, Professor Belding and Professor Birch enough.
Cornell and Vassar.
Professor
Decker then introduced Mr, Jos.
Ailing of Overseas Y. M. C. A.
force, who. demonstrated his ability hi tell us of tile work which
the united organizations are doing.
Mr. Ailing was present at the
Front at the beginning of (he
great drive on Chateau-Thierry
last July.
Continued on Page 4
MARGARET
SHEVLIN
it is with deep regret that State
College learned of the death of
Margaret Shevlin, member of the
Class of 1918. Miss Shevlin was
a victim of influenza and died at
East Syracuse, where she was
leaching history.
Miss Shevlin attended and was
graduated
from
the Saratoga
Springs High School. She entered
State College in the fall of 1914,
and during her four years here
was prominent in college activities.
The esteem with whicli her fellow
students regarded her capability
as a leader was shown by the
many offices to which she was
elected. She was president of Newman club, president of PromcContinucd on Page 4
OMICRON NU PAYS
TRIBUTE
Omicron Nu feels very deeply
the loss of one of its alumnae
members, Marion Payne, '17, who
died of influenza on October 10th.
Miss Payne's death occurred at
Herkimer, where she had been
teaching in a vocational school
since her graduation from college.
Her splendid character, her capability and her pleasing personality won for her a place of prominence in many of our college activities, Tn addition to being a
member of Omicron Nu she was a
charter member of Myskania and
was very active in Y. W. C. A.,
being an officer and a member of
the cabinet during her Senior year,
With her going, Omicron Nu
loses the first member in the history of the society.
Captain I-J. D. Rush, who is succeeding Captain E. L. Reed as
commander of the post (State
College Military Detachment), arrived in Albany last Saturday
morning.
Captain
Rush
had
charge of (he Syracuse detachment for a time, but was transferred from there lo New York for
special work. In behalf of the
men of the detachment the "News"
welcomes Captain Rush to State
College.
FRESHMEN MADE
NOMINATIONS
FOR OFFICERS
Lively Contest Expected December 2nd
A meeting of the Freshman
Class was called Monday noon by
Sergeant Fitzgerald and Private
Tower, representing Myskania, for
the purpose of nominating class
officers.
'President Bruce of the Sophomore Class read the Freshman
rulcs_ and Alary Whish,' '21, read
the list of penalties for failure to
abide by the rules. A penalty day
is soon to be chosen.
Continued on Page 3
CHEMISTRY
CLUB
The first meeting of the Chemistry Club this year will be held
Friday afternoon, November 22, at
4:10 in room 250. Five or six
members will address the meeting
at that time, each one giving a
synopsis of magazine articles on
current topics relating to chemistry. At present, when the high
value of chemistry in the successful completion of the war has been
demonstrated, and when so many
Continued on Page 3
IMPORTANT
CONTEST
Song Leader to be Chosen
On Friday, November 22nd, the
student body of State College will
be given an opportunity to elect a
college song leader. This is an
important event, and each S. C. T.
student should regard it a privilege to cast a vote.
There arc to be two nominees
from each of the upper classes.
The Seniors have nominated Jeannette Reller and Harriot Poole.
The Juniors named their candidates at their class meeting Wednesday. Each of the candidates
will be given ten minutes during
chapel period in which to lead the
Continued on Page 4
Page Two
THE STATE COLLEGE
NEWS
Vol. I l l
November 21,1918
No. 6
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the.'Student Body of the New York State
College for Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rafc is one dollar and a half per year. Advertising
rates may be had on application to
the Business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the Editor befort
Saturday of the week preceding
publication.
Board of Editors, 1918-1919
• Editor-in-chief,
Donald M, Toiver, 'w
Managing Editor,
Bernice S. Bronner, '19
Business Manager,
Caroline E. Lipes, '19
Assistant Business Manager,
Ellen Donahue, '20.
Associate Editors,
Edivard T, Springmann, '20
Dorothy M. Banner, '20
Kenneth P. Holben, '20
Elsie Hanbury, '20
Bertha West, '20
EDITORIALS
mm
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 1918
=
ARMISTICE IDEAL
News conies from all sources —
aibroad, home training camps, citizen activities — everywhere the
same, that the signing of the armistice has brought forth a decided cessation of war work. It
seems the tendency is to lay off —
to ease up. The soldiers are reported to be thinking now of the
home coming instead of the overseas trip. Citizens are reported to
be failing to buy war savings
stamps and to have stopped payments into the War Chest, Red
Cross, Y., M. C. A and K. of C.
funds,
To be true, this reaction is only
human — and "we're only poor,
weak mortals after all" — but we
have learned through the past
hard months to work and have
forgotten how to rest on our oars.
The spirit, attitude and actions of
the American public have merited
world-wide praise and admiration.
Efficient service has become the
American ideal — and Americans
have lived up to their ideal.
The fact that hostilities have
ceased and that peace is in sight
is. no reason for relinquishing our
ideal. .Beyond any question the
days ahead" are to be the most trying ones since August, 1914. With
reconstruction ahead (he only possible slogan is " Efficient Service."
It is expected that America, who
has suffered least, will sacrifice
•most in the stupendous task, It is left
for America to fight on now—it is
left fo'r her to atone for the two
and a half years of her inactivity
.at the opening of the war. Tier
experience after the Civil War peculiarly fits her for the present
needs. But the work is to be infinitely greater.
This country's position among
world powers is due to the perfect co-operation of its millions of
individuals.
Otherwise,
such
Utopian
transformations
could
never have come. Every person
has saved and served to the limit
and then has saved and served
more. And each individual is going to pick up the battle and fight
as he never has fought before.
Once more each one will take up
the slogan, " Efficient Service,"
and carry on until victory is really
complete and peace rules over
Europe and its forgotten battlefields— Europe a land of rebuilt
homes.
Let us then lake a new hold,
looking constantly toward the
ideal of "Efficient Service."
COME OUT FOR
THE NEWS
In the issue of October 3rd, the
" News " Board Constitution was
printed, together with regulations
governing the appointment of new
members to the editorial board. At
the same time an appeal was made
for new recruits to be added to
this year's staff.
As yet the response has been
slow, due, doubtless, to the long
vacation period. Still, new members are needed. The terms remain the same, and the present
board is anxious to assign " tryouts."
Freshmen and Sophomores, get busy! The position of
editor-in-chief awaits you in your
Senior year. But you have to
climb up. New honors and Hew
possibilities of service to your
Alma Mater await you. Come out
AT ONCE!
Hand your name to any member
of the board of editors and receive your assignment from Miss
Broriner. Then work hard and
add your nam* to those printed at the top of column one, page
two.
Come out for the ."News!"
NOTICE.
Tt will facilitate the compiling of
the College Calendar if persons or
organizations desiring to meet at
college will register at Dean
Pierce's office two weeks ahead of
time. This will allow the Calendar to be published in the "News"
inclusive of all functions scheduled in the week to follow. Cooperation of students is requested
in this matter.
ALL OUT FOR THE
PEDAGOGUE
Freshmen — show your pep!
Sophomores — keep your rep!
Juniors — speed your step!
Seniors —get a Zcp!
to
Sign up for the Pedagogue
NOW!
We want a college year book,
not a Senior Class year book!
Bring all your jokes and snapshots to the Pedagogue Board
and help us make our Victory
Pedagogue the best book ever!
And let's have a 100 per cent subscription!
No slackers, even
though the war is over! It's all
the more reason for you to help
send the Pedagogue "over the
t o p " with dying colors!
And hark ye!
To the member of each class
who secures the highest number
of subscriptions among his own
classmates will be given a Pedagogue FREE!!
Four Pedagogues to work for!
So get busy, one and all! Subscription blanks may be obtained
from Dorothy Roberts, '19, or
Gertrude Schermerhorn, '19, or at
the table in the Rotunda, all next
week.
Freshmen, it is up to you
To prove to us that you're true blue!
Sophomores, loyal to the red,
Don't let the Freshies get ahead!
Juniors, every girl and fellow,
Hustle for your colors, yellow!
Senior's it's for old '19,
Make her memory ever green!
by
Subscribing to the Pedagogue
NOW!
A N N U A L REPORT
of the
Treasurer of State College Athletic Council for the Year
Ending Sept. 30,
1918
Receipts:
Student tax
$3,470.00
Faculty tax
37.50
Rebate from war "tax,
Manhattan game
12.52
Balance basketball, 19161917
1.23
Basketball
430.21
Subscriptions and ads
from "The Echo"
169.58
Interest
35.00
Rebate from appropriation for song b o o k s . . . .
1.75
Subscriptions
and
ads
Prom College " News ". 238.76
PATRIOTISM IN
MILNE HIGH
The students of the Milne High
School are working out a novel
scheme in connection with the
English classes.
The students
who are buying Liberty Bonds oil
the installment plan arc presenting
plans in orfil compositions concerning the purchase of the bonds,
During the year war benevolences
will be discussed, and at the end
of the year a vote will be taken to
determine to' what organization
the money shall be given. This
work is in charge of the practise
teachers of English,
AN OPPORTUNITY
TO EARN MONEY
Total receipts
$4,396.55
Disbursements:
An opportunity is given to perBasketball (including one
sons who desire to earn some pin$100 bond and $12.45 in
money to co-operate with the Wowar stamps purchased
man's Exchange, which is open in
by the management).. .$1,145.56 the food conservation room of the
"The Echo"
'.... 925.05 County Court House;
College " News "
878.50
Any person who can cook sucPress Club
143.00 cessfully is in line to assist in
Contingent expenses . . . . 154.81 this work. If any student of the
Baseball
25.00 college desires to take this opporOne $500 Liberty Bond
tunity, she will call Miss Blood(3rd loan)
500.00 good at the County Court Mouse,
Main 5900. Recipes will be furTotal disbursements. ,$3,771,92 nished by Miss Hloodgood for this
Total receipts
$4,396.55 work, if desired.
The Woman's Exchange, which
Total disbursements
3,771.92
has just opened in the Albany War •
•ialance Oct. 1, 1918..., $624 63 Kitchen, Room 79, County Court
House, is in need of baked foods
'iscal year closes Sept. 30.
to meet the demand of the buyers.
C A. IIIDLEY.
Any baked foods are desirable,
namely: Cookies, cakes, quick
SENIOR CLASS NOTES
breads, yeast breads, biscuits and
•• At a meeting of the Senior Class muffins.
last Thursday it was decided that
All baked foods are to be sugarthe class dues for the year should less and should be accompanied,
be two dollars.'' The dues commit- when sent in, by the recipe, so that
tee, which consists of Mildred copies of these can be made and
Oatcy, Margaret- Becker, Viola given out with each article we sell.
Brovvnell, Veronica Farreli, Helen
All cookies sell at 25c per dozen.
fay,
Ethel
McKenna,
llariot Pies at 30c and 35c each, dependPoole, Jcauctte Keller and .Marion ing on size. Cakes 60c, 70c, 75c,
Tubbs, is prepared for the Senior according to size and kind.
Class Dues Drive.
Avoid the
Yeast breads are preferable to
Christmas rush by paying dues quick breads, although there is
immediately!
call for both.
Jeanette
Reller and
llariot
The persons making the differPoole were chosen to lead in the ent articles receive the profit,
song contest Friday.
with the exception of a very
Attention is called to the fact small rate of commission to pay
that caps and gowns should be or- the running expenses of the Exdered at once.
change. The rate is 1c per dozen
cookies, lc for pie, 2c for cake,
etc.
LOBDELL '20 RESIGNS
FROM NEWS BOARD
Van Allen Lobdcli, '20, has tendered his resignation as assistant
business manager of the State College " News," the resignation to
take effect immediately.
The
" N e w s " greatly regrets its loss,
and reluctantly accepts the resignation. Mr. Lobdeil's duties as
first sergeant made it impossible
for him to continue longer his connection with the college weekly,
Ellen Donahue, '20, has been
appointed to fill the vacancy, Her
previous training will make her a
valuable asset to the paper. Miss
Donahue is president of the Girls'
Athletic Association and acts as
instructor of several women's gym
classes.
MYSKANIA
APPOINTS
MISS HOLDER TO COMPLETE HONOR ROLL
Clara Holder, '19, has been appointed by Myskania to have complete
charge of the Honor Roll of State
College. It is necessary that the list
of men of the College who are in the
service should be completed at once.
The student body is urged to hand
any information available to Miss
Holder.
Report of the Committee on
Schedules and Examinations
with suggestions for making
up time lost due to the
epidemic. Adopted by the
Faculty on Monday, November 11, 1918,
The calendar, as originally scheduled, called for 88 recitation days, 12
examination days in the first term;
95 recitation days, 12 examination
clays in the second term.
Lost from the first term, 28 recitation days—(Oct, 9-Nov. 9).
Make up part of this time as follows :
Cut Thanksgiving recess two days
(allowing just Thursday).
Cut Christmas recess three days.
(Recess as orginally planned begins
Friday, Dec. 20, 5 :50 p, m., work resumed Tuesday, Jan. 7, 8:10 a. m.
[lave the recess begin as sechcduled
and have wont resumed Friday, Jan.
3, 8:10 a. m. This gives 11 clays, exclusive of Sundays, the same as last
year.)
Omit the final examinations for this
term and substitute therefor the average of grades obtained by tests held
Continued on Page 3
. / ' !
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 1918
A large number of Y, W. C. A,
girls took advantage of the "At
Home" day at the new Y. W. C, A.
dormitory, 31 South Lake avenue, on
Friday afternoon, and inspected the
new home from top to bottom,
Among the guests were Mrs. Fiuley,
Mrs. Brubachcr, Mrs, Walker and
Miss Pierce.
Charlotte Benedict, '20, and Mary
Allen, '22, have joined the girls at
the house.
REPORT OF COMMITTEE
Continued from Page 2
during the term, the number of the
tests to be at least two.
Extend the first term one week, to
Fqb. 8.
The number of recitation clays recovered for the first term would then
lie 23. •
Thanksgiving
Christmas
;
Examination period
Extension of term
(Licul. Jock Harwich.)
Lieutenant Jack Harwick, cx-'17,
who is in France, was in the great
American offensive drive in the St.
Mihicl, lie led one of the first platoons in bis division " over the top.".
Lieutenant Harwick is stationed with
Co. G, 328th Inf., U. S. A.
HOME ECONOMICS
NOTES
The Home Economics Practice
House will be opened for occupancy
next wck.
Linda M. Smith, '18, has accepted
a position as instructor of Home Economics,in Potsdam Normal, Potsdam,
X. Y. Miss Smith makes (be second
graduate of the ClassT of '18 to receive a position in ,\ ormaI instruction,
The dressmaking shop is open for
business from 9 a. rn. to 5 p. m. every
day except Tuesday and Saturday.
Any member of the College facultv,
or student body may have garments
made, remodeled or repaired by seeing Miss Tempany, who is in charge
of the shop at 156 Central avenue.
Y. W. C. A.
2
3
12
6
Total
23
Lost from the second term six recitation days due lo extension of the
first term.
It is thought advisable not to attempt to recover these as the only
ways of doing it arc:
Omission of the spring recess.
Omission of the final examinations.
Extension of the college year one
week to June 23.
Or a combination of the three.
We feel that the spring vacation of
one week is a necessity for both the
faculty and students, especially this
year, as the actual teaching work will
have no intermission of any kind
from Jan. 3 to April 16. To omit the
recess would mean the teaching would
continue from Jan. 3 to May 30,
which is too long a period.
The final examinations in June
should not be omitted, especially since
the examinations are omitted in January.
The college year should not he extended to June 23, as this would give
only two weeks' rest before the beginning of the summer session. Moreover, many of the students will be
needed again this year as they were
last ''ear for farm work.
SUMMARY.
The number of recitation days lost
on the year's work due to the epidemic is 28. The number recovered
by reorganization of the college calendar is 17, leaving a loss of 11 days,
5 in the first term and 6 in the second.
(Signed)
H. BIRCHENOUGH.
G. M. YORK.
H. M. DOUGLASS.
S. A. .T. C. NOTES
Continued from Page 1
With the ceasing of hostilities in
Work on the last of the three
' Europe the work of the V. W. C. A. barracks
practically finished.
increases. In order to carry on this 'Section R is
have completed the
work successfully your assistance is laying of men
a
company
street bebeing solicited in the United War tween the barracks.
Work Campaign. Miss Florence
The use of Spraguc Chapel as
Stubbs, '20, has been appointed as the
Y. W. C. A. Chairman of the War an infirmary has been discontinWork Committee at State College. ued. The regular camp hospital
'Detailed accounts of the campaign building is now complete and the
are given in pamphlets now being sick men have been removed to
the new infirmary. One death from
distributed by the Y. W. C. A.
iufluenzai-pncunionia occurred durThe first meeting of the Y. W. C, ing the past week. Other cases
A. since the reopening of College, arc reported as favorable.
was held Wednesday afternoon, Nov.
Quarantine has been raised from
13, in the auditorium. Miss Dorothy the entire post. Company A is
White, '20, had charge of the meet- forced to keep study hours the
ing. Professor Ki.rtlf.nd, who spoke first four nights of the week, State
on the " Riches of To-day," gave a College men using the collqge livery interesting and inspiring talk. A brary, and Law men marching to
vocal solo was rendered by Miss Law School or the State Library.
Florence Stubbs.
The name of Sergeant'Ryan was
Miss Helen Fay, 1(1, during her unintentionally omitted from last
vacation, was engaged in war work> week's list of appointments of N.
caring for influenza patients at the C, O's. Sergeant Ryan is a Junior
Homeopathic Hospital
at the Law School.
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
Page Three
Feerey'#
for Shoes
23 No. Pearl St.
OFFICIAL CALENDAR
THURSDAY, November 21.
4:00 P. M.—Freshmen Advisers, Room 108.
FRIDAY, November 22. 9.00
A. M.— Student Assembly,
Auditorium. 4:10 P, M.—
Chemistry Club, Room
250. 8:00 P. M.—G. A. A.
Party, Gymnasium.
Cotrell & Leonard
Makers of
CAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, Albany
B r a d t Drug C o .
7 Central Are.
G. A. A. SPECIALS
At a G. A. A. meeting held on Friday, Nov, 15, some important matters
were discussed.
The first frolic is planned for Nov.
22. Bring your bloomers, sneakers
and a smile. All Freshmen are invited and every Soph and upperctassrhan who has paid her dues,
On Saturday, Nov. 23, we are going to hike out to Normanskill.
About a hundred have already signed
up. Get in line I
Basketball has started. Captains
and managers have been elected, and
regular practice begins next week,
Come down and try out.
5S6 Broadway
9- II No, Pearl St.
Lenox Lunch and Restaurant
Good Thing* To Eat
3 Central Avenue
Albany, N. Y
Agents For
Hart. SUffner & Marx Clothes
Regal Shoes
NOTICE
The Home Economics Department, EAT HOSLERS ICE CREAM
is offering opportunities to students
in the College lo earn money in as
small or large amounts as the free
ITS THE BEST
time of students permits. The Department now has in running order a
cafeteria and dressmaking shop,
where- from one to thirty hours a
week may be spent, and remuneration
472 to 478 Broadway
received for work done. The type of
HATS AND SHOES FOR MEN
work given will be suited to student's
WOMEN'S
OUTER AND
capacity and advanccent. If work is
UNDER GARMENTS
desired in the cafeteria, Miss 'Puttie
WOMEN'S
FOOTWEAR,
FURS
may he consulted in Room " T," the
AND FUR COATS
cafeteria. If work in dressmaking
Fine
Qualities
—
Reasonable
Price
shop is wanted, Miss Tempany at. No.
156 Central avenue, upstairs, can give
information. It is hoped that many Shampooing — Scalp Massage — Hairstudents will avail themselves of this
Dressing—Manicuring
opportunity to work'in projects under
College supervision.
MKS. LEE
2 6 7 Ontario St.
Albany. N.Y.
CHEMISTRY CLUB
Phone Wft 888-J
Continued from Page 1
of the State College graduates are
FRESHMEN NOMINATIONS
actively engaged along chemical
Continued from Page 1
lines for the government, the inSergeant Fitzgerald read the
terest of all students should he
increased greatly. The members Freshman Class Constitution, afshould prove their interest by at- ter which the meeting was opened
tending all the meetings and en- for nominations.
tering into the discussions. In the
Following is the list of nominees
past this club has had the reputa- as made at the meeting. This list
tion of being one of the most ac- is subject to approval by Mystive organizations in college, and kania:
it remains for the members not
President: Robina Moore Smith,
only '0 maintain this activity, but
broaden the efforts of the club Eunice Rice, Private Harvey Albee,
Private Clyde Dicdrich.
toward another successful year.
Vice-President: Gladys Thompson, Eleanor Hylancl, Dorothy
MISS SPRINGSTEED
Tuthill.
Continued from Page 1
Secretary: Helen Walsh, CarMiss Springsteed's special prob- rol Travel-, Augusta Knapp, Marlem will be to teach foreign wo- jorie Maxwell.
men in the home and in industry.
Treasurer:
.Marion
Newell,
She will spend part of her time in Gladys Lodge, Catherine Stratton,
Albany and part in traveling. In Private James Delauey, Marian
behalf of the student body the Brennan.
" N e w s " extends to Miss SpringReporter: Sophie Rogers, Alice
steed all good wishes for success Clear, Margaret Kitiland, Private
in her new work.
Frederick Baggett.
Miss Helen Phillips of Cornell
The election will be held on
University, who came Tuesday to Monday, December 2nd, All cantake Miss Springsteed's place, will didates for office must have paid
probably begin her new duties their $5.00 blanket tax in order to
Thursday, November 21.
qualify for the election,
Cotrell & Leonard
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 1918
Page Four
The " N e w s " extends sincere
sympathy to Miss Shevlin's family
in their sad bereavement.
The Newman Club has offered
The girls who remained at the
house during the vacation were: Ar- the following resolutions for publication:
lien Beardsley, '19, Olive Woodworth,
Whereas, Margaret Shevlin has
'19, Florence Stanbro, '20, Bertha
Tate, '20, Elizabeth Gardner, '20, May been the inspiring leader of NewTrticman, '21, and Florence Van man Club of New York State College for Teachers, and
Ness, '21.
Harriet Church, '19, who was very
Whereas, She has been wholeill at her home in High Falls during hearted and untiring in her efforts
vacation, returned to College on for the best interests of the club,
Thursday.
and
Bertha Tate, '20, and Florence
Whereas, We cherish in fond
Stanbro, '21, did war work at the memory the qualities which so enState Laboratory during vacation,
deared her to us all; her deep symDoris Smith, '16, whose school in pathy, her remarkable executive
Catskill was closed owing to the epi- ability, and her untiring zeal, and
demic, spent a week with the girls at
Whereas, The college has lost a
the house.
noble daughter and the club a
Helen Leitzell, '21, spent three loyal and true member. Therefore
weeks of vacation visiting in Luzerne. be it
Edith Chandler, '18, and Elmetta
Resolved, That we take this sad
Van Dc Loo, '18, were recent visitors occasion to pay a tribute of affecat the house.
tion to our beloved friend; and
be it
Resolved, That we offer our
PSI GAMMA
sympathy to her family in their
bereavement;
and be it further
The Psi Gamma girls are glnd to
Resolved, That a copy of these
be back at work again.
Alta Sahler, '18, spent last week resolutions be placed on the record of the Newman Club and be
end at the Psi Gamma house.
Cordelia Haight spent Saturday published in the college " News."
Aileen Russell,
and Sunday in Schenectady,
Ethel McKcuna,
Mrs. George Roody, of Corning,
Catherine Fitzgerald.
N. Y„ was the guest of her daughter,
Sally Roody, at the Psi Gamma house
last week.
T . J. B R E N N A N
ETA PHI
STATIONER
College and School Supplies
Fine Stationery, Magazines, Greeting and Congratulation Cards,
Camera Films, Developing and Printing
FOUNTAIN PENS
LOWNEY'S
CHOCOLATES
SCHRAFFT'S
CONFECTIONS
Corner Washington and Lake Avenues
Opposite Albany Hiith School
Ncnr State College
PRICE, SERVICE AND QUALITY PRINTERS
M
'Printers of Stale College t^erta
HAMILTON
240
HAMILTON
PRINTING
STREET
COMPANY
ALBANY. N. Y.
CAFETERIA OPENS
beaten,' they said. 'Thank God
Continued from Page 1
they are our allies.'"
The
plan
is
to
have
the
cafeteria
Mr. Ailing then went on* to give
CAMP NOTES
self-supporting. The charge made a very vivid description of the
IMPORTANT CONTEST
for
food
will
be
such
as
to
cover
Front. The bustle and roar, the
Continued from Page 1
Word has been received from only the cost of the food and run- strained effort and concentration
college in any song which.he or
she may choose. Voting will take Camp Grant,, 111., that Gerald F. ning expenses, thus assuring a on lighting itself, lie told of the
strict precautions taken on board
place in the rotunda all day Fri- Curtin, cx-'19, has been promoted to moderate price.
The lunch room hour is between fships going bank and forth and
day. The candidate receiving the first lieutenant. Lieut. Curtin attended
the
Plattsburg
summer
camp,
11:15
and
declared we could not give too
12:45.
Tt
is
desired
that
highest number of votes will be
college song leader, while the one from which he received bis commis- all those who can eat before or rmich praise to the American
sion
as
second
lieutenant.
The
after the official college lunch Navy, but for whom our troops
receiving the next highest number
hour, which is 11:45 to 12:15, do never could have gotten across.
of votes will, be assistant song " N'cws " extends congratulations.
so, to relieve the congestion dur_ " And jet us not forget the Alleader.
ing
this period.
lied armies," he cautioned. " ReShow your college spirit. EvLieut. Theodore Wallace CassaAs well as catering to the fac- member that they fought for four
erybody vote!
vant, of Albany, a former member of ulty and student body at noon, the and one-half years while we were
the Class of 1919. visited College Sat- cafeteria proposes to take regular not realizing that this was our
MARGARET SHEVLIN
urday. Lieut Cassavant, who has boarders for breakfast and dinner. war, too. Great Britain has only
Continued from Page 1
been stationed in the West, was on a Annyonc may engage board by one-half our population—yet, conthcan, member of G. A. A., treas- forty-eight-hour furlough, after which the week for three meals a day, sider the enormous army they put
urer of Senior Class, secretary of he expects to go overseas.
two meals a day or one meal a into the field. In France thouCollege Club and junior Newman
day by arrangement with the cafe- sands have gone beneath the sod
councillor.
teria manager, Miss Tttttle. In during these four years.
She is survived by her parents,
Private Merrill Sauerbrci was a this case, also, the price will be
" T h e Germans thought we
Mr. and Mrs. George Shevlin, of visitor at College last Monday. He moderate, to cover only the cost
could not take men from all walks
Saratoga Springs, a brother, is stationed at Long Tsland City in of food and running expenses.
of
life and train them. But we
George, and a sister, Catherine.
the Chemical Warfare Department.
The cafeteria promises to be a have found, and the Germans have
big advantage to State College, found, that man to man our men
andmany will be greatly benefited are more than their equal. .The
by its installment.
spirit of the wounded is wonderful.
Always they say, ' H o w
quickly
can we get back again?'
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
take your films to inexperienced persons to b e developed a n d
or, ' Yes, they got me, but 1 got
Continued from Page 1
them first.'
printed, as m o r e films are ruined in developing than in taking.
Mr. Ailing said in part:
"There are so many things I
"Are we worthy the sacrifice
We have h a d 16 years experience in developing, finishing a n d
should like to tell you that I feel these boys are making?"
enlarging, a n d are pioneers in the business. So, if you want best like an
Egyptian
mnmmy —
Mr. Ailing then remarked on
results obtainable and the benefit of our 16 years experience, bring pressed for time. I was in Wash- the leveling of classes among the '
ington when news of the signing' boys over there and the disapyour films to us for good work a n d best results.
of the armistice came, and as 1 pearance of religious controversy.
stood upon the steps of a building He said that never before has an
a soldier came up and said, 'Say, army been taken care of in its
,
WILLIAM SPE1DEL, Central Ave. and Quail St.
if they don't send us home soon spare time, the time when the solC. BARBIN, Central'Ave. above Quail St.
L. A. BALDWIN, Madison Aie. above Quail StI'll put up a howl that they'll hear dier earns his reckless reputation.
He described thoroughly the recPOLAKOFF PHARMACY, 251 Central Ave.
E. C. CHOWDER, 301 Ontario St twenty miles off.'
RADDING PHARMACY, 1062 Madison Ave.
ESLOUVI, 1064 Modi.on Ave "And that is just the spirit of reation huts, He closed his remarks
by appealing to the stuthe boys over there, That great
MOREHEADS DRUG STORE, Central Ave. and Ontario St.
group of men will put up a howl dents to subscribe to the variocs
campaigns
as opportunity is prethat will be heard for 3,000 miles!
Look for the name
And yet it will be over two years sented.
before they can come home,
" I want you to visualize that
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
army; it is the sight of a lifetime.
Some of the Alpha Epsilon Phi
There are the great American
TiB/lNY.NY
girls
enjoyed a hike to East Greenmade railroads, clocks, freight
cars, machine shops, etc., all the bush last Saturday afternoon.
Anna K:tz, '18, who is teaching at
on the envelope that the way from the coast to that Front
work is delivered to you in, if you want work that is A-1 and guaranteed. We get where our army would have put Tannersville, was recently in Albany,
the
war
where
it
belonged
Marion Levitt, '18, who is taking
—
on
swamped with work, for the public likes our work so welPthat we cannot get the German soil. All this made a charge
of the Lorey studio at Schenwork out in 24 hours and do it right; to do the right kind of work, we take a great impression in France. ' A ectady, spent the week end with Ruth
little longer, generally 48 hours.
nation that can do this cannot be Grcenblath, '21, at her home in Troy.
DON'T
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