State College News VOL. I NoT5f /g r

advertisement
State College News
A
WEEKLY
VOL. I
JOURNAL
r
NoT5f /g
r
COLLEGE CALENDAR.
TO-DAY: 12:05, Consumers'
League, Room 161; 12:05,
Freshman Committee Meeting, Room 101; 4:30, JuniorSenior Girls' Game; 4:40, Y,
W. C. A. Meeting, Auditorium.
THURSDAY: 8:10 a. m. sharp,
Operetta Rehearsal; 4:35,
Meeting of "News" Board;
3:45, Chemistry Club Meeting, Mildred O'Malley '18 on
" Steel."
FRIDAY: 7:30, Y. W. C, A.
Banquet; 8:00, Delaware
County Club, St. Andrew's
Hall.
MONDAY: 8:15 p. m., Newman
Club Lecture, St.
Patrick's Hall.
C L A S S O F 1919 I N T R O DUCES SOPHOMORE
WEEK
Held Series of Festivities.
The Class of uji<) is to lie
congratulated upon the manner
in which they have inaugurated
Sophomore Week as an addition
to the College festivities.
This
has never heen tried before, but
has proved so successful that undorbledly a precedent has been
established.
The class colors of green and
while predominated for a whole
week, while and green costumes
donned by the young ladies and
white and green arm-bands worn
by all.
Friday evening the class dance
was held in the College gymnasium
without
interruptions
from the much-feared rivals, the
Frosh.
The room was very
prettily decorated with evergreens, southern smilax, palms
and while roses with the refreshments further carried out
the color scheme.
The receiving line consisted of
the officers of the class: Allen
Gillette, President; Miss Bern ice
Mronncr, Vice-President; Miss
Gertrude Blair, Secretary; and
Miss Ailecn Russell, Treasurer.
The patronesses were Mrs.
Thompson. Mrs. Powers, Miss
Spear and Miss Rafferty.
A very pleasing program was
rendered during intermission.
This included a soprano solo by
Miss jeanctle Roller, accompanied Miss Lois P. Knox, a
reading by Miss Helen Spear
and a dance by Miss Jeanne
Gray,
Continued on PHKO !i
NEW
YORK
STATE
COLLEGE
ALBANY, N.Y., MARCH 7, 1917
PROFESSOR
RISLEY
I N T E R V I E W E D B Y K. P .
REPORTER.
Says War Decision Would Have
Many Precedents.
" T h e r e is no established
standard of adequate cause for
war," said Professor Risley recently when told about the action of President Richmond and
half the faculty of Union University, in u r g i n g President
Wilson to declare war on Germany, " It is always an independent act to be determined
by the conditions of the time,
and largely by the ' a n i m u s
furandi 'of the aggrieved s t a t e , "
" One m o r n i n g the Associated Press publishes an ac
count nl" a plot against a peaceful nation, and at the same time
reveals an unprecedented and
almost unbelievable condition
nl" ambassadorial perfidy to a
protecting country.
Ft is so
staggering, so monstrous that a
whole people distrusts even a
reliable source.
" But the next m o r n i n g a
note from Secretary of Stale
Lansing confirms the plot, Is
it cause for war? T h e man in
the street car thinks so, and
says ' we should have been at
war long ago.' A n o t h e r denies
that it is sufficient c a u s e ; ano t h e r believes it is sufficient
provocation, while a fourth
holds still a different opinion.
F.ach a n s w e r is correct as to the
cause of war. Secretary H a y ' s
" this government wants perdi- ;
Continued on Pngo 3
FOR
TEACHERS
$1.50 PER YEAR
State College Wins Last Game
Defeats Hobart . 3 1 : 1 8
Outclassed
T h e State College basketball
team won its most decisive
victory of the season in its final
g a m e with I loharl Saturday
night in the Albany
High
School g y m n a s i u m . T h e score
was 31 : i 8 . T h e Purple and
(iold
learn
outplayed
the
Geneva team in all d e p a r t m e n t s
of the game and showed a
brand of passvvork that bewildered their opponents. Although flobart held the Albanians even in the first half,
I bey at no time had a chance.
The home team, being forced
lo play without
" Money"
Miller, could not get together
at first, and as a result the H o bart men gained several easy
points with shots from near the
J O H N L. W A R N E R A D DRESSES PRESS CLUB.
J o h n F. W a r n e r , of the AntiSaloon League Publicity Department, addressed the Press
Club on Friday, Mr. W a r n e r ,
who is a Syracuse University
alumnus, was a teacher for a
short time, lie emphasized the
importance of publicity and
showed its great value and use
by theatres, political parties,
and commercial
enterprises.
" Publicity is an easy t h i n g to
get," said Mr. W a r n e r , " provided somebody' will furnish
G I R L S ' I N T E R C L A S S B A S - the material to the newsThe
newspaper
papers."
KETBALL
editors take a n y t h i n g of interest to their readers.
Seniors 36 — Frosh 4.
T h e speaker pointed out the
Thursday
afternoon
the importance of advance writeSeniors defeated the Freshmen ups concerning athletic events,
at 36-4, Such a one-sided score- social activities and lectures.
was due to Ruth Moscley's ac- Interviews with the faculty
curate shooting and the fact that concerning items of present-day
I he Senior team has once more interest related to the work of
hit its last year stride.
The their d e p a r t m e n t furnish interFreshmen, however, think that esting stories for newspaper
they can make a better showing readers.
when they have their best team
T h e P r e s s 'Club will hold
on the floor. In this last game, regular meetings in the future
the stronger players were not at which lectures by men
put in until after the score was: prominent in school and newsso high that to attempt to even; paper work will be a feature.
lie it was an impossibility, The first of these series will
Cheer up, Frosh, and watch the. be held a week from Friday, at
Tuniors and Seniors fight it out
which lime J a m e s W i n g a t e ,
Thursday noon, Then be ready Superintendent of Schenectady
for your own game with the county schools, will address
Juniors Friday at 12:15.
the club.
Losers
basket.
From the beginning
the visitors displayed a tendency to commit personal fouls,
which fault cost them the loss
of Greene in the first, and Dietrich in the second half. H o haus, of the State College learn,
was b a n i s h e d for the same
reason.
D u r i n g the first few minutes
of play S. Fitzgerald dropped
the ball in the basket twice
from the foul line. C a r r tied
the score by scoring from the
field. A basket and a foul by
Moodcy put the visitors ahead,
but a few m o m e n t s later a foul
by Big Fitz and a basket from
the field by Ffohaus again tied
the score at 5:5. T w o baskets
by Greene and one by Ycates
boosted the points of the Geneva five lo rr, but State College came back with two foul
shots by Fitz and a field basket
each by J o n e s and Goev/ey and
the first half ended then with
the score tied at eleven all.
T h e P u r p l e and Gold set a
Continued on Page 3
PROF.
STINARD
GIVES
L E C T U R E O N CUBA.
Says American Exporters Are Too
Exacting About Credit.
On F r i d a y afternoon P r o fessor Stinard gave the first of
his
illustrated
lectures
on
Cuba. After being introduced
by K a t h a r i n e Bestlc, 'l8„' t h e
president of the Spanish Club,
the speaker explained that his
talk would bear on the Cuban
as a citizen and as a, producer,
but that in a later lecture he
would take up other phases of
C u b a n life.
After a few opening r e m a r k s
about the unrivalled beauty of
Cuba, Professor Stinard answered the question of w h y the
Cubans should now b e in the
midst of a sudden
revolt
against their g o v e r n m e n t , by
pointing o u t that the life of the
average Cuban and that of his
forefathers had been one inducivc to the development of
the revolutionary spirit. F o r
seven hundred years Spain w a s
in combat with the Moors.
D u r i n g that period Spain could
Continued on Pago 3
Patfe Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 7, 1917
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
A Weekly Journal
us, You will appreciate the necessity of our doing so. The
amount of cash which we have at our disposal has dwindled,
until we arc now-forced to use more drastic means of collecting
Vol. I
March 7, 1917
No. 18 what is our due. Simultaneously with the work being carried 011
Published weekly, on Wednesdays, during the college year, by the Com- by our representatives, we shall put a list of the names of those
mittee on Publishing a College Weekly Newspaper, Class of 1918, New York who, according to our books, aredelinquent, on the bulletin board
in the main hall. As each student pays, his name will be erased.
State College for Teachers, Albany, N. Y.
The subscription rate is one dollar and a half a year. Advertising rates In doing this we are following the example of the Freshman
may be had on application. Articles, manuscripts, etc., intended for publica- class, who successfully used this means to collect their class dues.
tion must be in the News Box before
Saturdays of the week preceding We feel that the limit of patience has been reached. Good busi:
publication.
•_
ness sense requires that we take this step. One hundred and
The Committee on Publishing a College Weekly Newspaper, twenty-five students still owe. Help us to reduce this number
Class of 1018.
to twenty-five by the end of the week. If our campaign docs hot
meet with success, wc will be forced to reduce the number of
Alfred E. Dedicke, Editor-in-Chief
publications to two a month.
Subcommittees
Committee on Finance
Editorial Committee
Lillian G. Magilton
Alfred E. Dedicke
MODERN LANGUAGE TEACHERS MUST BE CITIZENS.
Committee on Advertising
Jos. A. Walker
Stanley Heason
Committee on Subscriptions
Henry L. Greenblatt
A new regulation of the Board of Education of New York
Alfred E. Dedicke
Dorothy Austin
City provides that all applicants for teachers' positions in the
Committee on News
Kathryn Cole
public schools must be citizens, except that teachers of modem
Mildred McEwan
Committee »n Circulation
Stanley Heason
languages need only have declared their intention of becoming
Mildred McEwan
Eloise Lansing
citizens. That is a good rule, says the N. Y. World. If there is
Henry L, Greenblatt
Kathryn Cole
one indicated place for bona-fide Americanism, it is in the public
Kathryn Cole
Elmetta Van Deloo
schools of New York.
Committee on Cartoons
Ray Townsend
Maud Rose
Benj. Cohen
STATEMENT OF T H E FRESHMAN POSITION.
WAS I T NECESSARY?
- Feeling that the college might perhaps consider us spiritless
Much surprise and consternation and some shame was caused unless the facts were known, but confident that they will support
among the students by a short list of names which was placed us when these facts are understood, the men of 1920 wish to
on the bulletin board in the science building for a short time last make the following statement:
week. Said list would have remained there longer, 'but it seems
At a meeting of all 1920 men, a unanimous and well-conthat some kind friend took it clown. The purpose of this list, we sidered decision was reached that no attempt would lie made
believe, was to inform some few less fortunate fellow students to break up the Sophomore party. This necessitated the dropthat they had been dropped from college. Or else it was meant ping of certain plans previously made. The reasons for this deto give this information to the members of the faculty, for the cision were,
students in general we arc sure, were not concerned, nor can we
T. Our displayed superiority over 1919 in organized sport.
think of any particular reason why they should have been told.
Wc defeated them in two consecutive games, winning the basketThere is always something sad and, at times, something ball championship of the school during Sophomore week.
humiliating about the dropping of a student on account of failure
2. The opposition of the faculty. This was based on
in studies, and since we realize that we all arc human, and that grounds which must be evident to the college. We resolved to
the same thing may happen to us some day, we ask ourselves, uphold President Tripp in his pledge to them to do his best to
was it necessary to make a public spectacle of these, our fellow maintain order.
students who tried, but failed? Would it not have been sufficient
We made this decision trusting in the Class of 1919 to supand at the same time just as satisfying to have stopped with
privately notifying the students concerned or their parents? port President Gillette in his effort to maintain like order, We
therefore place our confidence in the honor of 1919 and will base
The same end would have been achieved.
The characterization of these students' work as it was given our future action on the good faith which they display during;
(Signed)
A. E. L., '19.
on the list was that it had been poor. And as we glanced down Freshman week.
the row of names, we came to one of whom much better things
can be said, aside from calling his work poor. We cannot here
L E T T E R TO EDITOR.
mention his name. But if his work in his own behalf, that is, in
his studies, was poor, then wc wish to emphasize that the work
he did for his college was indeed good and glorious. Tt was such Editor-in-Chief, " S. C. News."
that he did not deserve to have the character of his classwork
The Class in Dramatics wishes to express through the
published, especially so, since what he did for our college, with- columns of your paper its appreciation of (he very valuable
out doubt, kept him from doing his best where his own interests services rendered the class, in connection with the recent prowere concerned. Even if there is no appreciation in some quar- duction of Gallsworthy's "Silver Box"; first by Miss Perine of
ters of what'he and others are doing, we can assure him and his the faculty who gave much of her' time and experience to make
fellow workers that the loyal element among the students honor the scenery used effective, and by the Messrs. Arthur Woodward
and esteem them for it.
and Arnold Nolde for their pleasing interpretation of the roles of
We are sorry, as are hundreds of other students, that this Marlowe and policeman, respectively.
happened, and we hope that in the future wc may be spared,
L. A., Secretary
Why not change the policy and publish hereafter the names of
Class in Dramatics.
those who, in the examinations, have covered themselves with
glory? Wc are but little acquainted with our best scholars. Too
Mai'uh 31—Army at West Point.
little encouragement is given them. While special scholarship MANAGER D. TOWNSEND
April 14—-Albany Law School at
ANNOUNCES BASEprizes are, perhaps, too much to ask for just now, yet wellAlbany,
BALL SCHEDULE.
deserved public praise ought not to be withheld from "our best
April 21 —R, T, I. at Albany.
April 30 — Niagara at Albany.
students. Publish the names of the brilliant, not those of the
May 12—'St. 'Stevens at Annanpoor.
West Point and Niagara.
dak, N; Y.
May 39 —•St. Slovens at Albany,
June 11 — R. P, I. at Troy,
Manager D. Townsend yesMAY PUBLISH T H E " NEWS " SEMI-MONTHLY.
terday gave out the following
Manager Townsend is still in
Sometime during this week a representative of the " News " as the tentative official baseball communication with other colwill approach each one of'von, who signed a promise-to-pay last- schedule which the State Col- leges and several other games
fall, but have failed to redeem the same. The polite request of lege nine will carry out this may be added. He is planning
the representative will be that you pay the $r.50 which you owe spring",
a New York trip!
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 7, 1917
Clattof 1919 Introduce* Soph. Week s t r e e t s of nations, s o m e t h i n g
Continued from Pngc 1
should be done at some time.
Saturday
afternoon
the Undoubtedly there would b e
Sophomores entertained
their some who would say that wej
sister Class of 1917 and the were d r u n k with our o w n 1
Faculty at a T h e Dansant in the phrases, and that we had conCollege gymnasium.
fused parrotism with patriotGregvvare's
orchestra
fur- ism.
nished the music for both occa" But this intoxicant is not
sions.
served up to the American peoT h e program for- the week ple by the addresses of Presiended with the Hobart-S. C. dent W i l s o n to Congress. If
game held in the Albany High we k n o w how to read, it seems
School gymnasium,
Saturday t h a t any talk about adequate
evening. The class sat together cause for war is beside the
in a reserved section of the mark,
bleachers and were lead in the
" Read the message of last
class and College cheers by M o n d a y ; in it are ' t h e necesErnest Puderbaugh.
sity for definite action may
Between the halves of the come at any time, if we are in
basketball game Allen Gillette, fact and not in word, merely, to
in behalf of the class, presented defend our elemental rights as
loving cups to Francis Fitz- a neutral nation.' ' Only the
gerald and " H o n e y " Miller for method and the e x t e n t remain
their splendid work on the team to be chosen, upon the occasion,
this season.
if occasion should indeed arise.'
The members of the Social T h i s m i g h t lead to action. But
Committee were Allen Gillette, note further, ' I am not now
Kathryn Linehan, Augusta Ten proposing or c o n t e m p l a t i n g war
Eyck, Mae Cassan, Lois Knox, or any steps that ma}' lead to
Delia Ross, Agnes Dcnnin, Ger- it.'
Armed neutrality is a
trude Blair, Monica Cardiff, stopping place between peace
Hariot Poole, Margaret Becker, and w a r ; while no one is anxMargaret Major, Joseph Lasker, ious for war, one wonders just
Gerald Curtain, Cassius Logan, how man)' more stopping places
Wni. Lomcr, Theodore Cassa- may be established. T h e convant and Earl Sutherland.
clusion of armed neutrality
came as a surprise, with a sense
of shock at its unexpectedness.
Prof. Risley Interviewed by Reporter
Continued from Tuge 1
" T h e term armed neutrality
caris alive or Raisuli dead," has been applied to the case of
sent to Morocco in 1904 to pro- a nation, a neutral, that keeps
tect o n e American citizen is far an army, as Holland, but this is
different from the ' a n x i o u s pa- an error. T h e term should be
tience ' of F e b r u a r y 26, 1917. used to apply to neutrals who
T h e r e is no established stand- band together to obtain some
ard of adequate cause of war. desired privilege from the belI t is always an independent act- ligerents and who threaten
to be determined by the con- firms if necessary. If the term
ditions of the time, and largely has any value, it should be used
by the ' a n i m u s f u r a n d i ' of the in this historical sense and not
aggrieved state. I t a l y ' s causes be used indiscriminately. I beof w a r against Tripoli do not lieve the United States lays itseem a d e q u a t e ; Austria's ulti- self open to criticism in this
m a t u m to Servia in 1914 was matter. The privilege congress
precipitate.
C a u s e s of w a r has given our President is that
have often been trivial and have of armed defense and not armed
generally been lost sight of be- neutrality.
fore the war was over.
"•Certainly it seems that any
" Great Britain practically at- discussion of adequate cause of
tacked the United States in the war arising from Germany's inm a t t e r of the Caroline. Daniel sult to us is hardly in point
W e b s t e r , then secretary of when the m a t t e r of armed neustate, laid down the accepted trality or armed defense is the
rule ' t h e necessity of self de- extent of our violence,"
fense must be instant, overState College Wins Last Game
whelming, leaving no choice of
Continued from Page 1
m e a n s and no moment for deliberation.' T h u s a nation m a y pace too fast for the H o b a r t
perform an act of war to pre- men in the second half and had
Big
v e n t possible harm to itself. things their own way.
T h e V i r g i n i u s is another case Fitz opened this period with a
shot
in point. H e n c e w a r often is sensational one-handed
begun, not only from causes from the field, and Goewey folHobart
that appear trivial, but even to lowed his example.
prevent an act. T h i s indicates was never in the r u n n i n g after
that, the United States has not this. T h e y were able to score
lacked cause for action, pro- but one field basket in this half.
vided that action is demanded. T o w a r d s the end of the g a m e S.
Fitzgerald and H o h a u s both
W h e n a hot headed maniac, in
the last throes of desperation, tallied from the field on long
shots,
w'hich were two of the
runs amuck up and down the
neatest baskets seen this season. T h e teams were fighting
hard when the whistle blew.
T h e final score was 31 :i8.
Between the halves President
Gillette of the Sophomore class
presented " H o n e y " Miller and
F. Fitzgerald with silver loving
cups.
Both these men arc
Sophomores and the class gave
the cups as a token of appreciation of what they have done for
the class and college by their
work on the team.
Hobart
IMS, P.P. T.P.
Ycatcsj r.f
1
0 2
Moodey, l.f
1
6
8
Curr, C
1
0
2
Greene, t'.g
2
0
4
Smith, r.g
1
0
2
Dietrich; l.g
0
0
0
Howell, l.g
0
0
0
Totals
6
6 18
Suite College
F.P.. P.P. T.P.
S. Fitzgerald, r.f...
,3 13 19
F. Fitzgerald, l.f. • •
0
0
o
Gocwey, c
,1
o
6
Jones, r.g
i
o
2
Hohaus, l.g
2
o
4
Cohen, l.g
0
o
o
Totals
0 13 31
Summary.
Score at half
time, n : i i .
Referee—L, S. Mill. Timers —
Andrews, Hobart; Hubbard, S. C.
Scorers — Willard, Hobart; DerlIclcc, S. C. Fouls— Hobart, 22;
State College, 14. Final score —
18:31.
Prof. Stinard Gives Lecture on Cuba
Continued from Page t
never boast of a firmly established g o v e r n m e n t , and it was
in that period that the Spaniards acquired many of the
traits now manifest in their
Cuban descendants.
Almost
from the beginning the C u b a n s
have looked upon g o v e r n m e n t
as an instrument of oppression,
T h e taxes imposed upon them
during the nineteenth century
were indeed very excessive and
in the last half century the
Cubans were incessantly revolting against Spain,
With
such lack of training on the part
,if the Cuban it is hard to expect, Professor Stinard pointed
out, that they should exercise
the same cool-hcadedness and
self-control
as
the
AngloSaxon. T h e tendency towards
political unrest and revolution
is born within him.
T h e lecturer said that the
C u b a n s favored Mexico in the
conflict between that country
and ours. T h e North Americans arc a foreign race to t h e m ;
they know us only from the
mouths of demagogues or from
American adventurers.
The
C u b a n s hate to be reminded of
What they owe us.
They
claim t h a t ' t h e y have in added
trade amply repaid the United
States for w h a t she has done.
T h e y believe they would have
won' their
freedom
alone.
However, the educated class
believes that the control of
America has saved them many
Page Three
millions and much drudgery.
O n e chief cause of the present
rebellion is, said Prof. Stinard,
the fact t h a t the present executive was educated in the United
States and seems to favor the
Americans.
h\ s p e a k i n g of the commercial side of Cuban life, the
speaker pointed out that since
Cuba has become a republic its
c o m m e r c e lias increased materially.
In volume of trade
Ha van na now surpasses all
American harbors with the exception of N e w York. Sugar is
king on the island, with tobacco next. Contrary to common belief, Cuba does not export coffee, in fact it does not
raise enough to supply its own
demand.
Cuba represents an extensive
m a r k e t for American goods,
especially dry goods. In speaki n g of the causes of the apparent superiority of European
salesmen over the American,
Prof. S t i n a r d said that the
American made the mistake of
t r y i n g to sell that which be
wanted to get rid of, instead of
e n d e a v o r i n g to supply that
which w a s needed. Also the
American is much too exacting
about credit, which tends to
h u r t the Cuban's pride. H o w ever, of late, conditions have
been g r o w i n g better and the
North and Latin-Americans arc
slowly a r r i v i n g at a better
understanding.
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I
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"Your friends can buy anything
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Reference the Senior Class
THE PEARSALL STUDIO
29 No. Pearl St.
Page Four
KAPPA DELTA,
We are glad to welcome Lois
Knox, '19, as a pledge member.
LeMoyne Gillette returned to
her home at Little Falls for the
week end.
Edna Chappcll entertained her
sister, Marjorie Chappell, for a
few. days last week.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 7, 1917
PROMETHEAN
style. B R O W N ' S •***r
A short business meeting of
the Promethean Literary Society
was held Thursday evening in
the Milne High School chapel.
The installation of the new offiAt Medium Prices
cers took place at this time with
Miss Ethel Houck, the former
PHONE W-2230-J
president, officiating.
The in- 149 CENTRAL AVE.
coming officers were Miss Anna
THE COLLEGE SHOE STORE
SUFFRAGE MEETING.
Nelson, President, and Miss
Miss Louise Grant, a prom- Adelc Hedges, Vice-President.
inent suffragette in our State,
Members were appointed by
Our Complete Line of
will give a lecture Friday, March the new president to serve on
FRENCH
PERSIAN IVORY
gth, under the auspices of Col- the Program, Membership and
lege Club. Her subject will be Initiation Committees. The Prois the largest to be found
"Current Events and Their Re- gram Committee consists of two
north of New York City
lation to Suffrage." The Faculty groups: Miss Lorna Austin,
Very Acceptable Birthday
and students are invited,
Miss Caroline Bennett and Miss
Margaret Fly tin in the first and
Presents
Miss Margaret Shevlin, Arthur
Y. W. C. A.
DONNELLY
& HANNA
The annual Y. W. C. A. Burns and Miss Elizabeth OsUfi'te-liate
Pharmacy
borne
in
the
second.
•Cafeteria Supper will he served
Neckwear, Hosiery,
The Membership Committee
at the city Y. W. C. A. Friday
251 Central Avenue
Shirts, Sweaters
includes
the
Misses
Louise
evening, March 9th, at 7130.
and Gloves
Burleson,
Jane
Schnilzler,
FlorTickets, 50 cents each, may be
entine Fitzgerald, Mildred Mcobtained in the College hall.
Ewan and Theodore Cassavant, coward &l^cl&unv
Dawson's Men's Shop
The Initiation Committee is
PSI GAMMA.
259 Central Ave.
HcuJ-lo-Foot Clothiers
composed of Harold Elliott, AlPsi Gamma girls have been al- fred Dedicke, Spencer Pcckham
Near Lake
Avenue
73 Stole S'rcct,
lowed to return to their College and the Misses Monica Cardiff
duties.
and Ethel Houck.
Marshman-Beebe Company
Gertrude Swift,- Hattic Ogle
Rhinehard Hohaus was apIncorporated 1908
AlUy.N.Y.
and Betty Curran are gradually pointed to the office of sergeantrecovering from their recent ill- at-arms.
PRINTERS
ness,
414 Broadway, cor, Beaver St.,
During the recent quarantine
ALBANY, N. Y.
H. E. DEPARTMENT.
N . Y . Phone Main 514-J
at 124 So. Lake avenue many
Next Saturday, March 10th, at
thanks were offered lo Alex- ten a. m,, Miss Van Liew will
favored by
H. MILLER
ander G. Bell for his invention have a conference with the The Restaurant
of the telephone.
LADIES' AND GENTS' TAILOR
College students
Juniors and Seniors of the IT. E.
Psi Gamma is glad lo welcome Department in Room I 6 J .
Cleaning, Repairing a n d Pressing
Central A v e n u e
as pledge member Cordelia
SPECIAL PRICES TO COLLEGE STUDENTS
The speakers will be graduates
H .light ' 1 9 ,
291 Central Avenue
Near Essex Lunch
2 blocks from Robin Street
who are leaching and they will
present some of the difficulties in
ORGAN
RECITAL BY teaching. Those who will speak
Writing Paper for Students
HARRY A. RUSSELL,
are Katherine Kinne '13, HerkH A L F M O O N LINEN
EX '18.
imer; Jessie Cole '13, Albany;
150 Sheets Paper ) * . , . , Students will be interested to Naomi .1 Lowells '14, Albany;
NEWS DEALER
125 Envelopes) * 1 " i 5
know of a series of organ re- Amy Rextrew '15, Schenectady;
Marion
Fleming
'\$,
Rhinebeck;'
ntals which are being given
during Lent at All Aaints' Ca- Laura Sexton '14, Saratoga Cigars, Candy and Stationery P a p e r P e r Box Envelopes P e r P a c k
35c.
15c.
thedral by 'Harry Alan Russell, Springs.
There is a plan to have later in
S. C, T. ex '18. The second rePRINTING and DEVELOPING
cital will be given Wednesday tlic year graduates who are doing5
R.F.CLAPP,JR.
evening, March 7, at 8:30 p. m., dictation work speak lo the De- ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CAMERA FILMS
70 N. Pearl St.
State and Lark Sts.
and the last three will follow partment, also graduates who are
2 1 5 Central Ave.
N.Y. Phono West 3973
on the Wednesdays of each doing luncheon work.
successive week.
SENIOR PRACTICE
Developing, Kodak Filmi,
Printing
TEACHERS T O PLAY
ESSEX LUNCH REEUGENE SISSON
We develop any size of six exposure
MILNE
HIGH.
films for ten cents, and prices for printMODELED.
CAMERA FILMS. SCHOOL SUPPLIES,
ing are the lowest in the city — and the
PRINTING A N D DEVELOPING
Milne High School Faculty
work is the best.
A
SPECIALTY.
The management of the Es- play the Milne High basketball
sex Lunch System invites all team this afternoon at 4 o'clock. 207 CENTRAL AVE. 2 DOORS ABOVE RODIN
SCHNEIBLE'S PHARMACY
faculty members and all stu- This game is an annual event
Corner W e s t e r n a n d Lake A v e n u e s
dents of State College to visit j and an exciting game is always
its restaurant at 295 'Central assured, because it is the only PRICE, SERVICE AND QUALITY PRINTERS
Avenue. This restaurant has opportunity the students have
just been enlarged, newly of revenging themselves on their
equipped, and'made up-to-date instructors. The teachers esin every sense of the word, so pecially request that as many
that it can now lie classed collegians as possible turn out
t<2
among the leading restaurants for they need all the encourageof the city. Its location near ment they can get.
Vrintcta of Stale College &£en>s
the college buildings and the The Faculty will probably line
quick and clean service for Up as follows; S. Fitzgerald
PRINTING
COMPANY
which it is known, makes it an and F. H. Conic-)*, forwards; H A M I L T O N
ideal place where college peo- Cassavant, center; Walker and
ple may eat.— Adv.
Hohaus, guards.
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY. N. Y
SHOES
ESSEX LUNCH
John J. Conkey
SCHNEIBLE'S
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