NIOSH 2012 PPT Stakeholders Meeting Pesticide Handling Sector 9:00‐10:30 AM EDT Kim Faulkner, PhD, MPH  

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NIOSH 2012 PPT Stakeholders Meeting
Pesticide Handling Sector
9:00‐10:30 AM EDT
Kim Faulkner, PhD, MPH Stan Thomas
Hyatt Regency, Pittsburgh, PA
March 20‐21, 2012
* This meeting is being recorded
Acknowledgements
• Support team
• Dennis Groce
• Chuck Urban
• Barb Sheppard
• Stakeholder partners
• Federal EPA
* This meeting is being recorded
2
Housekeeping
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Live meetings
Microphones
Videotape
‘Clickers’
Note cards and evaluations
Recertification credits (Pennsylvania) * This meeting is being recorded
Audience
Response
System
(e.g., clickers)
4
About the Clickers
• Provides audience response
• Instant feedback
• All answers are anonymous
5
About the Clickers
• Only one person per ‘clicker’
• Push the number that corresponds to
your answer
• Change your answer by pushing a
different button
• Responses are not accepted after the
polling closes
6
Breakout 1: Let’s practice polling…
TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF
NIOSH National PPE Surveillance and Intervention Program among Pesticide Handlers
• Goal is to improve PPE practices
– Long‐term effort includes scientific studies
– Short‐term effort includes interventions based on preliminary input from stakeholders
PPE = personal protective equipment
8
Research Partners
Pesticide handlers
PPE Manufacturers and Suppliers
Employers
and Supervisors
Researchers, educators &
Pesticide Manufacturers and Suppliers
other health professionals
Regulators
PPE = personal protective equipment
9
Identified Potential Barriers
 Farm visits and exhibits
 NIOSH Pesticide PPE Hotline
 [email protected]
 1‐888‐654‐2294
 Stakeholders meetings
PPE = personal protective equipment
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Overview of Barriers
PPE = personal protective equipment
2. Difficulty Obtaining
3. Lack of Acceptance
Workplace issues
1. Lack of Knowledge
Brow
Not Provided
Cultural issues
NIOSH 2011 Stakeholders Meeting
12
Which group best identifies your primary duties? 1. WPS Pesticide Handler or Certified Applicator
2. Grower/Supervisor
3. Manufacturer or supplier
4. Educator/Researcher
5. Regulator
6. Other profession
13
Why might someone who is handling a pesticide not understand the correct
PPE to wear for a task?
1. Information on the pesticide label is unclear, incomplete or outdated
2. Inadequate Pesticide Safety Training
3. Dealer Distributor Information Unavailable
4. The PPE packaging label
is unclear
14
What is the primary reason why people who handle pesticides don’t know how to use PPE properly?
1. Information on pesticide label is unclear or incomplete
2. Inadequate Pesticide Safety Training regarding PPE
3. No guidance available with the PPE packaging for specific task or what is available is confusing
15
National Training Solutions Committee
Objectives
1. Best pesticide PPE training techniques
2. National clearinghouse of training resources
3. Best pesticide PPE practices document
PPE = personal protective equipment
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When correct PPE is known, what are barriers for obtaining it?
1. It is not available 2. Fear of retaliation
3. The PPE packaging/ labels are unclear
4. Identifying correct PPE during the purchasing process
5. Limited market for pesticide related PPE
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Improving the Ability to Identify Correct Pesticide PPE to Purchase
March 20, 2012
9:00‐10:30 AM EST
PPE = personal protective equipment
18
Moving From Barriers to Solutions
• Discuss issues and their causes
• Identify priority issues
• Design solution strategies
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Pesticide Personal Protective Equipment
EPA Worker Protection Standard 40 CFR: 170.240
• Chemical resistant headgear and aprons
• Protective eyewear, clothing, gloves, and footwear
• Respiratory protective devices
EPA = Environmental Protection Agency
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Given the pesticide label requirements, why is purchasing the correct PPE difficult?
3. Selecting
2. PPE marketplace among PPE in the market is limited
is difficult
1. Information on PPE requirements is limited
PPE = personal protective equipment
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Given a goal of buying the correct PPE, consider these three questions when reviewing PPE label requirements:
1. Is information on PPE requirements provided on the label limited?
2. Is the PPE marketplace limited?
3. Is selection among PPE in the market difficult?
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PenncoZeb 4FL (Flowable Fungicide) Caution
• Coveralls over long‐sleeved shirt and long pants
• Protective eyewear
• Chemical resistant gloves made of any waterproof material*
• Chemical resistant apron*
• Shoes plus socks
* Materials that are chemical resistant to the product are not provided nor referenced
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Lannate SP (Insecticide: Water soluble powder in water soluble bags) ‐‐ Danger Poison
• Long‐sleeved shirt and long pants
• Protective eyewear
• Dust/mist filtering respirator (MSHA/NIOSH approval number prefix TC‐21C), or a NIOSH approved respirator with any R, P, or HE prefilter
• Chemical resistant apron*
• Chemical‐resistant gloves, such as barrier laminate or butyl rubber
• Socks and chemical resistant footwear*
* There is no reference made to other materials that are chemical resistant to this product
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Guthion Solupak (Insecticide: 50% wettable
powder in water soluble packets) – Danger Poison
• Chemical resistant coveralls over long‐sleeved shirt and long pants
• Chemical resistant headgear • “ … or a NIOSH‐approved respirator with an organic vapor (OV) cartridge or canister with any N, R, P, or HE prefilter”
• Chemical resistant gloves
• Chemical resistant footwear plus socks
*Materials that are chemical resistant to this product include barrier laminate, butyl rubber, nitrile rubber, neoprene rubber, PVC, and Viton. For more options, see category A on …
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EPA Chemical Resistant Category Chart
Phase 1: Information on PPE requirements is limited
• Certain PPE requirements are not provided
• PPE requirements are not detailed
• Respirator terminology is outdated and technical
• Language barriers
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Certain PPE requirements are not provided
“When handlers use closed systems, or enclosed cabs, in a manner that meets the requirements listed in the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for agricultural pesticides (40 CFR 170.240(d)(4‐
6), the handler PPE requirements may be reduced or modified as specified in the WPS.”
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Phase 2: PPE marketplace is limited
• Limited variety and supply
• Marketing terminology is inconsistent with label requirements
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Limited variety and supply
HIGH: Highly chemical-resistant. Clean or replace PPE at end of each day's work period. Rinse off pesticides at rest breaks.
MODERATE: Moderately chemical-resistant. Clean or replace PPE within an hour or two of contact.
SLIGHT: Slightly chemical-resistant. Clean or replace PPE within ten minutes of contact.
NONE: No chemical-resistance. Do not wear this type of material as PPE when contact is possible.
Inconsistent terminology in marketing
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•
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“Safety” glasses
Protective eyewear
Dust/mist vs. particulate respirator
Mask vs. respirator
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Phase 3: Selecting among PPE is difficult
1. Pesticide and PPE labels and packaging use different terminology
2. PPE labels and packaging are not sufficiently detailed
3. PPE is marketed incorrectly
4. Pesticide PPE is mixed in with other PPE
5. Sales people don’t know correct PPE
6. Language barriers
Incorrect Marketing
PPE appropriate for pesticides is mixed in with other PPE
Sales people don’t know correct PPE
Sales people sell what they know
HIGH: Highly chemical-resistant. Clean or replace PPE at end of each day's work period. Rinse off pesticides at rest breaks.
MODERATE: Moderately chemical-resistant. Clean or replace PPE within an hour or two of contact.
SLIGHT: Slightly chemical-resistant. Clean or replace PPE within ten minutes of contact.
NONE: No chemical-resistance. Do not wear this type of material as PPE when contact is possible.
Let’s start polling…
PRIORITIZING ISSUES: IDENTIFYING PPE IN PURCHASING PROCESS
Difficulty identifying PPE in the purchasing process‐‐
Which one of these is the most important issues that we could change over 1‐2 years?
1. Label provides limited PPE information
2. PPE marketplace is limited
3. Selecting among PPE in the market is difficult
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Pesticide labels provide limited PPE information‐‐
Which one of these is the most important factors we could change over 1‐2 years?
1. Some PPE requirements are not provided
2. PPE requirements are not detailed
3. Respirator terminology is outdated or technical
4. Language barrier
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Next Steps • What are some of the challenges in overcoming this barrier?
• Are we satisfied with our suggested solutions?
• Who would be the likely key players that could assist with this issue?
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PPE marketplace is limited ‐‐
Which one of these is the most important factors we could change over 1‐2 years?
1. Limited variety and supply
2. Marketing terminology is inconsistent with label requirements
41
Next Steps • What are some of the challenges in overcoming this barrier?
• Are we satisfied with our suggested solutions?
• Who would be the likely key players that could assist with this issue?
42
Selecting among PPE is difficult–
Which one of these is the most important factors we could change over 1‐2 years?
1. Pesticide and PPE labels and packaging use different terminology
2. PPE labels and packaging are not sufficiently detailed
3. PPE is marketed incorrectly
4. Pesticide PPE is mixed in with other PPE
5. Sales people don’t know correct PPE
6. Language barriers
43
Next Steps • What are some of the challenges in overcoming this barrier?
• Are we satisfied with our suggested solutions?
• Who would be the likely key players that could assist with this issue?
44
Summary Wrap Up
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Return note cards and evaluations
Return ‘Clickers’
Recertification credits
Poster session
Improving Safety Culture: 3:00‐4:30 PM EDT
Best Pesticide PPE Training Techniques Workshop
Contact us at [email protected]
[email protected]
Pesticide Handlers Sector Posters
Poster #
Poster Topic
Name
Organization
Old Dominion
University, School of
Community and
Environmental Health
PH1
Utilization of Poison Control Center data and local health department
infrastructure to address improper use of PPE among migrant workers: A
proposed approach
Blando, James
PH2
Oregon OSHA’s Pesticide Emphasis Program:
Personal Protective Equipment for Pesticide Handlers
Cooke, Garnet
Oregon OSHA
PH3
Respiratory Protection Regulation for Pesticide Handlers: The California
Model
Fong, Harvard
California Department
of Pesticide Regulation
PH4
Promoting pesticide applicator exposure reduction through outreach
education.
HoffmanRichards, Kerry
Penn State Pesticide
Education Program
PH5
Emphasizing the need to select different PPE for different pesticide
products and their uses during training
Rivers, Ann
USDA
PH6
Predictors of Personal Protective Equipment Compliance among Farm
Youth
Roy, Natalie
AgriSafe Network
PH7
Pesticide Safety on the Farm: Montana Private Applicator Behavioral
Trends
Tharp, Cecil
Montana State
University Extension
PH8
Current Pesticide Education Trends Across North Carolina
Tutor, Robin
NC Agromedicine
Institute
PH9
Personal Protective Technology Use Among North Carolina Farms
Applying Soil Fumigants
Tutor, Robin
PH10
Fit Testing of Pesticide Applicators Respiratory Protection
Wyckoff, Sherry
NC Agromedicine
Institute
Northeast Center for
Agricultural and
Occupational Health
(NEC)
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