R C EQUEST FOR

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DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
X
REQUEST FOR COURSE REVISIONS
Credit Hours
X
DEPARTMENT:
COMMUNICATION, MEDIA & THEATRE ARTS
DEPARTMENT CONTACT:
Course Number/Subject Code
Course Title
Course Description
Prerequisite/Corequisite
Restriction
COLLEGE:
LEE STILLE
PHONE:
ARTS & SCIENCES
487-6846
CONTACT EMAIL:
[email protected]
DIRECTIONS: COMPLETE SECTION A AND SECTIONS B1a, B2a, B3a B4a, B9, B10 AND B11. COMPLETE ONLY THE REMAINING PARTS OF
SECTION B THAT CONCERN THE REVISIONS CHECKED ABOVE. FOR ASSISTANCE CONTACT THE COURSE AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
OFFICE.
A. Rationale for Revision:
Shifting disciplinary emphasis in Performance Studies has lead to an increased number of courses addressing the
performance of non-literary/non-traditional texts (personal narratives, etc.). To maintain existing programmatic
emphasis on the presentation of non-dramatic literary texts, the Interpretation & Performance Studies area has chosen
to combine content from the previously distinct courses of CTAO 311 Interpretation of Prose and CTAO 412 Oral
Interpretation of Poetry into a single course. The combined option, Performing Prose & Poetry, has thrice been offered
as a Special Topics course.
This course revision proposal for CTAO 412 is accompanied by a course deletion proposal for CTAO 311. With the
accompanying revision, CTAO 412 will be expanded to also include the content of CTAO 311 and be renamed
“Interpretation of Prose & Poetry”.
B. Course Information
1. a) Current Subject Code and Course Number:
CTAO 412
b) (If new) Proposed Subject Code and Course Number:
2. a) Current Course Title:
Oral Interpretation of Poetry
b) (If new) Proposed Course Title:
3. a) Current Credit Hours:
Interpretation of Prose & Poetry
3
b) (If new) Proposed Credit Hours
c) (If new) Briefly describe how the increase/decrease in credit hours will be reflected in course content.
5. a) Current Catalog Description:
The application of the principles of oral interpretation to the reading of poetry, with an emphasis on modern and contemporary poetry.
b) (If new) Proposed Catalog Description (Limit to approximately 50 words):
The application of the principles of oral interpretation to the performance of prose and poetry, with an emphasis on modern and
contemporary short fiction and poetry. Limited attention given to longer works of fiction.
Miller, Course Revision,
Sept. 05
6. (Complete only if prerequisites are to be changed.) List Current and Proposed Prerequisite Courses by subject code, number and title.
Students must complete prerequisites before they can take this course.
Current:
Proposed:
7. (Complete only if corequisites are to be changed) List Current and Proposed Corequisite Courses by subject code, number and title.
Students must take corequisite courses at the same time as they are taking this course.
Current:
Proposed:
8. (Complete only if concurrent prerequisites are to be changed.) List Current and Proposed Concurrent Prerequisite Courses by subject
code, number and title. Students must take concurrent prerequisites either before or at the same time as they are taking this course.
Current:
Proposed:
9. (Complete only if course restrictions are to be changed. Complete only those sections that pertain to the restrictions that are to be
changed.) List Current and Proposed Course Restrictions. Course Restrictions limit the type of students who will be allowed to take the
course.
a. Academic/Class Level: Check all those who will be allowed to take the course as part of their academic program.
Current
Proposed
Freshperson
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Certificate
Master’s
Specialist
Doctoral
X
X
X
X
Freshperson
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Certificate
Master’s
Specialist
Doctoral
X
X
X
X
Note: Only 400-level undergraduate courses can be taken by graduate students for credit toward their program of study.. Only
Certificate and Masters students may take these courses. If this is a 400-level course that will now be offered for graduate credit,
attach Approval Form for 400-level Course for Graduate Credit.
Note: Only 500-level graduate courses can be taken by undergraduate students.
b. Majors/Programs: (Check if course is restricted to those in specific majors/programs)
Current
Proposed
Yes
Yes
No
X
No
X
If yes, list the majors/programs
Page 2 of 8
c. Departmental Permission: (Note: Department permission requires the department to enter authorization for every student
registering.)
Current
Yes
No
Proposed
Yes
No
X
X
d. Admission to Specific College: (Check if course is restricted to those admitted to specific college.)
Current
Proposed
College of Business:
College of Business:
College of Education:
College of Education:
9. List all departmental programs for which this course is Required or a Restricted Elective.
Program
Theatre Arts (Major & Minor)
Program Comprehensive Communication & Theatre Arts (INPS concentration)
10. Is this course required by programs in other departments?
Required
Restricted Elective __X____
Required
Restricted Elective ___X___
Yes
No
X
11. If yes, do the affected departments support this change?
Yes
No
If yes, attach letters of support. If no, attach letters from the affected department explaining the lack of support, if available.
12. Will the proposed revision increase/decrease credit hours in any program? Yes
No
X
If yes, list the programs and provide an explanation for the increase/decrease, along with a copy of the revised program that includes the new
credit hour total.
C. Action of the Department/College
1. Department
Vote of department faculty:
For ____27______
Against ____0______
(Enter the number of votes cast in each category.)
Abstentions ____0______
2/7/13
Department Head Signature
Date
2. College
College Dean Signature
Date
3. Graduate School (if Graduate Course)
Graduate Dean Signature
Date
D. Approval
Associate Vice-President for Academic Programming Signature
Date
Associate Vice-President for Academic Programming Signature
Date
Page 3 of 8
CTAO 412: Interpretation of Prose & Poetry Course Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Lee Stille Office: 121 Quirk Building Office Phone: 487-­‐6846 (w/voicemail) E-­‐Mail: [email protected] Mailbox: 124 Quirk Office Hours: Text: COURSE PACK—includes excerpts from: Campbell, Paul. The Speaking and the Speakers of Literature. Belmont, CA:
Dickenson P, 1967. And Geiger, Don. The Sound, Sense, and Performance of Literature. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman
and Co, 1963. Jaffe, Clella I. Performing Literary Texts: Concepts and Skills. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2006. Astley, Ed Neil, ed. Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times. New York: Hyperion, 2003. Course Outcomes: Students will… Ÿ Demonstrate awareness of what constitutes and distinguishes “poetic” and “narrative” expression. Ÿ Comprehend the value both of point of view and persona (character) in the performance of narrative (and all other) texts. Ÿ Evoke through performance the narrative languages of description, scene and summary. Ÿ Engage various aspects of imagery in the performance of poetry. Ÿ Determine and execute performance choices reflecting lyric, dramatic and narrative modes. Ÿ Demonstrate advanced critical skills through intensive written and performance work with the poetry of a single published poet and/or modern (or contemporary) novel. Ÿ Examine the relationship between an author/poet and his/her work. Ÿ Enhance general performance and communicative skills. Course Work: • WRITTEN WORK: Various short papers relating to specific textual or performative concerns. Handouts will be provided for all written assignments. Most are linked directly to your assigned performances. Consider due dates “set in stone!”-­‐-­‐the nature of the writing assignments necessitate pre-­‐performance vs. post-­‐performance thinking. Late papers, being less useful to you, will not be accepted! All papers must be typewritten and of high quality. • PERFORMANCE EMPHASIS: The course relies on both formal and exploratory (workshop) performances-­‐-­‐each with specific goals. Approximately four performances will be identified as EXPLORATORY and five as FORMAL. All assignments will be responded to critically. o Final Performance—Time Limit: 6-­‐8 minutes, including introduction and transitions. For this assignment, you may
select from either of the following two options: OPTION 1: The “Short Story”—May be a single “short-­‐short” or extracted from a longer story; novels may not be
used for this assignment. This should not be perceived as an exercise in editing, but rather as an opportunity to
engage and embody, through performance, the implied speaker and context of the narrative work. Selections
should challenge you and require instructor approval. Paper: Papers should be expertly written and address the following elements. Make sure to provide specific evidence from the text as support for your assertions. • A thorough dramatistic analysis of the selection (who, what, when,…) • A discussion of the general theme of the selection. • Discussion of Gesture/Descriptions and Dialogue Page 4 of 8
•
What challenges does this selection pose for you as a performer? How will you meet those challenges? OPTION 2: Poetry – May be single poem or compilation of multiple poems on a single theme. This should not be
perceived as an exercise in editing and/or programming, but rather as an opportunity to engage and embody poetry
through performance. In other words, poems should be performed in their entirety. Selected poems require
instructor approval. Paper: Papers should be expertly written and address the following elements. Make sure to provide specific evidence from the text as support for your assertions. • A thorough dramatistic analysis of the selection (who, what, when,…) • Identification of Mode and Performance Implications • Discussion of Sensory, Tonal, and Literary Imagery • What challenges does this selection pose for you as a performer? How will you meet those challenges? "Ground Rules" for the Course: o As this is a performance based course, participation is essential. Consider attendance mandatory. Active involvement (physical and mental) is expected every class period. Missed opportunities for engagement (this includes excessive tardiness) will be noted and will negatively influence your final grade. o All assigned work must be completed on the scheduled due date. This cannot be stressed enough! We have an intensely busy semester. It is your responsibility to know when you are scheduled to perform. No time will be available to make up performances. o Much class time will be devoted to performance. Be considerate! If you arrive late, listen outside the door before you enter. Never interrupt a classmate’s performance and always enter quietly so as to disturb the group. Also, please turn off all cell phones and other electronic devices. o No food or drink in class. o Academic dishonesty in any form will result in an E (failure) for the course. Grading: The grade you receive in this course will be based on the following division: Participation/Attitude/Effort/Growth 20% EXPLORATORY Performance Work 20% FORMAL Performance Work 30% Written Work (text analyses, poetic moment, notations, epic/lyric/dramatic paper, performance plans) 30% Schedule: (may be subject to change) Week 1 September 8 Orientation; Expectations; Assign: Read Campbell’s The Speaker and Speaking of Literature, Introduction & Chs 1-­‐5, and Jaffe’s Performing Literary Texts: Concepts & Skills—Ch 4; Assign: Read “novel” excerpts Week 2 13 Presentation: 2-­‐4 minute story 15 Discussion of Campbell; Assign: Speaker Assignment Week 3 Page 5 of 8
20 FORMAL Performance 1a: Preview/”In Defense of Persona” 22 FORMAL Performance 1a: Preview/”In Defense of Persona” Week 4 27 FORMAL Performance 1b: Speaker Presentation 29 FORMAL Performance 1b: Speaker Presentation Week 5 October 4 Discussion: Summary (Scene), Scene (Role), Description (Gesture); Workshop on Description; Discuss notation for vocal choices; Assign: Locate Descriptive Passages-­‐-­‐approximately 2-­‐3 minutes long; 6 EXPLORATORY Performance 1: Vocal Dynamics Week 6 11 FORMAL Performance 2: Performance of Description w/ Notation 13 FORMAL Performance 2: Performance of Description w/ Notation Week 7 18 EXPLORATORY Performance 2: Dialogue; Assign: Locate 5 Images 20 EXPLORATORY Performance 2: Dialogue; Due: 5 Images—(include, image, title/author of poem, page # for each image); Assign: Read Geiger’s Sound, Sense, and the Performance of Literature—Ch 1-­‐4; Poetic Moment. Week 8 25 Due: Poetic Moment; Poetic Impulse and Modes; Assign: Locate Lyric, Epic, and Dramatic poems; Assign: Epic/Lyric/Dramatic Poems w/ Paper 27 Poetry Discussion/Sensory and Tonal Imagery Rhythm; Week 9 November 1 EXPLORATORY Performance 3: Rhythm and Texture; Epic/Lyric/Dramatic Poems w/Paper; Discuss: Final Performance 3 Submit & Discuss: Analysis for “The Image” assignment. Week 10 8 FORMAL Performance 3: Performance “The Image” w/ Analysis 10 FORMAL Performance 3: Performance “The Image” w/ Analysis Week 11 15 FORMAL Performance 3: Performance “The Image” w/ Analysis; Discuss: Lyric Performance & Paper 17 Discuss Characteristics of the Ballad; Assign: EXPLORATORY Performance 1: The Ballad; Week 12 22 EXPLORATORY Performance 4: The Ballad 24 NO CLASS -­‐ Thanksgiving Recess Week 13 29 FORMAL Performance 4: Lyric Poem Performance w/ Performance Plan December 1 FORMAL Performance 4: Lyric Poem Performance w/ Performance Plan Week 14 6 Preparation for Final Performances 8 FORMAL Performance 5: Final Performances w/ Performance Plan Week 15 13 (1:30-­‐3:00) FORMAL Performance 5: Final Performances w/ Performance Plan Page 6 of 8
BIBLIOGRAPHY Astley, Ed Neil, ed. Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times. New York: Hyperion, 2003. Print. Baldwin, Dean, and Patrick J. Quinn. An Anthology of Colonial and Postcolonial Short Fiction. Boston: Wadsworth Publishing, 2006. Print. Bell, Elizabeth. Theories of Performance. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2008. Print. Bentley, Phyllis. Some Observations on the Art of the Narrative. London: Home & Van Thal, 1946. Print. Blair, Rhonda, ed. and Lutterbie, John, ed. “Cognitive Studies, Theatre, and Performance [special section].” Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism. 25.2 (2011): 63-­‐139. Print. Campbell, Paul. The Speaking and the Speakers of Literature. Belmont, CA: Dickenson Publishing, 1967. Print. Cook, Jon. Poetry in Theory: An Anthology 1900-­‐2000. Boston: Wiley-­‐Blackwell, 2004. Print. Dawson, Paul. “The Return of Omniscience in Contemporary Fiction.” Narrative. 17.2 (May): 143-­‐161. Print. Geiger, Don. The Sound, Sense, and Performance of Literature. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1958. Print. Gray, Paul, and James VanOosting. Performance in Life and Literature. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1996. Print. Grobe, Christopher. “The Breath of the Poem: Confessional Print/Performance circa 1959.” PMLA. 127.2 (2012): 215-­‐230, 423. JSTOR. Web. December 2012. Gura, Timothy, and Charlotte Lee. Oral Interpretation. 12 ed. New York: Pearson , 2009. Print. Harris, Mary Dee. “Analysis of the Discourse Structure of Lyric Poetry”. Computers and the Humanities. 23:4/5, Aug-­‐Oct 1989. 423-­‐428. JSTOR. Web. September 2004. Herman, David, James Phelan, Peter J. Rabinowitz, Brian Richardson, and Robyn R. Warhol. Narrative Theory: Core Concepts and Critical Debates. Columbus: Ohio State UP, 2012. Print. Hoffman, Michael J., ed. and Patrick D. Murphy, ed. Essentials of the Theory of Fiction. 3rd ed. Durham, NC, Duke UP, 2005. Print. Jaffe, Clella. Performing Literary Texts: Concepts and Skills. Boston: Wadsworth Publishing, 2005. Print. Kafalenos, Emma. Narrative Causalities. Columbus: Ohio State UP, 2006. Print. Kaminsky, Ilya, ed., and Susan Harris, ed. The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry. New York: Ecco, 2010. Print. Keleta-­‐Mae, Naila, “Outskirts to Mainstream? Performance Poetry on the Move. Canadian Theatre Review. 149 (2012): 76-­‐79. Print. Nielson, Lara. “Working the Field with Oral History: Talking Towards the Research Encounter in Theatre and Performance Studies. Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 24.1 (2009): 99-­‐116. Print. Oates, Joyce Carol, ed. and Christopher R. Beha, ed. The Ecco Anthology of Contemporary American Short Fiction. New York: Harper Perennial, 2008. Print. Page 7 of 8
Pelias, Ronald J., and Tracy Stephenson Shaffer, Performance Studies: The Interpretation of Aesthetic Texts. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt Pub, 2007. Print. Petterson, Anders. The Concept of Literary Application: Readers’ Analogies from Text to Life. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Print. Peterson, Eric E., and Langellier, Kristin M. “The Performance Turn in Narrative Studies.” Narrative Inquiry 16.1 (2006): 173-­‐180. Print. Poulin, A. and Michael Waters. Contemporary American Poetry. 8th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Publishing. 2005. Print. Roloff, Leland. The Perception and Evocation of Literature. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1973. Print. Stern, Carol Simpson, and Bruce Henderson. Learning to Perform: An Introduction. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 2010. Print. -­‐-­‐-­‐. Performance: Text and Context. New York: Longman, 1993. Print. Strukus, Wanda. “Mining the Gap: Physically Integrated Performance and Kinesthetic Empathy. Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 25.2 (2011): 89-­‐106. ProjectMUSE. Web. September 2012. Thompson, David W. and Virginia Fredricks. Oral Interpretation of Fiction: A Dramatistic Approach. Minneapolis: Burgess P, 1967. Print. Woodley, Krista. “Let the Data Sing: Representing Discourse in Poetic Form.” Journal of the Oral History Society. Vol 32, no 1, 2004. 49-­‐58. JSTOR. Web. November 2012. Yordon, Judy. Roles in Interpretation. 5th ed. Boston: McGraw-­‐Hill, 2001. Print. Page 8 of 8
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