APPENDICES List of Appendices

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Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDICES
List of Appendices
A. Mission, Goals, and Services
B. Usage Reports (and Satisfaction Rates) by Semester
C. Detailed Organizational Chart and Permanent Position Definitions
D. Fulltime Staff Resumes/CVs
E. Job Descriptions for Graduate Tutors and Writing Fellows
F. QEP and Writing, Reading, and Critical Studies Program: Rubrics and Outcomes
G. Surveys and Satisfaction Rates: Writing Fellows
H. Policies and Appointments
I. Faculty Services and Workshop Descriptions
J. Online Services: Meebo and Smarthinking Information, Usage
K. NSSE and the CSWC: Survey Means Comparisons (Writing Portion)
L. Writing Fellows Program Information and Forms
M. Website: Sitemap, Resource List, and Usage Rates/Analytics
N. Additional Training Materials: Syllabi for English 220/221, Graduate Staff Meetings
O. Peer Institution Comparisons
P. Budget Information: Funds, Expenditures, Salaries, etc.
Q. Survey of Student Files: Topics of Sessions and Student Needs
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX A
Mission, Goals and Services
WaLC Mission:
The Writing and Learning Commons seeks to enhance the academic environment and raise the level
of academic discourse at Western Carolina University by providing tutoring, academic skills
consultations, workshops, online learning resources, and faculty consultations.
WaLC Goals:
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Support faculty members’ efforts to maintain academic rigor
Build students’ confidence in their ability to achieve academic success
Provide engaged learning opportunities for students and faculty members
Promote students’ intellectual versatility and flexibility across the disciplines
Collaborate with faculty to support QEP and UNC Tomorrow initiatives
Challenge students to be active learners
Help students understand their responsibilities for learning, reading, and writing in the
academy
Advance the principle that writing, learning, and teaching are recursive and interconnected
processes
Train and support a workforce of tutors and peer educators who model and facilitate
effective learning practices
WaLC Services:
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Writing tutoring
Course-specific tutoring
One-on-one and group tutoring
Writing and research skills workshops
Learning skills workshops
Faculty consultations on writing assignment design
Tutoring in English as a Second Language (ESL)
Writing Fellows - a curriculum-based peer tutoring program that places trained
undergraduate tutors in eligible courses
Online, open-access writing, research, and learning resources
Instant messaging service for simple writing queries
Academic skills consultations
Extensive training for student employees
Documentation of students’ tutoring visits, communicated to course instructors weekly
Support to faculty and staff campus-wide, especially English, Graduate School and contentspecific departments
Appendix A: Mission, Goals, and Services
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing Fellows Program Description:
The Western Carolina University Writing Fellows program—the first of its kind in the UNC
system— provides focused, course-specific support for undergraduate writing. It supports the QEP
by helping students learn to communicate effectively and responsibly.
Peer tutors, called Fellows, are hired by the Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC).
Fellows are trained to work with students on their writing, and assigned to one course. Each Fellow
works closely with 10 to 15 students on the writing assignments in that class. Fellows read drafts of
each paper, write thorough endnotes, and conference with each student to develop revision
strategies. Fellows also meet with the instructor to discuss assignments and requirements.
Once students have worked with their Fellow, they revise their papers before submitting a
final draft to the instructor. The instructor then grades the final draft. Instructors have access to all
student drafts and Fellows’ comments.
The Writing Fellows Program began in 2007 and works with a wide variety of majors and
departments, providing an additional level of one-on-one support and facilitating the revision
process for many students across campus.
Writing Fellows are talented undergraduates with a passion for writing and helping others.
The WCU Writing Fellows Program encourages a university-wide writing culture, promotes
collaborative learning, complements existing WaLC services, and empowers students to become
intentional, effective writers. The program is overseen by the Associate Director of the WaLC.
WaLC Ethics
The following Code of Ethics was established by the Association for the Tutoring Profession and is
supported by the College Reading and Learning Association.
 Best Interest: Tutors will be committed to acting in the best interest of students. They will not
complete students’ assignments for them.
 Responsibility: Tutors will take responsibility for their own behavior and work to resolve
conflicts that may arise between themselves and the students and faculty with whom they work.
 Integrity: Tutors will practice and promote accuracy, honesty, and truthfulness; they will
maintain academic integrity and uphold the Code of Student Conduct. Writing Assistants and
Writing Fellows will look for instances of plagiarism, discuss the importance of doing original
work, and offer solutions to the problem, such as effective note taking and proper
documentation of sources.
 Fairness: Tutors will exercise reasonable judgment and take precautions to ensure that their
potential biases, the boundaries of their competence, and the limitations of their expertise do not
lead to or condone unjust practices.
 Commitment: Tutors will fulfill commitments made to students, faculty, and the program.
 Respect for Others’ Rights and Dignity: Tutors will respect the dignity and worth of all
people and the rights of individuals to privacy, confidentiality and self-determination.
 Excellence: Tutors will strive to maintain excellence by continuing to improve their skills and
to engage in applicable professional development activities.
 Respect for Individual Differences: Tutors will respect cultural, individual, and role
differences, including those based on age, sex, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national
origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language and socioeconomic status.
 Professionalism: Tutors will not engage in inappropriate relationships with the students they
serve. Tutors also will not suggest a grade for an assignment or engage in negative talk about an
instructor’s teaching methods, grading policies, assignments, or personality.
 Confidentiality: Tutors will maintain the highest privacy standards in terms of protecting
personal information relative to those they serve.
Appendix A: Mission, Goals, and Services
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX B
Usage Reports (and Satisfaction Rates) by Semester
The following tables show the WTP’s usage statistics for the last three years. Also see Appendix G.
Fall
Number of
students
Number of
visits
Hours tutored
2008
Students
615
1688
1133.47
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Other/ blank
Students
41
39
68
386
79
2
615
Spring
2009
Number of
students
Number of
visits
Hours tutored
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Other/blank
Visits
Hours
92
63.75
58
50.07
167
117.45
752
591.66
559
81.67
60
228.87
1688 1133.47
By Gender
Male
Female
305
325
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still have questions
Not satisfied
Study only
Blank
594
11
2
5
53
Students
417
By Gender
Male
Female
993
781.69
Students
24
25
29
281
57
1
417
Visits
54
36
75
558
269
1
993
Hours
43.39
25.19
72.66
403.37
236.23
0.85
781.69
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still have
questions
Not satisfied
Study only
Blank
Visits
Hours
1257 938.58
13 10.48
2
0.76
5 13.79
103 169.86
Visits
Hours
198
226
411
940
683.17
4
3
4
29
4
4
5
40
2.53
3.01
9.68
83.28
Appendix B: Usage Reports
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Summer 2009
Students
Visits
Hours
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Students
Fall
2009
Students
Visits
Hours tutored
11
34
32
3
94
Students
44
78
176
325
63
1
687
Spring
2010
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
other/blank
Visits
Hours
53
30.72
32
20.03
93
49.98
71
43.82
5
4.73
254
149.28
46
49
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
Study only
blank
93
7
2
0
4
By Gender
Male
Female
Visits
127
145
380
610
188
4
1454
Hours
109.44
104.86
279.47
437.43
211.52
4.19
1146.91
608
1254
862.15
Students
34
58
144
326
46
0
608
By Gender
Male
Female
Students
687
1454
1146.93
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
other/blank
Students
Visits
Hours tutored
Students
94
254
149.3
Visits
118
120
308
591
117
0
1254
Hours
85.81
78.07
208.66
388.86
100.73
0
862.13
Visits
241
7
2
0
4
Visits
Hours
137.8
2.54
0.95
0
8
Hours
41%
59%
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
Study only
Blank
672
20
3
6
48
By Gender
Male
Female
267
350
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
Study only
blank
597
14
4
2
52
1343
23
3
7
78
950.02
15.16
2.95
25.28
153.5
1163
15
5
2
69
715.47
11.46
3.56
0.91
130.73
Appendix B: Usage Reports
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Summer 2010
Students
Visits
Hours tutored
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Students
12
30
6
33
11
92
Fall
2010
Students
Visits
Hours Tutored
Students
76
185
133
197
83
675
Spring
2011
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Visits
21
41
11
46
23
142
Hours
10.81
20.15
4.39
21.91
24.51
81.77
Visits
185
358
286
398
188
1419
Hours
157.13
241.44
183.44
254.42
171.81
1011.96
601
1094
752.68
Students
89
151
110
200
51
601
By Gender
Male
Female
33
62
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
Study only
blank
91
1
1
0
3
Students
675
1419
1011.96
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Students
Visits
Hours tutored
Students
92
142
81.79
Visits
159
271
202
359
103
1094
Hours
131.99
184.31
125.83
235.7
74.82
752.65
By Gender
Male
Female
280
404
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
OA logout
Study only
blank
654
29
5
1
4
48
By Gender
Male
Female
261
349
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
Study/other
tutor signout
blank
592
17
4
4
9
21
Visits
137
1
1
0
2
Visits
Hours
76.55
1.72
1
0
2.5
Hours
1328
30
5
1
4
51
934.74
23.45
3.94
0.52
0.78
48.5
1047
18
4
4
10.4
21
714.68
12.01
2.4
2.58
9
21
Appendix B: Usage Reports
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Summer 2011
Students
Visits
Hours tutored
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
Students
68
154
126.21
Students
29
5
5
23
6
68
By Gender
Male
Female
Visits
59
16
11
51
17
154
Hours
45.16
11.01
9.75
43.78
16.5
126.2
534 (Plus
1053 Writing
782.69 Fellows)
661
1283
879.86
Satisfaction
Useful assist.
Still questions
Not satisfied
Blank
Fall 2011
Students
Visits
Hours tutored
By Class
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Graduate
other/blank
+Writing Fellows
# of
# of
hours
students visits
tutored
215
431
312.98
86
164
135.65
85
146
100.47
114
217
165.3
31
91
65.28
3
4
3.01
534
1053
782.69
661
1283
879.86
Hours
35
34
60
3
1
20
84
Students
By Gender*
Male
Female
Visits
128
3
1
22
154
Visits
104.02
1.17
1.01
20
126.2
Hours
205
334
Satisfaction*
Useful assist.
491
936
680.27
Still questions
20
20
13.71
Not satisfied
1
1
0.59
OA logout
21
23
27.47
Study only
1
1
0.35
blank
61
72
60.28
*Not including Writing Fellows. Beginning in Fall 2011,
Writing Fellows is measured separately in TutorTrac. See
Appendix G for satisfaction rates in this program.
Appendix B tables and usage rates continue on the next page…
Appendix B: Usage Reports
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Usage of Writing Tutoring by College, Class, and Gender
August 2008 – August 2011
College:
Arts and Sciences
Health and HS
CEAP
Fine Arts
Kimmel
Grad School
Business
Undeclared/general
Other/unidentifiable
14.8%
18.9%
17.8%
3.8%
2.9%
24.3%
10.3%
5.6%
1.4%
Compared with CAMPUS? All except A & S within 5 percentage points of full 2010 student body ratios
(http://www.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/Student_Body_Profile_FINAL_-_included_duplicated_headcount.pdf).
Class:
Fresh
Soph
Jun
Sen
Grad
Other/unknown
9.4%
11.7%
16.6%
37.0%
24.3%
1%
Gender:
Male 43%
Female 57%
(comparable to campus 2010 stats)
For information on WRITING FELLOWS usage and survey/satisfaction results,
see Appendix G.
Appendix B: Usage Reports
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX C
Organizational Chart and Permanent Position Definitions
Position Definitions and Duties:
Chesney Reich, WaLC Director. Chesney hires, trains, and supervises all student tutors
for course-specific content, Academic Skills Consultants, and WaLC Ambassadors. She maintains
the WaLC’s budget and oversees the use and allocation of resources, teaches COUN 230 (Intro to
Peer Tutoring), and provides administrative support for TutorTrac. Chesney serves on the QEP
Assessment Committee, the Registrar’s Advisory Board, and the Student Athlete Affairs Committee.
Leah Hampton, WaLC Associate Director. The WaLC’s Associate Director oversees
the WTP. Leah oversees the training and supervision of all writing tutors, conducts all in-class
writing workshops, and maintains all online mini-courses. Leah also coordinates the Writing
Fellows program, including recruitment, training, and supervision of Fellows, consultations with
faculty, teaching English 220/221, and general administration duties.
Carrie Hachadurian, Administrative Support Associate. Carrie performs office
reception duties and supervises all student office assistants; schedules student appointments; creates
tutor schedules; takes care of purchasing and monitors budgets; provides technical support for
Smarthinking and TutorTrac; and oversees open houses and orientation days.
Appendix C: Organizational Charts and Position Descriptions
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX D
Fulltime Staff Resumes/CVs
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix D: Staff Resumes
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX E
Job Descriptions for Graduate Tutors and Writing Fellows
Graduate Tutors from English Department:
Job Requirements:
Research Assistants (RAs) work 20 hours/week. RAs must have excellent written and oral
communication skill, advanced research skills, and a demonstrated interest in one-on-one teaching
and collaborative learning. RAs must be highly ethical and able to multi-task.
Training Requirements:
During their first year, Research Assistants in the English Department’s M.A. program observe a
section of English 101 in the Fall and 202 in the Spring, work 14 hours/week in the university’s
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC), and take English 514 in preparation for teaching in their
second year. Research Assistants from the English Department’s M.A. TESOL program work 20
hours/week in the WaLC and are not required to do observations or take English 514. RAs
participate in training the first week of the semester, followed by weekly meetings with the WaLC
director and/or associate director, as well as on-the-job training and mentoring. RAs are required to
follow all procedures and policies in the handbook provided by WaLC associate director.
Research Duties:
RAs collaborate with students of all class levels and majors at any stage of the writing process in
individual tutoring sessions, workshops, and online help sessions. Research duties include:
 Researching appropriate scholarship on writing program administration and applying these
methods to client sessions, workshops, and updates to WaLC research and writing tools.
 Researching appropriate pedagogical and linguistic methods and/or theory from their
coursework and applying these methods/theories to client sessions.
 Learning the styles supported by the WaLC: APA, MLA, Turabian, and AMA.
 Paying attention to plagiarism problems and teaching clients effective research methods.
 Providing meaningful feedback to students and documenting client sessions.
Educational Goals:
RAs are preparing for their second-year teaching responsibilities in composition classes and/or
elsewhere. Their hours in the WaLC and class observations give them firsthand knowledge of how
classes are taught and how to work with a variety of students. This in turn helps prepare them for a
career in teaching by:
 Strengthening their ability to read, synthesize, analyze, and communicate.
 Deepening their knowledge and understanding of variables that affect learning and teaching.
 Enhancing their ability to work independently and as a member of a team.
 Providing a forum to share scholarly and professional ideas, assignments, projects, and plans.
 Providing an opportunity to apply the methodology and theory in their discipline to real-life
interactions with students, their own research, and the WCU community.
Performance Standards:
RAs meet with the WaLC associate director to discuss responsibilities and establish performance
expectations. RAs adhere to assigned schedules and attend all staff meetings and training sessions.
The WaLC associate director conducts formal evaluations for each RA and provides appropriate
documentation of evaluation results to the RA and the graduate program director in English.
Appendix E: Job Descriptions for Tutors
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
In-House (and/or non-English) Writing Tutors:
Job Requirements:
Research Assistants (RAs) work 20 hours/week. RAs must have excellent written and oral
communication skill, advanced research skills, and a demonstrated interest in one-on-one teaching
and collaborative learning. RAs must be highly ethical and able to multi-task.
Training Requirements:
RAs participate in training the first week of the semester, followed by weekly meetings with the
WaLC director and/or associate director, as well as on-the-job training and mentoring. RAs are
required to follow all procedures and policies in the handbook provided by WaLC associate director.
Research Duties:
RAs collaborate with students of all class levels and majors at any stage of the writing process in
individual tutoring sessions, workshops, and online help sessions. Research duties include:
 Researching appropriate scholarship on writing program administration and applying these
methods to client sessions, workshops, and editorial updates to WaLC research and writing
tools.
 Researching appropriate methods and/or theory from their coursework and applying these
methods/theories to client sessions.
 Learning the documentation styles supported by the WaLC: American Psychological
Association (APA), Modern Language Association (MLA), Turabian, and American Medical
Association (AMA).
 Paying attention to plagiarism problems and teaching clients effective research and note
taking methods.
 Providing meaningful feedback to students and documenting client sessions.
Educational Goals:
RAs’ hours in the WaLC and class observations give them firsthand knowledge of how classes are
taught and how to work with a variety of students. This in turn helps prepare them for a career in
their discipline by:
 Strengthening their ability to read, synthesize, analyze, and communicate.
 Deepening their knowledge and understanding of variables that affect learning and teaching.
 Enhancing their ability to work independently and as a member of a team.
 Providing a forum to share scholarly and professional ideas, assignments, projects, and plans.
 Providing an opportunity to apply the methodology and theory in their discipline to real-life
interactions with students, their own research, and the WCU community.
Performance Standards:
RAs meet with the WaLC associate director to discuss responsibilities and establish performance
expectations. RAs adhere to assigned work schedules and attend all staff meetings and mandatory
training sessions. The WaLC director or associate director conducts formal evaluations for each RA
and provides appropriate documentation of evaluation results to the RA.
[NOTE: This job description also applies to any hourly (non-contract, non-assistantship) tutors.]
Appendix E: Job Descriptions for Tutors
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing Fellows:
Writing Fellows are carefully selected and trained peer tutors who address undergraduate writing
needs by providing focused support in classes where instructors assign at least two academic papers.
Writing Fellows are assigned to instructors who have requested assistance with responding to
student writing. Fellows work closely with 10-15 students, reading drafts of their papers; writing
thorough endnotes; and holding individual, thirty-minute conferences to discuss revision strategies.
Fellows are expected to exercise discretion, good judgment, and professionalism when addressing
the individual needs of each writer; Fellows treat their peers’ work with respect and confidentiality.
Fellows also serve as peer mentors, demonstrating strong critical thinking and communication skills.
Additional duties include classroom observations, staff meetings, and regular meetings with the
assigned faculty member. Fellows will collaborate with the Writing Center associate director, the
assigned instructor, and other Fellows.
Fellows are chosen in a highly competitive application process. Candidates must demonstrate
exceptional oral and written communication skills, intellectual curiosity, attention to detail, mature
judgment, and an interest in helping others become better writers. Fellows will be required to enroll
in two one-credit courses on the theory and practice of peer tutoring.
Positions include Senior Fellows who have completed the two training courses and will serve as peer
tutors; New Fellows who will serve as peer tutors while completing the two training courses; and
Apprentice Fellows who observe tutoring sessions and provide limited tutoring while completing the
two training courses.
Fellows are expected to:
 Attend an orientation session and pre-semester meetings, and/or staff training the first week of the semester.
 Introduce themselves to their assigned class and ensure that their contact info and program info are made available.
 Communicate regularly with the instructor to whom they are assigned and assist as needed with assignment design.
 Read student drafts closely and write thoughtful, detailed endnotes.
 Meet individually with students in half-hour sessions to discuss drafts and suggestions for revision, referring
students who need additional support to the WaLC or elsewhere.
 Attend regularly scheduled staff meetings.
 Complete the required tutor training courses (ENGL 220 & 221).
 Report any concerns (including conflicts of interest) to the instructor and/or program administrator.
 Respond promptly to messages from instructors, students, and the program administrator.
 Attend one or more class meetings to introduce the program, if schedules permit.
 Complete a thoughtful self-evaluation and reflection of the Fellowing experience.
 Adhere to all WaLC and Writing Fellows policies and procedures, as outlined in this handbook.
Fellows are not expected to:
 Proofread papers or focus solely on sentence-level errors.
 Write papers for students or engage in any form of plagiarism.
 Undermine or criticize the instructor or assignment.
 Grade student work or suggest a grade.
 Work over major holidays, such as Thanksgiving or Easter breaks.
Fellows help students communicate effectively and responsibly, one student at a time. Although a Fellow's suggestions
can help to strengthen student writing, Fellows cannot guarantee perfection or drastic improvement; it is the student’s
responsibility to act on a Fellow’s advice and work towards his/her individual writing goals.
Appendix E: Job Descriptions for Tutors
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX F
QEP and Writing, Reading, and Critical Studies Program
Rubrics and Outcomes
See Section II.A (Alignment) of the Self Study for information on how these rubrics and outcomes are used by WTP.
Quality Enhancement Plan Learning Goals and Outcomes:
Appendix F: QEP and WRCS Outcomes
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
QEP Metrarubric for Effective Communication:
Writing, Rhetoric, and Critical Studies (WRCS) Program Learning Outcomes
Students will:
 Identify and employ all stages of the writing process, individually and collaboratively, using
appropriate technologies and document design
 Identify and demonstrate clear purpose and attention to designated audience to address and
solve complex problems within and between their discourse communities
 Individually and collaboratively utilize appropriate, scholarly research processes to locate
effective resources for a defined communication purpose
 Exhibit clear, sound reasoning in their analysis and synthesis of both individual and scholarly
information
 Exhibit an understanding of the power of rhetoric as it affects diversity, public policy, and
their role as responsible citizens
Appendix F: QEP and WRCS Outcomes
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX G
Satisfaction Rates: Writing Fellows
Every semester, students in courses with Writing Fellows assigned fill out a series of surveys. The data in this
appendix gives an overview of program-wide rates of satisfaction and usage for the last three semesters. (No
quantitative data is available for semesters prior to Fall 2010.)
More detailed data is available on individual courses but is not included here to maintain brevity.
FALL 2010
Total students served:
Total courses served:
Total respondents to survey:
Survey response rate:
166
6
128
78%
Average # appts. per student: 2
Total faculty served: 7
Colleges served: 4
1. My Writing Fellow’s feedback helped me improve my papers for this class.
87% agree or strongly agree with this statement.
Total score program wide: 4.35 out of 5
2. I submitted complete drafts and made an honest effort to learn from my conferences.
95% agree or strongly agree with this statement.
Total score program wide: 4.53 out of 5
3. I noticed improvement in the following areas:
Confidence about my writing:
Citation and use of sources:
Brainstorming/getting started:
Introductions:
Conclusions:
Organization:
Grammar/mechanics:
52
42
38
42
41
70
68
(41%)
(33%)
(30%)
(33%)
(32%)
(55%)
(53%)
Argumentation/logic:
Course content/major:
Time management skills:
Style and “flow”:
Understanding of audience:
Other (unspecified):
None/ no answer:
27 (21%)
27 (21%)
17 (13%)
74 (58%)
51 (40%)
5 (4%)
3 (2%)
4. After working with a Fellow, I plan to use the Writing Center more often.
80% agree or strongly agree with this statement.
Total score program wide: 4.42 out of 5
Appendix G: Satisfaction Rates, Writing Fellows
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
SPRING 2011
Participation**
Total students served: 166
Total courses served: 6
Total respondents to survey:
Survey response rate:
Average # appts. per student: 2
Total faculty served:
7
133
80%
Colleges served:
4
1. My Writing Fellow’s feedback helped me improve my papers for this class.
86% agree or strongly agree with this statement. Total score program wide: 4.25 out of 5
2. I submitted complete drafts and made an honest effort to learn from my conferences.
95% agree or strongly agree with this statement. Total score program wide: 4.45 out of 5
3. I noticed improvement in the following areas:
Confidence about my writing:
Citation and use of sources:
Brainstorming/getting started:
Introductions:
Conclusions:
Organization:
Grammar/mechanics:
Argumentation/logic:
Course content/major:
Time management skills:
Style and “flow”:
Understanding of audience:
Process/revision strategies:
Other (unspecified):
49 (37%)
46 (35%)
29 (22%)
52 (39%)
47 (35%)
75 (56%)
69 (52%)
30 (23%)
18 (14%)
17 (13%)
85 (64%)
43 (32%)
58 (44%)
5 (4%)
4. After working with a Fellow, I plan to use the Writing Center more often.
65% agree or strongly agree with this statement. Total score program wide: 3.81 out of 5
**TutorTrac measurements; numbers may be inaccurate due to issues with Writing Center sign-in computers.
Appendix G: Satisfaction Rates, Writing Fellows
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
FALL 2011
Participation
Total students served:
127
Average # appts. per student: 2
Average appt. time:
23 minutes
Total courses served: 4
Total faculty served: 5
Colleges served: 2
Total respondents to survey: 111
Survey response rate:
87%
1. My Writing Fellow’s feedback helped me improve my papers for this class.
86% agree or strongly agree with this statement.
Total score:
4.3 out of 5
2. I submitted complete drafts and made an honest effort to learn from my conferences.
90% agree or strongly agree with this statement.
Total score :
4.43 out of 5
3. I noticed improvement in the following areas:
Confidence about my writing:
Citation and use of sources:
Brainstorming/getting started:
Introductions:
Conclusions:
Organization:
Grammar/mechanics:
Argumentation/logic:
Course content/major:
Time management skills:
Style and ―flow‖:
Understanding of audience:
Process/revision strategies:
Other (unspecified):
43
76
24
36
35
63
53
19
13
10
36
39
43
5
(39%)
(68%)
(22%)
(32%)
(32%)
(57%)
(48%)
(17%)
(12%)
(9%)
(32%)
(35%)
(39%)
(4%)
4. After working with a Fellow, I plan to use the Writing Center more often.
59.4% agree or strongly agree with this statement. Total score:
3.73 out of 5
See Appendix B for usage and client satisfaction rates of in-house writing tutoring.
Appendix G: Satisfaction Rates, Writing Fellows
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX H
Policies and Appointments
Policies:
All WCU students are expected to comply with University Policies and the Code of Student
Conduct. Additionally, to ensure orderly and effective services for our students, we expect all
participants to familiarize themselves with the following WaLC policies. Non compliance with any
of these may result in dismissal from a tutoring session and/or loss of tutoring privileges.
Active participation:
We expect students to be active participants in the learning process. The WaLC’s services are
intended to supplement class instruction but not to replace missed class content. Tutors will not
write your papers for you, complete your homework assignments, or re-lecture material that you
missed because of absences from class. Students who participate in tutoring to earn extra credit for a
class also are required to comply with this policy. Students are not allowed to log in to TutorTrac
unless they are actively engaged in a tutoring session, and students may not drop-off papers and
expect them to be assessed without a corresponding in-person appointment.
What to bring to your writing appointment:
 Assignment sheet or the requirements for your paper
 Two hard copies of your paper or one hard copy and your laptop. If you’ve e-mailed your
paper and assignment in advance, you need to bring only one hard copy or your laptop.
 A list of issues you would like to address in the session. Visit our Evaluating Your Own
Writing page to help you determine what you’d like to work on during your session.
Disruptive Behavior:
Any behavior that disrupts or obstructs the learning process will not be tolerated. Possible examples
of disruptive behavior include but are not limited to: excessive complaints about the class or
professor, repeated interruptions, and inappropriate use of computers or other electronic devices.
Cell Phone Use:
Cell phone use is prohibited in the WaLC. If you are expecting an important call, please notify your
tutor before your session begins; then, set your phone to vibrate and excuse yourself from the center
before you answer a call.
Use of WaLC Facility and Materials:
WaLC tutors are required to conduct their tutoring sessions in the WaLC (30 Hunter Library) during
standard hours of operation. Students who schedule appointments during the last hour of the day
are expected to conclude their business, log out of TutorTrac, and exit the Center at closing time.
Students and tutors will receive a ten-minute warning before the center closes. Tutoring sessions
that take place outside of the WaLC without prior approval by the Director will not be logged in
TutorTrac and will not be counted as WaLC-sanctioned tutoring sessions.
Course textbooks, computers, and other materials housed in the WaLC are intended for tutors’ use
and may not be removed. Students are permitted to use these materials only if they are engaged in a
session with a tutor who determines that these materials are necessary for the session.
Appendix H: Policies
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appointment Scheduling:
Writing Appointments:
 Making an appointment will guarantee you a collaborative session with a graduate tutor.
 Students are strongly advised to make appointments in advance. Drop-ins are granted on a
case-by-case basis, based on tutor availability and other factors.
 Distance students are eligible for tutoring appointments, but precedence is given to resident
students.
 To schedule a writing appointment, call 828-227-7197. Our receptionist will ask you a series
of questions that will allow us to schedule your appointment for an appropriate amount of
time and with a tutor who can address your needs. Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to
revise your paper after your appointment. Your tutor can make a recommendation about
revision plans.
 If your paper is more than six pages long (double-spaced), you will need to submit your
paper in advance. Follow the instructions provided by the WaLC receptionist. If we do not
receive your paper in time for your tutor to read it, your appointment will be cancelled.
Appointment Attendance:
WaLC tutors are students, too, and they have busy schedules! Please respect their time: keep your
appointments; show up on time; and come prepared with all necessary materials (see Active
Participation policy). Students who repeatedly miss or arrive late for appointments may lose their
tutoring privileges (see Appointment Cancellation Policy for more information).
Appointment Cancellations:
 To cancel a Writing appointment, call 828-227-7197.
 If you are unable to keep a scheduled appointment and you do not cancel the appointment
in advance, your appointment will be labeled ―missed.‖ After three ―missed‖ appointments,
you will not be allowed to schedule future appointments until you have visited the WaLC to
speak with the Director.
What to bring to your writing appointment:
 Assignment sheet or the requirements for your paper
 Two hard copies of your paper or one hard copy and your laptop. If you’ve e-mailed your
paper and assignment in advance, you need to bring only one hard copy or your laptop.
 A list of issues you would like to address in the session. Visit our Evaluating Your Own
Writing page to help you determine what you’d like to work on during your session.
Writing Tutoring FAQs for Students:
Q. Does my paper have to be finished before I come in?
A. No, you can visit us during any stage of the writing process. Sometimes it's even more helpful to
come before you begin. For any visit, always bring your assignment instructions. Tutors can assist
you with brainstorming for ideas, organizing thoughts, and formulating a thesis. These appointments
are collaborative in nature and often get writers off to an enthusiastic and productive start.
Appendix H: Policies
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Q. Do I need to make an appointment?
A. Yes, we prefer that you schedule a time to come in. When you schedule an appointment, your
tutor will be more prepared and able to help you. However, if you need help at any time, drop by. We
will make every effort to assist you.
Q. What if I can't keep an appointment?
A. If something comes up, call us at 227-7197 to reschedule or cancel so we can offer your
appointment time to another student.
Q. May I drop my paper off and pick it up later?
A. No, students must be present to work with a tutor. We do not provide copy-editing services; our
sessions are interactive and collaborative.
Q. How much of my paper will a tutor write?
A. Tutors will ONLY make suggestions about how to resolve any issues in your paper. Larger issues
include a writer's thesis, organization, and evidence. Smaller, fine-tuning issues include sentence
structure, word choice, grammar, and punctuation. It's up to you, the student, to understand the
tutor's suggestions and to revise your paper based on your new understanding. Ask questions and
make notes for yourself for later. The more a tutor knows what you're thinking, the more helpful the
tutor can be.
Q. Will I have my ideas criticized or my paper edited to shreds?
A. No, tutors strive to be positive and help you improve as a writer. We want you to enjoy both the
writing process and your time here. Your tutor will make sure your ideas and questions come first.
Q. Will revising my paper based on a tutor's suggestions guarantee me an A?
A. No, a tutor's suggestions can only help to strengthen the paper, not perfect it. Tutors cannot
grade (or influence how your professor grades) your paper.
Q. What if my experience at the Writing Center isn't positive?
A. Just as students have different personalities and working styles, so do tutors. We value our
diversity as a staff and recognize that not all students will connect well with every tutor. If your
experience is neither pleasant nor helpful, please contact Leah Hampton at 227-3426 or
at [email protected] She will try to connect you with a more compatible tutor for your next visit.
Q. I would like to be a writing tutor. What positions are offered?
A. All our writing tutors are students at WCU. Graduate assistants provide one-on-one tutoring in
the center, while undergraduate students work in the Writing Fellows program. If you are interested
in applying for a graduate assistantship, please contact Leah Hampton (828-227-3426;
mailto:[email protected]). To become a Writing Fellow, follow the link above to our
program information page.
Appendix H: Policies
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX I
Faculty Services and Workshop Descriptions
Services:
The following services are available to all instructors, including graduate TAs:
 Weekly TutorTrac reports listing details of any students who have come to the WaLC for
tutoring
 An online ―Faculty Toolbox‖ with tips on designing and grading writing assignments, antiplagiarism resources, and links to all our online mini-courses and tutorials (see Sitemap in
Appendix M)
 One-on-one consultations and assignment reviews with the WaLC Associate Director
 Writing Fellows program
 In-class workshops led by a member of WaLC staff (see below)
Workshop Descriptions:
The following writing workshops are offered to any instructor, and can be tailored upon request to
fit a specific requirement or student population.
Walk the WaLC: Using Campus Resources to Maximize Your Success
Do your students believe tutoring services are only for students who are struggling academically? This
workshop shatters the remedial stigma associated with tutoring and helps students define realistic
expectations for services offered by the Writing and Learning Commons and the Math Tutoring Center.
Top 10 Grammar Mistakes in College Papers
A rundown of comma rules, homonym tips, and common style and grammatical problems.
Tackling the ___________________________
(Insert any assignment type, e.g. book review, research paper, annotated bibliography) A tailor-made workshop to assist
students with planning, revising, and editing specific types of writing projects.
Raising Your Game: Rules for Writing in College
Recommended for first-year transition courses, this workshop helps students understand the rhetorical
situations of the college classroom, introduces them to academic writing, and explains some of the differences
between high school and college papers.
Avoiding Plagiarism
Information on research methods, crediting authors, and summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting effectively.
Peer Review Workshop
WaLC staff can lead your students in a peer editing session, with tips and strategies for being and learning
from a ―second pair of eyes.‖
Research and Documentation (MLA, APA, AMA, or Turabian)
Any style, at any level, from freshman to graduate. WaLC staff can go over the brass tacks of simple citation,
the theory behind and approach to advanced research in a given discipline, and/or anything in between.
Appendix I: Faculty Services
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX J
Online Services: Meebo and Smarthinking Information, Usage
Smarthinking
For students who cannot attend tutoring sessions in the WaLC, tutoring support is available through
Smarthinking, a free, online academic tutoring service for subject areas and writing. Students can
also use the WaLC's online writing resources and learning resources (see Appendix M).
The Writing and Learning Commons, Office of the Provost, and Educational Outreach sponsor
Smarthinking online academic support in the following disciplines: Math, Bilingual Math, Biology,
Intro Human A&P, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physics, Economics, Accounting,
Introduction to Finance, Statistics, Spanish, Nursing, Allied Health, and Writing. Smarthinking is
not available to residential students who have ready access to the on-campus Writing and Learning
Commons and the WCU Math Tutoring Center.
Smarthinking tutors hold Masters or PhD degrees in the subject areas for which they provide
support. They undergo extensive training and on-going professional development.
All distance education and Asheville program students have been pre-registered by Smarthinking.
Students can receive feedback on any aspect of academic writing, including help with organization,
idea development, documentation, writing style, punctuation, and grammar. Nursing and Allied
Health students can submit essays by choosing Nursing or Allied Health essays from the Submit
Your Writing drop-down menu.
Smarthinking Usage Report for 2011:
[continued on the next page…]
Appendix J: Online Services
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Meebo Chat Line
The WaLC began a pilot of an online chat line for quick writing queries in the Fall of 2011.
Faculty, staff, students, and members of the public can go to http://www.wcu.edu/29407.asp to
access our chat line and ask a question. Instructions are provided on this page. Graduate writing
tutors take turns monitoring the chat line, which currently operates Sunday thru Thursday.
The Fall 2011 pilot included only a very small number of queries from students, but hours were
limited due to WTP staffing issues. Further, the service has only recently been advertised to the
student body and the faculty, so we anticipate an increase in usage in future semesters.
Appendix J: Online Services
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX K
NSSE and the Consortium for the Study of Writing in College:
Survey Means Comparisons (Writing Portion)
Results from the CSWC portion of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) are reprinted below.
See Section III. B of the Self Study for more information on these studies.
Note that WCU scores well above the mean (indicated by the “***”) on several key areas of writing and revision.
Appendix K: NSSE and CSWC
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
WCU
CSWC
Carnegie Class NSSE 2009
Appendix K: NSSE and CSWC
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX L
Writing Fellows: Program Information and Forms
See Appendix E for Writing Fellows job description.
The Western Carolina University Writing Fellows program—the first of its kind in the UNC
system— provides focused, course-specific support for undergraduate writing. It supports the QEP
by helping students learn to communicate effectively and responsibly.
Peer tutors, called Fellows, are hired by the Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC). Fellows are
trained to work with students on their writing, and assigned to one course. Each Fellow works
closely with 10 to 15 students on the writing assignments in that class. Fellows read drafts of each
paper, write thorough endnotes, and conference with each student to develop revision strategies.
Fellows also meet with the instructor occasionally to discuss assignments and requirements.
Once students have worked with their Fellow, they revise their papers before submitting a final draft
to the instructor. The instructor then grades the final draft. Instructors have access to all student
drafts and Fellows’ comments.
The Writing Fellows Program began in 2007 and works with a wide variety of majors and
departments, providing an additional level of one-on-one support and facilitating the revision
process for many students across campus.
Writing Fellows are talented undergraduates with a passion for writing and helping others. The
WCU Writing Fellows Program encourages a university-wide writing culture, promotes collaborative
learning, complements existing WaLC services, and empowers students to become intentional,
effective writers.
Applications for faculty and student participants appear on the next page(s)….
Appendix L: Writing Fellows Program Info
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix L: Writing Fellows Program Info
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix L: Writing Fellows Program Info
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Appendix L: Writing Fellows Program Info
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX M
Website: Sitemap, Resource List, and Usage Rates/Analytics
WaLC SITEMAP
HOME
1. WaLC FAQs
2. About the WaLC [mission]
A. Ethics
3. Student Employment Opportunities
A. Course Tutor Responsibilities and Qualifications
i. apply for a position
--application tips
ii.learning outcomes for tutors
iii. Tutor certification
B. ASC resp. and quals
i. learning outcomes for ASCs
C. OA resp. and quals
i. learning outcomes for OAs
4. Contact the WaLC
5. Appointments
A. Policies
6. Hours
7. Chat with a Writing Tutor
8. For Distance Students
9. Course Tutoring
A. Meet the ASC’s
B. What to Expect from Course Tutoring
C. Learning resources
(includes multiple children)
10. Faculty Tools
A. Workshops and visits
B. FAQ’s for Faculty
C. Subject tutors for your course
i. instructor agreement
ii. recommend a tutor
iii. syllabus statement
iv. tutor expectations
D. Teaching Writing and Resarch
i. plagiarism resources (+ children)
ii. designing assignments
iii. help with grading papers
iv. process vs. product
v. where to go for help
vi. special info for distance ed
vii. Writing Fellows
E. Special info for Thesis Directors
11. Writing Assistance
A. Research and Documentation
i. APA
ii. MLA
iii. AMA
Appendix M: Website
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
iv. Turabian
v. Helpful links and other formats
vi. Plagiarism Help and general citation rules
vii. Summarizing, Paraphrasing, and Quoting
B. Grammar Help
C. Tackling Different Types of Papers (examples, outlines, and strategies)
i. essay tests
ii. outlining
iii. Thesis statements
iv. Research papers (+ children)
v. Abstracts
vi. Annotated bibliographies
vii. book reviews
viii. theatre reviews
ix. lab reports
x. lit papers (+ children)
xi. lit reviews
xii. management briefcase
xiii. Transition from High School to College
D. Writing in the Disciplines
(Includes multiple children)
E. Special Info for GRAD Students
i. Theses and dissertations
ii. Helpful links and resources
iii. Writing in grad school: how is it different?
iv. How we can help
v. Special tips for grad school applications
F. Writing Appointment FAQs
Minicourses
(Available online or in hard copy on the WaLC’s resource cart.)










APA
MLA
Turabian
AMA
Avoiding Plagiarism
A Good Blueprint for Any Paper
Writing as a Process
Writing a Lab Report
Writing a Film/Book Review
Writing a Theatre Review







Writing an Annotated
Bibliography
Compiling a Management
Briefcase
Transitions
Editing for fragments, run-ons
and commas
Finishing touches
Better reading strategies
Outlining
Usage Rates
Average number of hits per month, Fall 2011: 2,100
Most popular pages: Plagiarism Self Test, Plagiarism Resources, APA Guidelines, Home
Page, How To Make An Appointment, and Research and Documentation
Appendix M: Website
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX N
Additional Training Materials:
Syllabi for English 220 and 221, Graduate Staff Meeting Topics
English 220 and 221 are the training courses for Writing Fellows. Both are worth one credit hour.
SYLLABUS
ENGL 220.70: Introduction to Writing Fellows
Tuesday 3:35 – 4:25, Coulter 202
Instructor: Leah Hampton email: [email protected] Phone: 227-3426 Office: Hunter 30 (in the WaLC)
Course objectives.
Congratulations on your Writing Fellows appointment! Over the course of the semester, we will be exploring the theory
and practice of curriculum-based writing tutoring. The purpose of this class is threefold: to provide practical strategies to
prepare you for your work as a Fellow, to hone your critical thinking and writing skills, and to introduce you to writing
center and composition scholarship. We will also review grammar and punctuation basics, but nota bene: as a Writing
Fellow you will never act simply as a proofreader or copy editor. Rather, you will always engage with the substance of
the paper, its overall development, argument, and form.
We will address standards of professional conduct, including responding to student writing, holding conferences,
documenting services, interpreting assignments, and collaborating with faculty.
Texts and Materials.
All the texts below are required and available from the Writing Center library:
 The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, Leigh Ryan and Lisa Zimmerelli
 What the Writing Tutor Needs to Know, Margot Soven
 The Elements of Style, Strunk and White
 The Writing Fellows Handbook
In addition, you will need: a couple of writing samples of your own work, course materials (syllabus, etc.) from your
assigned class (if applicable), and a good dictionary/thesaurus.
Attendance and Participation.*
Both attendance and attentiveness are essential for successful completion of the course. You are expected to complete
all reading assignments and report to class prepared and on time. Any unavoidable absence (emergency, serious illness,
death in the immediate family) should be brought to my attention as soon as possible. This course follows WCU
guidelines for attendance and excused absences; see your Student Handbook for more information. Chronic absences
and/or lack of participation may result in dismissal from the Writing Fellows Program.
Evaluation and Grading Criteria.
Class participation/readings:
40%
Please come to class on time, prepared, and ready to learn. This is a discussion-based class; you will be
expected to participate regularly. Always bring the scheduled reading with you.
Compliance with job responsibilities: 20%
While I cannot ―grade‖ you on your job, part of this course includes record keeping and maintenance of your
Fellow responsibilities. You should consider your Fellows duties as an outside ―project‖ in this course. This
―project‖ will provide you with examples and a frame of reference for the course content taught here. Thus, in
order to succeed in this course, you are expected to adhere to the terms of the Fellows contract, maintain
accurate records, and respond professionally and promptly to emails/calls from me, WaLC staff, the instructor
to whom you are assigned, and the students you are Fellowing.
Appendix N: Addt’l Training Materials
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Semester Project:
30%
You will abstract and review two articles on WPA, WAC, or CBPT. Details will be provided soon.
Final project:
10%
Your final project will be a reflection on your role as a Fellow. Details will be provided at the end of the
semester.
Assessment is on the following scale:
A+ = 98 – 100; A = 92 – 97; A- = 90 – 91; B+ = 88 – 89; B = 82 – 87; B- = 80 – 81; C+ = 78 – 79; C = 72 – 77; C- =
70 – 71; D+ = 68 – 69; D = 62 – 67; D- = 60 – 61; F = below 60.
Protocol.
Please be attentive, prepared, and courteous during class discussions. Some specific guidelines:
 Turn off cell phones during class time. No texting.
 When possible, please make a circle with the desks/chairs before class. Move desks back after class.
 Feel free to make minor adjustments to our environment (lights, blinds, thermostat, etc.) so that you are comfortable and able
to focus. You do not need permission for this.
 Check your email regularly, according to University policy.*
Questions?
In many ways, this class is your ―answer center.‖ If you have concerns or queries about any aspect of your Fellowship,
course content, or just general best practices for interacting with students and faculty, this is the place to raise them. We
are all learning together, and as any good peer reviewer knows, the person who asks the question is sometimes the
bravest and smartest one in the room!
Accommodations for Students with Disabilities*: Western Carolina University is committed to providing equal educational opportunities for
students with documented disabilities. Students who require reasonable accommodations must identify themselves as having a disability and
provide current diagnostic documentation to Disability Services. All information is confidential. Please contact Disability Services for more
information at (828) 227-2716 or 144 Killian Annex. You can also visit the office’s website: http://www.wcu.edu/12789.asp
*For further details on this and all university policies, consult the WCU Undergraduate Catalog or The Student Handbook. This course
adheres to and is governed by all WCU rules and regulations.
Course Outline
Due to the collaborative nature of this course, we may modify this schedule. You are responsible for noting any changes
to the syllabus and being prepared for the day’s assignment.
Week One (8/23): Course introduction, review syllabus
 Sign contracts, distribute texts and handbook, and design class introductions.
 Some background on CBPT and other acronyms
 Discuss the introduction to Soven
 If you are struggling in the first few weeks, chapters 3, 4, and 5 of BOTH texts offer a lot of help.
Week Two (8/30): Nuts and Bolts
Week Three (9/6):
 READ: Soven ―Where We Tutor, How We Tutor‖ and the Writing Fellows Handbook.
 Discuss Bedford ―Inside the Tutoring Session‖ and your role as a Fellow.
 Assignment: Bring one of your own academic papers—one that has already been graded, and preferably one
that has the instructor’s comments written on it.
 FERPA quiz!
Week Four (9/13): Fellows’ Golden Rule: If you can’t say something nice…
 Discussion/Calibration exercise: analyze and respond to sample student paper.
Appendix N: Addt’l Training Materials
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
 READ: Soven, ―The Writing Process of College Students.‖
Week Five (9/20)
 Punctuation and Grammar Inventory, discuss Soven reading
 READ: Soven ―How to Conference and Write Comments‖
 Passive voice, second person, homonyms, punctuation…
 Boundaries? What if your students are not doing well?
Week Six (9/27)
 READ: WaLC’s website resources on documentation and plagiarism
 Discuss WaLC documentation mini-courses for APA, MLA, and website
 Discuss/assign Semester Project
Week Seven (10/4)
 Discuss first Fellowing experiences (grammar make up…)
Week Eight (10/11)
 Attend a tutoring session with a graduate student in the WaLC by this week
 A senior Fellow visits…
Week Nine (10/18): Fall Break—no class. 
Week Ten (10/25)
 Bedford ―Coping with Difficult Tutoring Sessions‖
 Leftover citation and grammar issues
Week Eleven (11/1):
 Bedford ―Helping Writers Across the Curriculum‖
Week Twelve (11/8): Reflect, rant.
 Sign up for Individual conferences with Leah. Review recordkeeping and comments.
 SEMESTER PROJECTS DUE. Discuss in class!!
Week Thirteen (11/15)
 Discuss/assign Final Exam/project
 READ: TBA
Week Fourteen (11/22): Thanksgiving Break… class does not meet.
Week Fifteen (11/29)
 READ: TBA
 Discuss end-of-class procedures, assessments
Week Sixteen (12/6): Loose Ends and Reflection
 Evaluations, discuss topics for 221 next semester.
 Discuss final exam
 Return UWC texts
Finals Week
 Work on final exams; consult with Leah as needed. Due by 12:00pm on December 15th.
Appendix N: Addt’l Training Materials
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
SYLLABUS
ENGL 221.70: Advanced Leadership for Writing Fellows
Tuesday 4:00 – 4:50; Coulter 202
Instructor: Leah Hampton email: [email protected] Phone: 227-3426 Office: Hunter 30-A
Course objectives.
This course will build on the material you learned in English 220. We will explore in depth the theory and practice of
curriculum-based writing tutoring.
By the end of this semester, you will have:
 developed practical strategies to prepare you for being a Senior Fellow next year;
 sharpened your critical thinking, research, and writing skills;
 read and discussed at least two different theoretical approaches to writing tutoring;
 experienced some of the formats/styles used in discipline-specific writing and research; and
 gained a background in the ethics and logistics of working with students in higher education.
We will also review some grammar and punctuation, and you will have the opportunity to TEACH a class meeting.
Texts and Materials.
All the texts below are required and available from the Writing Center library:
 The St. Martin’s Sourcebook for Writing Tutors, Third Edition
 Strunk and White’s Elements of Style, Illustrated 4th edition
 The Writing Fellows Handbook
In addition, you will need: a couple of writing samples of your own work, course materials (syllabus, etc.) from your
assigned class, regular access to catamount email AND the WaLC’s website, and a good dictionary/thesaurus.
Attendance and Participation.*
Attendance and attentiveness are essential for successful completion of this course. You are expected to complete all
reading assignments and report to class prepared and on time. Any unavoidable absence (emergency, serious illness,
death in the immediate family) should be brought to my attention as soon as possible. This course follows WCU
guidelines for attendance and excused absences; see your Student Handbook for more information. Chronic absences
and/or lack of participation may result in dismissal from the Writing Fellows Program.
Evaluation and Grading Criteria.
Class participation/readings:
40%
Please come to class on time, prepared, and ready to learn. This is a discussion-based class; you will be
expected to DO THE READING and participate regularly. Always bring the scheduled reading with you.
Compliance with job responsibilities: 20%
While I cannot ―grade‖ you on your job, part of this course includes record keeping and maintenance of your
Fellow responsibilities. You should consider your Fellows duties as an outside ―project‖ in this course. This
―project‖ will provide you with examples and a frame of reference for the course content taught here. Thus, in
order to succeed in this course, you are expected to adhere to the terms of your Fellows contract, maintain
accurate records, and respond professionally and promptly to emails/calls from me, WaLC staff, the instructor
to whom you are assigned, and the students you work with.
Class Instruction:
20%
You will lead at least one class discussion on the issues listed in the course schedule. See below for more
details.
Final project:
10%
Your final project will be a revision of part of the Writing Center’s website.
Assessment is on the following scale:
A+ = 98 – 100; A = 92 – 97; A- = 90 – 91; B+ = 88 – 89; B = 82 – 87; B- = 80 – 81; C+ = 78 – 79; C = 72 – 77; C- =
70 – 71; D+ = 68 – 69; D = 62 – 67; D- = 60 – 61; F = below 60.
Appendix N: Addt’l Training Materials
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Protocol.
Please be attentive, prepared, and courteous during class discussions. Some specific guidelines:
 Turn off cell phones during class time. No texting.
 When possible, please make a circle with the desks/chairs before class. Move desks back after class.
 Feel free to make minor adjustments to our environment (lights, blinds, thermostat, etc.) so that you are comfortable and able
to focus. You do not need permission for this.
 Check your email regularly, according to University policy.*
Questions?
In many ways, this class is your ―answer center.‖ If you have concerns or queries about any aspect of your Fellowship,
course content, or just general best practices for interacting with students and faculty, this is the place to raise them. We
are all learning together, and as any good peer reviewer knows, the person who asks the question is sometimes the
bravest and smartest one in the room!
Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Western Carolina University is committed to providing equal educational
opportunities for students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. Students who require reasonable
accommodations must identify themselves as having a disability and/or medical condition and provide current diagnostic
documentation to Disability Services. All information is confidential. Please contact the Office of Disability Services for more
information at (828) 227-3886 or [email protected] You may also visit the office’s website: disability.wcu.edu
*For further details on this and all university policies, consult the WCU Undergraduate Catalog or The Student Handbook.
This course adheres to and is governed by all WCU rules and regulations.
TRAINING FOR GRADUATE TUTORS
Training for graduate tutors takes place via observations, staff meetings, readings, and other
activities.
General topics for the first/fall semester of a graduate assistantship in the WaLC are
discussed in the beginning of the Graduate Tutor Handbook (see Additional Materials Attachment to
this Self Study/Appendix.)
Topics for tutors’ second/spring semester include university governance, administrative
issues for writing centers, and information on how to transfer their tutoring practice into classroom
practice, should they decide to pursue a teaching career.
Appendix N: Addt’l Training Materials
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX O
Peer Institution Comparisons
A survey of peer institutions was conducted in December 2011. Results are below.
NA = “no answer.” Answers from James Madison University, an aspirant school, are marked with an asterisk.
1. Enrollment
Western Carolina University
Eastern Illinois University
James Madison University *
Kennesaw State University
Plymouth State University
St. Cloud State University
Western Illinois University
Winona State University
Undergraduate
7,450
10,200
17,900
21,840
4,300
15,536
10,000
8,000
Graduate
1,979
1,800
1,822
2,160
2,700
1,695
1,600
NA
Location
Cullowhee, NC
Charleston, IL
Harrisonburg, VA
Kennesaw, GA
Plymouth, NH
St. Cloud, MN
Macomb, IL
Winona, MN
2. Hours of Operation
Western Carolina
University
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Hours of operation
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (M-TH)
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (F)
7 to 9 p.m. (Sun-W online chat only)
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 6 to 9 p.m. (M-TH)
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (F)
Wilson Hall: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (M-TH); 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m. (F)
Libraries: 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. (Sun-W)
Online: by appointment only
9 a.m. to 8 p.m. (M-TH)
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (F)
1 to 5 p.m. (Sun)
9 a.m. – 9 p.m. (M-W)
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. (TH-F)
6 – 9 p.m. (Sun)
Jan. term = 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Main location: 9 to 7 (M and W)
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (T and TH)
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (F) Noon to 5 p.m. (Sun)
Library – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (M-TH)
Simpkins Hall: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (M-F)
Library: 6 to 9 p.m. (M-TH); 6 to 8 (Sunday)
Res Halls (2): 6 to 9 p.m. (Sun-TH)
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (M-TH)
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (F)
Summer hours of operation
1 to 7 p.m. (M-TH)
1 to 5 p.m. (F) June through first
week of August
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. mid June to
early July; mid July to early Aug.
NA
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (M-TH)
Closed June
Half time mid-July to midAugust
Full time mid-August to start of
term (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (M-TH) for 15
weeks
12 hours per week for 11 weeks.
Not open
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
3. Mission
Western Carolina U
Eastern Illinois U
James Madison U*
Kennesaw State U
Plymouth State U
St. Cloud State U
Western Illinois U
Winona State U
The Writing and Learning Commons seeks to enhance the academic environment
and raise the level of academic discourse at Western Carolina University by
providing tutoring, academic skills consultations, workshops, online learning
resources, and faculty consultations.
The Writing Center of Eastern Illinois University is a place where students can
develop as independent writers and thinkers. We recognize that student writers
come to the center with individual needs and individual writing processes, and
we are committed to working with students from all disciplines, majors, and
academic backgrounds at any stage of the writing process.
We create access for all students to learning opportunities
that foster personal transformation and academic achievement.
The Kennesaw State University Writing Center strives to promote excellence in
writing across the university community. In the Writing Center, writers from all
disciplines and at all levels of ability learn how to improve their writing and their
writing processes through one-on-one instruction and group workshops. The
Writing Center serves faculty by supporting writing across the curriculum,
encouraging the processes of peer review and revision, and serving as a resource
center for the practical and theoretical aspects of composition and rhetoric.
The Writing Center is staffed by a diverse group of students and professionals
from various disciplines. We help all writers at any stage of the writing process,
whether brainstorming ideas, creating outlines, reviewing a draft or partial draft,
responding to professors’ comments, checking mechanics and grammar, or citing
sources. We work with writers of all levels, and we strive be friendly and
supportive at all times.
We serve all members of the PSU community: undergraduates, graduates,
faculty, and staff. We also provide outreach to members of the non-PSU local
community.
To maintain a fundamental philosophy of collaboration and inclusion. Within
this core philosophy, to offer individualized help and encourage independence in
all writers who use the center, respecting the writers’ authority and ownership of
their own written work.
To offer its graduate and undergraduate student staff a venue for professional
development, primarily, supporting their individualized development as effective
peer consultants.
To respond to SCSU community writing needs in a timely, creative, and ethical
manner to promote excellence in scholarship on all levels.
The mission of the University Writing Center, which serves the Macomb and
Quad Cities campuses, is to offer students at any academic level collaborative,
one-on-one consultation on writing projects from any discipline at any point in
the writing process.
The Writing Center offers WSU students free, individualized instruction in all
aspects of writing. The mission of the Writing Center is to help students in all
disciplines use writing as an effective tool for learning, communication, selfexpression, and critical thinking. To this end, staff in the Writing Center work
closely with students, faculty, and administrators to help students become
capable, successful writers
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
4. Learning Outcomes?
Western Carolina University
Eastern Illinois University
James Madison University*
Kennesaw State University
Plymouth State University
St. Cloud State University
Western Illinois University
Winona State University
In development
Not overall learning outcomes, no
NA
No
NA
We don’t have them or use them.
No
No
5. How is your center situated within the university? To whom do you report?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Provost’s Office/Academic Affairs  VC for Undergraduate Studies  WaLC.
We are not officially affiliated with any academic department, and fulltime staff do
not carry faculty loads or responsibilities.
The WC is funded by the English department and staffed exclusively by graduate
assistants in English. Though situated in the English department, we provide
annual reports to the Provost’s Office, the Deans of the four colleges, the English
department chair. As Director, I also serve on the Committee for the Assessment of
Student Learning and on the Committee of Retention Efforts.
NA
Physically, we are located in the English building. Until about three years ago, we
technically reported to the English department chair, although we were not funded
through the department (but rather through the dean of Humanities and Social
Sciences). Now we report directly to our dean.
Our center is located in the Lamson Learning Commons (a building previously
known as Lamson Library). The writing center director reports to the Dean of
Library & Academic Support Services.
We are in the English Dept.; however, I report to the Dean of the College of
Liberal Arts.
housed in the Department of English and Journalism. I report to the chair.
The Director is a member of the English Dept. and works with the Chair of the
English Dept. and the Dean of the College of Arts and Letters.
6. What is your organizational structure?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
3 fulltime staff: Director (non-faculty EPA), Associate Director (non-faculty
EPA), and Administrative Assistant (SPA).
We have a Director and Assistant Director. Both are tenure-track faculty. We earn
reassigned time for our duties. We teach the Writing Center Theory and Practice
course (ENG 5500) in the fall together and then teach two sections of courses other
than 5500. In the spring, we both teach two courses typically. I also serve as the
Director of WAC.
NA
Director (tenured Associate Professor; 2/2 course release (3:3 is typical load), 12month appointment; renewable every five years )
Assistant Director (Lecturer (non-tenured but full-time, permanent faculty with 5:4
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
load); 4:3 course release; 12-month appointment
Coordinator (Staff position; full-time; this is a brand new position for the Center
starting this month)
Tutoring staff: Graduate and undergraduate student assistants (paid hourly);
graduate teaching assistants (work in Center in first year of three-year
assistantship); one part-time faculty member who teaches in Center for 10 hours
per week as the equivalent of teaching one class. We also employ a few alums
(former student assistants) who work in the Center hourly either as a supplement to
or while they look for full-time jobs.
The director is an 86% position; the asst director is part-time hourly and no
benefits. She works twelve hours each week. We also have a graduate writing
assistant who works 15 hours/week. He works with both graduate and
undergraduate writers, although he’s funded exclusively through the College of
Graduate Studies. (The Graduate Writing Assistant position has existed at PSU for
probably twelve years, but it wasn’t until last year that the position was moved to
the WC with supervision by the WC director. Having this extra person is
enormously helpful.) We have twelve undergraduate writing consultants who work
between five and ten hours weekly. Four staff members are paid by tuition
reduction for talent grants and one is paid by tuition reduction for a fellowship
Director (2/3 faculty reassignment to the writing center).
2 assistant directors (2nd year grad assistants—20 hours per week)
13 Graduate Assistant writing consultants—20 hours per week
13 Undergraduate writing consultants—3 to 20 hours per week
4-5 reception and clerical staff—3 to 20 hours per week
Director is a tenure-track faculty member on 50% teaching load. The writing
center has one ½ time secretary, 14 graduate assistantships (8 funded by English
and Journalism, 4 by FYE, and 2 by University Advising and Academic Support
Services), 4 undergraduate writing consultants (2 by E & J and 2 by FYE), and 4
receptionists funded by federal work study.
We are staffed by a Director who receives some reassigned time, graduate teaching
assistants and advanced undergraduates who receive internship credits.
7. Any FT staff engaged in significant University work outside your center?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
No. Both director and associate director are staff positions, though both do teach
one class per semester.
See answers 5 and 6
NA
The director also teaches in the graduate program and coordinates the English
department TA program and serves as Associate Director of the College’s WAC
program (these just happen to be additional things I do; they are not a part of my
WC role). The asst director teaches one first-year comp course each semester.
The director is the only full-time staff member and occasionally will teach a
course as an adjunct, for which she is compensated separately from her WC
salary.
The director teaches 1/3 time and directs the writing center 2/3 time
Just the director, who is on a 50% teaching load.
Yes, the Director teaches a 2/3 load.
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
8. Does your institution have a tutoring center? If so, what is your relationship to it?
Western Carolina
The Writing and Learning Commons contains both a course tutoring and a writing
center. The two centers merged in 2011 as part of a budget reduction effort.
EIU has a Reading Center and a Student Success Center that is associated with
helping students who go on academic probation, etc. Our relations are friendly, but
as a WC we’re pretty autonomous.
Yes; The Learning Centers include the English Language Learning Service; PASS/
Supplemental Instruction; Science and Math Learning Center; and the Writing
Center.
We have an ESL Center for International students and non-native speakers. We
occasionally talk with that director about how to best serve our growing ESL
population. There is a math lab and psychology lab (mostly for APA help). We are
working with math lab on a joint orientation for first-year students but otherwise
have no relationship with these two entities. Only the Writing Center is considered
a real ―Center,‖ which in the College of HSS has certain benefits and expectations.
We have a center known as PASS, Plymouth Academic Support Services. Their
center is next-door to us on the lower level of Lamson Learning Commons.
Yes. We are not related in organizational structure, although we do meet from
time to time concerning support service business.
Yes. We are separate units but are currently working jointly to get a foothold in
the library.
Yes, we have a unit called Tutoring Services. We work with them on issues of
writing and do our best to support one another’s efforts.
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
9. What services does your center provide?
Individual
tutoring
Small group
tutoring
Writing Fellows
program
In-class
presentations/
workshops
Online tutoring
Online chat
Graduate thesis
consultation
Faculty
consultations
Other
WCU
x
E. Illin.
X
J. Mad.
x
Kenn. State
x
Ply. State
x
S Cloud
x
W. Illin
x
Winona
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
X
(intermittent)
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
X (pilot)
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
workshops in
Center and for
specific
programs:
Adult Learner,
specific grad
programs,
orientation, etc.
Community
outreach to
schools and
senior ctr
Small
group
facilitatio
n in large
sized FYC
classes
(intermittent)
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
10. What populations can access your services?
WCU
Full-time/campus
Online/ distance
Part-time
Undergrad
Graduate
Athletes
Student with
documented
disabilities
At-risk students
Other (and/or ALL
students)
J.
Madison
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
K.
State
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
P. State
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
E.
Illinois
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
W.
Illinois
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Winona
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
St.
Cloud
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
x
X
x
x
x
x
alumni
x
x
X
x
x
x
x
x
W.
Illinois
x
x
Winona
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
11. What kinds of appointments/sessions do you provide?
WCU
E. Illinois
Walk-ins
Scheduled
appointments
Standing
appointments
(―regulars‖)
Unlimited
appointments
Limited: only a
certain number
per student
x
x
x
x
Online
appointments
―Hotline‖ or
online quick help
Group papers/
group work
Others (please
specify)
(see Other)
x
J.
Madison
x
x
K.
State
x
x
P. State
x
x
St.
Cloud
X
X
x
x
x
X
x
x
X
X
(one per day
with limited
online
appts)
(one visit
per day, up
to 2 visits
per week)
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
per
day, 3
per
week)
x
x
Smarthinking
X
(one
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Video
sessions
with
shared
docs
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
12. How many students are employed by your unit?
Undergraduate
consultants/tutors
11
0
13, plus 12 Writing
Fellows
5
12 (five are paid by tuition
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
Graduate
consultants/tutors
9
11
4
Clerical
TOTAL
8
NA
4
28
11
33
9
1
NA
NA
14
13
13
14
18
4 to 5
4
NA
30
22
24
reduction)
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
13
4
6
13. On average, how many student clients each semester/year? How many visits?
# of students served per semester/year
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
# of visits per
semester/ year
2300/year
1500 to 1700/yr
NA
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
5000/yr
1300/ semester
6000/yr
3398/yr
1300/ semester
2000-3000/yr
700/ semester
2500/yr
NA
NA
1000/year (NOT including in-class visits)
NA
3000/yr
14. What kinds of resources are available on your website?
WCU
Tutorials
(grammar,
citation, etc)
Advice on
writing
assignments
Faculty
information
Links to outside
sources (Purdue
OWL, etc)
Other
E. Illinois
x
J.
Madison
x
K.
State
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Study
skills,
job info
Mission &
Philosophy,
Resources
page
Grammar
and
punctuation
self tests
P.
State
x
x
St. Cloud
W.
Illinois
Winona
x
N/A
x
N/A
x
x
N/A
x
x
N/A
Handouts,
reference
books
N/A
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
15. Do you subscribe to any professional standards or hold any certifications?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
CRLA in development for Writing Fellows. All other standards are in-house.
Part of the International Writing Centers Association (IWCA) and the Midwest
Writing Centers Association (MWCA).
NA
No
Yes, we subscribe to professional standards. Regarding certifications, the PASS
center (next-door) offers level one CRLA tutoring certification and we could
piggyback on that, but we haven’t chosen to do so. Our consultant credentials have
never been questioned by a prospective student, parent, or any client.
No, but all students are required to read and agree to follow 2 sets of standards—
―Guidelines for Professional Behavior in the Writing Center‖ and ―Staff Guidelines
for Ethical Use of Write Place Technology.‖
No
No
16. How are your tutors trained?
WCU
Handbook/
manual
Staff meetings
Credit-bearing
training course
Readings/
scholarship
Observations/
mentoring
Online
E.
Illinois
x
J.
Madison
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Fellows
only
x
K.
State
x
P. State
St.
Cloud
x
W. Illinois
x
Wino
na
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Other (please
specify)
Staff field trip
to NEWCA
each spring
3-day
orientation
17. How are your tutors evaluated?
WCU
Surveys/
SurveyTrac
Student evals
Observations
Grades
Informal
feedback
Other
E.
Illinois
J.
Madison
K.
State
P. State
St.
Cloud
W.
Illinois
Winona
x
Intermittent
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Self-eval forms
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
18. List any major publications or scholars that inform your center’s approach.
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, St Martin’s Sourcebook for Writing Tutors; see
assessment self study for more.
Our center espouses the ideas set forth by Jeanne Simpson (the first Director of the
EIU Writing Center) in her ―Statement on Professional Concerns‖ published in The
Writing Center Journal in 1985.
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
NA
We use the Bedford Guide to Writing Tutors in our training. Students also read Jeff
Brooks’ ―Minimalist Tutoring,‖ North’s ―The Idea of a Writing Center,‖ and perhaps
a selection by Harris or Bruffee. Writing Lab Newsletter available to all the staff.
Plymouth State
We subscribe to The Writing Center Journal and The Writing Lab Newsletter. We
read articles/books by any scholars who support a nondirective approach to writing
consultation.
Undergrads take an undergrad course that includes Bruce and Rafoths ESL tutoring
guide, Rafoth’s tutoring guide, and St. Martin’s Sourcebook for Writing Tutors. The
Grad course uses Bruce and Rafoth’s ESL tutoring guide, The Longman Guide to
Writing Center Theory and Practice, and Joseph Williams latest edition of Style.
Stephen North, Charles Bazerman, Mark Waldo
NA
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
19. How would you describe your unit’s approach to writing tutoring/instruction?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
See assessment self study report.
To take North’s phrase, which we use on our PR materials, ―We are here to talk to
writers.‖ Probably the best way to describe our ethos is ―Talking in the Middle‖ by
Muriel Harris.
NA
Much like our composition program, we view writing as a process. We emphasize
how that process guides what we do in sessions with students and what we
encourage them to do when they leave the Center. We strive to help students see
that their writing matters and that it is, ultimately, their writing.
We embrace a nondirective, collaborative approach. We are non-authoritative and
refer to ourselves as consultants rather than tutors. We model with writers how to
use resources such as writing guides and websites to access help with writing.
We are essentially non-directive and scaffolding.
Discipline-based
Process-based and student driven. We have the idea that, as North says, we help
make better writers and not necessarily better texts.
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
20. How is your unit funded?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Student fees, Provost allocations, Grad School and English dept (for grad tutors)
English department
NA
We receive at least 60% of our budget from a fee assessed to all English 1101
students. In return for the fee, we visit and offer an extended outreach presentation
to each 1101 class.
We are institutionally funded, roughly 90% by Undergraduate Studies and 10% by
the College of Graduate Studies.
45% from Graduate College 35% from Academic Affairs, 5% from College of
Liberal Arts, 5% from the Diversity Committee, 10% from Multicultural Student
Services.
Three funding sources E&J, FYE, and UAASS.
Funding for the graduate assistantships comes from the Provost’s Office. This is
our only source of funding.
21. What is your estimated annual operating budget (not including perm staff salaries)?
Western Carolina
$42,000 (includes all operating costs and student wages—including course-specific, nonwriting center tutors--except one grad assistantship)
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
$1575
NA
Approximately $100,000 (probably a little less). This depends on fee revenue
(explained above).
Because we are housed in the Lamson Learning Commons, our operating budget
falls under the LLC umbrella. The Writing Center budget and expenditure
summary only includes my salary, my assistant’s, student wages, and general
supplies. See answer below for details.
$240,000
We do not have our own budget.
NA
22. What percentage of your budget is allocated to student wages, supplies, etc.?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
83% to student wages, the rest to printing, supplies, and services
NA
NA
Approximately 60% goes to tutor wages. Another 20% to our Coordinator. The rest
goes to supplies, printing, furniture, books for our WC library, etc.
Student hourly - $6000; student work study - $2000; part-time (professional) hourly
- $8000; Supplies - $1000
Student wages—80%
Supplies, WConline subscription, professional subscriptions, misc.—10%
Technology (equipment replacement, software)—10%
N/A
All of it
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
23. How much do you pay your tutors?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
Hourly tutors
$12/hr (graduate
hourly)
N/A
NA
$9/hr (undergrad
tutors)
$10/hr (graduate
hourly – non
TAs)
$7.25 first year;
$7.50 second
year; $7.75 third
year and beyond
St. Cloud State
$9/hr
Western Illinois
$9.55/hr
Winona State
NA
Graduate assistants
$8,000 per year (via us
or English dept)
Routed through the
graduate program—
tuition waived plus
monthly stipend
NA
Tuition waiver plus
$2000 per semester for
10 hours/ week for 1st
semester, 7 hours/ week
for 2nd semester
$4000 stipend per
academic year plus 12credit tuition waiver
(This is paid by College
of Graduate Studies and
not out of the WC
budget)
$10,000 per year plus 8
credits per year tuition
remission
Tuition waiver +
monthly stipend
NA
Writing fellows
$800 or $900
per semester
N/A
Other
Clerical staff earn
minimum wage
N/A
NA
NA
NA
$2000 for parttime faculty for 10
hours/ week
$1500 tuition
reduction per
semester for ten
hours of work
each week
for talent grant
recipients, $500 tuition
reduction per semester
in exchange for
five hours of work
each week. The
assistant director is
paid $20 an hour with
a total account pool of
$8000. This means she
works twelve hours a
week for two sixteenweek semesters.
Desk workers $8/hr
N/A
N/A
NA
NA
24. What are the salary ranges for full-time, professional staff members?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Associate Director, $43,000, Administrative Asst., $27,000
Not sure
NA
The only staff position is our soon-to-be-hired Coordinator, who will make
$24,000 annually.
The director is paid $48,000 annually for an 86%-time position. That is the
only full-time position.
Director (includes both teaching and director assignment)--$60,000 yr
N/A
Not applicable because Director only receives reassigned time.
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
25. Describe the physical space your center uses to conduct its core functions.
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Shared space with course tutoring. One front desk; approx 6 tutoring tables; laptop cart for
checkout; Tutortrac reporting stations; white boards, bookshelves, and other supply areas; tutor
break room; 3 staff offices; one small group tutoring room. Overflow/meeting space upstairs
and outside in library study areas. (NOTE: moving next year to much larger space!)
The WC has a front desk with a Mac for intake. We have four round table with three chairs per
table. In the back there is a comfy couch and a chair, a credenza, and file cabinets. Toward the
front there’s a workspace with two desktop computers (Mac and HP) and a printer. We have
two HP and two Mac laptops.
NA
Students enter the Center into a main room. There are a few comfy arm chairs for waiting, the main
desk with a computer for staff use, the sign-in computer, another computer for staff use, and a table
with coffee and tea and supplies and the occasional food offering. If they go to the room to the
right, they will enter the Computer Lab, which also has two arm chairs and a sofa and coffee table
and one big round table with chairs for students to use. The Conference Room, which includes the
Writing Center Library of Rhet/Comp journals and books is the next room. There are windows on
the wall dividing the Computer Lab and Conference Room, and the Conference Room also has a
door leading out to the hall. The Conference Room has a large conference table and chairs, and two
additional tables. All of this, including the main table can be broken up and reconfigured as a
particular event may require. We are expecting installation of a SmartBoard this semester, so there
is an accompanying computer workstation in one corner.
Had a student gone left from the main reception room, they would have gone into (it’s very open –
no door) the tutoring room, which has four large tables in the middle (again, capable of being
separated) arranged as one big table, surrounded by chairs. There are also three cubicles lining each
of the two longest walls; straight ahead are bookcases stocked with reference books, texts
frequently used by freshman comp classes, and other writing guides. The wall shared with the main
room has a supply cabinet on one side and a horizontal file (looks like mailboxes) for handouts. A
door leading out the other side of the tutoring room goes into a staff area outside the Assistant
Director and Director’s offices.
We’re very lucky that we had several years with surpluses in our budget (we were still unsure as to
how the fee structure would work and spent more carefully during the year than we needed to) and
thus have been able to replace all the furniture in the past few years, so everything is nice (and it
matches!).
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
We have four student computers and a printer available. They are maintained by the LLC
technology support team, whose offices are conveniently located just upstairs! We have four
tables with 3-4 chairs each. We have a reception/waiting area with a couch, coffee table, three
armchairs, and a credenza with handouts on top and office supplies & writing guides in the
drawers. Finally, we have a large office with two desks, two desktop computers, bookshelves,
file cabinets, etc. This is shared by the director, assistant director, and graduate writing
assistant.
Main location: tutoring space—8 round tables, six IMac computers, 1 printer. Reception desk
with computer and printer. 1 online computer station. Assistant Director office with table and
IMac. Staff lounge with small round table, chairs, couch, microwave, coffee pot, water boiler.
Library location: 3 tables with 3 laptops for tutoring. 1 reception desk with laptop. File
cabinet.
We have four writing centers. Our main writing center is in Simpkins (5 tutoring tables with 4
chairs each, 2 conference tables with six chairs each, a couch, receptionist desk and chair, and
six computers + one printer), and two satellite centers in the dorms (3-4 tables + chairs), and
one satellite center in Malpass library (three tables + chairs)
Seven tables equipped with Ethernet outlets. (All students are required to have own laptops. )
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
26. List any software or web-based programs your unit uses on a regular basis.
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
TutorTrac, Smarthinking, Meebo, Blackboard, Microsoft Office
Can’t afford much of that stuff, but we do have Skype for distance-ed students.
NA
We use WCOnline for appointment scheduling and data tracking
We use Big Blue Button, Skype, and Google.docs. We are looking at EtherPad.
We do not subscribe to any tutor tracking or online scheduling software.
WConline scheduler and online consulting module, Office Suite
N/A
Tutortrac is used for students visiting the center to log in and out of tutorials.
27. What resources or staff would you LIKE to have that you do not currently?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Library for faculty, updated computers, more reliable tracking software
We’d like to be able to have more students to work the front desk. Those students
are given to us by the departmental secretary when she has some that she can offer
to us. We only had one this semester. We’d certainly like to have a more diverse
staff since we play no part in the hiring of our writing consultants (the Graduate
Studies Committee selects GAs), but there is apparent financial stability in having
our staff selected in this way. We would really like undergraduate writing
consultants from diverse disciplines, but there’s difficulty in that proposal (money
and support). The past two years we have used the ―Genre Search & Share‖
assignment in our practicum course, and it has helped.
NA
With the addition of the Coordinator position, we feel like we’re in better shape
than we’ve ever been, so none right now.
We want Big Blue Button to have better functionality. We are struggling to apply
our WC philosophy to online consultations. We’d love to have a full-time assistant
director.
None
Electronic scheduling software, software for online tutorials, more funding lines
for graduate students outside of English.
Receptionist, Writing Program Administrator, etc.
28. What services would you LIKE to offer that you cannot/do not currently?
Western Carolina
Eastern Illinois
James Madison*
Kennesaw State
Plymouth State
St. Cloud State
Western Illinois
Winona State
Better data to report to campus, more faculty services, expanded web and online
services.
We’ve thought about an 48-hour email service like University of Kansas and a
writing fellows program. The former would be easier than the latter
NA
We may move toward online services eventually, once our website is up and used.
NA
None
Online tutorials, writing fellows program.
NA
Appendix O: Peer Institution Comparisons
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX P
Budget Information: Funds, Expenses, Salaries, etc.
The following spreadsheets illustrate the budgets for Writing Fellows (101012), the former Writing Center (152712),
and the general, merged Writing and Learning Commons budget (152727). (See Self Study for info on the merger.)
WRITING FELLOWS
FY
2011
Account
111010
135050
151010
152020
154070
156030
2000BP
3000BP
4000BP
5000BP
Writing Fellows
Title
EPA Regular Salaries
Student Regular Wage
Social Security
State Retirement
Optional Retirement
Medical Insurance
Purchased Services Pool
Supplies Pool
Property, Plant and Equipment
Pool
Other Expenses & Adj Budget
Pool
Adjusted
YTD
Commitme Available
Budget
Activity
nts
Balance
38563
9640.74
28922.22
0.04
20420
2500
0
17920
196
736.42
0
-540.42
204
0
0
204
0
1181.97
0
-1181.97
0
1232.4
0
-1232.4
1899
86.78
0
1812.22
600
0
0
600
2500
1063
0
1437
25
64407
0
16441.31
0
28922.22
25
19043.47
FY
2010
Account
111010
135050
151010
152020
154070
156030
2000BP
2100BP
3000BP
4000BP
5000BP
Title
EPA Regular Salaries
Student Regular Wage
Social Security
State Retirement
Optional Retirement
Medical Insurance
Purchased Services Pool
Purchased Cont. Services Pool
Supplies Pool
Property, Plant and Equipment
Other Expenses & Adj Budget
Adjusted
YTD
Commitme Available
Budget
Activity
nts
Balance
38563
28257.6
0
10305.4
21820 21299.62
0
520.38
196
2057.07
0
-1861.07
204
0
0
204
0
3351.39
0
-3351.39
0
3017.76
0
-3017.76
759
728.27
0
30.73
40
40
0
0
300
232.37
0
67.63
2500
569.9
0
1930.1
25
0
0
25
64407 59553.98
0
4853.02
Appendix P: Budgets
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
FY
2009
Account
111010
135050
151010
152020
154070
156030
157600
2000BP
2100BP
3000BP
4000BP
5000BP
Title
EPA Regular Salaries
Student Regular Wage
Social Security
State Retirement
Optional Retirement
Medical Insurance
Flex Spending Acct Savings
Purchased Services Pool
Purchased Cont. Services Pool
Supplies Pool
Property, Plant and Equipment
Pool
Other Expenses & Adj Budget
Pool
Adjusted
YTD
Commitme Available
Budget
Activity
nts
Balance
38563 38370.15
0
192.85
20420 21727.01
0
-1307.01
196
3038.25
0
-2842.25
204
0
0
204
0
4440.59
0
-4440.59
0
4187.4
0
-4187.4
0
9.18
0
-9.18
1899
918.75
0
980.25
0
0
0
0
600
403.92
0
196.08
2500
1399
0
1101
25
64407
0
74494.25
0
0
25
-10087.25
FORMER WRITING CENTER
FY 2011
Account
111010
131010
135050
151010
154070
156030
2000BP
3000BP
4000BP
5000BP
152712
Title
EPA Regular Salaries
Non-Student Reg Wage
Student Regular Wage
Social Security
Optional Retirement
Medical Insurance
Purchased Services Pool
Supplies Pool
Property, Plant & Equipment
Other Expenses & Adj
Budget
Adjusted
YTD
Commitmen Available
Budget
Activity
ts
Balance
52849
12202.51
40607.53
38.96
1692
1692
0
0
7195
3274.88
0
3920.12
0
1067.25
0
-1067.25
0
1373.43
0
-1373.43
0
1232.4
0
-1232.4
827
287.2
0
539.8
1143
0
106.18
1036.82
150
99
0
51
127
63983
89.67
21318.34
0
40713.71
37.33
1950.95
Appendix P: Budgets
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
FY 2010
Account
111010
131010
135050
151010
154070
156030
157600
2000BP
3000BP
4000BP
5000BP
Title
EPA Regular Salaries
Non-Student Reg Wage
Student Regular Wage
Social Security
Optional Retirement
Medical Insurance
Flex Spending Acct Savings
Purchased Services Pool
Supplies Pool
Property, Plant Equipment
Other Expenses & Adj
Adjusted
YTD
Commitmen Available
Budget
Activity
ts
Balance
52310
50954.51
0
1355.49
650
648
0
2
11276
11751.25
0
-475.25
0
2999.69
0
-2999.69
0
5153.71
0
-5153.71
0
4560.22
0
-4560.22
0
268.86
0
-268.86
1170
971.72
0
198.28
380
462.13
0
-82.13
570
569.9
0
0.1
127
89.97
0
37.03
66483
78429.96
0
-11946.96
Title
EPA Regular Salaries
Non-Student Reg Wage
Student Regular Wage
Social Security
State Retirement
Optional Retirement
Medical Insurance
Flex Spending Acct Savings
Purchased Services Pool
Supplies Pool
Property, Plant & Equipment
Other Expenses & Adj
Adjusted
YTD
Commitmen Available
Budget
Activity
ts
Balance
44810
44585.99
0
224.01
980
471.6
0
508.4
21020
16414.81
0
4605.19
0
2591.45
0
-2591.45
0
0
0
0
0
5159.98
0
-5159.98
0
4187.4
0
-4187.4
0
393.78
0
-393.78
600
932.6
0
-332.6
1063
826.64
0
236.36
457
387
0
70
127
85
0
42
69057
76036.25
0
-6979.25
FY 2009
Account
111010
131010
135050
151010
152020
154070
156030
157600
2000BP
3000BP
4000BP
5000BP
Appendix P: Budgets
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
MERGED WALC FUNDS
Summary of Writing and Learning Commons Budget Revisions/Allocations
Org 206183
Fund 152727
FY 2011-2012
111010 EPA Salaries
original allocation
permanent revision moved from SPA Salaries (152727 - 121010 line,
position 5211 (Admin. Assistant)
permanent revision moved from 152712 - H82712 (WC - GA)
permanent revision moved from 152712 - H82712 (WC - GA)
permanent revision moved from 152712 - position 1771 (Associate Dir)
permanent revision moved from 152712 - position 1814 (former Director)
permanent revision (funds from WC director's position moved to 135050 student wages)
Total
121010 SPA Salaries
original allocation (Admin asst salary)
permanent revision moved to line 111010
permanent revision (moved to line 2300)
permanent reduction (reversion)
permanent revision moved to fund 160724-111010 (Career Services EPA)
permanent revision from 152749 (QEP) for position 1769 (Admin Assoc)
44,058
4,362
500
7500
5000
6992
-6992
61,420
30683
-4362
-3246
-18126
-4949
27000
Total
27000
135050 Student Wages
original allocation
permanent revision from 152712 -135050 (WC)
permanent revision from 152712 - 111010 position 1814 (former Director)
temporary revision from 152703 (Undergrad Studies)
permanent revision (moved to line 111010, position H82712 - GA position
14500
9426
6992
4762
-500
Total
35180
2300 Purchased Services
original allocation
permanent revision from line 121010 (Admin Asst's SPA Salary)
permanent revision from 152712 - 2300
905
3246
254
Total
285015 Paw Print
original allocation
permanent revision from 152712 (WC)
4405
178
573
Total
751
Appendix P: Budgets
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
3000 Supplies
original allocation
permanent revision from 152712 (WC)
417
1143
Total
4000 Property, Plant, and Equipment
original allocation
permanent revision from 152712 (WC)
1560
0
150
Total
5000 Other Expenses & Adjusted Budget
original allocation
permanent revision from 152712 (WC)
150
100
127
Total
227
Total WaLC Allocation FY 12 (Including Salaries) 130,693
Appendix P: Budgets
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
APPENDIX Q
Survey of Student Files:
Topics of Tutoring Sessions and Student Needs (preliminary results)
In December 2011, we sampled 200 student visit records, or approximately ten percent of an average year’s visits.
This survey identified the content of tutoring sessions; it was conducted using paper files and analog calculations.
Appendix Q: Survey of Tutoring Session Topics
Writing Tutoring Program (WTP)
2012 Self Study
Writing and Learning Commons (WaLC)
NOTES
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