ALL QUEEN CHOSEN Tyler, Torkelson To

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Buy -.-"w
Christmas
Seeds
Vol II
Stevens Point, Wis., December 11, 1940 ·
No. 11
ALL QUEEN CHOSEN
Tyler, Torkelson To
Rule Over Annual
Senior Class Formal
Gerald M. Torkelson, who will reign as king of the annual Senior Ball
Saturday evening announces that he has chosen Kay Tyler, also a senior,
to be his queen. Both have attended C.S.T.C. for the past three years and
~re members of the high school department .
.--------------------------Torkelson Well Known
Kay, A Downer Graduate
"Jerry" is one of the seniors at Central
Kay Tyler graduated from the MilState who is well known by the students
and faculty alike. At present there are waukee Downer seminary in 1937 and
two Torkelsons besides himself at attended Lawrence college at Appleton
C.S.T.C., and another brother enrolled in the following year. While at Downer
the engineering school at the University she was maid of honor for the Carnival
of Wisconsin. Jerry's activity here has Queen, and modeled clothes for benefit
included a varied range. For the past fashion shows sponsored by Chapman's:~
three years he has been a bass soloist for Department Store. She was also a mem-:.
the Men's Glee club; he is now president ber 'e f the student council, and was voted i
of that organization. He is a member of to the Self Reliance group by students j
Chi Delta Rho fraternity, the Social and faculty of the school. This is an '
KING
Science club, and Alpha Kappa Rho, honorary group made up of about one-.!
fourth of the student body.
- - - - - - i - - - - - - - - - - - - - - : - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - : - - - - ; honorary music fraternity.
Beauty Contestant at Lawrence
,,
Prominent In High School
By a vote of the men students at
At Merrill High School. T<:>rkelson was Lawrence college, Kay was chosen to
editor of the Acme News, student publi- compete for beauty honors with 18 oth<;r
cation. He was president of the Men's college women at a contest featuring Hal
chorus, a member of the cast of the .Kemp, orchestra leader, as judge. · Kay
Point and Westby High
senior class play, and the school repre- was among eight of the contestants who
Schools, !representing the Stevens Point
sentative in oratory for two ye_ars. He were picked by Mr. Kemp as the winners.'
and La t::rosse districts, were awarded
College Theater Presents was
voted one of the 10 outstanding In another contest Kay was voted the·
"A" ratirlgs in the one-act play contest
seniors from a class of 135, and was most beautiful freshman girl by a majoriheld Fridiay, December 6, in the Central
"Love From A Stranger" senior
class vice-president. He was active ty of the fraternities on the campus.
State Teakhers' College auditorium.
Love From a Stranget, a play in three in chorus work during all four years, and
The St~vens Point cast presented "LitMember of Kappa Alpha Theta
tle Darling"; Westby gave "When the acts written by Frank Vosper, will be did much of the solo work of the club.
Kay
was a member of Kappa Alpha
Wedpresented
by
the
College
Theater,
Sun Rises"; and Oconto Falls, representTook Extension Course at Me,rrill
Theta sorority, a nationally known sister-.
ing the dshkosh district "The Man in the nesday night December 11, and Thursday,
Jerry
Before
coming
to
Central
State
hood on the campus at Lawrence. She
Bowler Hat". The plays were judged by December 12, at 8:15 P.M. Mr. L. M. enrolled in a year's course given through was a member of the A Cappella Choir
Burroughs will direct, assisted by stuMrs. Raylnond Krueger of Wausau.
the University extension division. This and was active in the Spanish and drama-·
Members of the Stevens Point cast are dents.
was the first course of its kind offered tic club.
Tickets
Yvonne Moreau, Georgiana Laszewski,
at Merrill.
Active at Central State
Tickets for either performance can be
Jean NyeJ Beth Johnson, John Mase, and
At Central State Kay's activities cover
Interesting Hobbies
Robert Kk>nopacki. Their coach is Miss obtained only upon presentation of your
Building model airplanes is Jerry's a wide area. She is a member of Omega
Dorothea I Wolfe of the Stevens Point activity ticket in front of the library.
High Sc~ool faculty. Ruth Jersey and Only three hundred tickets will be issued favorite hobby. He teaches the training Mu Chi sorority of which she holds the
for one night.
(Continued on page 3, col. 2)
school boys how to put struts and ribs
Betty AsJ:Jier are the student coaches.
together, but he has "no intention of
The twb winners of this sectional conMystery Drama
learning to fly." He likes all kinds of
test will dompete in a state meet at MadiLove From a Stranger, is a mystery "good" music, attends the movies when
son on December 12.
drama, presented by Alex Yokel in New he thinks the picture is worth while, tries
I
York, and later in London with an all- his hand at fishing once in a while, and
1
English cast. It is the story of a carefree participates in all sorts of winter sports.
girl, a Sweepstakes winner who disobeys
Chef and Choir Director
her mother's wishes and runs off to EngJerry does light housekeeping with his
land with an irresponsible high-strung
A ratio of "15 students to each teacher"·
scamp, Bruce Lovell, with neither money, brothers and two other fei!ows at 1181fz in the state's nine teachers' colleges drewI
name, or background instead of marrying Division St., and is rated as one of the criticism of Governor Heil Friday asI
a steady, stolid, calm individ ual. Bruce C.S.T.C.'s best cooks. Besides the daily he considered the request of the board of
WEDNE~DAY: December 11, 1940
Lovell's nervous irritability results in a routine of classes, activities, and domestic normal school regents for $4,526,488 for
4:00P.M.
psychopathic case. Bruce has a criminal duties Jerry finds plenty of time for his the next biennium.
record; in fact, his plot to murder Cecily greatest activity, his religion. He is an
Phot~ Club Meeting. ·Room 103.
The requested appropriation included:
Harrington is almost perfected, when she ardent church goer, and each Sunday he proposed increases for buildings, opera-·
8:00P.M.
directs a choir at the First English Lu- tion, and salaries, the last of which prodiscovers
it.
Her
method
of
outwitting
Womrn's League Bowling.
theran church in Stevens Point.
him is clever.
voked the disapproval of the governor. ·
(If [email protected] are unable to attend, please
Cast
"I never want to cut teachers' salaries,"
notif~ Miss Davidoff a day or two
Iris Precourt plays the part of Cecily
he said, "I believe in paying good wages:
beforf if possible)
Harrington, and Bob Handeyside, Bruce
to the women in the state service, but
8:00p.M.
Lovell; Ruth Nobel, Louise Garrard;
there is no such thing in this country as
Colle~e Theater
James Unger, Nigel Lawrence; Ray Min15 pupils per teacher. That is all wrong._
The experts tell me it is bad business to
"LovJ From a Stranger". (Wednes- ton, Hodgson; Hanna Kaufman, Ethel;
Gordon Bentle, Dr. Gribble.
A United States Army Air Corps have only 15 pupils per teacher ... If you
day ahd Thursday)
!
examining board is in Wausau this week enlarge the classes and make a saving I
Stage Technicians
THURSD..j\Y: December 12, 1940
to receive applications and give physical will let you keep it for the raises. 'In
lO:OOIA.M.
Don Krider has chosen these students exams for flying cadets. In the past ap- other words, we can make a trade. I am
Edwi~ A. Rowlands, "The Value of a as members of the Stage technicians: plicants have had to go to Chicago ·or a trader.''
Hobb~". College Auditorium.
Stage Manager, Jack Ackerman; Assis- Minneapolis to take their examinations,
He asserted that he was for education,
tants, Ronnie Craig and Charles Miller; but under the new regulations, according but for sanity and economy in it.
8:00P.M.
Chief Carpenter, Robert Torkelson; Light- to Lieut. A. C. Tisdelle, Jr., flying cadet
Governor Heil approved $9,773,708
"Lov~ From a Stranger". College
ing Technician, Robert Burkman; Assis- recruiting officer for northern Wisconsin for the University of Wisconsin for the
Theater.
tants, Dan Durkee and Clarence Solberg; and Upper Michigan, these examinations coming biennium, an increase of more
9:15 P.M.
Properties Manager, Barbara Gerdes; As- will be given at convenient points in the than $2,031,000.
Men'~ League Bowling
sistants, Betty Smith' and Marjorie Mae state enabling prospective flying cadets
Approximately three-fourths of the
FRIDAY:! December 13, 1940
Nelson; Make-up Manager, Evelyn Mur- to enroll without making the trip to Chi- increase was earmarked· for buildin~ con.
gatroyd; Assistants, Alva Thompson, Lil- cago or Minneapolis. Any young man struction and improvements. The univerBaskefball Game at Houghton.
lian Boe, E~rle Siebert and Phyllis Eckels; between the ages of 20 and 27 who has sity contemplates construction of four
SATURDtY: December 14, 1940
Advertising Manager, Janet Poggemiller; had two years of college is eligible to short course agricultural dormitories, a
S<niol Bdl. T<runing S<hool Gym. Auditorium Manager, Elaine Catlin.
apply for the flying cadet examinations.
(Continued on page 3, col. 3)
And Westby Rate
In Contest Here
MYSTERY DRAMA STAGED
TONIGHT AND THURSDAY
HElL KILLS BUDGET JUMP
FOR TEACHERS COLLEGES;
OKAYS SAME FOR U. W.
a
0LLEGE
1ALENDAR
Air Corps Examiners
At Wausau
VOL.D
December 11 1940
, Tl;IE POINTER
2
THE POINtER
At".
As·
Published Weekly except holidays and ex3milliltim~ periods. at S'te:v.~ !?oint b¥ .
Tl..ttr.'("·
s~b·t:r,
by students of the Central' Wisconsin State Teachers College. s·uoscription Price
.I. n
.J
~IU
J
$2.00 per year.
Entered as second-class matter May 26, 1927, at the post office at. Stevens Point, ' Edwin A. Rowlands, " America's Foremost Autograph Collector" will speak
Wisconsin, under the Act of Ma.rch 3, 1879.
on "The Value of a Hobby" at 10:00
Thursday, December 12, in the college
aEPRIItSENTitO. FOR· NATIONAL ADVERTISING B¥
auditorium.
National Advertising Service, Inc.
During the course of his talk Mr.
College Puhlisbttrs Represerf<latif!e
Ro.wlands enumerates· the various classifiNEW YORK, N,.. Y.
4.20 MADISON AvE.
. cations of hobbies. He. relates the story
CHICAGO ' BOSTON ' LOS AIIGI!UI "' SAN FRAIICIICO
of people who have made their hobbies
pay and describes the hobbies of famous
EDITORIAL STAFF
people. He explains what the hobby of
Editor-in-chief ........................................ Earle R. Siebert, 1206 Sims .Ave., Phone 1711 iutograph collecting has done for him,
News Editor ............................................................................................ Marcelle Martini and what any hobby can do for you.
Features ... .. ....................... Lillian Boe, Glendy Chapin, Gerald Torkelson, Jim Bagnell
His most interesting experiences have
Sports ............................. ....................... James Hanig, James Kulidas, Florence Theisen b~n in meeting and obtaiaing autographs
Act Editor .................................................................................................... Elizabeth Cress from such famous personalities as Albert
·copy Editor ..................................... ... ................................................................ John: Kelley Einstein, Amelia Earhart, Chief Justice
Reporters .............. Fay Wendorf, Alex Mancheski, Myrna Rogers, Wilma Anderson, Hughes, Shidey Temple, Walt Disney,
Patricia Maquire Lily Pons, Edwa.rd Benes,. Paderewski,
Composition Editor .................................................................................... Sherman Sword Doug Coirigan and Thomas E. Dewey.
Proof Readers ....................... :........ Evelyn Murgatroyd, Carmelita Wirkus, Jane Shier
Edwin Rowlands stands 6 feet 4 inches
Typists .................................................... Margaret Murrish, Alice Wagner, Betty Hein in height and is youthful and neat in appearance. In high school he was a four
BUSINESS STAFF
letter sports star. He received higher edBusiness Manager .................................................. ............ Keith Nelson, 428 Madison St. ucation at the University of Pittsburgh.
Assistant Business Manager ............................................ ...................... Janet Poggemiller He played semi-pro baseball and basketCirculation Manager .... ............ .. ................................................................... Mary Rinehart ball and also coached the junior basketCirculation Staff ................................. Aloha Walters, Dorothy Wirkus, Lucille Weiher · ball team of the Downtown Y.M.C.A. of
Marjorie Reiten . Pittsburgh for three years. For two seasons he was assistant Director of the Red
Triangle Dramatic Club.
Pointer Office Phone 1584
College Office Information, Phone 224
He was employed in various capadties
in the Mellon National Bank for seven
years. Then he accepted the position of
Advertising Manager of a Pittsburgh
PLATFORM FOR 1940-41
paint concern, from which position he
resigned in July of 1938 to devote his en1. Complete .and impartial news coverage.
tire time to the lecture field.
2. Stimulate student interest in public affairs.
He has traveled from coast to coast
3. Promote cooperation among tne various groups and organizasince 1936 to personally meet and obtain
autographs from two thousand famous
tions on the campus.
persons representing all walks in life.
Mr. Rowlands was featured as the out1
.. 0
S
,
'standing hobbyist of his particular field
SH WER OF GIFT • • • •
in articles which were publishe.d in Time,
.
.
.
.
.
Look. Coronet, and leading newspapers
Once more 1t seems advtsable to turn our attention to pubhc affatrs-, throughout the country. He has broadespecially the present war. During the past few weeks the newspapers have··cast from the f_ollowing stat!ons: WIOD
played up the pro.bability of the United States extending loans to England._ in ~~ami, Flor~da; WTAM 10 Clt;v_elan•. d:
Saturday the front page stories spoke of "U S pledges of aid to help fight Ohw • K~WB 10 • H?llywood, Cahforn a •
.
,
.
.
·
.
· ·
.
WHAS 10 LoUisvtlle, Kentucky; and
aggressiOn. Satd Prest dent Roosevelt tn an answer to a message from Ktng WCAE and KDKA in Pitts. burgh, PennGeorge II of Greece:
·
.
sylvania.
"As your majesty knows, it is the settled policy of the United States 1 He was u_nanimously select:d by ~~wsgovernment to extend aid to those governments and peoples who defend papermen, Judges and pubhc as The
Outstanding Speaker" of Pittsburgh's
· t
· ·.
them~eIves agams
agg~esston.
.
. First Annual Hobby and Antique ExposiI assure your maJesty that steps are bemg taken to extend such atd tion held in the William Penn Hotel
to Greece, which is defending itself so valiantly."
from March 20th to 26th, 1939.
Jesse Jones, United States secretary of commerce, stated recently that
~igh~y-five per~ent of his audiences,
he considers the British government a good risk for loans. Secretary of wh1~h tncluded ~tgh school an~ college
·
·
d ·
·
Th B · · h
bodtes and mens and women s clubs,
the treasury Morgenthau agree wtth htm.
e ntls government was chose him as "The Most Interesting
undoubtedly pleased with the remarks which were timed just before the Speaker of the Year."
'--------------------------------.-..l
-
R:owla11ds, H ftb,by-ist
I
I
PROCLAMATIQN
Whereas, the United State& ~·~ increasing its forces for na~ion.at defe se;
Whereas, one of the immed:i te needs
is trained pilots and young meq to enter
into training for pilots;
i
Whereas, the government o£ tre United
States is making it possible fpr yo·ung
men to enter i~to the se.rvi~e _of the .country and obtam such tratmng wtthout
cost and with direct pay to themselves;
Whereas, special recru_iting efforts are
being made at this time to secure young
men for the air corps as flying cadets to
train for officer"s commissions,
.
Now, therefore, as mayor o~ the .city
of Stevens Point, I hereby prodaim the
week of December 8 to 14, 194P, as Flying Cadet week in Stevens Point. I urge
all young men between the ages of 20 ari.d
26 inclusive to give special thought to
the opportunities for a career in aviation offered by the United Sta~s government in the army air corps. The e wUI be
a traveling flying cadet physica examining board in Wausau at the ar y recruiting headquarters in the post off~ce building on December 9, 10, and 11 linclusive,
and young men may call ori. the board
for examination for flying instructions as
a flying cadet with the army air corps on
these days.
FRANK J. BLOOD,
Mayor.
I!
I
arrival of Sir Frederick Phillips, undersecretary of the British treasury, in
Washington to work out "a detailed account of his country's assets for
·waging war with Germany."
.
Recently the United States government advanced a large loan to the
Chiang Kai-shek government of China to carry on the fight against Japanese aggression. Undoubtedly this action was taken because China was
agreed to be "a good risk" also.
To any level-headed American these loans mean that our government
is willing to take a "long chance" as it has done so often in the past, and
llope that it may be paid back. Our experience with the British during the
first war and the years that followed ought to be evidence enough of their
unfairness in meeting their financial obligations. The flat refusals given
our government in reply to pleas for payment of the World War No. 1
debt along with the insults which went with them is proof enough of the
false sincerity of the British government. They have always used diplomacy
to gain their ends, and the effort now to gain a "touch" is certainly no
different. This writer thinks that this might be a good time for our government to show a little common sense and apply the same kind of self-interest that Great Britain has found so profitable in her foreign relations.
I
Many U. S. Citizens In Superior Sup' t Named
Canadian Air Service
Head At Eau Claire
According to Leonard W. Brockington, counselor to the war committee of
the Cabinet of Canada, there are at present 2,500 United States Citizens serving
in the Royal Canadian Air Force. New
enrollees by the hundreds have come in
since the war began last year, announced
Brockington. They are mostly young aviators who want to see action and fight
German Messerschmidts.
The Royal Canadian Air Force has two
squadrons in England to date, and official
reports show 71 German planes to their
credit.
W. R. Davies, Superintendent , of
schools at Superior, was appointed president of Eau Claire State Teachers' College on Friday by the State Board of
Normal Regents, it was announced Monday. He succeeds H. A. Schofield who resigned recently because of ill health.
Davies was recommended by a special
committee of the Board of Regents which
examined qualifications of about 20 per·
sons mentioned for the post.
EXCHAIGE BITS
TUDE
T
G
S PARRI
(Ed. Note : This department is conducted
for the purpose of stimulating ~e expression of. opinions advanced by stutlents and
faculty members of the college. The right
of editing and rejecting contributions is
reserved.)
To The Editor :
To a silly little freshman and . an upper
classman who should know better:
Maybe you think it's cute to ~o mooning arouncf'the campus and builciling,_kissing in whatever dark or not so !dark corner you happen to stumble intq, but students and teachers who have 1been emharassed by coming upon you in one of
your clinches have been thoro~ghly disgusted .
;
Getting a " rep" the first thrqe months·
of school is a pretty poor start jf or a girl
on any campus. And to our amourous upperclassman ; You must want a job or you
wouldn't have been coming here all these
years. Just who do you think is going to
hire you or even recommend yqu, if you
keep on making a spectacle of yourself.
And if you won't think of yourselfwhat about the girl you're making a fool
of ?
DISGUSTED SPECTATOR.
!...--------------.-..l1
Our new assistant coach, physical educa,tion instructor ,and intramural director,
Mr. Charles Heyer, not only has plenty of
ideas for the athletic end of the Physical
Well-being program, but is putting them
into effect as rapidly as possible. His
purpose is to include all the men possible
in a program of sports and leisure time
recreation. Whereas in the past athletics
h~s been fairly well confined to varisity
squads, now everyone may take part in
one or the other of the two new intramural "fraternity" and . "independent"
leagues and play football, basketball, softball, bowling, tennis, golf, badminton,
ping pong, and horseshoes. A point system has been devised whereby teams entering, not forfeiting, and winning may
compete for a supremacy. In addition to
these, Mr. Heyer intends to promote
other leisure activities, possibly developing mixed group recreation to include
volleyball and ping pong.
Carroll Echo
*
*
*
*
*
*
Said one student to his departing roommate: .... "If I'm studying when you get
back-wake me up!"
Concordia Courier
" Are they very strict at your college?"
"Strict? You remember Brown? Well
he died and they propped him up till the
lecture ended."
The Racquet
I
Chi Delts Atte~d
Whitewater
M~et
The Chi Delta Rho National Fraternity conclave was held at Whitewater,
Wisconsin, December 7. The development of a better fraternity w~th better
unity was discussed. Mr. Tesm'el r, Grand
Master, gave a talk on the desirable
qualities of a pledge. Official liandshake,
password, and whistle were a~opted. It
was also decided that the Spring Conclave
be held at Stevens Point.
Each chapter had a representative who
reported the activities of his chapter. Delegates from Stevens Point included: Dennis Roberts, Jack Vincent, Francis Kelly
and Ken Brenner. Representatives from
the University of Wisconsin, Milton College, Central State and White ater were
guests at the banquet at the fraternity
house of the Beta Chapter.
THE POINTER
I
3
NEW PREXY GIVES FIRST
OLLABORATION CORNER ADDRESS FOR STUDENTS
,
THE
OLLEGE
INFORME
L
Oj;ly 14 days 'till Christmas and in between tests and term papers we're trying
to get 1the Christmas spirit. . . . .
Doctor Pierson certainly must be carrying the torch for someone-he wouldn't
dance 'with anybody at the all-school party.... Ethel Ann Lawrence and Phil MeLaughlli n make a cute couple.... Tiny Christmas trees are beginning to appear in
many ~f the rooms at the dorm .... Whatever happened to the Dorm-Omeg homecoming trophy which was supposed to have been adorning the mantle at Nelson Hall
these3' any long weeks?
·
·
e're glad to see Hank Kronenwetter back in school completely recovered from
injurie he sustained in an accident some weeks ago .... Jack McCawley was having
a gran time dating a C.S.T.C. coed until a certain little student nurse over at St.
Joseph'ls in Marshfield got wind of it. Now relations are slightly strained-all
around .. . Congratulations to Eyleene Atkins! It isn't every school marm who can
sing wlth Dick Jurgens. . . .
"Doc" just breezed in and reported that his date with Isabel Johnson was very
succes~ul-keep up the good work "Doc"; maybe you'll edge out Winsor. At the
dance ast Friday night Dolly Rouman had a date with Parr not expecting to see her
1·egula beau, Bandelin. When he arrived the resulting row would make good copy.
The s.e status could possibly be applied to the riff between Cashin and Berard.They ad an argument at the dance Friday night also.
R MEMBER, TELL US ABOUT YOUR FRIENDS; THEY TELL US ABOUT
YOU.
[
A Letter To Santa Claus
by Margaret Engelman
1
At sweet sixteen I first began to ask you, Santa, for a man.
At seventeen, you may recall, I wanted someone strong and tall,
The Christmas when I reached eighteen ·I fancied someone hard and lean.
And then at nineteen I was sure I'd fall for someone more mature,
At twehty I still thought I'd find romance in someone with a mind.
I retrogressed at twenty-one and found the college boys most fun.
My viewpoint changed at twenty-two : I longed for someone to be true.
I brok9 my heart at twenty-three, and asked for someone kind to me.
Then begged at blase twenty-four for anyone who wouldn't bore
Now, Santa, that I'm twenty-five just send me someone who's alive!
Jim Bagnell came to the Pointer office this week arrayed in his finery-he explainedl when asked-'Tm having a date next week and I dressed up now so that
by the time of the big event I'll feel at home in a suit!"
Then there's that story on perseverance and stick-to-itiveness that we've heard
recently. A farmer placed the milk from his evening chores in a large milk can and
set it in the stream which wound its way through the fields. Quite by accident two
very adventurous frogs found themselves struggling in the milk. One frog, exasperated[ at the futility of his efforts, gave up the struggle to remain afloat and sank
to the J?ottom. The other frog, being of quite a different temperment, determined to
stay aflpat regardless of how long he had to struggle. The next morning the farmer
came tq get his milk and was surprised to find a triumphant frog sitting on a lump
.of butter.
"P?p" Boe, af ter writing her column this week, couldn't figure out why she was
blushing. Take a look at the eligible list of males she composed for the lonely
'heardts .. f.. wef understand that "Pop" became so interested in her work that she
save a ew o the eligible males for her own little black book.
There's a rumor making the rounds that the girls living off the campus will
'have n9 definite hours to observe . . .. at least that's the information we received
from Janet Poggemiller.-Ray Warren, that tall basketball flash, proved to be quite
a dancer at the Betsy Ross Hall last Thursday night after the game. Incidentally,
;that was Ray's first try at rug-cutting.
DdJ., what's that we hear about you and Fred Shwierske .... how about the
Jowdo n?
T OUGHT FOR THE WEEK: It is with narrow-souled people as with nar~ow:ne~ked bottles: the less they have in them, the more noise they make in pour!lng u out.-Pope
KNOW YOUR
ORGANIZATIONS
I ALPHA
PSI OMEGA
Alpha Psi Omega, honorary dramatic
~ociety, 1 has the honor of being the only
internatfonal fraternity on our campus.
The local chapter was organized March 3,
:1938 and had twelve charter members.
At p~esent it is solely an honorary or_ganization with no definite purpose other
than th~ recognition of outstanding dra)Ilatic ability in the student body. It acts
as an auxiliary to College Theater.
The present officers are:
Director ............ ... ... ... ......... Bob Burkman
Sub-director ..... .......... ............. Don Krider
·Secretary and Treasurer .... ......................... .
.. .............. ................ :... Janet Poggemiller
.Publicity Manager .............. Earle Siebert
Its functions now are mainly social, but
-there are many opportunities for future
advancement of Alpha Psi Omega. It is a
·young qrganization here and its greatest
.accomplishments still lie in the future.
New !members are admitted to the fraternity each semester. They must have
shown their ability in one or more of the
various fields of play production in order · to become eligible candidates. A
Hotel
\o/hiting
· ~----+-------------------------~
President William C. Hansen addressed
the faculty and students for the first time
at a general assembly Thursday, December 5. President Hansen expressed his appreciation for the reception he had been
given, saying that he felt like the Prodigal Son, in his return to his Alma Mater.
"I hope that I will have the good fortune to remain here longer than the former presidents have," Mr. Hansen said.
In the last four years there have been
four presidents of Central State.
President Hansen also stressed the importance of doing our best, today, and
the inadvisability of "putting things off"
until tomorrow.
The college band under the direction
of Peter J. Michelsen initiated the program, and Mr. C. F. Watson, former acting president, introduced President Hansen.
£ .Yleene A t k.lnS
l~T·
YY lnS
uonors
In
·Contest
fl4
Eyleene Atkins, of Almond, was selected
winner of the vocal contest sponsored by
the Junior Chamber of Commerce at Wisconsin Rapids. She was given the opportunity to sing with Dick Jurgens' orchestra at the field house there on Thursday
night, December 5.
Fifteen contestants from Central Wisconsin entered. Miss Atkins, Miss Merry
Arpin of Wisconsin Rapids and Miss
Sheila Weirs of Marshfield were the three
chosen at the Wisconsin Theater Sunday
afternoon. Final selection was made on
Thursday night when each of them sang
with the orchestra. Decision was made
by .the applause of the audience.
Eyleene is a Senior in college, soloist
of the Girls' Glee Club, and also sings
with the college band. She is a member
of Alpha Kappa Rho, honorary music
fraternity.
The finalists were provided with formals and accessories by the Rapids Junior
Chamber of Comerce. About 2,800 dancers
and spectators attended the dance·, the
which will be used for
proceeds
Christmas of
baskets.
1·
I
ORGANIZATIONS
1---------------...J
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English
fraternity, met Wednesday evening, December 4, at the home of Miss Sybil Mason.
A lengthy business meeting was held
during which the constitution was thorpledge period of from three to four weeks oughlv discussed. It was suggested that
is required for the candidates, and a com- new by-laws be added to the national
prehensive examination is given at the constitution to regulate the local chapter.
The meeting was followed by a deliformal ceremonies.
cious lunch of cookies, ice-cream and
coffee.
BALL QUEEN CHOSEN
(Continued from page 1, col. 4)
office of chaplain, and she is treasurer of
Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity. Last year she was chairman of
the decorations committee for the Junior
Prom. Her favorite hobby is collecting
antique dishes, but as she stated in a
press interview, "I like horseback riding,
too." Kay has studied Latin, French and
Spanish. She prefers classical music to
modern swing and likes "good" art. Her
major is English, and at present she is
teaching it in her practice class at the
training school. Kay's home is in Stevens
Point, and you'll find her at 909 Wisconsin St .
Receiving Line
President and Mrs. W . . C. Hansen, Regent and Mrs. W.S. Delzell, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Evans, General Chairman Jack
Vincent and his partner Shirley Fonstad,
and King Torkelson and Queen Tyler
will comprise the receiving line which
will form at nine o'clock.
Marine Theme
Chairman Vincent has announced that
indications show the Ball will be a huge
success. "Due credit must be given to the
committees which have · done a very fine
job in making the arrangements," he said.
The under-the-sea theme of the Ball is
"worked out beautifully," states Marjorie
Jacobs, chairman of the decorations committee, and advance ticket sales show
promise of a large crowd.
Heil Kills Budget J urn p
(Continued from page 1, col. 4)
dairy industries building, additions to
the chemical and electrical engineering
structures, installation of safety devices,
and minor alterations.
The balance of the increase will be
spent for new laboratory equipment,
maintenance, university extension work,
and agricultural aids.
"What is the use of having a university if we cannot do a good job out there?"
the governor asked.
Referring to the projected building
program, the governor said: ·
"These buildings we are going to
erect must be beautiful, but not extraordinarily beautiful with gingersnap frills.
We want good sewers and copper downspouts. We want buildings that will not
need much exterior maintenance.
"Now let us go forward. Let us have
the best, not the largest, farming, electrical and chemical engineering schools in
the world."
Last week in the "Pointer" there appeared a Goin' Steady List ... It has been
suggested by some and indorsed by some
more that the "Eligible Bachelor List" be
published. And as this is the last month
of Leap Year it will serve to show all of
the Sadie Hawkins's what they have slipped up on during the past eleven months. ·
So here it is:
Ralph Ahles
John Kelley
"Sport" Anderson Don Kordus
Bob Baebenroth
Myron Kufel
John Bing
Jerry La Fleur
Bob Becker
Riley Leach
Ken Brenner
Jim Kurtzeweil
Gus Binnebose
George Lindroth
Jim Bray
Gordy Lewison
Ralph Calvert
Bob Malecki
Bill Carnahan
Alex Mancheski
Bernard Coates
Rollie McManners
Bob Conant
Ralph Mischnick
Roman Cooper
Karl Mittlesteadt
Bob Dietrick
Loy Mullarkey
Dan Durkee
Bud Nelson
Harve Erdman
"Babe" Nixon
Russell Fredrick
Bob Nixon
Frank Friday
Roy Otto
Ervin Frisch
Roger Olson
Ted Fritsch
Joe Palmer
Bill Fryer
Kenny Parr
Joe Goodrich
Jack Perry
Lyle Grimm
Duane Phaneuf
Norman Halla
Frank Pliner
Dennis Helixon
Hank Pospyschala
Roy Hendrich
Jimmy Quinn
Ole Hestad
Rolly (Buck) Rades
Dick Hansen
Denis Roberts
Bob Hanson
Norbert Ruff
Bob Handeyside
Art Seidel
Gardner Harvey
Myron Sharkey
Walter Jacobson
Bob Shorey
Bob Johnson
The Terzynskis
Chet Johnson
Bud Trankle
Leon Kalkofen
Jim Unger
Leonard Vig
Torkelson (Multiply by 3)
. M a ke your own add 1·t'wns an d correctwns. · · ·
P.S. We did not accept bribes.
SCRIBNER'S DAIRY
The bottle with the celophane
hood
Park Ridqe
Phone 1934
!)Jeal
DRY CLEANERS
CALL AND DELIVERY SERVICE
102 Stronqs ·Ave.
TeL 295J
Store of Many
GIFTS!
THE MODERN TOGGERY
EXCLUSIVE- NOT EXPENSIVE
For Good Foods at
Reasonable Prices,
Patronize
BARTIG
Grocery Stores
218 N. Public Square
106 S. E. Public Square
748 Church St. South Side
Compliments Of
CASH and CARRY
DELZELL OIL CO.
Delivery Service FR~
with $2. Orders
Phillip 66. Gas
Watch for weekly specials in every
Wednesday's Journal
December 11.' . ~94~
THE !POINT£R
POINT BEATS LUTHER IN THRILLJ!R
·POINTERS SHOW POWER
IN BEATING KNIGHTS
FROM THE
LOCKER ROOM
RAY TERZYNSKI STARS
IN SECOND VICTORY
~
liHuluf ~uL«<M.
The Purple and Gold cagers defeated
St. Norberts 48-38 for their second sue. cessive victory last Thursday night in the
P.J. Jacobs High School gymnasium.
Ray Terzynski, freshman guard, led the
Point attack with six baskets and four
free throws for a total of 16 points. Jim
Bagnell scored ten points on three baskets
and four free throws and Ray Warren
poured five buckets and a free throw.
Captain Pete Terzynski had difficulty in
finding the hoop and only scored six
points.
The Kotalmen led throughout the
game and didn't have much difficulty
with the Green Knights. After a ragged
first half the boys displayed a very good
brand of basketball and pulled away
easily.
Central State 48
F.T. P.
B.
1
Carnahan f. ..................... . 0
0
2
Bagnell f. ...................... .. 3
4
0
Mullarkey f. .. ................ .. 0
0
Fritsch f. ........................ .. 0
0
0
P. Terzynski f ................. .. 3
0
3
Jusits f. .. ........................ .. 0
0
0
Pospychala c. .. ................ .. 0
0
0
Waren c......................... .. 5
0
0
Fisher c. .......................... .. 0
0
0
2
Posluszny g ...................... . 1
0
4
0
R. Terzynski g ............... .. 6
Helixon g ....................... .. 0
0
0
0
Olk g .............. ................. .. 0
1
Van Dyke g ................... .. 1
2
0
1
0
Druckrey g ..................... .. 1
19
St. Norberts' 38
B.
4
0
0
2
3
0
0
2
1
1
Monard f. ··························
Richards ............................
Hartman ····························
Machi ································
Madden ······························
Dodge ................................
Florianno
Coddington ........................
Picard ................................
Wondrash ........................
........................ u
15
The two sport editors just back from
dates, being sentimental and definitely not in the mood for editing a sports
column do hereby submit the following
article for your pleasure. . . Here are
some statistics that were tabulated during
the Point-St. Norbert game by our official tabulator. . . Norman Nye. . . The
C.S.T.C. cagers had sixty-two tries at the
basket and sent 19 of them through the
hoop for an average of 30.6 percent. ..
The Green Knights took 48 shots and
made good on fifteen occasions for an
average of 31.2 percent. . . Here is the
Pointers individual performance ...
Name
Shr.>ts Tried Shots Made
P. Terzynski ....
10
3
Warren ............
16
5
R. Terzynski ....
16
6
Bagnell ............
7
3
Olk ....................
2
o
Helixon ........... ,
1
0
Van Dyke ........
4
1
Jusits ................
2
0
Posluszny ..........
2
1
Mullarkey ........
1
0
Druckery ..........
1
0
.. .Incidentally the Kotalmen and the
St. Norbert boys both did a fine job in
making penalty shots. They both had an
average of 57.1 percent .. . The Purple and
Gold Cagers made 10 out of 17 and the
McCormick men made 8 out of 14...
Milwaukee State handed out 31 major
10
13 football letters this season. . . Followers
of basketball in the Southern Division of
F.T. P. the Teachers College Conference are go0 ing to see some of the best brand of bas3
0
0 ketball in the state as furnished by the
0
0 teams in the circuit. . . Milwaukee State
defeated Carroll and Chicago Teachers
1
0
2 and are favorites to cop the champion0
0
0 ship . .. Two years ago a group of basketba!l m~n in _school played a champion0
0 ship
Rtpon ftve and defeated them. The
2
2
1
4 ~arne wa~ 'arranged .and played for a bene2 fit for Btll Loewecke... Maybe our lads
0
are a little too Cortfident but they feel
that they could give the University boys
16
8
IGYM ANTICS I
Coaches Honor
Fritsch, Parr, Otto
Here is the news you have been waiting for, folks! Mixed badminton will
start off with a bang on the first Monday after vacation at 7 :15. And this isn't
just for the ones who know something
about the game. It's for everyone, who is
i.n terested in the least in batting around
the birdies. The fee is the lowly sum of
5 cents a night. We will see you there
then. Write it in your date book.
Yes, here is a statement on our
female bowlers. It seems the faculty
is well represented by Miss Davidoff,
who bowled 172 last time. Not bad!
Mike Blissett came in second with
a 157 and Allice Grube rolled 136.
Congratulations girls.
We have a new topper for our ping
pong ladder. It is none other than June
Wallace, who is certainly an all around
good sport. She challenges any comers
and swings a mean paddle. See if you can
threaten her safety.
Coaches at their annual meeting saw
fit to select eight Stevens Point boys in
their All-Star selections. Naturally, not
all of the boys were given 1st team ratings. Those fellows who did rate that
singular honor were as follows: Ted
Fritsch at the fullback spot; Ted really
was outstanding this year and no one in
the conference even came close to equalling his fine work. ·Roy Otto was picked
as a guard despite the fact that he played
the tackle spot. Roy was one of those
steady performers, always in there playing
Dry Cleaning
and Laundry
•
Phone 380
LUMBER & MFG. CO.
Lumber, Millwork &
Building Material
Phone 1304
Distributors
Wlb'DIY
8 S J S CLEAfUNI ,·
Phone 688
a pretty interesting game ... We are very
much in agreement with this as the Wisconsin boys didn't look too impressive in
their game at the Rapids the other night.
. . . . The average age of the Concordia
Collrge basketball team is 18 years of
age. Concordia will furnish the opposition for the Pointers on February 8 .....
The Stout basketball team traveled to
Stevens Point for their recent game in
two taxis. . . What has happened to the
"S" club? .. We can't see any reason why
this organization cari't be the leading
group on the campus. . . It is rumored
that our star quarterback William Carnahan will transfer to Milwaukee State next
semester ... Joe Goodrich is the betting
terror on the campus ... Joe makes bets
on various athletic events and wins 80%
of the time. He won a bet the other day
by rememberin~ the Minnesota-Northwestern football score of 1930 ... Captain
Pete Terzynski has a twin brother who
plays on the Rhinelander city team ...
The Pointers will meet the Rhinelander
quintet on Dec. 20 the night after they
play Stout Institute ... Ted Fritsch was
one of the few college football players
to kick two field goals in a game ... Ted
turned this trick during the homecoming
game with Oshkosh. . . He kicked them
from the 32 yard line and from the 18
yard marker. . . Bill Winsor after bowling a 150 game last Thursday puts out
his chest and says that he will have a 136
average for his three games this coming
Thursday ... The Chicago Bears broke all
existing records when they defeated the
Washington Redskins ror the championship 73-0. . . Indiana will win the Big
Ten basketball championship. . . .Art
Seidel went to Marshfield last week and
bowled a 640 series. . . Their are five
boys in school who are capable of running the quarter mile under 52 seconds ...
Kenny Parr our all-conference football
center came out for basketball Monday
night... He is a dassy performer on the
hardcourt.
Coach Kotal's C.S.T.C. cagers 1efeated
Luther College of Decorah, Iowa, 42-40
in a wild exciting game last nigHt in the
P.]. Jacobs High school gym t:!efore a
screaming student body and town~people.
I
The Purple and Gold cagers took an
early lead and held it until midway in
the first half at which time Coadh Kotal
substituted freely. The score at ~he time
of the substitution was 17-9 and when
the half ended the margin was cut down
to 19-18.
The first five started the secdnd half
but they· found the Norsemen if?. a different mood. The Luther boys I jumped
into the lead and held it until the last
four minutes of play. They displayed a
very good brand of basketball and looked
very good on fast breaking plays.
Ra)' Warren led the Point attack by
scoring 14 points with four baskets and
two free throws. Ray Terzynski put in
tWo baskets and six free throws and
Captain Pete Terzynski came through
with four baskets. Engvoldstad was high
point man for the Lutherites by scoring
two buckets and six penalty slwts. The
Pointers won the game from the free
throw line by scoring 18 to their opponents 10 free throws. Luther outscored
them from the field 15 to 12.
The Kotalmen will travel to :Northern
Michigan and Play Michigan T~ch and
Northern Michigan Teachers this coming Friday and Saturday.
Central State 42
Bagnell f ........................ .
Terzynski f ...................... .
Warren c......................... ..
Terzynski g ...................... .
Olk g . ................................
Van Dyke g . ................... .
Fisher c........................... ..
Posluszny g ................
Helixon g ........................ .
Druckery g ..................... ..
Fritsch g ......................... ..
a good steady game. Ken Parr· was the Mullarkey f ...................... .
finest performer at his respective spot. Parr c.· .............................. ..
Although handicapped by an injured
back Ken played an outstanding brand of
ball.
Luther 40
Honorable mention was given to five
of Kotal's boys. Hanig and Dorsha were Thompson f ................... ..
mentioned at ends; Carnahan, Peterson, Preus f ........................... ..
and Koehn received mention as out- Everson f ......................... ..
Settge f ............................ .
standing backs.
Quite an array of talent, isn't it? The T. Jacobson c................. ..
best part of it is that they will all be M . Jacobson c................ .
back next year, we hope. These boys will Kvam g ........................... ..
form a fine nucleus for Coach Kotal's Engvoldstad g .................. .
next years' team and with the· income of McDonald g . ............ ....... .
some fine. new talent maybe you can't C. Jacobson g ................. ..
blame us if we are just a little optimistic. Doniels g .......................... .
The Store With a
Thousand Gifts
Finest Canned Foods and
Fresh Produce
PROMPT SERVICE
~auif;
GIFTS of Distinction
at Modest Prices
Gifts for many members in
the family. Choose from a
large assortment that
you'll be proud to give.
Start making your selec'tions now!
A. L. SHAFTON & CO..
NORM-INGTON'S .
liHuluf
W a.rren Paces Scoring
In Pointers' Third Win
d
.... .
~m~ce~m~m~m~m ~
BELKE
247 N. 2nd St.
ll
RALLY LATE TO BEATr
IOWANS; SCORE 42-40
F,;T. P.F.
2
2
2
0
,6
3
2
0
2
i6
1
0
2
0
1
o lo
'O
0
0
g I~
g lg
0
3
0
0
0
0
~
0
12
·18
13
B.
F.T. P.F.
2
'o
2
0
1
4
~
lci
2
1
0
0
1
0
I0
1
2
1
~
I~
o
.:, 1.:
3
2
2
0
1
18
Meet Andy Varipopa in person, at Breqqer's Arcade Alleya Wednesday, lJ>ec. 11.
Free lessons-one and a quarter lloura entertainment at 11:00 P.M. After th~ leaque
Bowlinq. Admission 40c. -this iiDcludes
one free line of bowlinq at any
e with·
in 30 daya.
lir'
TYPEWRITERS
NEW
REBUILT
USED
~
Carbons
Mention "THE POINTER"
1t2 Spruce St
:ellfielJEJ!1fim~aJli!j!1EJ!1
B.
2
4
4
Ribbons
F. M. PHELAI
PhoweJ·•44s
ntE POIN'fBR
Decefl1ber 11, 1940
J
. t•·IOn
. A Vla
M OSJ
dobs Are Held By
Ground VV orkers
1
It t~kes 30 to 40 ground workers to
keep a si4gle pilot in the air, states Edna
H. Rober,s.
"You s~y it is aviation for you," says
Miss Rob:erts. "All right, what kind of
aviation -+- commercial, private, government, Arrhy, Navy or Marine? And having takenl your choice there, decide between the many fields of work within
that choi~e. Go through this outline of
work in tile commercial airline field, for
example, always remembering those 30odd men ~nd women who are at work on
the grounp for every pilot of a plane:
"Mechanic. A fanatic for detail whose
work deals with engines, propellers, tubing, brakes, rigging, controls, or instruments. Ot perhaps he works in the machine shop, the radio department, or the
sheet metal department. Whatever his
work, he's a specialist at it.
"Operations, communications and meteorology I departments. Operations men
supervise , preperation for a flight, and
have complete charge of the plane while
it is in the air. Radio operators are skilled
at both voice and code communication.
Meteorolqgists have invented' a new
science, aeronautical meteorology.
"Business department. Workers are in
reservations service, sales, purchasing, legal · serviqe, public relations and personI
nel.
I
"THE HOME OF QUALITY
I
FUELS"
CA~EY
COAL CO.
"Steward department. Where the hostesses and stewards draw pay. Perform
services for passengers-serve meals, supervise sleeper accommodations. Also,
there are commissary and clerical jobs in
the steward department.
"Some of the other jobs in aviation are
held by airport managers, field superintendents, airplane salesmen. aviationschool teachers, aviation insurance men,
aviation writers and editors, and research
workers.
"Then, too, there's· the industry's
largest single field --:-- aeronautical engineering and manufacturing."
Toys
S~orting Goods
Fi~hing Tackle
G~ns .
Big Ten
Games
Leon Kalkofen ............ · 6
Becker ............................. 6
Hestad ............................ 6
Pierson .......................... 4
Posluszny ...................... 6
Van, Dyke ...................... 6
Koehn .................... ...... 6
Seidel ............................ 3
Trankle ........................ 3
Yokers .......................... 3
STANDINGS
W.
L.
Phi Sigs ....................................... 5
1
Independents .............................. 4
2
Unite<ll Cigars ............................ 3
3
3
Schilices' Rock Garden ............ 3
Faculty No. I ............................ 2
4
5
Faculty No. II ............................ 1
Before a large crowd of college bowling enthusiasts the Phi Sig keglers took
undisputed possession of first place by
defeating Schlices Rock Garden twice in
their three game series while the Faculty
No. I team won two out of three games
from the Independents to send them into
second place. The United Cigars moved
into a tie for the third spot by taking the
Faculty Team No. II into camp twice.
Leon Kalkofen's 214 game and 597
series score took honors for the evening.
Fruits, Veqetables
and Groceries
' 457 Maln St.
Phone 1526
i
!'
Free Delivery
Studel'lts
Clothing
....
~~~~-----~-~-~-*
A MERRY XMAS
and
HAPPY NEW YEAR
to
Teachets and Students
..
BEftiNS BARBER SHOP
In the Sport Shop Bldq.
-----~~~-~ -~~~~~~~~-~~
GENIUS ....
is perfection in technique
plus something else.
GOOD PRINTING .... .
is the product that fine
craftsmen produce in a
well equipped plant.
Our experience in
printing and helping
you pian your school
annuals and other
publications is
at your service.
Wo.RZAL·LA P~~.nNw:a
HARDWARE
.
BOODl'NDJJfG
PHONE 267
Phone 21
'
JONAS CLOVER
FARM STORE
High Grade
TYPEWRITERS, and
ADDING, MACHINES
Quality Groceries at
Reasonable prices
I
NEW AND USED
STEVENS POINT BEVERAGE CO.
I
The CONTINENTAL
,!,
~--------------------~ .._______________________,
422 Main St.
Best of All
N'O'tlCE!
Final plans for the Newman Club
Sleigh Ride Party will be posted on
the bulletin board.
Phone 51
KREMBS
Generally Better
Always the Best
Sport Shop
I The
Averages
187
167
167
166
162
161
160
160
158
157
, CITY FRUIT EXCHANGE
MAIN STREE.T
FOOO MARKET
FOR !CHRISTMAS GIFTS
Th~
+
+
PHI SIGS T AK.E LEAD
IN BOWLING LOOP
GIVE
1
Bob Becker and Dr. Pierson followed
dose behind with 202, 542; and 206, 539
single and series scores respectively.
Tomorrow nights' festivities will feature the meeting of the two faculty teams.
The faculty No. I team which is defending champ returned to form last week and
defeated the Independents twice to break
rttto the win column. The faculty No. II
' team showed signs of improvement when
they also broke into the victory side of
the ledger by taki:ng one game from the
Uni'ted Cigars.
Schedule
63
Faculty No. 1 vs Faculty No. II
Phi Sigs vs United Cigars +27
Rock Garden vs Independents
83
Beverages~Point Pure
Water Used
RENTED, REPAIRED and
EXCHANGED
PHONE 61
nOWEBS-THE PERFECT GIFT FOR CHRISTMAS
lt-
Special rates to teachers and
students on rentals.
FLOWERS-THE PERFECT
1
~>-i
"'
~
The Perfect Gift
The picture of a lo\.red
one is highly treasured
Special discounts to teachers
on portables.
0
gift.
l:ll
• • •
But one of Wilson's Modem Corsac;res is
~
·r
definitely in order for "her" for Satur-
P. D. SNOW
day niqht's Senior BaiL You can bet
501 V2 Third Street
WAUSAU, WIS.
your complimentary ticket that you're
Send one to the folks
who are away from
home.
When your typewriter or acldinq
machine c;rives trouble, qet
an esliiDUte for repairs
No Appointment
Necessary at the
ARK STUDIO
516 Clark St.
startinq the nic;rht off ric;rht if you send
her a Wilson corsaqe of rose-buds, qar·
denias, orchids or forc;ret-me-nots. Do the
"riqht thinq" by stoppinq in at Wilson's
and leavinq your order next time you're
up town. We'll deliver it when and
FO!' that hungry feeling - try something new and tasty A BIG JUICY SANDWICH at
where you say.
WILSON'S FLORAL & GIFT SHOPPE
421 Main St.
•
2120
~
~
3H !-,;H3.M.01l
)!(-
SYWJ.SUIH::> 110-i Ulf> J.::>3l113d 3HJ.-8113.M.01l
THE
q.Aill
110 N. Third Street
All sandwiches are prepared over an
open CHARCOAL GRILL.
fl•
THE :POINTER
6
SCHOOLMASTERS'·CLUB
MEETS ·AT WIS. RAPIDS
Twenty-eight school men from the
faculties of C.S.T.C. and P.J. Jacobs High
School attended a dinner meeting of the
Central. Wisconsin Schoolmasters' Club,
held Wednesday evening, December 4, at
the Lincol High School at Wisconsin Rapids.
Dinner was served by the Home Economics department to more than 100 men,
the largest attendance at such a meeting
for soi;ne time.
Mr. William C. ·Hansen, our new president, was introduced as a guest at the
meeting and welcomed as a new membe.r
of the club.
·
· The· program of the evening was a
panel discussion on "What Shall Our
High Schools Teach ?" Leading the discussion were ,E. G . Doudna, secretary of
the State Board of Normal Regents, ]. F.
Waddell of the State Department of Education, and Dr. C. E. Ragsdale of the
University of Wisconsin facultv.
Musical numbers were songs by a
HUartet composed of Charles C. Evans and
Herbert Steiner of Stevens Point, Merle
Palmer of Wausau, and W . T. Darling
of Wauwautosa. Community singing was
led by Mr. Darling, accompanied by Norman E. Knutzen. A. W . Zellmer of Wisconsin Rapids is president of the club
and Mr. Knutzen is secretary.
The next meeting will be held February
5 in Wausau.
FREE PARKING
LOT SERVICE STATION
Let us service your car while you shop
DOWNWIND'.S
D.ODO TALK
Well, here's old Downwi~d · back agai~
for some more hangar flying-seems like
thats what we're confined to for a while
-till the planes get their new skiing
outfits rigged up.-Been waiting for two
weeks now-wonder if they'll get here
afore the snow leaves.
When all those boys have so much
spare time on their hands-the bunk flying is fast and furious-the pace is too
much fon us fireside chatters.
*
*
ALL-SCHOOL PA,RTY
DRAWS FINE CROWD
Galesville· Hea'd ·
. Succeeds Ha,sen
The All-School party held in the
Training School gym Friday night had
:a splendid turnout. One of the biggest
crowds of the year was on hand to dance
to the music of the Playboys, the new
school ·dance orchestra. · Dancing lasted
from 9 to 12 P.M.
. Robert C. Petersen, supervisfng principal at Galesville, will ,succeed William C.
Hansen as Superintendent of the Stough~
ton schools. Mr. Hansen was named President of Central State Teachers' College in
·October, and assumed his new duties
December 2.
·
1
.e..
Phone 39.7
JACOBS & RAABE
JEWELRY - MUSIC - RADIO
Expert Watch Repairing
ll1 Water St.
Phone 182
Grizz Hair Cuts
We are experts in all
types of haircut
BERENS BARBER SHOP
In Sport Shop Bulldlnq
e
e
e
and. eol.oniat Room
Sizzlinq Steaks - Our Specialty
Special Sunday Dinners
Attention qiven to Reservations
Group Dinners
I
Phone 397
Br.ings new
life and beauty to
the hair and does not
Obtainable only from your Fulle
Brush l,.,afer- Call him today.
ask for CLIFF SPRAGUE
Phone all calls 566-J-3
~!€:~
OPTOMETRIST
418 Main St.
Stevens Point
EYES EXAMINED
GLASSES FITTED
Convenient Budqet Plan
I
LASTING
(dl~t11
for her
J. L. HANAWAY, 0. D.
for
Across from Post Office
J
~
Cedar Chests
j
~
Make Up Cabipets ~
Sewing Cab~nets ~
for him
Smokers
j
Lounging Chairs
and Stools
Rea~gLamps
Men's Furnishings
Shoes
Save one dollar a
day. •Have $4250
tn ten years.
VETTER MFG. CO.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
2lbs. 65c
Lumber & Millwork
Capital & Surplus $268.500.00
Larqest in Portaqe County
2% lbs. 79c
Holiday Gift
Wrappers
Wisconsin Cheese
451 Main Street
. . . . . . .
• • j • • j~~~·~~·~~·~-"'
• • j • • j • j • • j~
•· ·
~··~~~""'
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++•+++++++++++++
A , UI•Ef·
Off.£ r I• •I •I
f.
~·
POINT CAFE
/!!.~J:f:r/
t
i Don't Be
'WE SERVE TO SERVE AGAIN'
OPEN 24 HOURS!
*
Fe Bohan 'has finally broken down
and signed for a three year term in
the air corps. He is due to report for
training on January 13. Fe--C.S.T.C.
football captain in '39 has just completed a highly successful season in
the pro ranks-playing with the Milwaukee Chiefs and Boston BearsRemember, £ella-nothing but three
point landings.
December I:i, 1940
Oh just before Christmas will be too
So ~rder your c~ds right away
.
For If you forget It
You'll surely regret it
Cards should be ordered today
12 Cards 2sc- 39c- 49c
16 Cards for 89c
18 Cards for 49c
HANNON-BACH
Between the Banks
l~te
THIS SPACE
CLEANED BY
HENLINE'S
POINT CLEANEllS
112 STRONGS AVE.
Visit Our Store and!
Solve Your Gift Problem
BOSTON'S
Furniture & Undertaking
430 Main St. I
If
~~
PATRONIZE
I
"POINTER" ADVERTISERS
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