THE PO.JNTER KRUMM NAMES JOY PROM QUEEN '34

advertisement
Graduates
Meeting
After
Auembl:r
Serie~
THE PO.JNTER
Ill Vol. VIII No. 22
Stevens Point, Wis., March 29,
1934
AssefllbiJ.
TodaJ
At
10 o·c~oc~
Price 7 .Cent•
KRUMM NAMES JOY '34 PROM QUEEN
WALLY BEAU TO
FURNISH MUSIC
FOR BIG EVENT
NATIONAL MEET
AT LEXINGTON
DEBATERS' GOAt
Primaries Plan
Kid Party Apri/9
THE POINTER
2
~·ol.
VIII
THE POINTER
A SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF
PUBLIC EDUCATION IN WISCONsiN
No. 22
Published Weekly at Stevens Point by the students of the Central Wisconsin
State Teachers C<>llege. Subscription Price $2 00 per year.
Entered as l!econd-elass matter May 26, 1927, at the post office at Stevens
Point, Wisconsin, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
EDITORIAL STAFF
J:ditor ......... : . ................. Harvey Polzin, 1011 Main St.'; Phone 1443
Associate Editor ...................................•...•......... John Wied
Sports Editor •...........................................•... Wm. Ringness
News Editors ..•................................ Arba Shore)", Gilbert Busch
Society Editor ..............................................•• Eunice Riley
Girls Sports .••......................................•.....• Thyrza Iverson
Proof· Reader ............................................ Margaret Novitski
BUSINESS STAFF
Bu.ainess Manager .......................... George Maurer, Phone 240J or 43.
Circulation Manager ...••...............................•..... Ignatius Mish
Faculty Adviser ......................•...••.......... Raymond M. Rightsell
The Council on Education of the Wisconsin Teachers As!!ociation ~ub~Uf the
following statements of policy regarding public education f\lr your co~ideH!tion.
These statementll are based (1) upon the fundamental princl~le that tduet.~~if
a func<tion -of the state. This is expressed in Article X and repeatedly· reaff~rmed
in statutory -p rovisions and by Supreme C<>urt decisions. (EdueatioUfo} l~~~r§lU_P,
with its power to affect the common welfare is a social trust and m118t be 'ailmf:
nistered for the common good). We have a social obligation to remoutrate ~Mn
the welfare of children is jeopardized.
State Support Of PUblic Schools
The people of the state are co=itted to a policy ot providiUJ fl8f_
schools on both the elementary and secondary level. Since edueati~n- WptJQI
a responsibility of the state, we urge as vigorously as possible state finalleial
support up to 50% of the cost of the public elementary and aecon~ ~Ofltt.
State Support Of Higher Education
We maintain that the state supported instit~ttions of higher edu-cation are a.n
essential part of a system of free education and should receive f!l~l an~ ~!!1J9-Me
support and confidence.
• ·
' '·
Federal Aid For Education
We support the principle of federal aid .to states for e(J.ucll-tionalpnrP:<J:C!Cs.
Priority Of School Taxes
Since education is a first responsibility of the sta.te, WI! urge thl! rll•r;taetment
of \Section 74.15 which will reestablish the priority of school monies in the diatri·
bution of local tax re!Jeipts.
Fiscal Independence
We re-assert our belief in .t he fiscal independence of school boa.rds.
Change In Tax Base
We believe that the baae of taxation for the support of public II'Chools should
be shifte-d from property to a more equitable measure of ability to paJ. We 1;t~­
lieve that inheritance .taxes, which are the accumulationl! of wealth created py
society, -s hould be· held in trust for public education and not dissipated in cur·
rent expenses of government.
'
Better Schools For Rural Children
We believe that the village and the ope~ country should unite for achool
purposes whereve-r feasible, and where not feasible, the area of the ·taxing unit
should be inereased to make possible as fine a system of elementary &11-d second·
ary schools for rural ~hildren a.s are now available in urban areas.
Part-Time And Evening Schools
We are for adequate financial support and the continuous development of the
part-time and evening school system for both juveniles and adults.
Teacher Preparation
'"
We support a four year course beyond high school graduation as a minimum
qualification for teaching on any level in our state.
Teacher's Minimum Salary
We support a legal minimum !Salary base for teachers of not less than $100
per menth.
The Necessary Modem Curriculum
\Ve advocate for the public schools a curriculum adequate to furnish an ~n·
dersta ndincr of the world in which our pupils will}ive. This will include as basic
subjects m~sic, art, physical education, home making, in_dustrial and vocational
educ:ttion, as well as the more widely accepted school subJeCts.
Health Education
We advocate a continuation of health education in the public &ehools to in·
elude such health services as medical examination, !School nurses, clinics, and
nutrition.
Administrative Reorganization
We favor such a reorganization of the county and state systems of education as will result in a more effe0tive administration thereof and better ~ducational opportunities.
.
. .
We stand directly in opposition to national groups which advocat!l fixmg t~e
limit of free public education at the elementary school _level, and ~o leagues and
alliances backed by financial and industrial le.aders which are tryi~g to emasculate the public schoQl program to proteet theu wealth from ~axahon . . We are
unalterably opposed to any movement ~ place t_he burden of this depressiQn upon
the backs of litltle children. ThP recessiOn ~r withdraw.al of state .suppor: for the
edueation of normal -or mentally and physically handicapped c~1l~ren IS an 11-.t·
tempt to evade the social obligation of our commonwealth. We msist that pubhe
t.imit of free public education at the elementary school level, and to leagues and
the development of ' school policie~, the selection of te11.chers, ~nd ena.etm~nt of
educational legislation should be determined s-olely !lpon their eontnbut1on to
the common welfare.
-,,.
Pointer Office Phone, 1584
College Office Information, Phone 224
HIGHER STANDARDS
· • It may a1ppear to be quite doubtful to many of the present
'1'eachers College Students, but we believe that to the majority of
them the idea of raising the Standards of Teaching, probably in a-ccordance with the suggestion offered by the Council on Education of
t)J.'e Wisconsin Teachers Association, which appears on this page,
would be decidedly benefactory to this profession, The Collij.cil states,
"We support a four year course beyond high school graduation as a
minimum qualification for teaching on any level in our 's tate:'' This
almost undoubtedly would put the Teaching profession ~p to where
it actually belongs, where it would be rated equally with other profe_ssions in the eyes of the public. There perhaps would remain a
shght tendency for the standard to remain somewhat below that of
other professions in that the training necessary for elementary teach?rs could be completed at •state supported institutions, thereby draw~ng young men and women into the field who are not at all fitted
for the work.
On the whole, the level of the profession would be raised consider~bly. Shifting to _Se-condary and Higher Educational fields, preparatiOn along these hnes would duly equal and in some cases surpass that of other professions. This undoubtedly would rid the field
of its many misfits. Likewise salaries must be raised as suo-"'ested
by the council in accordance with the amount of preparation "'~eces­
sary to enter the various steps in the field, which woul-d also help to
raise its level in the eyes of the citizens. Boal'ds of Education of
yarious high schools throughout the state have raised their standards
of requirements for the respective teaching positions. The tendency
at present seems to inform us that such a movement will become
state-wide within the next two or three years.
-. -~ ";?-. ,,
FOR USE AGAIN
Now that the Mens Room is all redecorated and ready for use
~gain, we're wondering if it isn't possible for those ·certain few who
.are continually 'wrecking' the place to refrain from their faulty
habits and help to keep the lounging room neat and in a presentable
condition. All the men of the college should make a special effort to
-depict these obnoxious individuals and bar them from the use of the
room. President Hyer informs us that as much as he desires to ne
finds it impossible to buy any new furniture for the room due t~ the
lack of funds, and if such a thing were possible, it would be a rather
NO JUSTIFICATION FOR FRATERNAL ORDEALS
foolish move considering the rate at which furniture has been deThe fraternity "testing" program has changed in the _las~ ~ew
t>troyed heretofore. Men - it's your room - use it, but let's use it
years
and it was about time that it did. There can be no JUStificat.o a good advantage. Remind the 'rascals' there is a heavy fine for
tion for the :;o-called "hell week". It doesn't make "men" out of
~he destruction of State property.
weaklings. Instead it breaks them down; it is absolutely impossible
to administer couraae confidence, and self-respect by any number of
Knutzen Entertains
beatings. As to theo oth~r angle, th.e ~m;nb.ling o! those who are. ~oo
cocky, it need only be said that agam It IS 1~poss1ble t? beat ?nm~h.ty
NOTICE
Glee Club At Tea Room
into anyone. And any brotherhood that exists to break men s sp1r~~
Students having snapshots
Th~ Men's Glee Club was entersuitable for the Iris-please . should .never dare to lift its face in respectable circles.
There is no justification for fraternal ordeals, impelled as they
tained at the Gingham Tea Room
leave them in the box providmay
be by the best spirit of brotherly love.... !f there is no r~ason­
last eveni.ng by Mr. Norman E.
ed for I!Uch in the main ofable justification for hazing in a brotherly fashion, why does 1t perKnutzen, director of the organizafice. Snaps of by-gone days
sist 1 The answer is simple, but in its frankness it is hard to face.
tion. President F. S. Hyer and
are especially welcome. .
Hazing persists because a certain element in the fraternities enjoy it.
bean Steiner were guests of
Iris Editor
~orne remem-b er the day when they were on the other end of tlie
honor.
paddle, and cannot bear to leave the books unbalanced. Others revel
In connection with the social
in the authority of the paddle. It is a fine game when one can comside of the evening, plans were ll!~~jgjjgjlg]IHJ[g]jgj[g]mli!J
NOTICE
fli mand and be obeyed, even to his slightest desire. Then there is the
made regarding further appear- ~
gang who once upon a time hung aroun-d the benches in front of the
ances of the group. There is ~
All four-year graduates, l!ll "illao-e store waitin(J' for a do()' fi<Tht For them hazing is just a little
evidence that the group will make ll'll
llclJ who expect to be graduated l1ll
o
o o ·to the other fellow, so much the
•
~ amusement.
I£ it iso not so amusing
appearances in some of the larger ~J •
I
m
~une!
pl~ase
m~et
m
the
\i
better.
The
laugh
is
bigger
as
a result._. There have been cases on
high schools in this vicinity.
l!ll auditonum unmediately a.f- ~ this campus that almost resulted in death. All for a little fun that
I i~n 't fun. It isn't worth it, and the sooner the bloodthirsty brothem
A compliment always passes for ~ ter assembly today.
~~~
l)lj realize that the better.-The Lawrentian.
more than its face value,
I
THE POINTER
.1-_w.
PCIOANREDERAPFRIGLHT
A. A.-~ IBI_L~'S BULLj
Marian Morency and Eleanor
Apnl 12 the date set for the
1 12' Eubanks
made their debuts in tap- an~ual basketball banquet. Fritz
dancing circles when a group per- Cnsler, coach at Princeton, is to
No TOURNAMENT formed
recently for Jackson be guest speaker. Such an aecomSchool's P. T. A. Other members plished and well-versed speaker is
IS
T~:gn;:
T
J
:zs
·
OUrney
.
I
1
00n
.
.
The surest sign that spnng.IB
Snke~r comes ~he~ youhsee Maunee
. mner gettm~ m s ape for tenms: \Vorkout~ m the .gym feature
Skinny and his tenniS racquette
as he gets his eye in shape for the
cement court. Pl81DS are already
underway for tennis tournaments
to select the college team. Skinner Cletus Collins Arvie Gordon
Bob Neale and Di~k Schwahn ar~
the vete;ans returning. A r t
Thompson was the only loss by
graduation.
'33 A Poor Season
of the group were: Velma Scrib- a treat well worthy of our cage
Boxing Team S e 1 e c t e d.
ner, Bonita Newby, and Jean squad.
T r a i n Regularly
Lynn. They were -accompanied
For First Test
at the piano by Beulah Bennett
Tumbl'
.
tt'
d
: The elimination tournament
·
.
mg IS ge mg un erway
schedule for tonight has been
Volleyball
. with Art Thompson as he~d tumdropped, due to the bet that most
There are a large number of bier ~nd coach. ~en workmg out
students will be going home for college women out for volleyball. are Jimmy.McGmr.e, Charles Sparthe holidays. The college boxing The tournament will be entered hawk, Bill Theisen, Leonard
.team has been selected, however, by five or six teams, one of which Scheel, John Wied, Art Kussmann,
~nd the men are working hard in is an entirely "Home Ec" group and Clifford Elliot. Ooach Tommy
preparation for the eard at Platte- of sop?om~res.
.
plans to put on an entertainment
iville, April 13. Stanley Roshak,
Tomght IS the last mght for the m :M;ay.
Lloyd Hayes, Charles Torbenson, W AA movie. benefit, a dou·bl~ fe~:Russ Beppler, Peter Zaborski, Al- ture showmg Kay Francis m
Plans for the fraternity kittenivm Zurfluh, Art Laabs, Web Be- :·M.~nSdlalay'' and Wynne Gibson ball tournament will soon begin.
tLast year the rfulacq'?et~rst werle
rard, Bruno Slotwinski, and Mic I~
eepeTE! East". Buy your Several of the fellows wanted to no. very sue~~
m ~ erco •
key McGuire are the punch- tickets from the WAA's.
know if a certain Frank on the l~giate ~ompetitibon: Speetal.dprac-·
throwers ·who will carry the PurThe annual V()Heyball tourna- west side of town belonged to the be~ pe~wds are emg consx ered
ie
and
Gold
as
they
invade
the
nament
schedule
is made out
. h'1s 1to Improve
P
t
pthe games
'bl d ofblthe col.
. · The Ch'1 D elts. H e seems t o h ave m
padded arena
of
the
Pioneers.
g·ames
will
be
played
in
both
gyms
·
art' 1 1 1
ege
s
ars.
ossi
.
.
.
p~sess10n an
1c e c ose y resem- binations are G 0e r ou
d 0 es
n comand
.. Flght At Platteville
on Wednsdays and Thursdays at bhng the trophy won in last year's S h h
d C II'
d N 1
·
.
4 P.M. starting April 4th and run- battle
c wa n, .an
o ms an
ea e.
College fans "":Ill haye a chance ing through the l9th. There are
·
Every sprmg matc?es are held beto see the team m _actwn whe~ a six teams, tw<> Freshmen, two
.
tween colleges, climaxed by the
return match with Platteville· Sophomore, and two Junior-SeMeetmg
state toul'nam.ent. For the last
takes place .shortly after the meet nior. The tournament will be a
At the ·monthly meeting last two years this event has taken
thllere. Oth~~ . matchhesdulbedetwe_ethn . round To'bin affair, the winner de- night plans were begun for the plaee here.
•
d on t h e per·centage b asis.
· event· of t h e year: t h e annua1 1- - - - - - - - - - - - - .
co eges
St
N bare
rt' uemgthsc be t b WI
term me
THE
. h'or e s ask eth es. e ·
The members of the teams are:
play day at which .the W AA memT IS year mar s e maugurab
h
· 1 £ 11
tion of boxing as an intercolleers are <>s.tess~ to gir s o . a
giate sport at Central State. 'l'he Freshmen I
Freshmen n ~he surro~ndmg. high school.s with•
progress in athletics this school Dumbleton
Van Vuren m a ~ertam radms. Followmg the
•'The Bank That Service Built'
has made under Coach Eddie Ko- Bortz
Wehr meetmg the .group attended the
talhas not only brought us win- Kopecky'
Pfiffner theatre benefit.
ning teams, but also a much wider Koshillik
McVey
distribution of sports than ever Larson, M.
M.cWilliams
before in the history of the Argue
Miner
school. Kotal has been instrumen Kahr
Iverson, M.
tal in the ·b acking of boxing, tenTurinski
nis, track, baseball, volleyball,
Sophomore II
golf, cross-country running, tum- Sophomore I
Jones
Malesevich
bling, wrestling, and intramural
Wagner
Bunker
games of all kinds. An athleticalHe·nsell
ly minded man ought to be able Srpry
McGillivray
Houle
to find exereise and experience
MacKenzie
Meath
along nearly any line of w<>rk.
Larson, G.
Switzer
Wide Activity Range
Rodger
Weller
The intramural and interclass Meyer, I,
tournaments give even the poorWHITES-GREYS
. est players a chance for competi- Junior-Senior I · Junior~Senior II
Lynn
tion a.nd exercise. Our institu Hoffland
BLONDES-BLACKS
Scribner
tion has progressed rapidly along Behnke
Newby
scholarship, athletic, and extra- Baughman
P.rices That Match the
Reisinger
curricular lines to such an extent Kimble
that new: ·fields are open to every Sparks
Wiggins
College Student's Purse.
mind and body. The opportu- Rustad
Slowey
nities at C. S. T. C. are certainly Dallich
Iverson, T.
vast, and it does not pay to pass
Sorenson
them all by.
Free Fox Ticket For
The charity that begins at home
Erwin T·auschek
doesn't make many a.cquaintances
abroad.
The miser's creed contains a
iHIA§btD<Dmlf#l#i#[email protected]#jjJQ#i&Mhi#DijiftiW#IMijiijiijl large SaVing Clause.
~
~
~
t
Citizens National Bank
Are You Ready For The
Big Easter Parade??
•
Shoes are the big object Without shoes you're not dressed-
F. 0. HODSDON
I
~ce ~~::::;;Rices
I
"m"!.J:!t!2..~~
THE MODERN TOGGERY
MBN'S SUITS
Sock;- Ties-Shirts and Other
l
Accessories
450 Main St.
College Junior Prom
Friday, April 6
RINGNESS SHOE CO.
Ringness Shoes
Fit Better
Wear Longer
417 MAIN STREET
You '11 want to be dancing in smart,· comfortable shoes-to the music of Wally Beau's
fine orchestra.
WE TINT SHOES TO MATCH YOUR FORMAL GOWNS. ·
THE POINTER
Several New
Books Added
To Library
STUDENT
KEEP IN STYLE
When You Want Something New
and Smart in
LADIES' READY TO WEAR .Go To
Bridge, Ann. Peking picnic
355 p. $2.50, Little, 1932
An artistic novel ·g1vmg a
Faulkner, Harold Underwood
Quest for social justice
1898-1914. 390 p. illm!. $4,
·Macmillan, 1931
A well balanced treatment of
American society of the years before the World War, with especial emphasis {)n the life of the
common people. Prof. Faulkner
has taken a heterogenoous mass of
facts and organized them int() an
interesting story of the death of
the •laissez-faire system; the birth
of the conservation movement;
the labor and feminist movement;
the concern of legislatures for
child labor; and the turn of sentimentalism to realistic trends. An
excellent panoramic v i e w of
American life from 1898 to 1914.
Hoskins, Roy Graham. Tides of
life: the endocrine glands in
·
bodily adjustment
352 p. $3.50, Norton, 1933
An up to the minute resume
giving the latest developments of
the endocrine glands and their
funetions. A firm believer in the
future of glandular therapy, Dr.
Hoskins has written with a conservative and critical mind an interesting and popular book o.n
science without embroidering the
facts, or becoming tiresome with
a lot of incomprehensible technical terms.
.Ttmg, Carl Gustave Modern man
in search of a soul
282 p. $3, Harcourt, 1933
A collection of lectures by a
nbted Viennese psychiatrist who
sees the necessity for an approach
to the spiritual side of man in
psychotherapy. Jung makes an
honest effort to synthesize his
knowledge of the human mind
into a new and modern philosophy. The reader isn't always
positive whether or not the author
is sure <>f himself when he discll.sses the importance of dreams;
t~e original stages of life and the
soul ; or the magnamity of man's
spiritual problems ; •but all lectures are originally presented and
arouse the student's mental curiosity.
Pree Fox Ticket For
lla.fk ~hToeder
CITY FRUIT
ALWAYS OPEN
By LOIS L. RAINER
vivid ~d comprehensive picture
of iegation life in Peking. A
group {)£ sophisticated English,
French and Americans make witty and interesting puppets for
Miss Bridge. The author has a
keen appreciation for Chinese life
and land, and through her we see
beauty in a landscape which has
· often ·been portrayed as arid and
lmplea.&a.nt. A delightful work
through which the reader may
gain ·mueh know·ledge of Chinese
life and -customs.
STEVENS POINT
MOTOR CO.
309 Strongs Ave.
Phone 82
ROSENOW'S
Moii-Giennon Company
BROADCAST
Dear Editor:
I ·know it's a little late for this letter
to get to The Pointer. However, I ea.nnot refrain from dropping this in the
''slot''·
Those seve;n· hundred and fifty of us
who nearly filled the auditorium to ca·
pacity tonight (Monday) to hear th.e
''Petrie All-Star Quintet'' certainly
were well pleased with the program.
Iricide·ntally I might mention that of
the many comments that flowed freely
after the close of the· program, I did not
hear one that did riot praise the e.ntertainers. Our expectations were certainly
lived up to, to the "nth" degree. Pres'
ident Hyer ought to mllike an effort to
get the same eompany to favor us with
an appearance here again next year.
There is another little matter that deserves attention too. The Men's Glee
Club were very good i.n their initial performance. This is something new this
year arid deserves the unstinted praise
of its mariy admirers. There are distinct
possibilities of those men developing ~n­
to a real, first class choir. Go to it boys!
Everyone wants to see you continue the
good work.
Yours,
Orpheus
GROSS &JACOBS
I
Hardware
CENTRAL
STATE TEACHERS
COLLEGE
STEVENS POINT. WIS.
Easily Accessible
Expense Relatively Low
Location Unsurpassed
For Health!uln~
An Influence As Well As a. School
Credits Accepted At All Universities
Degree Courses For All Teachen
Special Training For
Home Economics aDd
Rural Education
Send For Litera.ture
I
ED.RAZNER
:Men's And Boys• Olotbing
And Furnishings
10% Off To Students
Phone- 887
806 M'afn· St.
. Compliments of
I
Free Fox Ticket For
Elmira Blecha
If you have an account
here, you don't have
to go to a Fortune
Teller to have your
future foretold.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Capital &Surplus $250,000
Largest in Portage County
A COMPLE't£
Organization fer
the Production
of Fine Prin ling
Worzalla
Publishing
Company
Muslin d.e Sol
crepe de a1ene
Silk ~e!s
orjcndies
Tcffejcs
For The Shining Hours OJ
The Night
$8.50 to
$16.75
1111
Drink
DEERWOOD
COFFEE
only because
it's better
MOLL .
GLENNON.
/ &
co.
Open to 9;P. M. Friday Nights
THE
Helene Waterman m
Harlequin Club
Several Concerts
Miss Helene Waterman, Sopho1 dB B.
d. more from Mosinee, has been dan• New Amendment sehedUte
~ an gerously ill with scarlet fever for
As has been evident in the last the past· ten days. It is understood
Drops Entrv Bars three
years, our music department that she has passed the ~ri~:li1! and
At' a meeting of the Harlequin is "going over the top" in features is well on her way to recovery.
Club Monday night Professor presented to the student body and Mi:ss Waterman d-oes not expect to
Knutzen addressed the group in to the publ~c. During Mr. Michel- return to school this semester.
an informal and inspiring talk. so·n 's regini·e the music department
Plans were made for a party to be of C. S. T. C. has blossomed into
A bank teller alwars has someheld shortly after the holidays. A one of the outstanding schools in thing of interest qn hand.
new amendment proposed by Bill this outside activity.
·
Rin~~s was officially read into . We are hereby submitting somethe '(mhs'titution after being tabled of the plans of this department.
for two weeks. This alteration Though they are not complete
will certainly be of interest.
and do not include all of the inPHONE 380
New Requirements
tentional exc_ursio.ns and appearEverything In
Membership in Harlequin Club ances t? be g_Iven I?- o~her s~bools,
is :p.ow attaina'hle by students they Will briefly_ mdiCate ImporLaundry
doimg outstanding work in speech tant dates of their calendar.
cla8ses ~ well as to those who April 11, '34.
Band Concert
and
have taken part in plays sponsor(In Auditorium)
Cleaning
ed <by the elub. Activity in Harle- Aprill5, '34.
Chorus and
quin productions, which hitherto
Orchestra, (Internationl Radio
Services
has been the only method of gainProgram)
ing admittance, will admit only April 20 '34. High School Band ~~;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;~ij
those whose work is deemed satisFestiv~l.
factory by a unani~ous vote. of April 25, '34.
Operetta
the cl.ub membersh.Ip, accordmg May 10 and 11, '34. Athletic and
to th~ ne:w emendation.
.
Music Festival.
The amendment was adopted m
For The College
order to affiliate the dub more
closely with other dramatic work
Prom And
A New York youth lost $3,000,in college and to offer member- 000 in less than three seconds reSpring Formals
-ship to a greater number of cently. The heiress said, "No".
people, whi'<lh ha·s become neces~
'sary due to the •growth of the
Student Special
~chool in recent years.
Tl~UUJ)...:Jl
2 BIG FJL\T'D)qfl
MATINEE THU. 2 P~ - l h
KAY FRAN
"MANDALAF
N0RM) NGToN'S
· ·.
Dry
"MASSACRE"
-TUXEDOS-
--·--Publish Article By
Former T. C. Student
An article entitled, "Attenuation of Overland Radio Transmission" written by Clifford N.
Anderson was recently published
in the research bulletin of the Bell
Telephone Company. Mr. Anderson was formerly a resident of
lola. He attended this institution
for a tiwe and served in the Radio
sectio:il 4uring the late war.
Many a true word is spoken by
mistake.
3
0F
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BOURJOIS'
LOVELIEST CREATIONS
{~.
Ut
$1.75
MONTGOMERY-WARD & CO.
Phone 1542
320 Main Street
·College
Drop in and see ?Ur. n,ew
spring stock of sui£&, hats,
ties, shirts and men's w~
ing apparel. Qualitr, . F~f­
chandise in line with the
student's pocketbook.
Pn!liJ
FACE POWDER
PERFUME
LIPSTICK
All for
Spring Styles
..
$1!~
oF the
A. l SHAFI'ON & CO.
Our new stock of spring
dresses, swagger suits, coats,
wraps and suits will be just
the thing for those college
social events after Easter.
When downtown we invite
you to visit our displ~ys.
DISTRIBUTORS
"HELLMANS"
Thousand Island Dressing
Mayonnaise Dressing
Sandwich Spread
BOURJOIS
Try "HELLMANS''
Better Than The Rest
TAYLOR'S
Has New Truth Made Impossible An Old Faith?
Bring Your Faith Up To Date.
Truth Can Do You No Harm.
You May Be Injured For Life If You Refuse
To Expand Your Faith.
Make Your Religious Thought And Practice
Grow Until It Includes All Truth.
GO TO CHURCH.
.
KISS STORE
Phone 875
445 nlain Street
t
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t,
Continental ·
Clothing Stott! .
427 Main Street,
Phone 971
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ASECOND FAKE
IS UNCOVERED
FOR STUDENTS
. ".reachers Agency Is Termed
lfot Reliable. Students
ShQuld Investigate
The following information coneerning an advertisement of a
Teachers Agency of which has apin several of the Teachers
college papers, a second graft
:Within .Teachers College circles in
the past two weeks, was received
the' ]NWrt week.
' Post-dated Checks
As :f-ar. ae we can learn the proeedore of the agency has been
to buy good-sized space, offering
post dated checks in payment,
_these checks being made payable
quite 800lle time after the a,dvertising would be of the most use.
The. registration fee appears to
be $3.00 if the candidate enrolls
for either a summer or school
year position, $5.00 if he enrolls
for both, $3.00 each additional if
candidates enroll in Department
B, which is for people who wish to
secure positions in the same city.
The oommission is 2%. This i~
quoted from the contra·ct, ''The
XYZ guarantee to secure a good
position for the eandidate - with
Sllbstantial raise in salary, if the
· ea.nd:idate is now teaching - or it
will, if the candidate requests a
refund, refund all the money paid
to the XYZ, including all the
money the candidate paid the
XYZ for photos. The candidate
agrees to supply the XYZ with at
least six good copies of his or her
photo. Failure to do so within
one week from the date of this enrollment will relie'Ve the XYZ
from all obligation to make a refund to the candidate."
Many Vacancies
Ineluded with the letters sent
to those who reply to their ad is
a map showing the approximate
number of va-cancies annually in
eaah state. 2,891 is the number
given for Wisconsin. The ad
states that "good positions" are
plentiful now and that complete
information will .be mailed upon
the reeeipt of a three--cent stamp.
They also offer oo. their registration blan•k to pay $5.00 for each
name suggested as a candidate as
soon as a position is secured for
this person.
How the manager got the data
from Wisconsin is a mystery.
Anyway it seems outrageous to
take money on this basis.
Mr. Herriek made an announ'Cein Ma.ss Conference M o n d a y
afternoon stating that all graduates interested in registering
with a Teachers Agency see him
as to the stability of the organization before doing so.
Peared
WISCONSIN SHOE SHOP
SHOE REPAIRING
Ul Strongs Ave.
._________________________
~
THE POINTER
I
SAY IT
~ISN'T
SO!!!
LJ A J\T.G£
E·,Av.c•flrt..l
y~
'S
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MILWAUKEE
L<>well Thomas, well known adventurer, writer, and lectwre·r,
spoke on "International Phases of
. the Present World Tangle'' at an
. · assembly program at Milwaukee
Teachers College. Mr. Thomas
needs no introduction to readers,
Say It Isn't So - that Evelyrn St&ph- a-s he is a well known radio reportenson said men are just the opposite er on a national -chain. He is well
from guns: the 'Smaller the caliber, the prepared to deliver his message
bigger the bore.
as he has travelled extensively in
.And then there was the bootlegger the United States, Europe, Alaswho walked all the '1Vay to the drug ka, the Arctic, Arabia, and many
store to get some poison to kill the eat. other countries. (From the Echo
Weekly, Milwaukee Teachers ColOne fa.mily in town ha.s moved so
often that everytbne their chickens sa.w lege).
a wagon, they'd cross their feet and
'DE PERE
wa.f.t to be tied.
''Denying that they circulated
Miss Jones ea.n 't understand why petitions <>f any kind in the De
Francis Bremmer still oomes late to bio- Pere elections, the Independent
logy class now that his girl has searlet Democrats, College Students, who
fever.
entered city politics ten days ago
and dropped out three days later
Art Xussmann said all a. musician in obedience to their superiors, are
does for a. living is play around.
t(}day definitely out of the politiOne of our stndent OW.A workers said cal pieture.
"The campaign, which etute4
as a. bulletin board joke, and grew
into a serious a.tt~mlj).t to b ne:iDA'
ination, papers for.,· epmpltte tieket of 14 candidat.e&; held the m
terest of De Pete f£'over a week,
and had .state n.pa.peroa telephoning the coil• at all ho111'8
of the .day, espec.iallt during the
last week-.end.'' ·(From The St
Norberta Times,_Defere, Wis.)
WELCOME TO
THE POINT CAFE
Here you will find Good Food. Clean,
Courteous Service alldeaigaed to make
you and your friends comlortabJe aDd
contented while you are our guests.
SOl Main St.
STEVENS POINT, W1L
TYPEWRITERS
Special
Student Rate
$3.00 Monthly
3 Months for $7.50
HUTTER BROS.
Phone45
he bas eaten three yeast ca!kes but
hasn 't got a raise yet.
If you kn<lw Mish you'll a.gree that
what the world needs is a good five
''scent'' cigar.
Madge Griffin stated that one reason
why girls are naughty is because they
get the shingle in the wrong place.
College ]·unior Prom
Friday, April 6
One of our professors spent some time
figuring ()Ut why several -of our students
are so absent·minded and then he forgot
the answer.
Sa.m :Kingston said golf is about the
only thing th&t depreciates above par.
The only thing that's more popular
than the "silver coach"
with the
college students is the allowance cheek
from home.
·
Ed. Jarvis said his home town, Laona,
is so small that they painted ''Come
Again" on the back of the "Welcome"
sign.
We understand Celestine Nuesse was
proposing to "one" of his coeds on the
way home from the dance the other
night and then was stopped abruptly on
the comer of Main and Division streets.
.A few of the eollege boys can't see
what's right under their noses. If they
could, a lot of mustaches would be
shaved off.
Time will tell-unless the gossips beat it under the wire.
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Beau's
Wally
When
Orchestra strikes up the
tune of the Grand March in
the new gym next Friday
night you'll want to look
your best.
Visit our display room
today and see our entirely
new 1934 formal and semiformal gowns in all shades
and sizes.
STUDENTS!
In Appreciation
Of Their Support
Patronize .
..
Pointer
Advertisers .
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FISCHER'S
Specialty Shop
(Hotel Whiting Block)
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