STATEMENT OF REASONS

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Canada Border
SelVices Agency
Agen08 des servials
frontaliers du Canada
4214-33
AD/1398
4218-32
CVDI134
OTTAWA, July 31,2012
STATEMENT OF REASONS
Concerning the initiation of investigations into the dumping and subsidizing of
CERTAIN UNITIZED WALL MODULES ORIGINATING IN OR EXPORTED FROM
THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
DECISION
Pursuant to subsection 31 (l) of the Special Import Measures Act, the President of the
Canada Border Services Agency initiated investigations on July 16,2012, respecting the alleged
injurious dumping and subsidizing of unitized wall modules, with or without infill, including
fully assembled frames, with or without fasteners, trims, cover caps, window operators, gaskets,
load transfer bars, sunshades and anchor assemblies, originating in or exported from the
People's Republic of China.
Cet enonce des motifs est egalement disponible en franyais.
This Statement of Reasons is also available in French.
Canada
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SUMMARy
1
INTERESTED PARTIES
1
Complainants
1
Exporters
3
Importers
3
Government of China
3
PRODUCT INFORMATION
3
Definition
3
Additional Product Information
3
Production Process
5
Classification of Imports
6
LIKE GOODS
6
THE CANADIAN INDUSTRy
7
Standing
7
THE CANADIAN MARKET
7
EVIDENCE OF DUMPING
8
Normal Value
9
Export Price
10
Estimated Margins of Dumping
10
MARGIN OF DUMPING AND VOLUME OF DUMPED GOODS
10
EVIDENCE OF SUBSIDIZING
11
Programs Being Investigated
13
Programs Not Being Investigated
14
Conclusion
14
Estimated Amount of Subsidy
14
AMOUNT OF SUBSIDY AND VOLUME OF SUBSIDIZED GOODS
16
EVIDENCE OF INJURy
17
Lost Sales
17
Price Erosion and Price Suppression
18
Reduced Profitability
18
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
Loss of Market Share
19
Reduced Employment
19
Underutilization of Capacity
20
THREAT OF INJURy
20
CAUSAL LINK - DUMPING/SUBSIDIZING AND INJURy
21
CONCLUSION
;
21
SCOPE OF INVESTIGATION
21
FUTURE ACTION
22
RETROACTIVE DUTY ON MASSIVE IMPORTATIONS
23
UNDERTAKINGS
23
PUBLICATION
24
INFORMATION
24
APPENDIX 1 - DESCRIPTION OF IDENTIFIED PROGRAMS AND INCENTIVES
26
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
SUMMARY
[1]
On May 24,2012, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) received a written
complaint from Allan Window Technologies, Ferguson Neudorf Glass Inc., Flynn Canada Ltd.,
Inland Glass & Aluminum Ltd.!Aluminum Curtainwall. Systems Inc., Oldcastle Building
Envelope, Sota Glazing Inc., Starline Architectural Windows Ltd. and Toro Aluminum/Toro
Glasswall Inc., (hereafter 'the Complainants') alleging that imports of certain unitized wall
modules originating in or exported from the People's Republic of China (China) are being
dumped and subsidized and that the dumping and subsidizing has caused injury and is
threatening to cause injury to the Canadian industry.
[2]
On June 14,2012, pursuant to paragraph 32(1)(a) of the Special Import Measures Act
(SIMA), the CBSA informed the Complainants that the complaint was properly documented.
The CBSA also notified the Government of China (GOC) that a properly documented complaint
had been received and provided the GOC with the non-confidential version of the subsidy
portion of the complaint.
[3]
Although the GOC was informed that it was entitled to consultations prior to the
initiation of the investigations, pursuant to Article 13.1 of the Agreement on Subsidies and
Countervailing Measures, the GOC did not request any such consultations.
[4]
The Complainant provided evidence to support the allegations that certain unitized wall
modules from China have been dumped and subsidized. The evidence disclosed a reasonable
indication that the dumping and subsidizing has caused injury and is threatening to cause injury
to the Canadian industry producing these goods.
[5]
On July 16,2012, pursuant to subsection 31(1) of SIMA, the President of the CBSA
(President) initiated investigations respecting the dumping and subsidizing of certain unitized
wall modules from China.
INTERESTED PARTIES
Complainants
[6]
The Complainants account for a major proportion of the production oflike goods in
Canada. The Complainants' goods are produced at manufacturing facilities at various locations
in Canada.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
1
[7]
The names and addresses of the Complainants are:
Allan Window Technologies
131 Caldari Rd., Unit #1
Concord, ON L4K 3Z9
Ferguson Neudorf Glass Inc.
4275 North Service Road
Beamsville, ON LOR IBI
Flynn Canada Ltd.
6435 Northwest Drive
Mississauga, ON L4V 1K2
Inland Glass & Aluminum Ltd.!Aluminum Curtainwall Systems Inc.
1820 Kryczka Place
Kamloops, B.C. VIS IS4
Oldcastle Building Envelope
210 Great Gulf Drive
Concord, ON L4K 5WI
Sota Glazing Inc.
443 Railside Drive
Brampton, ON L7A lEI
Starline Architectural Windows Ltd.
9380 198th Street
Langley, B.C. VIM 3C8
Toro Aluminum/Toro Glasswall Inc.
330 Applewood Crescent
Concord, ON L4K 4V2
[8]
Other producers of like goods in Canada include: Aluminum Window Design Ltd.,
Applewood Glass & Mirror Inc., ENVISION Global Inc., Epsylon Concept Inc., Ferguson Glass
(Western) Ltd., Gamma Industries Gamma Windows and Walls International Inc., Merit Glass
Ltd., Noram Enterprises Inc., OVG Inc., Phoenix Glass Inc., Primeline Window and Doors Inc.,
Quest Window Systems Inc., State Window Corporation, Transit Glass Inc., Verval Ltd.,
Windsor Glass Company operating as Contract Glaziers, and Zimmcor. All Canadian producers
with the exception of ENVISION Global Inc., Basic Structures Engineering, and Gamma
Industries Gamma Windows and Walls International Inc. provided letters supporting the
complaint l .
1 Dumping Exhibits 15 (NC), 16 (NC), 17 (NC), 18 (NC), 19 (NC), 20 (NC), 24 (NC), 25 (NC), 26 (NC), 27 (NC),
28 (NC), 29 (NC), 30 (NC), 31 (NC), 32 (NC).
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
2
Exporters
[9]
The CBSA identified 80 potential exporters and producers of certain unitized wall
modules over the period of January 1,2009 to March 31, 2012 from information provided by the
Complainants and CBSA import documentation.
Importers
[10] The CBSA identified 17 potential importers of certain unitized wall modules over the
period of January 1,2009 to March 31,2012 from information provided by the Complainants
and CBSA import documentation.
Government of China
[11 ] For the purpose of these investigations, "Government of China" refers to all levels of
government, i.e. federal, central, provincial/state, regional, municipal, city, township, village,
local, legislative, administrative or judicial, singular, collective, elected or appointed. It also
includes any person, agency, enterprise, or institution acting for, on behalf of, or under the
authority of, or under the authority of any law passed by, the government ofthat country or that
provincial, state or municipal or other local or regional government.
PRODUCT INFORMATION
Definition
[12]
For the purpose of these investigations, the subject goods are defined as:
Unitized wall modules, with or without infill, including fully assembled frames,
with or without fasteners, trims, cover caps, window operators, gaskets, load
transfer bars, sunshades and anchor assemblies originating in or exported from the
People's Republic of China.
Additional Product Information
[13] Subject and like unitized wall modules are an aluminum framed engineered fenestration
product which form the building envelope or facade for multi-story buildings; the building
envelope or facade is often referred to as curtain wall or window wall. Unitized wall modules are
designed to be and are interlocking with each other; are assembled at a production facility and
shipped to site for installation ("certain unitized wall modules").
[14] Stick system building envelopes or facades are not subject goods as they are not unitized.
Unlike unitized wall modules, stick systems are not interlocking and require installation of
individual framing components on-site to form the supporting grid for the system. Stick systems
are shipped to the project site as vertical and horizontal member components which are then
installed and connected piece by piece to fmm the structural grid for a stick system envelope or
facade for buildings. Once the grid of support members is secured to the building structure, infill
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
3
materials are installed from the exterior and/or interior side of the building. Once a stick system
envelope or facade is completed, the appearance of the building exterior will be similar to a
building envelope or facade made up of unitized wall modules. However, a stick system
envelope or facade is differentiated from a "unitized wall module" building envelope or facade
when viewed from the building interior, where the vertical frame members in the stick envelope
or facade will be one-piece, and in the "unitized wall module" envelope or facade the vertical
frame members will be two interlocked pieces.
[15] Products referred to as "point-fixing glass wall/curtain wall" and "full-glass glass
wall/curtain wall" use glass fins, patch fittings, cable supports and other means for structural
support and do not rely on the extruded aluminum members used in the subject goods covered by
this complaint. These products cannot be "unitized" and are not subject goods.
[16]
Installed unitized wall modules separate the outdoors from a building's indoor
environment. The unitized wall modules are designed to resist extreme wind pressures, limit air
infiltration and exfiltration, prevent water infiltration and meet heat loss and energy usage
criteria.
.[17]
The unitized wall modules are generally designed to meet any of the following or
equivalent specifications:
2
• air infiltration/exfiltration to a minimum 0.10 L/s/m when tested in accordance with
American Society of Testing and Materials ("ASTM") standard E283 at 0.3kPa
negative and positive pressure differential or equivalent proprietary or other
internationally accepted standard;
• no water infiltration when tested under static wind load in accordance with
ASTM Standard E331 using 205 liters of water per square meter for 15 minutes at a
minimum 0.3kPa negative pressure differential or equivalent proprietary or other
internationally accepted standard;
• no water infiltration when tested under dynamic wind load in accordance to
American Architectural Manufacturers Association ("AAMA") Standard 501.1 using
205 liters of water per square meter for 15 minutes at a minimum O.3kPa negative
pressure differential or equivalent proprietary or other internationally accepted
standard;
• structural performance when tested to ASTM Standard E330 by uniform static air
pressure at a minimum 0.5kPa for 60 seconds without permanent deformation or
equivalent proprietary or other internationally accepted standard; or
• thermal performance calculated in accordance with Canadian Standards Association
("CSA") Standard A440.2 to deliver a maximum of3.0 W/m2C for vision glass areas
and 1.5 W/m 2 C for opaque areas (including framing) or equivalent proprietary or
other internationally accepted standard".
[18]
Unitized wall modules usually consist of three principal components: extruded prefinished (mill, alodine, painted or anodized) aluminum frame, hardware, and infill materials.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
4
[19] The frame is the structural component that provides support for the infill materials.
Hardware consists of fasteners, gaskets & sealants used to attach or sit between the frame and the
infill materials. Infill materials include but are not limited to insulated glass units, monolithic
glass, panels of various materials such as stone, granite or limestone, aluminum or galvanized
steel back pans, insulation, terracotta tiles, ceramic tiles, thin veneer unitized bricks, louvers,
grilles and photovoltaic panels. Patio or terrace doors and operable windows also are used as
infill materials.
Production Process
[20] The manufacturing process begins with the fabrication of individual module components.
Aluminum extrusions in the required sizes, shapes and finishes are purchased as required for
each project. They are verified for colour and surface quality meeting the applicable standards
and to ensure they meet the specifications of the individual project for which they are destined.
[21] Thermal breaks made from non-metal materials such as PVC or Polyamide extrusions are
sized and inserted into the aluminum extrusions to separate interior from exposed exterior
sections of the frame. These composite frame sections are cut to length, if required shaped and
machined to the final size of the unitized wall modules.
[22] The frame sections are then assembled. Typically the vertical mullions and horizontal
frame sections are assembled using screws to connect the vertical to the horizontal frame
sections. Frames are typically rectangular in shape but may also be manufactured to different
shapes by use of various angles and curves.
[23] The frames are prepared for the installation of infill materials. Frame connections are
sealed using various sealant such as silicone, butyl, acrylic and elastomeric sealants. Frame
sections are prepared by installing various types of air seal and glazing gaskets and/or glazing
tapes to achieve air and water tight seals between the frame and infill materials.
[24]
Once the frames have been prepared the infill materials are added. This can be done in a
stationary manner on a fixed assembly table or on a conveyor assembly line. The process of
installation into the assembled frames varies depending on the type of infill and complexity of
the final unitized wall modules.
[25]
For a typical unitized glazed wall module the following assembly/infill procedures apply:
• install aluminum or galvanized steel back pans at spandrel conditions / opaque areas;
• seal back pans at the perimeter to the horizontal and vertical frame sections;
• install insulation boards of various thickness and materials into the backpan area. The
insulation boards typically used are mineral board and fiberglass board;
• install glass panels of various thickness and assemblies into the vision and spandrel
areas;
• glass panels or other infill materials are secured to frame sections mechanically using
extruded glass stops, pressure plates and caps, or are glued using structural silicone
or special structural adhesive tapes.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
5
[26] Infill materials can vary in type, thickness, and colour. Materials include but are not
limited to insulated glass units, monolithic glass, aluminum or galvanized steel back pans,
insulation, panels of metal, granite, limestone, photovoltaic, fibre reinforced or thin precast
concrete, terra cotta and ceramic tiles, thin veneer unitized bricks, louvers, grilles and fixed or
operable sun shading devices. Patio or terrace doors and operable windows are also used as infill
materials.
[27] Once the frame assembly and installation of infill materials is completed, the assembled
unitized wall modules are protected for shipment using cardboard, wood crating or steel racks.
The product is then ready for shipment to the customer.
Classification of Imports
[28] Under the 2011 Customs Tariff, the goods subject to the product definition were normally
imported into Canada under the following Harmonized System (HS) classification numbers:
7610.10.00.20
7610.90.00.90
[29] Under the 2012 Customs Tariff, the goods subject to the product definition are normally
imported into Canada under the following HS classification numbers:
7610.10.00.20
7610.90.10.90
7610.90.90.90
[30] Certain importers may also be classifying the subject goods under the following
HS classification numbers:
6802.23.00.10
7005.29.00.98
[31] The HS classification numbers identified are for convenience of reference only. The
HS classification numbers include non-subject goods. Also, subject goods may fall under
HS classification numbers that are not listed. Refer to the product definition for authoritative
details regarding the subj ect goods.
LIKE GOODS
[32]
Subsection 2(1) of SIMA defines "like goods", in relation to any other goods, as goods
that are identical in all respects to the other goods, or in the absence of identical goods, goods for
which the uses and other characteristics closely resemble those of the other goods.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
6
[33] Unitized wall modules produced by the domestic industry compete directly for the same
building contracts as the unitized wall modules imported from China. The goods produced in
Canada are completely substitutable with unitized wall modules produced in China. Therefore,
the CBSA has concluded that unitized wall modules produced by the Canadian industry
constItute like goods to the unitized wall modules produced in China. Unitized wall modules can
be considered as a single class of goods.
THE CANADIAN INDUSTRY
[34] As previously stated, the Complainants account for a major proportion of domestic
production of like goods.
Standing
[35]
Pursuant to subsection 31 (2) of SIMA no investigation may be initiated unless:
a) the complaint is supported by domestic producers whose production represents more
than fifty per cent of the total production of like goods by those domestic producers
who express either support for or opposition to the complaint; and
b) the production of the domestic producers who support the complaint represents
twenty-five per cent or more of the total production oflike goods by the domestic
industry.
[36] Based on an analysis of the information provided in the complaint and letters of support
provided by other Canadian producers, the CBSA is satisfied that the complaint is supported by
domestic producers, who represent more than 50 percent of the total production by those
domestic producers expressing an opinion, and who represent more than 25 percent of unitized
wall modules production in Canada.
THE CANADIAN MARKET
[37] The domestic industry and the Chinese exporters sell certain unitized wall modules
through the same channels of distribution to both general contractors and owners of building
projects in Canada.
[38] The Complainants estimated the import portion ofthe Canadian market using their
commercial intelligence.
[39] The Complainant's commercial intelligence indicated that China, the Federal Republic of
Germany and the Republic of Korea are the only countries that export certain unitized wall
modules to Canada.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
7
[40] The Complainants provided estimates respecting the Canadian market for certain unitized
wall modules. These figures are based on their own domestic sales reports, commercial
intelligence and on publicly available import data.
[41] The CBSA conducted its own analysis of imports of goods based on actual import data
from CBSA import documentation.
[42] A review of CBSA import data demonstrated a similar pattern to that provided by the
Complainants with respect to subject good imports from China. However, the CBSA found that
other countries have exported unitized wall modules in addition to China, the Federal Republic
of Germany and the Republic of Korea.
[43] Detailed information regarding the volume of subject imports and domestic production
cannot be divulged for confidentiality reasons. The CBSA has, however, prepared the following
table to show the estimated import share of certain unitized wall modules in Canada.
CBSA Estimates of Import Share
(By Value2)
Country of Origin
China
Korea
Germany
USA
Other Countries
Total Imports
2010
2009
13%
9%
1%
74%
3%
100%
2011
38%
3%
1%
55%
3%
100%
50%
1%
2%
40%
7%
100%
2012-Ql
22%
0%
7%
48%
23%
100%
EVIDENCE OF DUMPING
[44] The Complainants allege that subject goods from China have been injuriously dumped
into Canada. Dumping occurs when the normal value of the goods exceeds the export price to
importers in Canada.
[45] Normal value is generally based on the domestic selling price oflike goods in the country
of export where competitive market conditions exist, or on the full cost of the goods plus a
reasonable amount for profit.
[46] The export price of goods sold to importers in Canada is the lesser of the exporter's
selling price and the importer's purchase price, less all costs, charges, and expenses resulting
from the expOliation of the goods.
2 Reliable importation volume was unavailable in the CBSA's import documentation so the importation sales value
was used to create the table.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
8
[47] The Complainants' allegations of dumping are based on a comparison of estimated
normal values of the allegedly dumped goods with estimated export prices to Canada.
[48] The CBSA's analysis of the alleged dumping is based on a comparison of the CBSA's
estimated normal values with the estimated export prices.
[49]
Estimates of normal value and export price are discussed below.
Normal Value
[50] The Complainants did not have any information to perform an estimate of normal value
based on domestic sales of like goods in China.
[51 ] Normal values were estimated by the Complainants based on the estimated costs of like
goods in China plus an amount for profits, a method similar to paragraph 19(b) of SIMA. There
is no publicly available information on the costs in China of the input materials used in the
production of certain unitized wall modules. Therefore, the estimated costs for input materials
(aluminum extrusions, infill materials, hardware) were determined using the Complainants' own
costs. The estimated conversion costs (labor cost and general selling and administrative
expense) for producing unitized wall modules from the input materials were based on an
estimated percentage of the Complainant's conversion costs adjusted to reflect the differences
between the costs in China and Canada. The adjustments to the conversion costs were derived
from industry reports. 3 The Complainants' estimated an amount for profit using a publicly
available annual report. 4
[52] The Complainants' normal value estimates appear to be conservative and reasonable in
nature.
[53] The CBSA did not have any information to perform an estimate of normal value based on
domestic sales of like goods in China.
[54] The CBSA estimated normal values using a similar methodology as described above.
Adjustments to the Complainants' estimates were made to the cost of aluminum extrusions,
general selling and administrative expense, and the amount for profit to reflect the CBSA's
research.
3
4
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 13
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 14
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
9
Export Price
[55] The export price of goods sold to an importer in Canada is generally determined in
accordance with section 24 of SIMA as being an amount equal to the lesser of the exporter's
selling price for the goods and the price at which the importer has purchased or agreed to
purchase the goods adjusting by deducting all costs, charges, and expenses, duties and taxes
resulting from the exportation of the goods.
[56] The Complainants used a deductive methodology to estimate export prices, beginning
with price quotes for specific projects they were able to obtain from various sources. The
5
Complainants provided evidence in their complaint to support these price quotes.
[57] The Complainants calculated the estimated export prices by deducting amounts for
estimated inland freight, ocean freight, Canadian freight and brokerage fees to arrive at an
estimated FOB China factory price.
[58]
The CBSA estimated the export prices using a similar methodology as used by the
Complainants. Adjustments were made to the Complainants' estimates, where better
information was available from the CBSA's review of import documentation for items such as
freight and brokerage.
Estimated Margins of Dumping
[59] The CBSA estimated margins of dumping by deducting the CBSA's estimated export
prices from the CBSA's estimated normal values and expressing the result as a percentage of the
export price.
[60] Based on this analysis, the subject goods from China were dumped by an estimated
margin of dumping of 12%, expressed as a percentage of export price.
MARGIN OF DUMPING AND VOLUME OF DUMPED GOODS
[61] Under section 35 of SIMA, if, at any time before the President makes a preliminary
determination, the President is satisfied that the margin of dumping of the goods of a country is
insignificant or the actual and potential volume of dumped goods of a country is negligible, the
President must terminate the investigation with respect to that country.
[62] Pursuant to subsection 2 (1) of SIMA, a margin of dumping ofless than 2% of the export
price is defined as insignificant and a volume of dumped goods is considered negligible if it
accounts for less than 3% of the total volume of goods that are of the same description as the
dumped goods that are released into Canada from all countries.
5
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachments 6-12
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
10
[63] On the basis ofthe estimated margin of dumping and the import data for the period of
January 1,2010 to March 31,2012, summarized in the table below, the estimated margin of
dumping is not insignificant and the estimated volume of dumped goods is not negligible.
Estimated Margin of Dumping and Imports of Certain Unitized Wall Modules
January 1,2010 to March 31, 2012
Country
Estimated Share
of Total Imports
by Sales Value6
Estimated
Dumped
Goods as %
of Country
China
Korea
Germany
USA
Other Countries
Total
41%
1%
2%
48%
8%
100%
Total
100%
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
Estimated
Dumped Goods
as a % of Total
Imports
41%
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
Estimated
Margin of
Dumping as a %
of Export Price
12%
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
* NIA indicates Not Applicable.
EVIDENCE OF SUBSIDIZING
[64] In accordance with section 2 of SIMA, a subsidy exists where there is a financial
contribution by a government of a country other than Canada that confers a benefit on persons
engaged in the production, manufacture, growth, processing, purchase, distribution,
transportation, sale, export or import of goods. A subsidy also exists in respect of any form of
income or price support within the meaning of Article XVI ofthe General Agreement on Tariffs
and Trade, 1994, being part of Annex lA to the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement,
that confers a benefit.
[65]
Pursuant to subsection 2(1.6) of SIMA, a financial contribution exists where:
a) practices of the government involve the direct transfer of funds or liabilities or the
contingent transfer of funds or liabilities;
b) amounts that would otherwise be owing and due to the government are exempted or
deducted or amounts that are owing and due to the government are forgiven or not
collected;
c) the government provides goods or services, other than general governmental
infrastructure, or purchases goods, or;
d) the government permits or directs a non-governmental body to do anything referred
to in any of paragraphs (a) to (c) above where the right or obligation to do the thing is
The CBSA's import documentation was used to estimate the imports of subject goods during the POI. Since
reliable information on import volume was not contained in the documentation the import sales value was used as
the unit of measure.
6
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
11
normally vested in the government and the manner in which the nongovernmental
body does the thing does not differ in a meaningful way from the manner in which
the government would do it.
[66] If a subsidy is found to exist, it may be subj ect to countervailing measures if it is specific.
A subsidy is considered to be specific when it is limited, in law or in fact, to a particular
enterprise or is a prohibited subsidy. An "enterprise" is defined under SIMA as also including a
"group of enterprises, an industry and a group of industries." Any subsidy which is contingent, in
whole or in part, on export performance or on the use of goods that are produced or that originate
in the country of export is considered to be a prohibited subsidy and is, therefore, specific
according to subsection 2(7.2) of SIMA for the purposes of a subsidy investigation.
[67] An enterprise, particularly a state-owned enterprise (SOE), may be considered to
constitute"government" for the purposes of subsection 2(1.6) of SIMA if it possesses, exercises,
or is vested with, governmental authority. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the
CBSA may consider the following factors as indicative of whether the SOE meets this standard:
1) the SOE is granted or vested with authority by statute;
2) the SOE is performing a government function;
3) the SOE is meaningfully controlled by the government; or some combination thereof.
[68] In accordance with subsection 2(7.3) of SIMA, notwithstanding that a subsidy is not
specific in law, a subsidy may also be considered specific in fact, having regard as to whether:
a) here is exclusive use of the subsidy by a limited number of enterprises;
b) there is predominant use of the subsidy by a particular enterprise;
c) disproportionately large amounts of the subsidy are granted to a limited number of
enterprises; and
d) the manner in which discretion is exercised by the granting authority indicates that
the subsidy is not generally available.
[69] For purposes of a subsidy investigation, the CBSA refers to a subsidy that has been found
to be specific as an "actionable subsidy", meaning that it is countervailable.
[70] The Complainants alleged that the exporters of subject goods originating in China have
benefited from actionable subsidies provided by various levels of the GOC, which may include
the governments of the respective provinces in which the exporters are located and the
governments of the respective municipalities in which the exporters are located. The
Complainants referred primarily to the CBSA's Statement of Reasons for various investigations,
including Certain Aluminum Extrusions (CAE), Certain Seamless Carbon or Alloy Steel Oil and
Gas Well Casing (SOGWC), Certain Stainless Steel Sinks (CSSS), Certain Pup Joints (CPJ),
Certain Copper Pipe Fittings (CCPF), Certain Metal Bar Grating (CMBG), Certain Laminate
Flooring (CLF) and Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG). The Complainants also
referenced some U.S. Department of Commerce (USDOC) Decision Memorandums on their
countervailing investigations involving China, including Coated Free Sheet Paper,
Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe and Aluminum Extrusions.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
12
[71] Due to the scarcity of publicly available detailed information regarding subsidy programs
in China, the Complainants were unable to provide exhaustive information regarding all subsidy
programs. Instead, the Complainants provided all information that was reasonably available to
support the allegations.
Programs Being Investigated
[72] In reviewing the information provided by the Complainants and obtained by the CBSA
through its own research, the CBSA has developed the following categories of programs and
incentives that may be provided to manufacturers of the subject goods in China:
1. Special Economic Zone (SEZ) Incentives;
2. Preferential Loans and Loan Guarantees;
3. Grants;
4. Preferential Income Tax Programs;
5. Relief from Duties and Taxes on Inputs, Materials and Machinery;
6. Reduction in Land Use Fees;
7. Goods/Services Provided by the Government at Less than Fair Market Value;
8. Equity Programs.
[73] A full listing of all 150 programs to be investigated by the CBSA may be found in
Appendix 1. As explained in more detail therein, there is sufficient reason to believe that these
programs provided by the GOC may constitute actionable subsidies and that the exporters and
producers of the subject goods may have benefited from these programs. In fact, most of these
programs were identified and/or have been investigated by the CBSA in past countervailing
investigations.
[74] In the case of programs where an enterprise's eligibility or degree of benefit is contingent
upon export performance or the use of goods that are produced or originate in the country of
export, such programs may constitute prohibited subsidies under SIMA.
[75] For the programs where incentives are provided to enterprises operating in specified areas
such as Special Economic Zones, the CBSA considers that these may constitute actionable
subsidies for the reason that eligibility is limited to enterprises operating in such regions or is
limited to certain enterprises operating within those regions.
[76] As well, the CBSA is satisfied that there is sufficient evidence indicating that the
exporters of subject goods may receive subsidies in the form of grants, preferential loans, relief
from duties or taxes, and provision of goods and services, which provide a benefit and that are
not generally granted to all companies in China.
[77] The CBSA will investigate whether exporters of subject goods received benefits under
these programs, and whether such programs constitute actionable subsidies.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
13
Programs Not Being Investigated
[78] The following nine alleged subsidy programs were identified by the Complainants under
the category of "Grants". These grant programs were found by the CBSA to be not relevant
because none of the exporters of subject goods identified for this complaint were located in the
regions that would allow them to qualify for these subsidy programs:
• Grant - Changzhou five major industries development special fund;
• Grant - Changzhou city key supporting industry upgrading special fund;
• Grant - Financial subsides from Wei Hai City Gao Cun Town Government;
• Grant - Wendeng Government (Shandong);
• Jiangdu City industrial economy performance award (Jiangsu);
• Changzhou Qishuyan district environmental protection fund (Jiangsu);
• Changzhou technology plan (Jiangsu);
• Supportive fund provided by the Government of Xuyi County, Jiangsu;
• Enterprise innovation award of Qishuyan District (Jiangsu).
[79] The following four alleged subsidy programs were identified by the Complainants under
the category of "Grants". Based on the CBSA's analysis, the following four programs will not
form part of this investigation.
• Grant - Guaranteed Growth Fund (this program was found to be the duplicate of the
program "Special Fund for Fostering Stable Growth of Foreign Trade");
• Local Government Deposits Funds into Bank Account (this program was found to be
the duplicate of either the program "Research & Development (R&D) Assistance" or
the program "Grants for Export Activities");
• Export Development Fund (this program was found to be the duplicate of the
program "International Market Fund for Small and Medium Sized Export
Companies");
• Subsidy Receivable (the CBSA believes that this program is a duplicate of other
programs).
Conclusion
[80]
Sufficient evidence is available to support the allegation that the subsidy programs
outlined in Appendix 1 are available to exporters and producers of the subject goods in China. In
investigating these programs, the CBSA has requested information from the GOC, exporters and
producers to determine whether the exporters and/or producers of subject goods received benefits
under these programs, and whether these programs are "actionable subsidies" and, therefore,
countervailable under SIMA.
Estimated Amount of Subsidy
[81]
The Complainants stated that they were unable to determine the exact actual amounts of
subsidy received by the Chinese exporters under each program. The complaint suggested that the
amount of subsidy had to be at least equal to the difference between the estimated export price
and the estimated cost of the goods. The Complainants used a deductive methodology to
estimate export prices, beginning with price quotes for specific projects obtained from various
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
14
sources 7 and deducting amounts for estimated inland freight, ocean freight, Canadian freight and
brokerage fees. The cost of the goods was estimated using the estimated costs for input materials
(aluminum extrusions, infill materials, hardware), which were determined using the
Complainants' costs, and the estimated conversion costs (labor cost and general selling and
administrative expense) for producing unitized wall modules from the input materials. The
estimated conversion costs were based on an estimated percentage ofthe Complainant's
conversion costs adjusted to reflect the differences between the costs in China and Canada. The
adjustments to the conversion costs were derived from industry reports. 8 The amount of subsidy
was estimated.by deducting the estimated export price from the estimated cost of the goods.
[82] The CBSA was unable to determine the actual amounts of subsidy received by the
Chinese exporters under each program. The CBSA estimated the amount of subsidy as the
difference between its estimated export prices and estimated cost of the goods. The CBSA
estimated the export prices using a deductive methodology, beginning with price quotes for
specific projects that the Complainants were able to obtain from various sources. Adjustments
were made by the CBSA to the Complainants' estimates, where better information was available
from the CBSA's review of import documentation, for items such as freight and brokerage. The
CBSA estimated the cost of the goods using a similar methodology as used by the Complainants
to estimate normal values. In this regards, the estimated costs for input materials (aluminum
extrusions, infill materials, hardware) were determined using the Complainants' own costs. The
estimated conversion costs (labor cost and general selling and administrative expense) for
producing unitized wall modules from the input materials were based on an estimated percentage
of the Complainant's conversion costs adjusted to reflect the differences between the costs in
China and Canada. The adjustments to the conversion costs were derived from industry reports. 9
The Complainants' estimated an amount for profit using a publicly available annual
report. 10Adjustments to the Complainants' estimates were made by the CBSA to the cost of
aluminum extrusions and general selling and administrative expense to reflect the difference
between the costs in China and Canada. The amount of subsidy was estimated by deducting the
estimated export price from the estimated cost of the goods.
[83] The CBSA's analysis of the information indicates that subject goods imported into
Canada during the period of January 1,2010, to March 31, 2011, were subsidized and that the
estimated amount of subsidy is 14% of the export price of the subject goods.
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachments 6-12
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 13
9 Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 13
10 Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 14
7
8
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
15
AMOUNT OF SUBSIDY AND VOLUME OF SUBSIDIZED GOODS
[84] Under section 35 of SIMA, if, at any time before the President makes a preliminary
determination, the President is satisfied that the amount of subsidy on the goods of a country is
insignificant or the actual and potential volume of subsidized goods of a country is negligible,
the President must terminate the investigation with respect to the goods of that country. Under
subsection 2(1) of SIMA, an amount of subsidy of less than 1% of the export price of the goods
is considered insignificant and a volume of subsidized goods of less than 3% of the total import
volume of goods that are of the same description as the subsidized goods that are released into
Canada from all countries is considered negligible, the same threshold for the volume of
dumped goods.
[85] However, according to section 41.2 of SIMA, the President is required to take into
account Article 27.10 of the WTa Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures when
conducting a subsidy investigation. This provision stipulates that a countervailing duty
investigation involving a developing country should be terminated as soon as the authorities
determine that the overall level of subsidies granted upon the product in question does not
exceed 2% of its value calculated on a per unit basis or the volume of subsidized imports
represents less than 4% of the total imports of the like product in the importing Member.
[86] SIMA does not define or provide any guidance regarding the determination of a
"developing country" for purposes of Article 27.10 of the WTa Agreement on Subsidies and
Countervailing Measures. As an administrative alternative, the CBSA refers to the
Development Assistance Committee List ofOfficial Development Assistance Recipients
(DAC List of aDA Recipients) for guidance. I I As China is included in the listing, the CBSA
extends developing country status to China for purposes of this investigation.
11 The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, DAC List ofODA Recipients as of
January 1,2012, the document is available at
http://www.oecd.org/document/45/0,3746,en _2649_34447_209310 l_l_l_l_l,OO.html.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
16
[87] The CBSA used actual import data for all countries for the period of January 1,2010, to
March 31,2012. On the basis of this information, the volume of subsidized goods as a
percentage of the volume of total imports is estimated as follows:
Estimated Amount of Subsidy
January 1,2010 to March 31, 2012
Country
China
Korea
Germany
USA
Other Countries
Total
Estimated Share
of Total Imports
by Sales Value 12
41%
1%
2%
48%
8%
100%
Estimated
Subsidized
Goods as % of
Country Total
100%
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
Estimated
Subsidized
Goods as % of
Total Imports
41%
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
Estimated
Amount of
Subsidy as % of
Export Price
14%
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
N/A*
* N/A indicates Not Applicable.
[88] The volume of subsidized goods, estimated to be 41 % of total imports from all countries,
is greater than the threshold of 4% and is therefore not negligible. The amount of subsidy,
estimated to be 14% of the export price, is greater than the threshold of2% and is therefore not
insignificant.
EVIDENCE OF INJURY
[89] The Complainants allege that the subject goods have been dumped and subsidized and
that such dumping and subsidizing has caused and is threatening to cause material injury to the
production of certain unitized wall modules in Canada. In support of its allegations, the
Complainants provided evidence of lost sales, price erosion, price suppression, reduced
profitability, loss of market share, reduced employment, and underutilization of capacity.
Lost Sales
[90]
The Complainants have provided nine examples of lost sales. 13
[91] As a result of the lost sales, detailed through documentation provided in the complaint,
the Complainants allege significant lost revenues.
12 The CBSA's import documentation was used to estimate the imports of subject goods during the POI. Since
reliable information regarding import volume was not contained in the documentation the import sales value was
used as the unit of measure.
13 Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachments 38-46
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
17
[92] The Complainants maintain that these dumped and subsidized imports have been the
direct cause of the Complainants' suppressed sales volumes.
[93] The CBSA finds the Complainants' allegations oflost sales to be reasonable and well
supported. The lost sales have been reasonably linked to the allegedly dumped and subsidized
imports.
Price Erosion and Price Suppression
[94] The Complainants provided one example of price erosion as a result of the Chinese
subject goodS. 14 One of the Complainants was forced to drop the price of its contract bid in order
to compete with subject goods. The contract was awarded to the Complainant at a lower value
than it normally would have bid. The complaint also contains numerous other examples of
Complainants dropping their prices in order to compete with subject goods, but were ultimately
not awarded the contracts.
[95] The Complainants' allege that due to the decrease in shipment volumes combined with
increased costs during the period, additional production costs had to be absorbed by the
Complainants over fewer units produced/sold, causing increased costs per unit sold. These cost
increases have not been recovered through price increases during the period due to price
suppression as a result of the subject goods.
[96] The Complainants expect costs to continue to increase through the next 12 to 24 months,
which will continue to increase the Complainants' costs per unit sold.
[97] The Complainants maintain that these dumped and subsidized imports have been the
direct cause of the Complainants' eroded and suppressed prices.
[98] The CBSA finds the Complainants' allegations of price erosion and price suppression to
be reasonable and well supported. The price erosion and price suppression have been reasonably
linked to the allegedly dumped and subsidized imports.
Reduced Profitability
[99] The Complainants have provided aggregate income statement highlights containing their
revenue, cost of goods sold, gross margin, other costs and net income relating to the sales of
certain unitized wall modules for 2009,2010, and 20llY
[100] The information provided by the Complainants show that their net income has decreased
steadily from 2009 to 2011.
[101] The Complainants maintain that these dumped and subsidized imports have been the
direct cause ofthe Complainants' reduced profitability.
14
15
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 47
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 50
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
18
[102] The CBSA finds the Complainants' allegations of reduced profitability to be reasonable
and well supported. The reduced profitability has been reasonably linked to the allegedly
dumped and subsidized imports.
Loss of Market Share
[103] The Complainants provided a table showing the evolution of the Chinese exports and the
Canadian market as a whole. 16
[104] The Complainants' information shows a rise in market share for Chinese imports from
2009 to 2011. This rise in market share for Chinese imports coincided with a decrease in market
share for the Canadian producers.
[105] The CBSA's analysis of Chinese subject goods imports in the period 2009-2011 supports
the Complainant's position that subject goods are taking an increasing share of the Canadian
market.
[106] The Complainants maintain that these dumped and subsidized imports have been the
direct cause of the Complainants' loss of market share.
[107] The CBSA finds the Complainants' allegations of loss of market share to be reasonable
and well supported. The loss of market share has been reasonably linked to the allegedly
dumped and subsidized imports.
Reduced Employment
[108] The Complainants provided a table that contains the Complainants' direct and indirect
employment for 2009, 2010 and 2011 relating to the production and sales of unitized wall
modules. 17
[109] The information provided by the Complainants show that their number of employees
relating to unitized wall modules have decreased steadily from 2009 to 2011.
[110] The Complainants maintain that these dumped and subsidized imports have been the
direct cause of the Complainants' reduction in employment.
[111] The CBSA finds the Complainants' allegations of reduced employment to be reasonable
and well supported. The reduced employment has been reasonably linked to the allegedly
dumped and subsidized imports.
16
17
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 2
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 49
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
19
Underutilization of Capacity
[112] The Complainants provided a table that contains the production capacity and utilization
of all the Complainants for 2009, 2010 and 2011 18 .
[113] The information provided by the Complainants show that their capacity utilization has
decreased steadily from 2009 to 2011.
[114] The Complainants maintain that these dumped and subsidized imports have been the
direct cause of the Complainants' decrease in capacity utilization.
[115] The CBSA finds the Complainants' allegations ofunderutilization of capacity to be
reasonable and well supported. However, the CBSA believes that the underutilization of
capacity can only be partially linked to the allegedly dumped and subsidized imports. The
CBSA's analysis ofthe information in the complaint indicates that other factors may have caused
the underutilization of capacity.
THREAT OF INJURY
[116] The Complainants' view is that demand for unitized wall modules will at best increase
somewhat in 2012 and decline in 2013. This unsteady future demand will exacerbate the injury
to the industry from the dumped and subsidized imports of subject goods and poses a threat of
injury unless constrained.
[117] As well, there have continued to be significant increases in the domestic industry's costs.
These increases will continue even as the Complainants anticipate that pricing of subject and like
goods and consequently profit margins in 2012 will decline from 2011 and continue to decline
unless the dumped and subsidized imports of subject goods from China are constrained.
[118] After a review of the injury indicators in the complaint, the CBSA is of the opinion that
there is evidence that the injury to the Canadian producers has steadily increased from 2009 to
2011, and that there is a reasonable indication that the alleged dumping and subsidizing is
threatening to cause injury.
18
Dumping Exhibit 2 (NC) - Complaint Attachment 48
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
20
CAUSAL LINK - DUMPING/SUBSIDIZING AND INJURY
[119] The CBSA finds that the Complainants have sufficiently linked the injury it has suffered
to the dumping and subsidizing of subject goods imported into Canada. The injury the
Complainants have suffered in terms of lost sales, price erosion, price suppression, reduced
profitability, loss of market share and reduced employment is related to the price advantage the
alleged dumping and subsidizing have produced between the subject goods and the Canadianproduced goods. The Complainants also provided sufficient evidence that the continued alleged
dumping and subsidizing of subject goods imported into Canada threatens to cause injury to the
Canadian industry producing these goods.
[120] In summary, the information provided in the complaint has established a reasonable
indication that the apparent dumping and subsidizing has caused injury and is threatening to
cause material injury to the Canadian production of like goods.
CONCLUSION
[121] Based on information provided in the complaint, other available information, and the
CBSA's import documentation, the President is of the opinion that there is ~vidence that certain
unitized wall modules originating in or exported from China have been dumped and subsidized,
and there is a reasonable indication that such dumping and subsidizing has caused or is
threatening to cause injury to the Canadian industry. As a result, based on the evidence, the
President initiated dumping and subsidy investigations on July 16,2012.
SCOPE OF INVESTIGATION
[122] The CBSA is conducting investigations to determine whether the subject goods have
been dumped and/or subsidized.
[123] The CBSA has requested information relating to the subject goods imported into Canada
from China during the period of January 1,2010 to June 30, 2012, the selected period of
investigation for the dumping investigation. The information requested from identified exporters
and importers will be used to determine normal values and export prices and ultimately to
determine whether the subject goods have been dumped.
[124] Information relating to the subj ect goods imported into Canada from January 1, 2010 to
June 30, 2012, the selected period of investigation for the subsidy investigation, has been
requested from the GOC and the identified exporters. The information requested will be used to
determine whether the subject goods have been subsidized and to determine the amounts of
subsidy.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
21
[125] All parties have been clearly advised of the CBSA's information requirements and the
time frames for providing their responses.
FUTURE ACTION
[126] The Canadian International Trade Tribunal (Tribunal) will conduct a preliminary inquiry
to determine whether the evidence discloses a reasonable indication that the alleged dumping and
subsidizing of the goods has caused or is threatening to cause injury to the Canadian industry.
The Tribunal must make its decision on or before the 60th day after the date of the initiation of
the investigations. If the Tribunal concludes that the evidence does not disclose a reasonable
indication of injury to the Canadian industry, the investigations will be terminated.
[127] If the Tribunal finds that the evidence discloses a reasonable indication of injury to the
Canadian industry and the CBSA investigations preliminarily reveal that the goods have been
dumped and/or subsidized, the CBSA will make a preliminary determination of dumping and/or
subsidizing within 90 days after the date of the initiation of the investigations, by
October 15,2012. Where circumstances warrant, this period may be extended to 135 days from
the date of the initiation of the investigations.
[128] If the CBSA's investigations reveal that imports of the subject goods have not been
dumped or subsidized, that the margin of dumping or amount of subsidy is insignificant or that
the actual and potential volume of dumped or subsidized goods is negligible, the investigations
will be terminated.
[129] Imports of subject goods released by the CBSA on and after the date of a preliminary
determination of dumping and/or subsidizing may be subject to provisional duty in an amount
not greater than the estimated margin of dumping or the amount of subsidy determined during
the preliminary phase of the investigations.
[130] Should the CBSA make a preliminary determination of dumping and/or subsidizing, the
investigations will be continued for the purpose of making a final decision within 90 days after
the date of the preliminary determinations.
[131] If a final determination of dumping and/or subsidizing is made, the Tribunal will continue
its inquiry and hold public hearings into the question of material injury to the Canadian industry.
The Tribunal is required to make a finding with respect to the goods to which the final
determination of dumping and/or subsidizing applies, not later than 120 days after the CBSA's
preliminary determinations.
[132] In the event of an injury finding by the Tribunal, imports of subject goods released by the
CBSA after that date will be subject to anti-dumping duty equal to the applicable margin of
dumping and countervailing duty equal to the amount of subsidy on the imported goods. Should
both anti-dumping and countervailing duties be applicable to subject goods, the amount of any
anti-dumping duty may be reduced by the amount of subsidy that is attributable to an export
subsidy.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
22
RETROACTIVE DUTY ON MASSIVE IMPORTATIONS
[133] When the Tribunal conducts an inquiry concerning material injury to the Canadian
industry, it may consider if dumped and/or subsidized goods that were imported close to or after
the initiation of an investigation constitute massive importations over a relatively short period of
time and have caused injury to the Canadian industry.
[134] Should the Tribunal issue such a finding, anti-dumping and countervailing duties may be
imposed retroactively on subject goods imported into Canada and released by the CBSA during
the period of 90 days preceding the day of the CBSA making a preliminary determination of
dumping and/or subsidizing.
[135] In respect of importations of subsidized goods that have caused injury, however, this
provision is only applicable where the CBSA has determined that the whole or any part ofthe
subsidy on the goods is a prohibited subsidy, as explained in the previous section "Evidence of
Subsidizing." In such a case, the amount of countervailing duty applied on a retroactive basis
will be equal to the amount of subsidy on the goods that is a prohibited subsidy.
UNDERTAKINGS
[136] After a preliminary determination of dumping by the CBSA, an exporter may submit a
written undertaking to revise selling prices to Canada so that the margin of dumping or the injury
caused by the dumping is eliminated. An acceptable undertaking must account for all or
substantially all of the exports to Canada of the dumped goods.
[137] Similarly, after a preliminary determination of subsidizing by the CBSA, a foreign
government may submit a written undertaking to eliminate the subsidy on the goods exported or
to eliminate the injurious effect of the subsidy, by limiting the amount of the subsidy or the
quantity of goods exported to Canada. Alternatively, exporters with the written consent oftheir
government may undertake to revise their selling prices so that the amount of the subsidy or the
injurious effect of the subsidy is eliminated.
[138] Interested parties may provide comments regarding the acceptability of undertakings
within nine days of the receipt of an undertaking by the CBSA. The CBSA will maintain a list of
parties who wish to be notified should an undertaking proposal be received. Those who are
interested in being notified should provide their name, telephone and fax numbers, mailing
address and e-mail address, if available, to one of the officers identified in the "Information"
section of this document.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
23
[139] If an undertaking were to be accepted, the investigations and the collection of provisional
duty would be suspended. Notwithstanding the acceptance of an undertaking, an exporter may
request that the CBSA's investigations be completed and that the Tribunal complete its injury
mqUIry.
PUBLICATION
[140] Notice of the initiation of these investigations is being published in the Canada Gazette
pursuant to subparagraph 34(1)(a)(ii) of SIMA.
INFORMATION
[141] Interested parties are invited to file written submissions presenting facts, arguments, and
evidence that they feel are relevant to the alleged dumping and subsidizing. Written submissions
should be forwarded to the attention of one of the officers identified below.
[142] To be given consideration in this phase of these investigations, all information should be
received by the CBSA by August 23,2012.
[143] Any information submitted to the CBSA by interested parties concerning these
investigations is considered to be public information unless clearly marked "confidential." Where
the submission by an interested party is confidential, a non-confidential version of the
submission must be provided at the same time. This non-confidential version will be made
available to other interested parties upon request.
[144] Confidential information submitted to the President will be disclosed on written request
to independent counsel for parties to these proceedings, subject to conditions to protect the
confidentiality of the information. Confidential information may also be released to the Tribunal,
any court in Canada, or a WTOINAFTA dispute settlement panel. Additional information
respecting the Directorate's policy on the disclosure of information under SIMA may be obtained
by contacting one of the officers identified below or by visiting the CBSA's Web site.
[145] The investigation schedules and a complete listing of all exhibits and information are
available at http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.calsima-Imsi/i-e/menu-eng.html. The exhibits listing will be
updated as new exhibits and information are made available.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
24
[146] This Statement ofReasons has been provided to persons directly interested in these
proceedings. It is also posted on the CBSA's Web site at the address below. For further
information, please contact the officers identified as follows:
Mail:
SIMA Registry and Disclosure Unit
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
Canada Border Services Agency
100 Metcalfe Street, 11 th floor
Ottawa, ON KIA OL8
Canada
Telephone:
Dean Pollard
Robert Wright
Fax:
613-948-4844
E-mail:
[email protected]
Website:
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.calsima-Imsi/i-e/menu-eng.html
613-954-7410
613-954-1643
Caterina Ardito-Toffolo
A/Director General
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
25
APPENDIX 1 - DESCRIPTION OF IDENTIFIED PROGRAMS AND INCENTIVES
Evidence provided by the Complainant or otherwise available to the CBSA suggests that the
Government of China may have provided support to manufacturers of subject goods in the
following manner. For purposes of this investigation, "Government of China" (GOC) refers to all
levels of government, i.e. federal, central, provincial/state, regional municipal, city, township,
village, local, legislative, administrative or judicial. Benefits provided by state-owned
enterprises, which possess, exercise or have been vested with governmental authority may also
be considered to be provided by the GOC for purposes of this investigation.
I.
Special Economic Zone (SEZ) Incentives
Program 1:
Program 2:
Program 3:
Program 4:
Program 5:
Program 6:
Program 7:
Program 8:
Program 9:
Program 10:
Program 11:
II.
Preferential Tax Policies for Enterprises with Foreign Investment (FIEs)
Established in Special Economic Zones (SEZs) (excluding Shanghai
Pudong Area)
Preferential Tax Policies for FIEs Established in the Coastal Economic Open
Areas and in the Economic and Technological Development Zones
Preferential Tax Policies for FIEs Established in the Pudong Area of Shanghai
Preferential Tax Policies in the Western Regions
Corporate Income Tax Exemption and/or Reduction in SEZs and other
Designated Areas
Local Income Tax Exemption and/or Reduction in SEZs and other Designated
Areas
Exemption/Reduction of Special Land Tax and Land Use Fees in SEZs and
Other Designated Areas
Tariff and Value-added Tax (VAT) Exemptions on Imported Materials and
Equipment in SEZs and other Designated Areas
Income Tax Refunds where Profits are Re-invested in SEZs and other Designated
Areas
Preferential Costs of Services and/or Goods Provided by Government or Stateowned Enterprises (SOEs) in SEZs and Other Designated Areas
VAT Exemptions for the Central Region
Preferential Loans and Loan Guarantees
Program 12:
Program 13:
Program 14:
Loans and Interest Subsidies Provided Under the Northeast Revitalization
Program
Export Seller's Credit for High- and New-Technology Products by China EMIX
Bank
Preferential Loan for the National/Provincial key Science & Technology
Industrialization Projects, High Technology Industrialization Projects,
Science & Technology Achievements Commercialization Projects,
Modern Equipment Manufacturing Industry and key Information Technology
Industrialization Projects by Liaoning Governments
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
26
III.
Grants
Repaying Foreign Currency Loan by Returned VAT
Government Export Subsidy and Product Innovation Subsidy
Export Assistance Grant
Research & Development (R&D) Assistance Grant
Innovative Experimental Enterprise Grant
Superstar Enterprise Grant
Awards to Enterprises Whose Products Qualify for "Well-Known Trademarks of
China" or "Famous Brands of China"
Program 22: Export Brand Development Fund
Program 23: Provincial Scientific Development Plan Fund
Program 24: Technical Renovation Loan Interest Discount Fund
Program 25: Venture Investment Fund of Hi-Tech Industry
Program 26: National Innovation Fund for Technology Based Firms
Program 27: Guangdong - Hong Kong Technology Cooperation Funding Scheme
Program 28: Grants for Encouraging the Establishment of Headquarters and Regional
Headquarters with Foreign Investment
Innovative
Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise Grants
Program 29:
Program 30: Product Quality Grant
Program 31: 2009 Energy-saving Fund
Program 32: Energy-Saving Technique Special Fund
Program 33: Grants to Privately-Owned Export Enterprises
Program 34: Grants for Export Activities
Program 35: Grants for International Certification
Program 36: Emission Reduction and Energy-saving Award
Program 37: Grant for Market Promotion and Trade Development
Program 38: Refund of Land Transfer Fee
Program 39: Grant - Assistance for Exhibition Booth Fees
Program 40: Grant - Patent Application Assistance
Program 41: Grant - State Service Industry Development Fund
Program 42: Grant - Ecological Garden Enterprise Reward
Program 43: Grant - Municipal Construction Reward
Program 44: Grant - Cleaning-production Qualified Enterprise Reward
Program 45: Grant - Provisional Industry Promotion Special Fund
Program 46: Grant - Jiangsu Province Finance Supporting Fund
Program 47: Grant - Water Pollution Control Special Fund for Taihu Lake
Program 48: Grant - Provincial Foreign Economy and Trade Development Special Fund
Program 49: Grant - Subsidy from Water Saving Office
Program 50: Grant - Insurance Expense Compensation
Program 51: Grant - Industrial Science and Technology Breakthrough Special Fund
Program 52: Grant - Special Supporting Fund for Commercialization of Tec1mological
Innovation and Research Findings
Program 53: Grant - Policy on Value-added Tax for Recyclable Resources
Program 54: Grant - Large Taxpayer Award
Program 55: Grant - Resources Conservation and Environment Protection Grant
Program 15:
Program 16:
Program 17:
Program 18:
Program 19:
Program 20:
Program 21:
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
27
Program 56:
Program 57:
Program 58:
Program 59:
Program 60:
Program 61:
Program 62:
Program 63:
Program 64:
Program 65:
Program 66:
Program 67:
Program 68:
Program 69:
Program 70:
Program 71:
Program 72:
Program 73:
Program 74:
Program 75:
Program 76:
Program 77:
Program 78:
Program 79:
Program 80:
Program 81:
Program 82:
Program 83:
Program 84:
Program 85:
Program 86:
Program 87:
Program 88:
Program 89:
Environment Protection Award (Jiangsu)
Enterprise Technology Centers
Allowance to Pay Loan Interest
Supporting fund for non-refundable export tax loss
International market fund for export companies
International market fund for small and medium sized export companies
Business Development Overseas Support Fund
Refund from Government for Participating in Trade Fair
Grant - Special Fund for Fostering Stable Growth of Foreign Trade
The State Key Technology Renovation Projects
Reimbursement of Anti-dumping and/or Countervailing Legal Expenses by the
Local Governments
Financial Special Fund for Supporting High and New Technology Industry
Development Project
Subsidy for Promoting Energy-saving Buildings
Special Fund for the Key Projects in the Cultural Innovation Industry by Shunyi
District Local Government
Special Fund for the Technology Innovation by Niu Lan Shan Township Local
Government
Subsidy for the Technology Development
Awards for the Contributions to Local Economy and Industry Development
Beijing Industrial Development Fund
Grants, Loans, and Other Incentives for Development of Famous Brands, China
Top World Brands or other well-known Brands
Shunde Famous Brands
Guangdong Supporting Fund
"Five Points, One Line" Program of Liaoning Province
State Special Fund for Promoting Key Industries and Innovation Technologies
Fund for SME (small and medium size enterprises) Bank-Enterprise Cooperation
Projects by Guangdong Governments
Special Fund for Significant Science and Technology by Guangdong
Governments
Fund for Economic, Scientific and Technology Development by the Government
of Foshan City
Provincial Fund for Fiscal and Technological Innovation by Guangdong
Governments
Provincial Loan Discount Special Fund for SMEs by Guangdong Governments
"Large and Excellent" Enterprises Grant
Advanced Science/Technology Enterprise Grant
Award for Excellent Enterprise
Foshan City Government Technology Renovation and Technology Innovation
Special Fund Grants
Nanhai District Grants to State and Provincial Enterprise Technology Centers and
Engineering Technology R&D Centers
Supporting Fund for the Projects Used to Resolve the Important Technological
Issues for Enterprises' Production and R&D by Liaoning Governments
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
28
Program 90:
Program 91:
Program 92:
Program 93:
Program 94:
Program 95:
Program 96:
Program 97:
Program 98:
Program 99:
Program 100:
Program 101:
Program 102:
Program 103:
Program 104:
Program 105:
Program 106:
Program 107:
Program 108:
Program 109:
Program 110:
Program 111:
Program
Program
Program
Program
112:
113:
114:
115:
Program 116:
Program 117:
Program 118:
Program 119:
Technology Innovation Fund for Science & Technology Type SMEs by Liaoning
Governments
Supporting Fund for the Application Technology Research in the Overseas R&D
Institution/Branch by Liaoning Governments
Special Supporting Fund and Special Loan Assistance by Chinese Ministry of
Science & Technology for revitalizing the Northeast old industrial base
Special Supporting Fund for Key Projects of "500 Strong Enterprises in
Contemporary Industries" by Guangdong Governments
Fund for Supporting Strategic Emerging Industries by Guangdong Governments
Medium Size and Small Size Enterprises Development Special Fund
Medium Size and Small Size Trading Enterprises Development Special Fund
Special Fund for Export Credit Insurance by Guangdong Governments
Industrial Development Supporting Fund to Key Projects by Shunyi District Local
Governments
Supporting Fund for Converting the Industry Technology Achievements/Findings
by Beijing Governments
Special Development Fund for Beijing Cultural Innovation Industry
Supporting Fund for Becoming Publicly Listed Company
Supporting Fund for Constructing Energy-saving Projects by Niu Lan Shan·
Township Local Governments
Supporting Fund for the "Working Capital" Loan Interest
Supporting Fund for "Information-Technology Application" Demonstration
Enterprises by Niu Lan Shan Township Local Governments
Supporting Fund for the Lab by Niu Lan Shan Township Local Governments
Brand Development Fund by Shunyi District Local Governments
Supporting Fund to Encourage Outwards Development by Niu Lan Shan
Township Local Governments
Supporting Fund for the Investments on Key Projects by Niu Lan Shan Township
Local Governments
Award by Niu Lan Shan Township Local Governments
Supporting Fund for the Research of the Key Fire-proofing and Sound-proofing
Technology for Curtain Wall by Beijing Governments
Loan Subsidy for the Curtain Wall Technology Renovation Projects by Beijing
Governments
Award for Maintaining the Growth by Beijing Governments
Award by Beijing Technology Trading Encouraging Centre
Award by Shunyi District Science and Technology Committee
Supporting Fund for the New Energy-saving Curtain Wall Technology
Renovation Project by Shanghai Songjiang Economic Committee
Award by Shanghai Songjiang Economic Committee
Supporting Fund for Science and Technology Expenses by Zengcheng Local
Governments
Supporting Fund for the Development from Guangzhou Local Governments
Interest Assistance for Technology Renovation Projects by Liaoning
Governments
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
29
Program 120: Interest Assistance for the Application ofInformation Technology by Liaoning
Governments
Program 121: Loan Guarantee Fund for Science & Technology Enterprises by Liaoning
Governments
Program 122: Fund for Optimizing Import and Export Structure of Mechanical Electronics and
High and New Technology Products
Program 123: Special Fund for Pollution Control of Three Rivers, Three Lakes, and the
Songhua River
IV.
Preferential Income Tax Programs Relief from Duties and Taxes on Inputs
Program 124: Reduced Tax Rate for Productive FIEs Scheduled to Operate for a Period
Not Less Than lOYears
Program 125: Tax Preference Available to Companies that Operate at a Small Profit.
Program 126: Preferential Tax Policies for Foreign Invested Export Enterprises
Program 127: Preferential Tax Policies for FIEs which are Technology Intensive and
Knowledge Intensive
Program 128: Preferential Tax Policies for the Research and Development ofFIEs
Program 129: Preferential Tax Policies for FIEs and Foreign Enterprises Which Have
Establishments or Places in China and are Engaged in Production or Business
Operations Purchasing Domestically Produced Equipment
Program 130: Preferential Tax Policies for Domestic Enterprises Purchasing Domestically
Produced Equipment for Technology Upgrading Purpose
Program 131: Income Tax Refund for Re-investment of FIE Profits by Foreign Investors
Program 132: VAT and Income Tax Exemption/Reduction for Enterprises Adopting
Debt-to-Equity Swaps
Program 133: Corporate Income Tax Reduction for New High-Technology Enterprises
V.
Materials and Machinery
Program 134: Income Tax Credits on Purchases of Domestically Produced Equipment
Program 135: Preferential Tax Programs for Encouraged Industries or Projects
Program 136: Exemption from City Maintenance and Construction Taxes and Education Fee
Surcharges for FIEs
Program 137: Preferential Tax Program for FIEs Recognized as HNTEs (High and New
Technology Enterprises)
Program 138: Tax Offset for R&D Expenses in Guangdong Province
Program 139: Accelerated Depreciation on Fixed Assets
Program 140: Preferential Tax Treatment for the Technology Development Expenses by
Liaoning Governments
Program 141: Accelerated Depreciation on Intangible Assets for Industrial Enterprises in
Northeast Region
Program 142: Exemption of Tariff and Import VAT for the Imported Technologies and
Equipment
Program 143: Relief from Duties and Taxes on Imported Material and Other Manufacturing
Inputs
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
30
VI.
Reduction in Land Use Fees
Program 144: Reduction in Land Use Fees, Land Rental Rates and Land Purchase Prices
Program 145: Deed Tax Exemptions for Land Transferred through Merger or Restructuring
VII.
Goods/Services Provided by the Government at Less than Fair Market Value
Program 146: Raw Materials Provided by the Government at Less than Fair Market Value
Program 147: Utilities Provided by the Government at Less than Fair Market Value
Program 148: Acquisition of Government Assets at Less than Fair Market Value
VIII. Equity Programs
Program 149: Debt to Equity Swaps
Program 150: Exemptions for SOEs from Distributing Dividends to the State
Determinations of Subsidy and Specificity
Available information indicates that the programs identified under: SEZ and Other Designated
Areas Incentives; Preferential Loans; Preferential Income Tax Programs; Relieffrom Duties
and Taxes on Materials and Machinery; and Reduction in Land Use Fees, may constitute a
financial contribution pursuant to paragraph 2(1. 6) (b) of SIMA, in that amounts that would
otherwise be owing and due to the government are reduced and/or exempted, and would confer a
benefit to the recipient equal to the amount of the reduction/exemption.
Grants and Equity Programs may constitute a financial contribution pursuant to
paragraph 2(l.6)(a) of SIMA in that they involve the direct transfer of funds or liabilities or the
contingent transfer of funds or liabilities; and pursuant to paragraph 2 (1. 6)(b) of SIMA as
amounts owing and due to the government that are forgiven or not collected.
Goods/Services Provided by Government at Less than Fair Market Value may constitute a
financial contribution pursuant to paragraph 2(1. 6)(c) of SIMA as they involve the provision of
goods or services, other than general governmental infrastructure.
Benefits provided to certain types of enterprises or limited to enterprises located in certain areas
under program categories: SEZ and Other Designated Areas Incentives; Preferential Loans;
Preferential Income Tax Programs; Relieffrom Duties and Taxes on Materials and Machinery;
and Reduction in Land Use Fees, may be considered specific pursuant to paragraph 2(7.2)(a) of
SIMA.
As well, Grants, Equity Programs and Goods/Services Provided by Government at Less than
Fair Market Value may be considered specific pursuant to subsection 2(7.3) of SIMA in that the
manner in which discretion is exercised by the granting authority indicates that the subsidy may
not be generally available.
Anti-dumping and Countervailing Directorate
31
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