CHEM 102 General Chemistry - II Lecture Course Instructor

advertisement
CHEM 102
General Chemistry - II
Spring 2016 Section 01
Lecture
Days: MWF
Time: 11:00 – 11:50 am
Place: Currens 315
Course Instructor
Dr. Shaozhong Zhang
Office: 430-B Currens Hall
Phone: 309-298-1685
Email: [email protected]
Office hours: MWF (9:30 – 10:40 AM), or by Appointment
Course Prerequisite
Chem 101 or equivalent (C grade or better, strictly enforced)
Students without the prerequisite will be dropped from the course
Course Description
This is a continuation of CHEM 101 course. CHEM 102 course deals with the application
of the general principles of organic chemistry to biological, environmental, and applied sciences.
It includes the study of nomenclature, preparation, reactions of the functional groups of aliphatic
and aromatic compounds, elementary biochemistry.
Course Objective
• To know and understand the bonding and structure of organic compounds
• To appreciate the dependence of molecular properties on that bonding and structure
• To know the reaction of organic
• To develop practical laboratory experience in modern organic chemistry
Outside work requirements for the course
Students are expected to review, study and learn all material discussed in lecture, as well as read
assigned chapters in the textbook, and to work assigned practice problems/questions/terms listed
in class or on Western Online. Generally a minimum of 2 to 3 hours of outside study time is
required for each hour of class time for this course.
Text and Related Material
Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry, 11th edition
By Bettelheim, Brown, Campbell, and Farrell.
Thomson Brooks/Cole. ISBN # 978-133-10508-4
1
Assessment of Students (Tentative)
Quizzes (10)
Exams (4)
Laboratory
Final Exam
Total
200 Points
400 Points
250 Points
150 Points
1000 Points
Course Grading Scale:
Total Points
Letter Grade
930-1000
A
740-769
C
900-929
A-
700-739
C-
870-899
B+
650-699
D+
840-869
B
600-649
D
800-839
B-
500-599
D-
770-799
C+
0 - 499
F
LECTURE TESTS AND QUIZZES
Four lecture exams (each worth 100 points), ten quizzes (each worth 20 points), and a final exam
worth 150 points will be given. Make-up quizzes and make up exam will be given for those
with excused absences. Only two make-up quizzes and one make-up exam will be allowed.
Make-up exam has to be done within one week of original scheduled test day. Excused
absences are defined as documented illnesses, military service requirements, and family
emergencies. All excused absences must be approved by the course instructor.
ATTENDANCE
You are expected to attend class regularly and punctually. All students are responsible for all information
and materials given in class whether you are present or not. Excessive absences will be reported to the
financial aid office and your academic advisor. Attendance at the laboratory is required and will be
checked for each lab. Only one make-up lab is allowed with good excuses as mentioned under “Exams
and quizzes.”
Please turn off cell phones and beepers while in class out of consideration for your classmates. It can be
very distracting- especially during an exam! Also, class time is not a social hour; please refrain from
casual conversation during class time.
2
LECTURE OUTLINE
Week
Title of Chapter
Concepts Covered
1
Chapter 10:
1/19-1/22
Introduction to
Organic Chemistry
Bonding, hybridization, shapes of molecules, bond angle, bond
lengths, structural formula, common functional groups.
2
Chapter 11: Alkanes
Introduction to alkanes and cycloalkanes, systematic
nomenclature, conformations of alkanes and cycloalkanes,
normal alkanes versus branched alkanes.
Chapter 12: Alkenes
Systematic nomenclature of alkenes and alkynes, structures of
alkenes and alkynes, physical properties of alkenes and
alkynes.
1/25-1/29
3
2/1-2/5
4
2/8-2/12
and Alkynes
Chapter 12: Alkenes
and Alkynes
characteristic reactions of alkenes, important polymerization
reactions of ethylene and substituted ethylenes.
cont
5
2/15-2/19
6
2/22-2/26
7
2/29-3/4
Chapter 13: Benzene
and its Derivatives
Chapter 14: Alcohols, Structures, names, and physical properties of alcohols,
Ethers, and Thiols characteristic reactions of alcohols, structures, names, and
properties of ethers.
Chapter 14: Alcohols, structures, names, and properties of thiols , important
Ethers, and Thiols alcohols.
cont
Chapter 15:
Stereochemistry
8
3/7-3/11
Introduction to benzene, systematic nomenclature, structure
of benzene, characteristic reaction of benzene and its
derivatives, phenols.
Chapter 15:
Stereochemistry
Cis-trans isomers, diastereomers, chirality, enatiomers, optical
activity, biology and chirality.
Naming enantiomers, RS nomenclature; Racemic mixture,
meso compound, composition, Fischer projection formulas.
cont
9
Chapter 16:
3/21-3/25
Amines
Structures, names, and physical properties of amines, the
basicity of amines, the characteristic reactions of amines.
3
10
Chapter 17:
3/28-4/1
Aldehydes and
Ketones
11
Chapter 18:
4/4-4/8
12
4/11-4/15
13
4/18-4/22
Carboxylic Acids
Chapter 19:
Carboxylic
Anhydrides, Esters,
and Amides
Chapter 19:
Carboxylic
Anhydrides, Esters,
and Amides cont
14
Chapter 20:
4/25-4/29
Carbohydrates
15
Chapter 21-22:
5/2-5/6
Lipids; Proteins
Systematic nomenclature of name aldehydes and ketones,
structures and properties of aldehydes and ketones,
characteristic reactions of aldehydes and ketones, Keto-Enol
Tautomerism.
Systematic nomenclature of name carboxylic acids, structures
and properties of carboxylic acids, characteristic reactions of
carboxylic acids, soaps and detergents.
Naming carboxylic anhydrides, esters, and amides ; preparing
carboxylic anhydrides, esters, and amides;
Characteristic reactions of anhydrides, esters, and amides;
phosphoric anhydrides and phosphoric esters; step-growth
polymerization.
Introduction of carbohydrates; Fischer projections of
monosaccharides; Haworth structures of monosaccharides;
Chemical properties of monosaccharides; disaccharides;
polysaccharides.
Introduction to Lipids, Fatty acids, Waxes, Fats, and oils;
chemical properties of triacylglycerols; gylcerophospholipids;
steroids; cell membrane.
Classify proteins, the name of an amino acid and its ionized
structure, isoelectric point (pI), Identify the structural levels of
a protein, name of a dipeptide, role of an enzyme in an
enzyme-catalyzed reaction.
16
Finals Week
10:00-11:50 am, Wednesday, 5/11/2015
5/9-5/13
4
Tentative Schedule of Exams and Quizzes: CHEM 102
Assessment
Week
Quiz 1 (chpt 10)
2
Quiz 2 (chpt 11)
3
Quiz 3 (chpt 12)
4
Exam 1 (chpt 10-12)
4
Quiz 4 (chpt 13)
5
Quiz 5 (chpt 14)
6
Quiz 6 (chpt 15)
7
Exam 2 (chpt 13-15)
8
Quiz 7 (chpt 16)
9
Quiz 8 (chpt 17)
10
Exam 3 (chpt 16-17)
11
Quiz 9 (chpt 18)
12
Quiz 10 (chpt 19)
13
Exam 4 (chpt 18-19)
15
Homework: Since critical thinking and problem solving are important components of chemistry,
homework will be assigned regularly and posted in WesternOnline in order to help students
grasp principles and concepts discussed in class. Regular practice will help your overall exam
scores.
Web Resources: The course homepage is on the Western Online. Information for this class will
be posted there, including the course syllabus, homework problem sets, quizzes, exams, their
answers and your grades. Any class announcements will also be posted here.
Emergency evacuation: If a fire alarm should happen to ring, or if students are ordered to
evacuate a lab or classroom by the instructor, the students should walk to the nearest stairwell
(Do not use the elevators) and proceed to the ground floor and out the building. Any student on
an upper floor who cannot physically proceed down the stairs should go to the southernmost
stairwell and await assistance. If the building should be evacuated all students and personnel
5
should gather at the southwest corner of the Higgins Parking lot near the fence (parking lot just
outside the building) to wait further instructions.
Also, the campus emergency management office has two videos at the beginning of the
semester. These videos are titled "Shots fired and College Fire Survival" and can be found at the
following web site: http://www.wiu.edu/rmep/resources.php.
WIU Policies: It is the policy of Western Illinois University to accommodate individuals with
disabilities pursuant to federal law and the University's commitment to equal educational
opportunities. It is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor of any necessary
accommodations at the beginning of the course. Any student with a disability requiring
accommodations should contact the Office of Disability Support Services.
STATE ACCREDITATION POLICY INFORMATION:
“In accordance with Illinois State Board of Education certification rules, all candidates seeking teacher
certification are required by Western Illinois University to obtain a grade of “C” or better in all directed
general education course, all core courses, and all courses in the option. Note: A “C- ” is below a “C”.”
Please note: any secondary science teacher certification student wanting to see how this course is aligned
with the State and National Standards should see their advisor and/or examine the Secondary Science
Teacher Certification WesternOnline Advising site.
Chemistry Resource Center. Chemistry resource center is located in Currens 107. Free tutoring and/or
help is provided by the department through the Chemistry Help Center. Hours will be posted.
Students with disabilities : In accordance with University values and disability law, students
with disabilities may request academic accommodations where there are aspects of a course that
result in barriers to inclusion or accurate assessment of achievement. To file an official request
for disability-related accommodations, please contact the Disability Resource Center at 309-2982512, [email protected] or in 143 Memorial Hall. Please notify the instructor as soon as
possible to ensure that this course is accessible to you in a timely manner.
6
Chem 102 Lab Syllabus
Time: Tuesday: 8-10:50 am; 11:00-1:50 pm; 2-4:50 pm. Thursday: 8-10:50 am; 11:00-1:50 pm;
Place: CURRENS HALL 427
Lab Manual: Chemistry 102 Lab Experiments; Sub Title 1: Western Illinois University; by
Bettelheim and Landesberg; Cengage; Custom Lab Manual ISBN-9781337048231
Experiments: Each student is expected to successfully complete 10 experiments.
Lab Reports: Laboratory reports will consist of three parts: pre-lab questions, report sheet and
post-lab questions. The report should be hand written legibly. Each complete lab report is 20
points.
Pre-lab questions (5 pts) : The pre-lab questions are to be completed before coming to lab.
Your instructor will check your pre-lab report at the beginning of each laboratory period. One
will not be permitted to perform an experiment without completing the pre-lab section of the lab
report before the start of the lab.
Report sheet (10 pts): Report sheets include experimental data, calculations and observations.
Report sheet should be recorded during the lab.
Post-lab questions (5 pts): All questions should be answered unless otherwise indicated by your
instructor.
Lab report should be submitted at the beginning of the next lab period. Late lab reports will be
docked by 3 pts per day. Lab reports turned in one week after the due date will not be graded.
Attendance: Attendance is required. One and only one make-up lab is allowed at the end of the
semester. You must attend the lab section that you are signed-up for. Cell phones are not to be
used in the lab, and should be turned off and put away during lab period.
Grading: The instructors will collaborate so as to grade each lab section in a uniform manner.
Overall, the lab will count as 250 points and it will be added to your lecture portion points to
tabulate a final grade for this course. Failure to complete the lab with at least 60% (>150 points
out of 250 lab grade) will result in failure for the Lab. Since the laboratory experience is integral
to the overall course, failure to earn a passing grade in the lab will result in an automatic failure
for the course.
Statement on Ethics. Western Illinois University, like all communities, functions best when its members
treat one another with honesty, fairness, respect, and trust. Students have rights and responsibilities. The
following action is prohibited under the Student Conduct Code: Disorderly Conduct: Any behavior which
disrupts the regular or normal functions of the University community, including behavior which breaches
the peace or violates the rights of others. Plagiarism, cheating, and other forms of academic dishonesty
constitute a serious violation of University conduct regulations. Any student convicted of academic
dishonesty, can receive a failing grade and may be subject to further academic penalties. Web address for
Academic Integrity Policy (http://www.wiu.edu/policies/acintegrity.php). Please remember that you are
expected to do your own work at all times. You can’t directly copy the homework or lab report from your
7
classmates or other sources. However, discussing homework questions or lab reports with your
classmates and others is fine.
Students are expected to wear clothing that completely covers the feet and legs in lab and wear
safety goggle all the time in the lab. Be aware, sandals and shorts are not appropriate dress in lab.
Students who wear sandals or shorts will not be allowed to work in the lab.
Supplies to be provided by students
- Safety goggles. Eye protection is required and must be purchased by the student.
- Scientific Calculator (not a graphing calculator)
Schedule of Experiments
Week
Activities
Points
1
2
Lab
#
-
No lab
Lab check-in (Lab safety rules)
5
3
21
Structure in Organic Compounds(Use of Molecular Models I): To
visualize structure in organic molecules, build and compare
isomers, explore the three-dimensional character.
20
4
24
5
23
6
25
7
22
8
9
28
10
26
Classification and Identification of Hydrocarbons: To investigate
the physical properties, solubility, and density of hydrocarbons, to
compare the chemical reactivity of an alkane, an alkene, an
aromatic compound.
Column and Paper Chromatography(Separation of Plant
Pigments): To compare separation of components of a mixture by
two different techniques,
Classification and Identification of Alcohols and Phenols: To
learn characteristic reactions of alcohols and phenols,
identification of an unknown compound(an alcohol or a phenol).
Stereochemistry(Use of Molecular Models II): To study the
conformation of cyclohexane, to distinguish between chiral and
achiral systems, to define and illustrate enantiomers,
diastereomers, and meso forms.
20
Lab Midterm
Properties of Amines and Amides: To show some physical
properties of amines and amides, to demonstrate the hydrolysis of
amides.
Classification and Identification of Aldehydes and Ketones: To
learn the chemical characteristics of aldehydes and ketones, to
distinguish between examples of aldehydes and ketones, identify
20
20
20
20
20
20
8
11
27
12
30
13
31
14
15
16
34
-
aldehydes and ketones.
Properties of Carboxylic Acids and Esters: To study the physical
properties of carboxylic acids, to prepare a variety of esters and
note their odors, to demonstrate saponification.
Preparation of Acetylsalicylic Acid (aspirin): To illustrate the
synthesis of the drug aspirin.
Isolation of Caffeine from Tea Leaves: To demonstrate the
isolation of natural product, to learn the techniques of extraction.
Thanksgiving break
Make-up lab
Lab check-out
Lab final (comprehensive)
20
20
20
5
20
9
Download