Durham University Business School
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
3H: STRATEGY AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
2001/2002
Introduction
This double module course is intended for students who have already completed successfully
the 1H Introduction to Management and 2H Management in Organisations courses. As its
name implies, it focuses on the formulation and implementation of strategy by business
organisations, and the ramifications of conducting business on an international scale. By its
nature, therefore, it concentrates on larger firms, particularly those operating within an
international environment.
The course follows a pattern of study which places particular emphasis upon class
participation. To this end, there is less emphasis upon formal lectures than in other courses.
Many sessions will follow a workshop format based upon case study analysis and class
discussion of themes raised by prior reading. CONSEQUENTLY, PREPARATION
BEFORE EACH WORKSHOP SESSION IS ESSENTIAL.
Objectives
The course has four related objectives:
(i)
To provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of strategy in business
organisations;
(ii)
To analyse the nature and significance of multi-national corporations and the
growth of the global economy;
(iii)
To raise issues of economic, political and social concern about globalisation
and its impact for debate; and
(iv)
To encourage students to think critically and strategically about business
issues.
There are two other aims of the course which are worth stating:
(i)
it should be relevant - and thus helpful - to students' career choices; and
(ii)
it should prove to be interesting and enjoyable.
Course Outline
As previously mentioned, this course will examine the twin themes of strategy and
international business. However, rather than examine these themes separately, the course
integrates them both into one structure so that the links and conflicts can be more easily
established. The perspective of the course being to examine how companies manage within
an increasingly complex, international climate. The broader implications of these global
changes will also be examined.
Reading
It is essential to purchase the following book for the course:
G Johnson and K Scholes, Exploring Corporate Strategy,
(1999, Text and Cases 5th Edition), Prentice Hall
In addition, it is suggested that you purchase one of the following:
B De Wit & R Meyer, Strategy: Process, Content, Context
(1998, 2nd Edition), International Thompson Business Press
H Mintzberg, J B Quinn & S Ghoshal, The Strategy Process,
(1998, Revised European 2nd Edition), Prentice Hall
These books are available from the University Book Shop.
In addition to the main texts, the course makes extensive use of other books and, particularly,
articles from the management journals. The Main Reading List is included later in this
course guide. Most of the texts and articles on the reading list are held on Reserve or Long
Loan in both the Business School Library and the Main Library, with any variations to this
indicated on the list. Most students make extensive use of the Business School Library – a
file is kept behind the issue desk of all the articles used on the course to allow you to make a
personal study copy – just ask the librarian.
In addition to the main reading list, a detailed programme of reading and case questions
for each session will be provided for each term.
Case Studies
Case studies feature regularly in this course and you will need to prepare before each case
study workshop by reading and analysing the case study and attempting an answer to the
questions in the detailed reading list. Most workshops include elements of group work and
plenary discussion at which you will be invited(!) to present your views/analysis on particular
aspects of the case study. There will also be a number of occassions on which you will be
expected to make more formal presentations (as part of a group) to the class.
You will find it useful to work with the other members of your tutorial group (no more than
six people) in preparing for each case study workshop, sharing analysis and ideas; so
spreading the workload. I will assume that everyone is fully prepared for each session.
Tutorials and Formative Assessment
A central part of the course, and one which most students find very helpful, is the tutorial
programme. Each tutorial is based around a question taken from a recent examination paper
and the questions are also the same for the formal in-course assessment you need to undertake
for this course. Consequently, each tutorial will provide vital feedback before you submit an
essay for marking.
Once per term, you will be expected work with a fellow student make a presentation to the
rest of the group and lead the subsequent discussion. The presentation should take no more
than 15 minutes and should aim to address the key arguments/issues posed by the question.
The presentation should be supported by a written report or PowerPoint handout which
should be made available to me and the other members of the tutorial group prior to the
presentation. The tutorial will allow you to get oral feedback on your presentation and I will
also provide some written comments on your presentation and report after the session.
At all other tutorial sessions you should come having undertaken the relevant reading and be
prepared to play a full part in the discussion.
Tutorial groups are limited to no more than six people and there will be three tutorials in
each of the Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms, together with further tutorials for revision
purposes run in Easter Term. Times and membership of the tutorials groups will be sorted
out at the beginning of the year. Tutorials will normally take place in my room at the Business
School. If you are unable to make your normal tutorial time, you should arrange to
swap sessions with a colleague - but please let me know in advance.
Summative Assessment
From the list of six tutorial questions you will need to choose two for which you will submit
essays of up to 3,000 words each. Each essay will contribute a maximum of 15% to the
final mark for the course. There are no restrictions on which two questions you submit for
summative assessment, but normally students prefer to tackle the same question as covered in
their presentation. The deadlines for the essays are:
First essay - By 4pm on Friday 14 December 2001 (one week after the end of term)
Second essay – By 4pm on Friday 29 March 2002 (two weeks after the end of term)
Both essays should be submitted to the Undergraduate Office at the Business School in
person or by post or e-mail. Your essays will not be returned, but written feedback will be
given.
The final 70% of the course mark rests on a 3 hour closed book examination next May/June
in which you will need to answer three questions from nine.
Tutorial & Summative Essay Questions
Select any two essays from this list as your summative assignments. There is no restriction
on submitting an essay based on your tutorial paper.
Tutorial 1 – Week beginning Monday 5 November 2001
“Successful competitors move quickly in and out of products, markets, and sometimes even
entire businesses - a process more akin to an interactive video game than to chess. In such an
environment, the essence of strategy is not the structure of a company’s products and markets
but the dynamics of its behaviour. And the goal is to identify and develop the hard-to-imitate
organizational capabilities that distinguish a company from its competitors, in the eyes of
customers.”
G Stalk, P Evans & L Shulman, “Competing on Capabilities,
HBR, March/April 1992
Outline how an organisation can go about the process of creating these “hard-to-imitate
organizational capabilities” and assess the need for them to be distinctive in order to sustain
competitive advantage?
Tutorial 2 – Week beginning Monday 12 November 2001
“When the external environment is in a state of flux, the firm itself, in terms of its bundle of
resources and capabilities, may be a much more stable basis on which to define its identity.
R M Grant, Contemporary Strategy Analysis, 3rd ed., 1998
In light of Grant’s statement, outline how a firm can build sustainable competitive advantage
and evaluate the extent to which it still needs to assess its external environment.
Tutorial 3 – Week beginning Monday 19 November 2000
“One research study of international strategic alliances confirmed that the primary motivation
to form alliances was the need for specific resources and competences to survive and succeed
in globalising markets – particularly where technologies were changing too.”
“International developments through acquisition have been critically important in some
industries… [One] reason for acquisition is the lack of resources or competences to develop a
strategy internally.”
G Johnson & K Scholes, Exploring Corporate Strategy, 5th ed. 1999
Compare and evaluate the reasons for the use of acquisitions and strategic alliances by
organisations in order to develop the strategic capabilities necessary to survive and succeed in
global markets. Use relevant examples to illustrate your answer.
Tutorial 4 – Week beginning Monday 28 January 2002
“Shared assumptions help to explain the way business is done and strategy develops”
G Johnson & K Scholes, Exploring Corporate Strategy, 5th ed. 1999
How can an understanding of corporate culture help to interpret the strategic management
process within an organisation?
Tutorial 5 – Week beginning Monday 11 February 2002
“Changes in the international operating environment have forced MNCs to optimise global
efficiency, national responsiveness and world-wide learning simultaneously. For most
companies, this new challenge implies not only a fundamental strategic reorientation, but also
a major change in organisational capability.”
C Bartlett & S Goshal, “Transnational Management”,
in B De Wit & R Meyer, Strategy: Process Content Context, 1998
Outline and illustrate how companies can go about building the strategic capabilities
necessary to meet the challenges of globalisation as indicated in the quotation above.
Tutorial 6 – Week beginning Monday 25 February 2002
“Competitive advantage ultimately results from an effective combination of national
circumstance and company strategy. Conditions in a nation may create an environment in
which firms can attain international competitive advantage, but it is up to a company to seize
the opportunity”
M E Porter, The Competitive Advantage of Nations,
in B De Wit & R Meyer, Strategy: Process Content Context, 2nd ed.,1998
Critically assess Porter’s view about the importance of both national conditions and company
strategy in order for a firm to create international competitive advantage.
Keeping in Touch
Technology marches on and can, on occasions, even be useful. Consequently, I will use email as the primary means of keeping in touch with you between sessions. Please ensure
you register with the IT Service and check your e-mail regularly. In addition, it would be
helpful if you sent a brief message to me as soon as you have an e-mail address so that I can
build up a mailing list. If you have another e-mail address that you use as well or instead of
your University address then you might also wish to send it to me. My e-mail address is:
[email protected]
In addition, there is a website for the course which can be accessed at the following address:
http://www.dur.ac.uk/p.j.allen
The site contains details on the course (including this handbook) and background notes to
support the sessions – the material is not a substitute for attending lectures, workshops and
tutorials, but is a (hopefully) useful addition to them. I would welcome ideas on how this can
be developed during the year.
SUBMISSION OF ASSESSED WORK
In line with the University's policy on Penalties for the Late Submission of Summative
Assessed Work, all students are required to submit work before the deadlines for submission.
Failure to submit a piece of summative assessed work by the due deadline will mean
that the work will not be marked and a mark of zero will be recorded.
All assessed work must be submitted to the Undergraduate Course Secretary located in
the Taught Degree Programmes Office at the Business School (Room 203) by the due
deadline and a receipt obtained.
As all summative work may be required by the Board of Examiners in Management, marked
assignments will not be returned to you. Feedback on your performance will be made by your
tutor on an assignment feedback sheet. Hence, it is probably a good idea to retain a copy of
your assignment, particularly if you want to use it for revision purposes.
PLAGIARISM
The University has a very strict policy against plagiarism and particular care must be taken to
acknowledge the work and opinion of others and avoid any appearance of misrepresenting
them as one's own. Unacknowledged quotation or close paraphrasing of other people's
writing, amounting to the presentation of other persons' thoughts or writing as one's own, is
plagiarism and will be penalised. In extreme cases, plagiarism may be classified as dishonest
practice and can lead to expulsion.
Extensions to Deadlines
If you, for whatever reason, believe that you will be unable to submit a piece of summative
assessed work by the deadline, you should make a written request for an extension , on the
appropriate form, to the Chairman of the Board of Examiners in Management, well in
advance of the deadline. A copy of the form requesting an extension is included in this
Course Outline and further copies can be obtained from the Course Secretary. The form
requires you to explain the reasons for your request for an extension and, where appropriate,
you may be required to provide supporting evidence.
Normally, the only grounds on which an extension will be granted are circumstances beyond
your control, such as illness or a family bereavement. Only in exceptional circumstances will
an extension be granted after the due deadline. In such cases, the student should contact the
Chairman of the Board of Examiners in Management directly.
You will be informed as to whether the Chairman, or his nominee, has granted an extension
by the return of a signed copy of your completed form. It follows, therefore, that submission
of your form does not imply that a request will be granted.
Durham University Business School
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME
REQUEST FOR AN EXTENSION OF TIME FOR THE SUBMISSION OF
ASSESSED COURSE WORK
Students must complete part A of the form. Completed forms must be handed in to the
Undergraduate Course Secretary at the Undergraduate Office in the Business School (Room
208) well before the published submission deadline for the work in question.
________________________________________________________________________
Part A
Student's Name
College
Degree Course
Seminar Tutor
Seminar Tutor Group
Assignment Title
Due date
Reasons for extension*
(*provide supporting
evidence if necessary,
e.g. doctor's note)
Student's Signature
To be completed by the student
............................................................................................
............................................................................................
............................................................................................
............................................................................................
............................................................................................
............................................................................................
....................................Requested extension time......................
............................................................................................
.............................................................................................
.............................................................................................
.............................................................................................
.............................................................................................
.............................................................................................
..................................................................Date ....................
________________________________________________________________________
Part B
To be completed by the Chairman of the Board of Examiners
(or nominee)
Action:
...............................................................................................
New Submission Date:
................................................................................................
Signature: ...................................................... Date ......................................................
________________________________________________________________________
Completed copies to:
Student, Relevant Tutor, Course Leader, Course File
Main Reading List
Strategy & International Business 2001/2002
This reading list is split into four main sections, covering the main course texts and the three
major themes of the course: strategic management, the global firm and globalisation issues.
A detailed guide to the reading and case study questions for each session is published
alongside the timetable for each term. In addition, it is worth spending some time looking
around the shelves of both libraries, as well as browsing through the management journals
and business press. There is much available in this subject area (of varying quality and
length!) and it is worth making the effort to read widely.
All of the texts and articles below are available in either the Main Library or the Business
School Library, with the majority available in both unless indicated. The most frequently
used texts are held in the Reserve Collections of both libraries, with older editions often
available for longer loan periods. Copies of all articles are held behind the Issuing Desk at
the Business School Library – ask the librarian for the Strategy & International Business file.
Many of the articles are also individually catalogued and available in the Main Library
Reserve Collection.
Main Texts
G Johnson & K Scholes
Exploring Corporate Strategy,
1999, Text & Cases, 5e, Prentice Hall
(Recommended Purchase)
B De Wit & R Meyer
Strategy: Process, Context, Content,
1998, 2e, International Thompson Publishing
(Suggested Purchase)
H Mintzberg, J B Quinn
& S Ghoshal
The Strategy Process,
1998, Revised European Edition, Prentice Hall
(Suggested Purchase)
Strategic Management
Books
R M Grant(1)
Contemporary Strategy Analysis,
1998, 3e, Blackwell Business
G Pearson(1)
Strategy in Action,
1999, Financial Times Prentice Hall
S Segal-Horn(1)
The Strategy Reader,
1998, Blackwell Business
C Bowman(1)
Strategy in Practice,
1998, Prentice Hall
C Bowman & D Faulkner(1) Competitive and Corporate Strategy,
1997, Irwin
J Kay
Foundations of Corporate Success,
1993, Oxford University Press
M E Porter
Competitive Strategy,
1980, The Free Press
M E Porter
Competitive Advantage,
1985, The Free Press
R D Stacey
Strategic Management and Organisational Dynamics,
1996, 2e, Pitman Publishing
M Goold & A Campbell
Strategies and Styles: the role of the centre in managing
diversified corporations,
1987, Blackwell
J Harvey-Jones &
A Masey
Troubleshooter,
1991, BBC Books
J Harvey-Jones
Troubleshooter 2,
1992, BBC Books
J L Thompson
Strategic Management: awareness and change,
1997, Chapman & Hall
J I Moore
Writers on Strategy and Strategic Management,
1992, Penguin
R Whittington
What is strategy and does it matter?,
1993, Routledge
P McKiernan
Strategies of Growth: maturity, recovery and
internationalization,
1992, Routledge
D Collingridge
The Management of Scale,
1992, Routledge
D C Wilson
A Strategy of Change,
1992, Routledge
G Johnson
Strategic Change and the Management Process,
1987, Blackwell
D Asch & C Bowman
Readings in Strategic Management,
1993, Macmillan
G Morgan
Images of Organization,
1997, 2ed, Sage
D C Wilson &
R H Rosenfeld
Managing Organizations,
1999, 2ed, McGraw Hill
D Pugh & D Hickson
Writers on Organizations,
1997, 5ed, Penguin
D Hickson & D Pugh
Management Worldwide,
1995, Penguin
Articles
R M Grant
“The resource-based theory of competitive advantage –
implications for strategy formulation”,
Open University Business School/California Management
Review, Vol. 33, pp 97-115, 1999
The Economist*
"Business strategy: Eenie, meenie, minie, mo...",
The Economist, 20 March 1993
J Hendry
"We need a philosophy of management",
British Acadamy of Management Newsletter, No. 11 1991
S Miller
"The nature of strategic management",
in Human Resource Management: issues and strategies,
R Harrison (ed.), Ch. 1, Addison-Wesley, 1993
M E Porter*
"How competitive forces shape strategy",
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1979
T A J Cockerill(1)
"Vertical Integration and Competition Policy",
Consumer Policy Review, Vol 2 No 3 1992
A I Murray*
"A contingency view of Porter's generic strategies",
Academy of Management Review, Vol. 13 No. 3 1988
C W L Hill*
"Differentiation versus low cost or differentiation and low cost:
a contingency framework",
Academy of Management Review, Vol. 13 No. 3 1988
M Cronshaw, E Davis
& J Kay
"On being stuck in the middle or good food costs less at
Sainsbury's", British Journal of Management, Vol. 5 1994
M E Porter(1)
"From competitive advantage to corporate strategy",
Harvard Business Review, May/June 1987
H Mintzberg &
J Waters
"Of strategies, deliberate and emergent"
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 6 1985
H Mintzberg(1)
"The Design School: reconsidering the basic premises of
strategic management",
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 11 1990
I Ansoff(1)
"Critique of Henry Mintzberg's The Design School:
reconsidering the basic premises of strategic management",
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 12 1991
H Mintzberg(1)
"Learning 1, Planning 0: Reply to Igor Ansoff",
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 12 1991
R Hall
"The strategic analysis of intangible resources",
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 13 1992
R Hall(1)
"A Framework Linking Intangible Resources and Capabilities
to Sustainable Competitive Advantage",
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 14 1993
R Hall(1)
"A Framework for Identifying the Intangible Sources of
Sustainable Competitive Advantage", in
Competence-Based Competition, G Hamel & A Heene (eds.)
1994, John Wiley & Sons
K P Coyne(1)
"Sustainable Competitive Advantage - What It Is, What It Isn't"
Business Horizons, January/February 1986
G Hamel & C K Prahalad
"Strategic Intent",
Harvard Business Review, May/June 1988
G Hamel & C K Prahalad(1) “Strategy as Stretch and Leverage”,
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1993
C K Prahalad & G Hamel
"The core competence of the corporation",
Harvard Business Review, May/June 1990
G Stalk, P Evans &
"Competing on capabilities, the new rules of corporate
strategy",
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1992
L E Shulman
M Goold, A Campbell
& K Luchs
M Goold, A Campbell(1)
"Strategies and Styles Revisited: 'Strategic Control' - is it
Tenable?",
Long Range Planning, Vol. 26 No. 6 1993
& K Luchs
"Strategies and Styles Revisited: 'Strategic Planning &
Financial Control”
Long Range Planning, Vol. 26 No. 5 1993
C Carr, C Tomkins &
B Bayliss(1)
"Financial or Strategic Controls? An Anglo-German case
study", European Management Journal, Vol. 12 No. 1 1994
H Hungenberg
"How to Ensure that Headquarters Add Value"
Long Range Planning, Vol. 26 No. 6 1993
L O' Sullivan &
J M Geringer
"Harnessing the Power of Your Value Chain",
Long Range Planning, Vol. 26 No. 2 1993
H Mintzberg
"The fall and rise of strategic planning",
Harvard Business Review, January/February 1994
S S Cowen & R L Osborne
"Board of Directors as Strategy",
Journal of General Management, Vol. 19 No. 2 1993
P Verdin & P Williamson(1) "Successful Strategy: Stargazing or Self-examination?",
European Management Journal, Vol. 12 No. 1 1994
C Bowman
"Stuck in the old routines",
European Management Journal, Vol. 12 No. 1 1994
M E Porter(1)
"Towards a Dynamic Theory of Strategy",
Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 12 1991
M E Porter(1)
“What is strategy?”
Harvard Business Review, November/December 1996
G Hamel(1)
“Strategy as revolution”
Harvard Business Review, July/August 1996
H Mintzberg(1)
“Strategy Formation: schools of thought”, in
Perspectives on Strategic Management,
JW Fredrickson (ed.), 1990, Harper & Row
R Whipp, R Rosenfeld &
A Pettigrew(1)
“Culture and competitiveness: evidence from two mature UK
industries”, Journal of Management Studies, Vol. 26, No. 6,
1989
N J Adler
International dimensions of organizational behaviour,
1992, Boston, Chapter 2
S C Schneider(1)
“Strategy Formulation: the impact of national culture”
Organization Studies, Vol.10, No. 2, pp. 149-168
P B Smith(1)
“Organizational behaviour and national cultures”,
British Journal of Management, Vol. 3, 1992
F Contractor & P Lorange(1) “Why should firms co-operate?”, in B De Wit & R Meyer,
Strategy: Process, Content, Context, Ch 7 pp 321-331, 1994,
West Publishing
M Goold & A Campbell(1)
“From Corporate Strategy to Parenting Advantage” in B De Wit
& R Meyer, Strategy: Process, Content, Context, Ch 6 pp 287290, 1994, West Publishing
The Global Firm
Books
H Vernon-Wortzel &
L H Wortzel
Global Strategic Management: the essentials,
1990, 2e, John Wiley & Sons
S Humes
Managing the Multinational: confronting the global-local
dilemma, 1993, Prentice Hall
P J Buckley &
P N Ghauri (ed.)
The Internationalization of the Firm: a reader,
1993, Academic Press
M Mendenhall, B J Punnett Global Management,
& D Ricks
1995, Blackwell Publishers
AW Barrell
Building a Global Business,
1991, Fitzwilliam Publishing
M R Czinkota, P Rivoli
& I A Ronkainen
International Business,
1992, 2e, The Dryden Press
P Dickens
Global Shift - The internationalisation of Global Activity",
1992, 2e
J Drew (ed)
Readings in International Enterprise,
1995, Routledge
K Ohmae(1)
"Triad Power",
1995, Free Press, New York
Articles
A Treadgold*
"Dixons and Laura Ashley: different routes to international
growth", International Journal of Retail and Distribution
Management, Vol. 19 No. 4 1991
K Ohmae
"Companies without Countries",
McKinsey Quarterly, Autumn 1987
K Ohmae
"The Global Logic of Strategic Alliances",
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1989
K Ohmae
"Managing in a borderless world",
Harvard Business Review, May/June 1989
Y-S Hu
"Global or Stateless Corporations are National Firms with
International Operations", California Management Review,
Winter 1992
C Lorenz
"The birth of a transnational",
McKinsey Quarterly, Autumn 1989
C Lorenz(1)
"Does nationality matter",
Financial Times, 13 April 1994
C Lorenz(1)
"Sugar daddy",
Financial Times, 20 April 1994
C Lorenz(1)
"Nationality still matters",
Financial Times, 27 April 1994
W Taylor
"The Logic of Global Business: an interview with ABB's Percy
Barnevik",
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1991
T Sasaki
"What the Japanese have learnt from Strategic Alliances",
Long Range Planning, Vol. 26 No. 6 1993
R G Maruca
"The Right Way to Go Global: an interview with Whirlpool
CEO David Whitwam"
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1994
S M Shaw & J Meier(1)
"'Second generation' MNCs in China",
McKinsey Quarterly, No. 4 1993
M W Rennie(1)
"Born global"
McKinsey Quarterly, No. 4 1993
S Zahra & G Elhagrasey
"Strategic management of international joint ventures",
European Management Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1994
P Rosenzweig
"Why is managing in the U.S. so difficult for European firms?",
European Management Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1994
J R D'Cruz &
“The Five Partners Model: France Telecom, Alcatel and the
Global Telecommunications Industry”
European Management Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1994
A M Rugman
S Ghoshal & N Nohria
“Horses for Courses: Organisational forms for multinational
corporations", Sloan Management Review, Vol 34, No 2, 1989
Globalisation - implications
Books
W Hutton
The State We're In,
1995, Jonathan Cape
W Hutton(2)
The State to Come,
1997, Vintage
J Redwood(1)
The Global Marketplace: capitalism and its future,
1993, HarperCollinsPublishers
K Hughes (ed.)
The Future of UK Competitiveness and the Role of Industrial
Policy,
1993, PSI Publishing
K Ohmae
The Borderless World: power and strategy in the interlinked
economy,
1991, Fontana
P Kennedy
Preparing for the Twenty-First Century,
1993, HarperCollinsPublishers & Random House
M E Porter
The Competitive Advantage of Nations,
1990, The Free Press (2e, 1998 also available in Main Library)
R B Reich
The Work of Nations,
1991, Alfred A Knopf
R Dahrendorf (et al)
Report on Wealth Creation and Social Cohesion in a free
society,
1995, The Commission on Wealth Creation and Social
Cohesion
J Gray
Post-Communist Societies in Transition: a social market
perspective,
1994, The Social Market Foundation
P Ormerod(2)
The Death of Economics,
1994, Faber and Faber
T Burke, A Genn-Bash
& B Haines
Competition in Theory and Practice,
1991, Revised & updated edition, Routledge
L Thurow
The Future of Capitalism,
1996, Brealey Publishing
K Ohmae
"The End of the National State",
1995, Harper Collins
Articles
L Thurow*
"Who owns the Twenty-First Century?",
Sloan Management Review, Spring 1992
P F Drucker(1)
"The changed world economy",
Foreign Affairs, Spring 1986
W W Lewis & M Harris*
"Why globalization must prevail",
McKinsey Quarterly, No. 2 1992
M E Porter
"The Competitive Advantage of Nations",
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1990
R B Reich
"Who is Us?",
Harvard Business Review, January/February 1990
R B Reich
"Who is Them?",
Harvard Business Review, March/April 1991
W Hutton
"Markets threaten life and soul of party",
The Guardian, 4 January 1994
J Gray
"Against the world",
The Guardian, 4 January 1994
J Redwood
"The meat in the cauldron",
The Guardian, 10 January 1994
P Kennedy
"Preparing for the 21st Century: Winners and Losers",
The New York Review, 11 February 1993
P Kennedy
"The American Prospect",
The New York Review, 4 March 1993
W Hutton
"Why Rover was driven out of UK hands",
The Guardian, 7 February 1994
R Moss Kanter(1)
"Change in the Global Economy"
European Management Journal, Vol. 12 No. 1 1994
W W Lewis, H Gersbach,
T Jansen & K Sakate
"The secret to competitiveness - competition",
McKinsey Quarterly, No. 4 1993
K Hughes(1)
"Out of step with the 'footloose' argument"
The Guardian, 14 February 1994
R Radosevich &
S Kassicieh(1)
"Strategic challenges and proposed responses to
competitiveness through public-sector technology”,
California Management Review, Summer 1993
M Smitka(1)
"Are U.S. Auto Exports the Growth Industry of the 1990s?",
Sloan Management Review, Fall 1993
C Johnson
"Comparative Capitalism: The Japanese Difference",
California Management Review, Summer 1993
J J Sullivan(1)
"Japanese Management Philosophies: From the Vacuous to the
Brilliant", California Management Review, Winter 1992
R L Cutts
"Capitalism in Japan: Cartels and Keiretsu",
Harvard Business Review, July/August 1992
K S Wever & C S Allen
"Is Germany a model for managers?",
Harvard Business Review, September/October 1992
H A Henzler(1)
"The New Era of Eurocapitalism",
Harvard Business Review, July/August 1992
J Templeman et al(1)
"Germany: to regain competitiveness, companies are
overhauling production from top to bottom",
Business Week, 31 May 1993
B T Lloyd & S Skee(1)
"Why Germans like the best of British",
Management Today, December 1992
The Economist(1)
"The Japanese Economy - from miracle to mid-life crisis",
The Economist, 6 March 1993
D Marsh et al(1)
"Can Europe Compete?"
The Financial Times, February/March (various) 1994
The Economist(1)
"Japan - Death of a role model",
The Economist, 9 July 1994
M E Porter(1)
"Capital Disadvantage: America's Failing Capital Investment
System", Harvard Business Review, September/October 1992
D Rodrik
"Getting interventions right: how South Korea and Taiwan
grew rich",
Economic Policy, April 1995
L Elliot(1)
"Elite companies rule world of trade",
The Guardian, 31 August 1994
W Hutton(1)
"Money before machines",
The Guardian, 3 January 1995
J K Galbraith(1)
"Towards a New Deal",
The Guardian, 26 January 1994
G Soros
Capital Crimes”
The Guardian, 18 January 1997
All articles and books can be found in both the Main University and DUBS Libraries unless
indicated:
(1) DUBS Library only
(2) Main Library only
* Catalogued under “Strategy & International Business” in Main Library Reserve File
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