AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
AS Sociology Scheme of Work 2012-13 (AQA)
Unit 1 (SCLY1): Families and Households
Exam: Monday 13th May 2013, pm (1 hour)
1 double lesson (100 mins) per week, 1 teacher
Content:
 The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies
 Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the lifecourse
 The diversity of contemporary family and household structures
 The nature and extent of changes within the family, with reference to gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships
 The nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society
 Demographic trends in the UK since 1900
 Reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates and family size
Assessment:
Level 1
(Grade E)
Level 2
(Grade C)
Level 3
(Grade A)
AO1: knowledge and understanding 50%
 basic knowledge and understanding of sociological theories, methods
and concepts with limited evidence
 writing doesn’t always make sense and there will be errors of
grammar, punctuation and spelling.
 reasonable knowledge and understanding of sociological theories,
methods and concepts, with some supporting evidence
 writing uses sociological material in a mainly accurate way that makes
sense, with only a few errors of grammar, punctuation and spelling
 accurate knowledge and understanding of a range of sociological
theories, methods and concepts, supported by evidence
 writing uses appropriate sociological material, is logical, accurate and
makes sense, with excellent grammar, punctuation and spelling
Unit 1 exam Monday 13th May pm
Unit 2 exam Wednesday 22nd May am
AO2: application, analysis, interpretation and evaluation
50%
 limited ability to select, apply and interpret different types of
sociological evidence
 make a limited analysis and evaluation of relevant evidence and
arguments
 reasonable ability to select, apply and interpret different types of
sociological evidence
 offer some analysis and evaluation of relevant evidence and
arguments
 demonstrate an ability to select, apply and interpret, accurately and
appropriately, different types of sociological evidence from a range of
sources
 make some analysis and evaluation of relevant evidence and
arguments
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
1: What is a family?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: organise folders and run through handbook
Compare and
contrast families
and households
Starter: brainstorm in pairs – what makes a family?
AfL: differentiated Q&A, examples to test and highlight a) difference to household, b) diversity of family types
Use clip from ‘modern family’ to illustrate? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aogZUDx51vQ
Identify and
define diverse
examples of
families and
households
Main: Introduce Murdock’s definition then identify different types of family - identify and describe using playing cards / textbooks.
Extension/Challenge: make cross-cultural comparisons, research unusual examples, e.g. kibbutz
AfL: key term quiz
Exam skills: Explain the difference between a family and a household (Item 2A). (4 marks) (June 2009)
Main: explore key terms in relation to families (norms, values, socialisation) and ideas about nature / nurture. Watch feral children
clip / play the socialisation game / Complete nature / nurture sheet
Extension/Challenge: Anthony Giddens quote
AfL: notes made, completed worksheet, discussion
Exam skills: Suggest two reasons why lone-parent families are more likely to be headed by a female. (4 marks) (June 2009)
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Give simple definitions and
examples of families and
households (Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain the difference
between a family and a
household and give examples
of diverse types (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Distinguish between families
and households with
examples and explain some of
the difficulties with definition
(Level3)
Plenary: is there an ideal family type?
Homework: read Sociology Review article and answer questions
Resources: SociologyReview_sept2010_families_households,
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.61-6; read sociology review article
Specific case studies: Murdock, Giddens
Literacy objectives: making notes
Numeracy objectives: n/a
PSHCE objective: family diversity – adv / disadv, cultural differences
ICT objectives: n/a
Learning styles: verbal, kinaesthetic
Thinking skills:
Keywords: family, household, nuclear, diverse, primary socialisation, norms and values, lone-parent, polyandry, monogamy, polygamy, polygyny, reconstituted
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
2: How has the family changed?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: key words check
Explain the
relationship of
the family to
industrialisation
and urbanisation
Evaluate the
extent to which
there has been a
trend towards
nuclear families
Starter: the ‘cereal packet family’ - picture stimulus for discussion of what term means. Compare with other pictures (e.g. Victorian
families) and discuss how it has changed over time
Extension / challenge: how typical is this image?
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: Class draws picture of pre-industrial family and modern family, highlighting changes (emphasise key terms) based on
Talcott Parson’s ideas. Small groups then use information p.79 to highlight criticisms of Parsons from Laslett and Anderson.
Extension/Challenge: use Oakley (p.80) to further critique Parson’s etc.
AfL: ‘line’ vote for extent of change, each student to justify place.
Main 2: Draw own version of modern family then look at Young & Willmott (p.81-84) and a) use key terms to label b) critique ideas
Extension/Challenge: develop critique and compare with other studies
AfL: peer review of pictures of modern family with questioning as to reasons / evidence for choice made
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
define the nuclear family and
offer simple explanation of
change (Level1)
Most pupils:
explain how the family has
changed and make simple
judgement about the extent
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Evaluate the extent to which
the family has changed over
time (Level3)
Plenary: cross-cultural comparison using Indian and British women statistics
Homework: Research marriage rates and ages – present as a paper with illustrations
Resources: ppt, plain paper and pens
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.74-85
Specific case studies: Talcott Parsons, Laslett, Anderson, Oakley, Young and Willmott
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: data analysis
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives: n/a
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: family, household, nuclear, diverse, extended family, industrialisation, unit of production, urbanisation, ascribed status, achieved status, cereal packet
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
3: Why do people marry?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: vote for most accurate statement on marriage rates / data questions
Identify and
explain changes
in patterns of
marriage
Analyse and
evaluate changing
attitudes towards
marriage and
cohabitation
Starter: why do people marry? List as many reasons as you can think of.
Extension / challenge: categorise reasons, e.g. religious, economic…
AfL: group prioritisation task
Main 1: pairs / small groups - for each reason, explain how attitudes have changed and what effect this may have had on marriage
rates (positive or negative)
Extension/Challenge: Activity 18 p.86
AfL: each group reports back on one reason
Main 2: make notes on cohabitation from p.87-8, summarise in 5 bullet points then complete table of adv/disadv
Extension/Challenge: how far are the reasons for changes in marriage and cohabitation rates the same?
AfL: mixed pair peer review of notes / table
Main 3: complete source exercise in handout
Extension/Challenge: consider data reliability using information on handout
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Plenary: Exam skills: suggest two reasons why there has been an increase in cohabitation (Item 2A). (4 marks) (June 2010)
Use bullet points with 2 clear, separate reasons.
AfL: self-assessment
Homework: find 3 contrasting examples of contemporary presentations of marriage, e.g. articles / television programmes – positive, negative, alternative
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.85-8; activities 18 and 19
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: marriage, secularisation, cohabitation, serial monogamy, first marriage, re-marriage, social pressure, state support, legislation, civil partnership
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Outline basic pattern, suggest
at least 3 reasons for changing
patterns (Level1)
Most pupils:
Analyse patterns, suggest
reasons for changing patterns
and offer simple evaluation of
attitudes with some evidence
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse patterns and evaluate
changing attitudes using
appropriate sociological
evidence (Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
4: Essay writing
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: quick quiz on key terms and marriage / cohabitation
Develop writing
techniques for
sociology essays
Plan an answer
for the first
assessment
Starter: what are the components of a good essay?
AfL: build through questioning
Main 1: review mark scheme and then use to mark a model essay. Highlight knowledge in one colour and analysis / evaluation in
another.
Extension/Challenge: suggest ways in which the essay could be improved
AfL: awarded marks and WWW/EBI
Use model answer to outline how to plan, focusing on use of Item B provided.
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Understand mark scheme and
plan a simple essay (Level1)
Most pupils:
Understand and recognise level
2 requirements and plan level 2
answer (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Understand and recognise level
3 requirements and plan a level
3 answer (Level3)
Exam skills: Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that the nuclear family is no longer the norm. (24 marks)
(January 2009)
Main 2: consider set question and parameters (e.g. time, content) then individually plan an answer, researching evidence to use
Extension/Challenge: through awareness of levels
AfL: peer review plans
Plenary: target setting and trouble shooting
Homework: Assessment essay Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the view that the nuclear family is no longer the norm. (24 marks) (January 2009)
Resources: model answer, mark scheme, essay sheet
Cover: set essay question
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives: extended writing / essay planning
Numeracy objectives: data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: family, household, nuclear, diverse, lone-parent, serial monogamy, polygamy, reconstituted, cereal packet, stereotypical, norm
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
5: Why do families fail?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: Exam skills: Suggest two reasons why there has been an increase in cohabitation. (4 marks) (June 2010)
Explain the
changing divorce
rate
Evaluate different
sociological
perspectives on
marital
breakdown
Starter: Wars of the Roses clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ebv3i_9Ltc
Discuss reasons for divorce (link back to reasons for marriage)
Extension / challenge: are some marriages at higher risk of divorce? (distance, age)
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: study graph of divorce trends and suggest reasons. Test hypotheses by creating a timeline of divorce law changes, p.88-9
and link to graph.
Extension/Challenge: analyse Giddens’ idea of ‘confluent love’
AfL: completed timelines
Main 2: group teaching – outlining different sociological perspectives (marketplace)
Extension/Challenge: evaluate the perspectives
AfL: marketplace presentations
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Give at least 3 reasons for the
changing divorce rate and 2
consequences (Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain the changing divorce
rate and consequences, explain
different sociological theories
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Explain the changing divorce
rate and consequences,
evaluate different sociological
perspectives (Level3)
Main 3: consequences of divorce – mini-role plays / note taking (p.92-3)
Extension/Challenge: who might be concerned about rising divorce rates and why?
AfL: role-plays / notes
Plenary: Exam skills: Suggest three reasons for the increase in the divorce rate since 1969. (6 marks) (specimen paper)
AfL: traffic lights
Homework: reading
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.88-93; Activities 20 and 21
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: empty-shell, individualisation, secularisation, confluent love, divorce rate, separation, adultery, irretrievable breakdown, petition, decree nisi, decree absolute
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
6: Is there a right time to have children?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: key words
Explore and
explain changing
fertility rates
Investigate
teenage
pregnancy and
lone-parenting
Starter: analyse statistics and summarise changes in fertility; average age of first child; births outside marriage
Extension/Challenge: explain the difference between birth numbers and rates and why it’s important
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: read Sue Sharpe’s study findings and suggest reasons for changing fertility rates.
Extension/Challenge: evaluate her methodology
AfL: Exam skills: Suggest two reasons why women might delay having children (Item 2A). (4 marks) (January 2010)
Main 2: teen pregnancy – watch clip Underage and Pregnant http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p006f7tr
Or look at Kizzy http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7136196.stm. Identify stereotypes, issues etc. Look at research case study.
Extension/Challenge: compare with general fertility trends.
AfL: debate – is there a ‘right’ time to have children?
Main 3: Explore new role of grandparents as carers (compare UK and Africa?) through a diagram that shows the change over the
last 60years and suggests reasons (life expectancy, average age of having children, career, re-marriage / divorce, age of
retirement, state support)
Extension/Challenge: cross-cultural comparison with LDCs and impact of HIV/AIDS
AfL: completed diagrams
Plenary: consider life course options
Homework: life-course diagram and review work so far
Resources:
Cover:
Specific case studies: Sharpe
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: fertility rates, total Fertility Rate, infant mortality, live births, childless / childfree, infertility, illegitimacy
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Understand basic fertility trend
(down) and suggest reasons;
outline issues relating to teen
pregnancy and single parenting
(Level1)
Most pupils:
Analyse fertility trends and
explain reasons; analyse teen
pregnancy and single parenting
trends and issues (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse fertility trends and
reasons (Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
7: How is the population changing?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: quiz on info so far / key words
identify and
explain
demographic
trends
develop writing
skills
Starter: brainstorm demographic measures (births, deaths, life expectancy, population size and structure, migration)
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: Use House of Commons Research paper or www.statistics.gov.uk to answer questions and explain each trend
Extension/Challenge: develop evaluation
AfL: ask individuals to report back on each trend and DIFF by asking for evaluation
Main 2: plan and write essay Exam skills: Examine the reasons for changes in birth rates and family size since 1900. (24 marks)
(June 2009)
Extension/Challenge: level 3 skills
AfL: peer review
Plenary:
Homework: redraft and improve essay Examine the reasons for changes in birth rates and family size since 1900. (24 marks) (June 2009)
Resources: parl statistics
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.116-119
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: interpreting data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: demographics, fertility rates, birth rates, mortality, life expectancy, migration
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Outline some demographic
trends and suggest some
reasons; develop use of
evidence in writing (Level1)
Most pupils:
Identify and explain
demographic trends; analyse
evidence (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Identify and explain
demographic trends; develop
evaluation skills (Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
8: What is the function of the family?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: posy Simmonds cartoon – traditional view of the family? Use of key words…
Assess the
function of the
family from
different
theoretical
perspectives
Starter:
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: Introduce key Functionalist theory of role of family. Students discuss in groups how many ‘functions’ they can come up
with that the family has (reproduction, regulating sexual activity, social control etc.) then evaluate Murdock / Parsons functions in
context of modern family
Extension/Challenge: group leaders
AfL: group feedback
Main 2: Groups task marketplace– functionalism (p.66), new right (p.68), Marxist (p.70), feminist (p.71), and postmodern (p.102)
– interpretations of the family and criticism
Extension/Challenge: develop evaluation
AfL: marketplace
Plenary: recap functions / check understanding
Homework: create a quiz
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.
Specific case studies: Murdock, Parsons
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: interpreting data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: functionalism, reproduction, stabilising, regulating, procreation, social control, socialisation, Marxism, Feminism, New right, Postmodernism
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Identify and explain some
functions of the family;
understand simple theories
(Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain the functions of the
family and outline different
theoretical perspectives
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse the functions of the
family and evaluate different
theoretical perspectives in the
context of modern families
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
9: How relevant is functionalism today?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: theory matching
Recognise the
importance of the
nuclear family
and its
relationship with
modern society
Analyse
Foucault’s
perspective in
relation to the
modern family
Starter: ‘warm bath’ picture – what does this suggest about the family?
Extension/Challenge: domestic abuse picture – evaluation
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: quick survey of 2 other students about family / lifestyle and compare to your own experience. Use to consider how
modern life has affected functions of the family and the role of the state.
Extension/Challenge: consider the idea of ‘functions’ and the family as part of society
AfL: check understanding questions
Main 2: mini starter with 5 embarrassing things to be caught doing. Lead into discussion of Foucault. Consider statements and
then evaluate in the light of modern society.
Extension/Challenge: panopticon
AfL: completed tables and big brother vs ring of gyges (invisibility)
Plenary: assess functionalist theory of the family – class planning
Homework: note taking on Marxism and Feminism
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.116-119
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives: interpreting data
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: surveillance, Foucault, power, internalisation, welfare state, nurturing, social integration, social policy
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Understand basic functionalist
view with some examples of
functions performed (Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain functionalist view using
examples and begin to evaluate
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse functionalist view using
evidence and evaluate with
reference to other theories
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
10: Marxism and feminism – who is in control?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: theory matching
Analyse the
family as an agent
of social control
Evaluate Marxist
and Feminist
interpretations of
the family
Starter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyHB767JgsU how does this reflect a Marxist view of families or feminist?
Extension/Challenge: evaluate functions
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: how can the family be seen as propping up capitalism? How would a feminist view the family? How is control exercised?
Extension/Challenge: evaluate and critique
AfL: worksheet on social control
Main 2: case studies – analysis and evaluation
Extension/Challenge: cross-referencing
AfL: note-taking exercise
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Explain basic Marxist and
feminist views of the family
with examples of social control
(Level1)
Most pupils:
Analyse Marxist and Feminist
views using evidence (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse and evaluate Marxist
and Feminist perspectives using
evidence (Level3)
Plenary: caption competition – pics from news / tv etc. viewed through different theoretical perspectives
Homework: Plan - Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the Marxist view that the main role of the family is to serve the interests of capitalism. (24 marks) (January 2010)
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.70-71
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: Feminism, patriarchy, radical feminists, domestic labour, social control, capitalism, Marxism, means of production, ideological state apparatus
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
11: how can I write an A grade essay?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: outline requirements at each level
improve essay
writing skills
Starter: Exam skills - Suggest two ways in which an individual might be socialised into femininity. (4 marks)
Extension/Challenge: peer marking and improving
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Exam skills: Using material from Item 2B and elsewhere, assess the Marxist view that the main role of the family is to serve the
interests of capitalism. (24 marks) (January 2010)
Main 1: group discussion of topic and plans, identify evidence. Write using different colours for evidence and evaluation.
Extension/Challenge: level 3 skills
AfL: self assessment and then peer assessment
Main 2: small group redrafting exercise to improve, paragraph by paragraph.
Extension/Challenge: mixed ability grouping
AfL: improved essay
Plenary: Q&A
Homework: reading on New Right and Charles Murray article, mark and annotate an example essay
Resources:
Cover: reading and essay writing
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords:
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Write a level 1 essay and
understand the marking criteria
(Level1)
Most pupils:
Write a level 2 essay and
demonstrate an understanding
of the marking criteria through
self and peer assessment
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Write a level 3 essay and
demonstrate an understanding
of the marking criteria through
self and peer assessment
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
12: the New Right – is the family under threat?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: outline requirements at each level
Debate the
decline of the
family
Analyse Murrays’
view of the
underclass
Starter: Valerie Riches’ article – 5 things undermining the family, do you agree?
Extension/Challenge: link to theoretical viewpoints
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: Slobs clip – ‘brown baby’, discuss stereotypes mocked http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0gmYkNJXVI
television programme examples (e.g. Shameless, Eastenders, Keeping up Appearances) – consider changes in representation.
Extension/Challenge: deeper analysis
AfL: group feedback
Main 2: analysis of Charles Murray quote and news articles
Extension/Challenge: mixed ability grouping
AfL: debate on the decline of the family and threat
Plenary: debate
Homework: read and annotate ‘Families and Social Policy’ Sociology Review Sept 2010
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.68-70
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: familial ideology, maternal deprivation, cultural deprivation, norms and values, sub-class, feral, deprived
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Give some examples of social
issues related to the family
(Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain the idea of the
underclass and give examples
of issues that may be caused in
society (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Evaluate the notion of the
underclass and debate the
decline of the family using
evidence (Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
13: Should marriage be encouraged?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: post-it vote on key question
Explain how
government
policies affect the
family
Examine current
government
policy relating to
families
Starter: table of things you can and can’t do, e.g. age of marriage
Extension/Challenge: include additional examples
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: Discussion of social policy followed by Joe Bloggs – create a biographical timeline that shows how policies might
influence life from birth to retirement (at least 6 stages)
Extension/Challenge: deeper analysis
AfL: completed timelines
Main 2: explore changing policy approaches of different political parties
Extension/Challenge: analyse policies from different theoretical perspectives
AfL: check knowledge and recall
Plenary: students test each other ‘hot seat’
Homework: examine coalition government’s approach to family life and evaluate in light of current events and economic situation
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.72-74
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: social policy, new right, conservative, liberal, neo-liberal
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Identify and outline at least 3
government policies relating to
the family (Level1)
Most pupils:
Identify several government
policies and explain the impact
they have on families (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse several government
policies and evaluate the
impact they have on families
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
14: What is the best way to support families?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: vote on how far governments should interfere in family life
Assess social
policy in
relation to
sociological
theories
Starter: 2 team competition – how many recent policies can you think of
Extension/Challenge: differentiated groups
AfL: competition
Main 1: ‘Question Time’ role play – interview politicians about their approaches to family life and policy choices
Extension/Challenge: roles allocated
AfL: role-play
Main 2: exam skills - Examine the ways in which social policies and laws may influence families and households. (24 marks)
(specimen paper) timed essay
Extension/Challenge: differentiated support
AfL: self-assessed
Plenary: blockbusters http://www.teachers-direct.co.uk/resources/quiz-busters/quiz-busters-game.aspx?game_id=4061
Homework: domestic division of labour survey
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.72-74
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: social policy, new right, conservative, liberal, neo-liberal
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Describe different sociological
approaches to social policy
(Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain different sociological
approaches to social policy
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Evaluate different sociological
approaches to social policy
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
15: Do men do their fair share?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: list ‘male and female’ jobs
Explore gender
roles within
families according
to different
theoretical
approaches
Evaluate the
extent of the
equality of the
distribution of
domestic labour
Starter: women know your limits… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS37SNYjg8w
Extension/Challenge: highlight subtle shifts, explore further examples
AfL: discussion
Main 1: explain key terms (e.g. dual burden etc.) and use evidence to argue whether or not family life benefits women
Extension/Challenge: explore in terms of theoretical perspectives
AfL: Explain what is meant by the ‘expressive role’ (Item 2A, line 5). (2 marks) (January 2009)
Main 2: read ‘women having it all’ and ‘new men’ and complete table on key agents affecting gender roles
Extension/Challenge: consider ethnic differences, complete activity 31, p.109
AfL: debate – ‘can women have it all?’
Plenary: watch Flash adverts from 1960s, 1990s, 2000s – what, if anything, has changed? Create own ideal advert for a
household product
Homework: essay - evaluate the evidence that conjugal roles are still unequal in modern British society (24 marks)
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.105-7
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: domestic violence, abuse,
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Describe traditional gender
roles with examples (Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain traditional gender roles
using examples, begin to
evaluate inequalities in the
division of domestic labour
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse gender roles using
evidence, evaluate inequalities
in the division of domestic
labour (Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
16: Is there a dark side to family life?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: match the sociologist to the study
Analyse the
consequences of
unequal power
Starter: watch domestic violence clip
AfL: initial discussion
Investigate the
‘dark side’ of the
family
Main 1: causes of domestic violence, how does society perpetuate domestic violence - reading
Extension/Challenge: identify appropriate sociological studies
AfL: discussion
Exam skills: Suggest two ways in which ‘family life may have a harmful effect on women’ (Item 2A, lines 6 – 7). (4 marks) (January
2009)
Main 2: watch NSPCC advert and then read clips before silent debate on child abuse (ideas - Teaching children about religion,
Smacking, Teaching children racist ideas, Leaving children at home alone, Allowing children to cycle to school alone, Child beauty
queens)
Extension/Challenge: use evidence
AfL: ask individuals to feedback results
Plenary: quick fire – 3 reasons…. (e.g. for divorce, for marriage, the fertility rate has gone down etc.)
Homework: review notes so far
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.105-7
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords:
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Identify examples of the dark
side of family life (Level1)
Most pupils:
Analyse the link between abuse
and unequal power (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
evaluate the consequences of
unequal power relationships
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
17: How can I do my best in the exam?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’:
Improve exam
technique
Starter:
AfL:
Main 1:
Extension/Challenge:
AfL:
Exam skills: Suggest two ways in which ‘family life may have a harmful effect on women’ (Item 2A, lines 6 – 7). (4 marks) (January
2009)
Main 2:
Extension/Challenge:
AfL:
Plenary:
Homework: note-taking on childhood
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.1
Specific case studies:
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords:
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
(Level1)
Most pupils:
(Level2)
Some more able pupils:
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
18: What is childhood?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: post-its – what is a child?
Explain how
childhood has
been socially
constructed
Evaluate the
change in the
status of children
Starter: image of little boy in a red dress – discuss then reveal that it is a boy. Discuss implications.
Or cropped image of children then zoomed into full picture – how do we know they’re children? Lead into discussion of Aries
AfL: differentiated Q&A
Main 1: what is a child? Rogers (2001)
Extension/Challenge: draw out cross-cultural differences, biological and sociological
AfL: discussion
Main 2: the discourse of youth – watch Kevin the teenager and answer questions.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLuEY6jN6gY
Extension/Challenge: link to sociological studies
AfL: Exam skills - Suggest two ways in which the position of children could be said to have improved over the last one hundred
years. (4 marks) (January 2010)
Main 3: Postman and the end of childhood
Extension/Challenge: make links
AfL: discussion
Plenary: Kevin grows up? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8RkqbqmttA
Homework: essay - Examine the ways in which childhood can be said to be socially constructed. (24 marks) (January 2009)
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.112-114
Specific case studies: Aries, Rogers,
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: social construction, gender socialisation, child-centred, economic asset, teenager, infant mortality
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Describe some of the ways that
childhood differs from
adulthood in the UK (Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain how childhood and
adulthood differs and what it
means to say it is a social
construction (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse the social construction
of childhood, using evidence
(Level3)
AS Sociology Unit 1: Families and households 2012-13
19: Are children growing up too soon?
Lesson
Objectives:
Suggested Learning Activities
‘Do Now’: data interpretation task (child labour rates? Or numbers of children?)
Examine the
rights and
responsibilities of
children in the
family
Compare
experiences of
childhood,
especially child
labour
Starter: rights and responsibilities table
AfL: discussion and differentiated Q&A
Main1: consider ambiguities of childhood – sexualisation etc. (DVD)
Extension/Challenge: support with evaluated evidence
AfL: activity 35, p.115
Main 2: child labour in the UK and abroad
Extension/Challenge:
AfL: discussion
Main 3: different experiences of childhood across the world. Consider different factors influencing experience, watch Waterloo
Road clip - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rtpdHiWQ
Extension/Challenge: evaluate different factors
AfL: tell life story in character
Plenary: exam skills - Identify three ways in which childhood may not be a positive experience for some children. (6 marks) (June
2010)
Homework:
Resources:
Cover: Sociology in Focus, p.112-114
Specific case studies: Aries, Rogers, Hendricks, Giddens, Postman
Literacy objectives:
Numeracy objectives:
PSHCE objective:
ICT objectives:
Learning styles:
Thinking skills:
Keywords: social construction, gender socialisation, child-centred, economic asset, teenager, infant mortality
Differentiated Learning
Outcomes:
Some less able pupils:
Outline some rights and
responsibilities of children and
give some examples of different
experiences (Level1)
Most pupils:
Explain rights and
responsibilities of children and
describe different experiences
of childhood (Level2)
Some more able pupils:
Analyse rights and
responsibilities of children and
evaluate different experiences
of childhood (Level3)
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Suggested Learning Activities