EDR 687 Common Course Assessment: Reading Specialist Practicum
The learning experiences/assignments of EDR 687, typically conducted at the Godfrey-Lee practicum site, a school with a high proportionof
English Language Learners, offer graduate candidates opportunities to explore different roles. While expectations for each of these roles vary
widely and continue to evolve, we will use the following role expectations for reading specialists and literacy coaches:
READING SPECIALIST:
The reading specialist puts learners, particularly struggling learners, in the foreground. As reading specialists, we plan - and help teachers to plan
- instruction with clear, worthwhile learning targets and outcomes that call for authentic opportunities for learners to communicate by reading,
writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing visually. We use language and literacy assessment data to understand - and to help
teachers understand - strengths and needs of students. We use - and suggest to teachers - research-based instructional methods and materials
as well as enhancements to the instructional environment. As reading specialists, we provide intensive, differentiated reading/writing and
language instruction in one-on-one, small group, and whole class settings - and support teachers to do so as well - by, in part, modeling high
leverage instructional practices. We are conscientious in accounting for our use of student time and in reporting the results of instruction in
measurable, observable, and replicable terms.
LITERACY COACH:
A literacy coach’s role is to focus mostly on teachers. Literacy coaches are supportive of, and highly responsive to, the expressed needs of
teachers. Literacy coaches collaborate with teachers to analyze assessment results and collect observational data to frame and solve
instructional problems. We help teachers identify their own needs and interests and provide resources to support teachers’ professional growth.
We suggest resources for diverse ages, interests, cultures, and backgrounds of students. We support teachers to develop highly literate
classroom environments which will facilitate student learning across the curriculum.
NOTE:
In order to function well as a literacy coach and/or a reading specialist, candidates will experience those roles from the vantage point of a
classroom teacher, participating in this practicum both as literacy coach and as teacher-being-coached, and as reading specialist and teacherwith-students-supported-by-a-reading specialist. The following practicum experiences constitute the common course assessment for EDR 687.
PRACTICUM EXPERIENCES
1. PLAN INSTRUCTION
Use principles of ‘Understanding by Design’ (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005) and ‘Problem-based Learning’ (http://www.bie.org/) as well as current
standards (http://www.corestandards.org/) to guide teaching teams to construct an inquiry unit that provides students with authentic
opportunities to learn concepts of high interest or relevance, by reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing visually, mindful
of needs of English language learners.
Use literature on English Language Learners and literacy instruction to guide teaching teams to make a calendar that integrates inquiry unit and
shows learning experiences students will engage in; include rationale for choices. Experiences should address themes of Literacy Program: build
communities of inquiring readers, write to share important ideas, and develop rich language in context of inquiry.
Develop detailed plan for each lesson to be modeled for peers and/or observed by instructor (at least two per week).
These practicum experiences address IRA standards 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3.
2. CONDUCT ASSESSMENT
Lead teaching team in design of initial formative assessment(s) of reading, writing, and language skills that are learning targets/instructional
goals of inquiry unit. Formative assessment gathers evidence of student learning re: specific instructional goals; evidence guides teacher and
student decisions about what to do to improve teaching and learning (Valencia, unpublished manuscript). Provide actual assessment with
rationale and plan for administration and analysis.
Conduct, with teaching team members, initial assessments. Videorecord.
Collaborate with teaching team members to analyze assessment data. Refine instructional objectives and develop indicators of success for each
student.
Repeat formative assessment at least two more times, documenting response to instruction and revising instructional objectives, indicators of
success, and/or instructional approach.
Each member of teaching team will take primary responsibility for documenting the learning of an equal proportion of students. Save daily,
organize and maintain in folder in classroom artifacts or recordings of student reading, writing, and speaking with anecdotal notes. Prepare, with
student, a display of artifacts of student learning to be presented to families during an ‘open house.’ Each member of teaching team will prepare
letters to families and referring teachers that describes ‘their’ students’ instructional experiences with evidence of learning in response to
instruction.
These practicum experiences address IRA standards 3.2, 3.3, 3.4.
3. PROVIDE INSTRUCTION
Provide instruction to whole class, small groups, and/or individuals consistent with instructional objectives established by teaching team using
assessment data. Provide support in the context of classroom instructional experiences; ‘pull-out’ type instruction is discouraged unless justified.
Incorporate themes: building communities of inquiring readers, writing to share important ideas, and developing rich language in the context of
inquiry.
Demonstrate the use of research-based instructional practices that are appropriate, equitable, and differentiated for diverse learners, mindful of
students’ interest, developmental levels, linguistic, and cultural characteristics. Provide an instructional environment with multiple texts/ways to
access ideas, participation structures and routines as well as low-risk social environment that include choice and sufficient scaffolding to
facilitate success in meeting instructional objectives.
Participate in self- and peer-evaluation of instruction in the context of classroom learning labs. Each candidate will serve as host for one learning
lab; guest, for several other labs.
Participate in self- and instructor-evaluation in conferences with instructor using video of instruction and analysis of that video. Each candidate
will engage in one coaching session around plans for lesson and one instructional conference per week.
These practicum experiences address IRA standards 4.1, 4.2, 5.1.
4. FACILITATE REFLECTION ON INSTRUCTION
Engage in the study of literacy coaching practices via study of course text (Toll) and professional literature (self-selected and recommended) in
advance of teaching. During teaching, participate in weekly professional development with after-school opportunities to engage members of
own teaching team in analysis of assessment data and planning, reflecting on instruction and problem solving. Move as needed between roles as
facilitator, collaborator, and consultant.
These practicum experiences address IRA standards 6.3.
Scoring Guide/Rubric for EDR 687 Common Course Assessment: Reading Specialist Practicum
The reading specialist/literacy coach candidate will…
1.1
IRA Standard
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Progressing (1)
Unsatisfactory
(0)
Analyze quality of learning
environment for factors
contributing to reading and
writing success including
individual motivation to read
and write.
Accurately describe
learning environment -and
prompt others to
describe it - featuring
student learning;
Accurately describe
learning environment;
Describe learning
environment with
limited insight;
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
Consider in analysis - and
prompts others to consider
- relations between
cognitive, linguistic,
motivational, and/or sociocultural factors re: learning
of individuals;
Apply literature to specific
environment;
Takes responsibility for
creating learning
environment that ensures
success and prompts
others to consider how to
do so.
2.1
Design, implement balanced
curriculum; work with others
to assure suitable, balanced
curriculum for all learners
Use ‘Understanding by
Design’ inquiry model to
collaboratively design and
implement lessons of a
coherent unit of study
that integrates a
balanced literacy
curriculum (see ‘proficient’
criteria) with interesting
content.
Consider in analysis - and
prompt others to consider
- individual cognitive,
linguistic, motivational,
socio-cultural factors re:
sub-group (e.g., boys,
English language
learners) characteristics;
Cite useful literature;
Assigns responsibility to
students for some
factors/outcomes that are
within teachers’ control,
but recognizes this upon
discussion.
Show in analysis limited
awareness of cognitive,
linguistic, motivational,
and/or socio-cultural
factors;
Interpret students from
deficit perspective;
Fail to cite appropriate
literature;
Assigns responsibility to
students for factors that
are teachers’
responsibility.
Ill-equipped to help
others analyze learning
environment.
Collaboratively design,
implement lessons that
balance direct instruction,
supported and
independent work;
individual and group
work; teaching skills and
providing authentic
opportunities for oral and
written forms of
communication.
Lessons are designed in
a ‘divide and conquer’
approach rather than
collaboratively, lack
balance or coherence or
interest or authentic
opportunities to use
oral and written
communication.
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
2.2
IRA Standard
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Progressing (1)
Unsatisfactory
(0)
Use literature- researchsupported instructional
approaches to develop word
recognition, comprehension and
critical thinking, oral language,
and written expression in all
learners; support others to do
so.
Select instructional
approaches that suit
instructional purpose and
teacher need;
Select instructional
approaches that suit
instructional purpose;
Instructional
approaches are not
ideally suited to
instructional purpose;
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
Model for teachers, coteach to hand off;
Model for teachers;
Provide rationale for
choice.
Provide feedback if invited
to observe or facilitate
self-evaluation
Rationale has gaps in
connections between
research and practice.
Provide rationale and
literature to support
choice and
implementation.
2.3
Critically evaluate, select, use
varied high-quality print,
digital, online resources; lead
others in collaborative efforts to
do so.
Select instructional
resources that suit
instructional purpose,
student characteristics and
teacher need;
Model use, evaluation for
teachers, collaboratively
select, use, evaluate;
Select instructional
resources that suit
instructional purpose;
Model for teachers;
Provide rationale for
choice.
Design, administer, and
interpret assessments of
reading, writing, language,
interest.
Leads teachers in the
design, administration, and
interpretation of
assessments of reading,
writing, language, interest
that are well-matched to
students, goals, and
instructional context as
well as sensitive to
Instructional resources
are not ideally suited to
instructional purpose or
student;
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
Model shows partial
understanding of
resources;
Rationale has gaps in
connections between
research and practice.
Provide rationale and
literature to support
choice and
implementation.
3.2
Model shows partial
understanding of
approach;
Designs, administers, and
interprets assessments of
reading, writing,
language, interest that
are appropriate for
students, goals,
instructional context.
Designs, administers,
and interprets
assessments of reading,
writing, language,
interest with
considerable support
required from instructor
to align assessments
with students, goals,
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
IRA Standard
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
change.
3.3
3.4
Analyze and use assessment
data from multiple sources to
plan instruction and monitor
response to instruction.
Accurately, completely
analyzes assessments;
Communicate
assessment/progress results,
implications to educators,
families, and learners.
Progressing (1)
Unsatisfactory
(0)
instructional context.
Uses assessment data to
plan instruction, monitor
progress in response to
instruction and revise
instructional goals and
approaches as needed.
Instructional plans,
instructional
approaches are not
well-informed by initial
assessment nor revised
in response to progress
monitoring data.
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
Describes substantive
learning re: worthwhile
goals, with quotes, other
evidence from student
responses to instruction.
Describes progress
toward instructional
goals, with evidence from
student responses to
instruction.
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
Situates learning re:
importance of progress.
Communication is
detailed without jargon.
Communication does
not describe
substantive progress or
lacks convincing
evidence of progress.
Communication is not
sufficiently complete or
organized.
Articulates how
instructional goals and
plans are aligned with
initial assessment data,
progress monitoring
information.
Communication is
thorough, accurate,
audience-sensitive in
content, language.
Language or content of
message is not suited
to the audience.
4.1
Assist teachers to understand
the relationship between first
and second language
acquisition, literacy
development.
Articulate the relationship
between 1st and 2nd
language acquisition and
literacy, and the
implications of this
relationship for teaching
and learning, supported by
relevant literature. Apply
this information planning
for teaching, coaching.
Articulate the relationship
between 1st and 2nd
language acquisition with
citations and literacy and
the implications of this
relationship for teaching
and learning.
Description of the
relationship between 1st
and 2nd language
acquisition and literacy
is poorly developed and
the implications of this
relationship for teaching
and learning are illdefined.
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
4.2
Provide differentiated
instruction, use practices,
materials that are responsive
to, respectful of, learners’
Identifies diversity of
language, culture, family
background, academic
skills and interests present
Identifies diversity of
language, culture, family
background, academic
skills and interests
Demonstrates limited
awareness of individual
diversity of language,
culture, family
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
IRA Standard
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Progressing (1)
diverse skills, interests, and
backgrounds.
in classroom; identifies
potential tensions
between own backgrounds
and those of students and
assists teachers to do so.
present in classroom;
assists others to do so.
background, academic
skills, interests present
in classroom, and of
potential tensions
between own
background and that of
students.
Guides teachers to use
practices, chooses
materials that are
responsive to, respectful
of, learners’ diverse skills,
interests, and
backgrounds.
5.1
6.3
Create an environment that
enables all learners, including
English language learners, to
use spoken and printed words
in multiple instructional
opportunities, across a variety
of physical settings, with
different classroom
configurations that are
instructionally and socially
supportive.
Coached discussion of
plans, lessons of others
show ability to articulate
understanding of
principles of ‘guided
practice’ or ‘gradual
release of responsibility’
models of scaffolding
student learning.
Work with individuals and
groups of teachers, observing,
modeling, co-teaching, and
conducting effective
conversations for
collaboratively planning and
‘Coaching’ conversations
show evidence of
thoughtful plan,
attention directly focused
on student learning, elicits
insight, produces deep
insights into own and
Coaching supports
teachers to discover
opportunities for more
interesting, authentic uses
of reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
viewing, and representing.
Uses and models
practices, choses
materials that are
responsive to, respectful
of, learners’ diverse skills,
interests, and
backgrounds.
Lesson plan and lessons
modeled show use of
‘guided practice’ or
‘gradual release of
responsibility’ models of
scaffolding student
learning.
In modeled lessons,
students have
opportunities for
interesting, authentic
uses of reading, writing,
speaking, listening,
viewing, and
representing.
Leads ‘coaching’
conversations with
evidence of using
assigned prompts in plan,
with attention to student
learning, attempts to
elicit insights, produces
Unsatisfactory
(0)
Practices, choice of
materials are not
sufficiently responsive
to, respectful of,
learners’ diverse skills,
interests, and
backgrounds.
While lesson plan may
be based on ‘guided
practice’ or ‘gradual
release of responsibility’
steps, instructional
practice shows limited
implementation of such
models of scaffolding
student learning.
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
Teacher does most
talking; opportunities
for interesting,
authentic used of
literacy are rare.
Leads ‘coaching’
conversations with little
evidence of planning or
attention to authentic
student learning and
little depth of reflection;
Does not meet
criteria for
progressing.
IRA Standard
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Progressing (1)
problem solving.
other’s thinking in
reflection;
insights in reflection;
Models instructional
practice without an
understanding of the
practice and without a
good fit between
practice, learning
targets, K-12 student
strengths and needs,
and teacher needs.
Models research-based
instructional practices,
achieving, articulating
fit between practice,
learning targets, K-12
student strengths and
needs, and teacher needs.
Leads co-planning, coteaching efforts with
evidence of student and
teacher growth.
Models research-based
instructional practices
consistent with learning
targets, sensitive to
student or teacher needs.
Co-plans and co-teaches
with shared goals and
responsibilities.
Co-plans and coteaches by ‘dividing and
conquering’ the tasks.
Unsatisfactory
(0)