An Instructor’s Guide to
Computers and mobile devices are rapidly being adopted in K-12 classrooms
nationwide. Many districts have Bring Your Own Technology or Bring your Own Device
(BYOT or BYOD) policies; others are purchasing devices such as Chromebooks or
iPads for 1:1 student access. Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College (MLFTC) is committed
to preparing teachers who can effectively use technology in the classroom, which
includes digital citizenship, or “the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with
regard to technology use” (Ribble, n.d.). MLFTC’s teacher preparation program teaches
digital citizenship to help prepare 21st century teachers.
This guide was developed to support MLFTC instructors in teaching digital citizenship.
Table of Contents:
Section
MLFTC Courses
Digital Citizenship: Content
Instructional Recommendation: At A Glance
Instructional Recommendation: In More Detail
Grading Recommendation
TK20
Technical Issues and Troubleshooting
Action Items
Appendix A: Student Instructions for Module Registration
Appendix B: Student Handout Including Guiding Questions
Appendix B: Troubleshooting Handout
Appendix C: Quiz Questions and Answers
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9-10
11-13
14-15
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MLFTC Courses
In MLFTC, digital citizenship is taught in various courses, depending on the program.
Online modules have been developed along with a recommended instructional model,
to effectively teach digital citizenship. In addition, a technology infusion specialist is
assigned to each of the classes who can support instructors to teach digital citizenship.
Undergraduate Program
EED
SPE/EED Dual Cert
ESL/BLE
ECS
SED
Course
EED 324
EED 324
BLE 324
ECS 418 (Margo Dahlstrom, CC)
SED 322 (Chris Smudde, CC)
Tech Infusion Specialist
Stacey Pasquel
Stacey Pasquel
Stacey Pasquel
Jan Wolfgramm
LeeAnn Lindsey
Digital Citizenship Content:
There are four online digital citizenship modules. The first three modules listed below
focus on teachers’ responsibilities using technology, and the fourth module covers
information about K-12 students’ use of technology. Specific objectives and Standards
(InTASC and ISTE) are listed on the home page of each module. Please note: The
modules do not necessarily go in the order listed below. Instructors should consult
course syllabi for the order and suggested due dates for the course they teach.
Module
Copyright and Fair Use
Digital Footprint & Social Media
Acceptable Use
Fostering Responsible Student Computer Use (incl. Cybersafety
and Cyberbullying)
Approximate time needed to
complete the module
90 mins
90 mins
40 mins
115 mins
To increase their knowledge of the content and familiarize themselves with the modules,
course instructors can take each of the modules themselves. To do so, instructors will
follow the same directions as those given to students to register for and access the
modules (see Appendix A).
Instructors, please note that digital citizenship is a new and evolving topic in education.
In-service teachers, principals, and policy makers are all grappling with some of the
same questions that are presented in these modules. Thus, the content in these
modules isn’t always “black and white”. That said, the goal isn’t that students memorize
all of the “do’s and don’ts” of digital citizenship (because these have not all been clearly
defined, much gray area exists), but rather that they: 1) are equipped with the basic
information they need to make informed decisions regarding technology use, and 2) are
empowered to participate in the emerging conversation about digital citizenship in the K12 landscape. Instructors should help teacher candidates understand the overall
purpose of the modules and help them be comfortable with the content that is
somewhat nebulous.
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Instructional Recommendation: At a Glance
The digital citizenship modules were designed to be used with a “flipped learning”
instructional approach. The basic sequence for instruction is as follows:
1
2
Activity
Instructor or Tech Infusion Specialist
helps students register for the online
modules (during the first or second week
of class).
a) Instructor introduces digital citizenship
to students and explains the
assignment/expectations/due date. See
assignment summary on page 4.
Location
In class
Timeframe
15 -20 mins
In class
6 mins
3 mins
b) Instructor assigns the first module and
the guiding questions.
c) Instructor provides students with
direction regarding potential technical
issues with the module
3
4
5
6
Students take the first module and turn in
guiding question notes by the module’s
due date
a) On the due date, students take a quick
multiple-choice quiz in class
b) Instructor facilitates a debriefing
discussion or activity about the module’s
content
Repeat steps 2b-4 for each of the
remaining 3 modules.
1 min
Homework
Will vary, see table
above
In class
5 mins
10-15 mins
(Optional) Once students have completed
all four modules, quizzes, and in-class
debriefing discussions, instructors may
have students do a culminating digital
citizenship project or activity.
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Instructional Recommendation: Steps in more detail
Step 1: Instructor or Tech Infusion Specialist helps students register for the
online modules (during the first or second week of class).
A technology infusion specialist is pleased to come to your class session and facilitate
this step, helping students to register for the modules. This should be scheduled for the
first or second week of class to help minimize technical issues for students.


Please contact LeeAnn Lindsey, Jan Wolfgramm, or Stacey Pasquel as soon
as possible to schedule this for your class(es).
Students who are absent should follow the directions on the handout to
register for the modules on their own and/or work with another student in
class to do so. The handout may be posted in Blackboard. See appendix A.
Step 2a): Instructor introduces digital citizenship to students and explains the
assignment/expectations/due date.
Similar as with any course assignment, the instructor describes the assignment
(modules, guiding questions, quizzes, and class discussions) to students,
provides some context and rationale for the assignment, and clarifies
expectations and due dates.
Digital Citizenship Assignment Summary: Four digital citizenship modules will be
assigned throughout the semester. Prior to starting each module, students read
the guiding questions. Then, as they complete each module, students will take
one page of notes on a separate document that help them to answer the guiding
questions. Notes can include information ascertained directly from the module or
outside resources, as well as their own thoughts and reflections as they work
through the module. These notes will be due on the due date for each module.
During the class session when each module is due, students will take a short
quiz about the content presented in the module. Following the quiz, instructors
will facilitate a short in-class debriefing discussion. Students may use a hard
copy of their notes during the quiz and the in-class discussion. Please note the
order and due dates that your instructor has assigned for each of the modules.
A student handout containing directions and guiding questions can be found in
Appendix B.
Step 2b): Instructor assigns the first module and guiding questions

The instructor verbally assigns the first module and guiding questions.
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
The instructor shows students where to access the module (in the PLL, under
the “My PLL” tab.)
Step 2c): Instructor provides students with direction regarding potential technical
issues
Having a tech infusion specialist come in and register students for the modules will
greatly reduce technical difficulties. However, instructors should still let students know
what to do should they have technical difficulties. For more specific information, please
refer to the section in this guide, “Technical Issues and Troubleshooting.” Instructors
may also post Appendix C in Blackboard.
If an instructor needs assistance with Step 2, LeeAnn, Jan, or Stacey can provide
support.
Step 3: Students take the first module and take notes based on the guiding
questions
Students complete the module and take notes on their own time, outside of class.
 Instructors should remind students of the due date at least once prior to the
due date.
 Instructors should remind students that to begin the module at least 5 days
prior to the due date *just in case* they need any technical support from the
PLL staff.
Step 4a): On the due date, students take a quick multiple-choice quiz in class.
Instructors disseminate a short (5 question) quiz either through Blackboard or hard
copy. The purpose of the quizzes is to help ensure students have adequately prepared
for class (i.e., completed the modules). In other words, the quizzes are an
accountability measure as opposed to assessment. Students may use their guiding
question notes while taking the quiz.
Notes and Recommendations:

Require students to have their mobile device (laptop or tablet to access quiz
in Blackboard) in class on these days. Some instructors may want to
establish a 1-point deduction policy for not bringing a device to class (who
lack a good reason). This will help ensure a smoother quiz-taking experience
for all. Students who do not own a device may be able to check one out from
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





the college. Ask your technology infusion specialist for information about this,
if needed.
Require students to be in class to take the quiz (i.e., no skipping class and
taking the quiz from home in Blackboard)
The quizzes are developed in Blackboard. If you do not have the quizzes in
your course shell, please contact your technology infusion specialist.
The quizzes will be “hidden” in Blackboard. The instructor should “open” the
quiz no more than an hour before class (the closer to class, the better).
The first time you give a quiz, you may want to bring a class set of hard copy
quizzes, *just in case* technical issues arise and you want to forgo the
Blackboard version.
The quizzes each consist of 5 multiple-choice questions; 5 minutes should be
sufficient time for students to take a quiz.
Quiz items and answers are listed in Appendix D of this guide. Instructors
should be able to explain the answers to the quiz items, in case students
have questions. If you have any questions about the quiz items or the
answers, please contact your assigned technology infusion specialist who can
provide clarification.
Step 4b) Instructor facilitates a debriefing discussion or activity about the
module’s content, in class.
The in-class discussion/activity is intended to meet two needs. First, it will establish a
connection between the instructor and the content; it is important for teacher candidates
to feel that their instructor believes that digital citizenship is important. Since the
modules are taken online, this short activity will help provide that connection. Second,
the discussion can help clarify content, answer questions, and deepen understanding.
The following list contains ideas for a short (10-15-minute) debriefing discussion/activity.
This is not an exhaustive list and instructors are welcome to implement a different idea
instead.




Use the guiding questions (Appendix B) to structure class discussion. Since
students took notes based on these questions, they should be well prepared
to discuss them.
Ask students to come to class prepared with (4) questions they developed
with regard to the module. For example, they could craft 2 knowledge level
questions and 2 higher order questions. The instructor can facilitate
discussion with students using the questions they developed.
The online modules have an “online journal” built in to them. An instructor
may ask students to print out their journal entries and bring them to class, to
help seed class discussion. For more information about the journals, please
contact your technology infusion specialist.
Alternatively, an instructor may want to choose a few of the module’s journal
questions to focus on during a class discussion. Several “think about it”
questions are listed throughout each module.
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
An instructor may consider using Poll Everywhere or checking out “clickers”
for students to answer select questions. These technology tools will provide a
quick look at how students have answered the questions. This may enhance
an instructor’s ability to lead effective and efficient discussion. If interested,
please feel free to contact your technology infusion specialist for help.
Step 5: Repeat steps 2b-4 for each of the remaining 3 modules.
Each of the modules should have different due dates throughout the semester. On
each due date, students should take the in-class quiz and participate in a debriefing
discussion or activity.
Step 6 (Optional): Once students have completed all four modules, quizzes, and
in-class debriefing discussions, instructors may have students do a culminating
digital citizenship project or activity.
Some instructors may find it helpful to assign a culminating digital citizenship activity to
help students synthesize information from the four modules and see the digital
citizenship “big picture.” The following list contains idea for culminating activities. This
is not an exhaustive list.


Break students into four groups. Then assign one module to each group for
which they will create a 10-minute presentation/mini-teach. The presentation
may contain a summary of the content, extension questions, student
engagement strategies, technology use, etc.
Have the class create a “Code of Ethics” resource for using technology.
Individual or groups of students may use the sentence starter, “With respect
to technology use, classroom teachers…”
Grading Recommendation:
The digital citizenship modules altogether should be worth *approximately* 10% of the
points in your class. For example, if your total class points are 500, digital citizenship
grading model may look like this:
 10 points per module = 40 points + 10 points for culminating activity
 = 50 points total
One possibility for assigning points per module is:
 5 points possible for the quiz, 5 points possible for notes/in-class discussion.
 Note: Here are a few *tips* for instructors grading practices. Please use as
appropriate for your class
o As noted earlier, an instructor may want to announce a 1-point
deduction on the quiz for students who do not bring a device on
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quiz day (without adequate reason). This will help eliminate the
problem of students not being able to take the quiz in class due to
not having a device.
o If participation points are given for in-class discussion, an instructor
may consider having an alternative assignment (e.g., a one-page
summary of the module) for students who are absent.
TK20:
Instructors will record students’ digital citizenship scores in TK20, which will directly
correspond with the points earned on each of the four quizzes. Although instructors
may award digital citizenship points for notes and in-class discussion, those points will
not translate over to TK20. The image below shows the TK20 screen for the digital
citizenship assignment.
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Technical Issues and Troubleshooting:
Most of the known technical issues will be alleviated by having a technology infusion
specialist come to your class to help students register for the modules. However, it is
important for instructors to communicate to students that if issues do arise, it is the
students’ responsibility to get them resolved in time for them to complete the module by
the due date. The process below includes an email address for students to use to get
technical assistance; students should be told that this is not a 24/7 help desk.
Therefore, students should try to access the modules several days before the due date
of the module in case assistance is needed. In other words, if a student waits to seek
help on the day before the module is due, there is no guarantee the problem will be
solved in time. To avoid a stressful situation, students should work on the modules
early on, in case they need any technical assistance.
1. The two most common problems have simple fixes. Instructors can easily assist
students with these issues. See appendix C.
a. Error message stating “Manual Enrollments are not currently enabled” –
Tell students to wait 15 minutes, reboot computer, log in to the PLL. This
should fix the problem.
b. Error message stating “Login or Group Membership Required / Access
Denied – Tell students to email [email protected] and in the email, put
“Group Membership Required” and note that you are trying to access the
digital citizenship modules, but you do not have the correct permission to
your account. The folks at PLL will assist them.
2. If a student has a problem that is different than the two items above, or if they
apply the suggested fix and it doesn’t work, STUDENTS may email
[email protected] and copy the instructor. Students should include a clear and
specific description of the problem, including either a screencast or screenshot
that illustrates the problem if possible.
Please note: Instructors should not feel compelled to do heavy troubleshooting on
technical issues. Understanding the two common problems listed above and helping
troubleshoot those will be helpful. But beyond those issues, the instructor should advise
students to email [email protected] as noted in #2 above.
Action Items:
The following is a list of action items for instructors to prepare for the semester of digital
citizenship instruction. The first set of bullets contains more immediate action items,
while the second set includes items to consider throughout the semester.
Before the semester starts (or at the beginning of the semester):

Make sure that digital citizenship is clearly labeled on your syllabus
o Calendar: digital citizenship introduction
o Calendar: due date for each module, quiz, discussion
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


o Assignments: Description of the assignment, point value (including
the culminating activity, if applicable)
Contact your assigned Technology Infusion Specialist to schedule a time to
come into class and help students register for the modules.
Register for and take the modules.
Make sure the Digital Citizenship quizzes are in your Blackboard shell. If not,
contact your assigned technology infusion specialist.
Throughout the semester:



Open your quizzes an hour before class.
Prepare a discussion activity for class sessions.
TK20 – instructors will enter scores in TK20 for each student, corresponding
with the scores received on digital citizenship quizzes.
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Appendix A – Directions: Registering for the Modules. Instructors may give to students who are absent on the day students register.
Signing up for the PLL and a Digital Citizenship Module
Log into the PLL using your ASURITE ID and Password. To do
this go to the https://pll.asu.edu Select the ASURITE Login and
enter your ASURITE ID and Password.
If you are unable to log into the PLL using your ASURITE ID and
Password please complete the Google Form (link found at the
right). After completing the Google Form you will need to wait 24
hours before logging into the PLL.
Google Form link:
http://tinyurl.com/dcmodules
After logging into the PLL:
Type Digital Citizenship Learning Modules into the search field.
Click on the search button.
The Digital Citizenship Learning Modules resource will show up on
the search results page.
Click on the words Digital Citizenship Learning Modules .
The four modules are listed in the lower left hand corner.
Click on the title of the module for which you wish to register.
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Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click on the Section
Title (example: DC_Module_1 Copyright and Fair Use).
Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click on the Section
Title (example: DC_Module_1 Copyright and Fair Use).
A new screen will now open, select the Sign up button at the
bottom of the page where you will enter your email address, name
and phone number.
It will take the system 15 to 30 minutes to set up your access to the course. You will receive a confirmation email after you have
registered. This does not mean that the sign up process has been completed. Please wait 15 minutes before attempting to access the
module.
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Wait at least 15 minutes before you atempt to open the module. To get started click on the MY PLL tab (at the top of the page), then
click on the link to the module found under My Enrollments. (Do not click on the moodle link).
Helpful Tip: If you get the message “Manual enrollments are currently not enabled” close your browser and wait 15 minutes before
attempting to access the course. Then open your browser, log back into the PLL, select the MY PLL tab, and click on the appropriate
module link found under My Enrollment.
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Appendix B – Student Handout Including Guiding Questions
Computers and mobile devices are rapidly being adopted in K-12 classrooms
nationwide. Many districts have Bring Your Own Technology or Bring your Own Device
(BYOT or BYOD) policies; others are purchasing devices such as Chromebooks or
iPads for 1:1 student access. It’s critical for today’s teachers to understand their
responsibilities when using technology and to foster responsible and ethical use of
technology (otherwise known as “digital citizenship” by their students.
Directions: Four digital citizenship modules will be assigned throughout the semester.
Prior to starting each module, read the corresponding questions below. Then, as you
complete the module, take one page of notes on a separate document that help you
answer the questions. Notes can include information ascertained directly from the
module or outside resources, as well as your own thoughts and reflections as you work
through the module. These notes will be due on the due date for each module.
During the class session when each module is due, you will take a short quiz about the
content presented in the module. Following the quiz, you will participate in a short inclass debriefing discussion. You may use a hard copy of your notes during the quiz and
the in-class discussion.
Please note the order and due dates that your instructor has assigned for each of the
modules.
Guiding Questions for the Digital Citizenship Modules
Copyright and Fair Use



Scenario from Module: As a classroom teacher, I can find a lot of great teaching
resources online, through image searches and YouTube. Using images and
video I find online really helps my students, especially my English language
learners. I was told by my administrator to respect copyright. I think I’m in
compliance but I’m not sure. What should I know about copyright?
Imagine a teacher who uses copyrighted material in class, not allowable under
Fair Use. The teacher believes it is justified since it “benefits” the students. Do
you agree that the teacher should use whatever content he/she feels will benefit
his/her students? Why or why not?
What aspects of copyright and fair use are important for K-12 students to learn?
What are the best ways to teach this to them?
Digital Footprint and Social Media

Should teachers filter what they say and post online? Why or why not?
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
Should teachers “friend” students on social media? Why or why not? What if the
teacher’s social media account is used exclusively for professional
communication?
Acceptable Use Policy



Scenario from Module: My school issued me a laptop so that I can do work such
as grading and lesson planning off-site. I also have a computer at home that I
use for shopping online, downloading music, storing digital pictures and
communicating with friends and family through social media. It seems easier to
do everything on one computer, instead of two. Can I move all my music,
pictures and other files over to my work laptop and use it for personal items too?
Is there a set of rules that I should follow with regards to the laptop and other
technology?
What are the risks of using district or school-owned technology to store personal
content such as photos, videos, music, and documents (assuming doing so is
allowed, per the AUP)? Do the benefits of having/using one device outweigh the
risks?
What rules do you suppose are consistent among most/all district and school
AUPs?
Fostering Responsible Student Behavior


Should cybersafety be taught at home, at school, or both? What age/grade
levels should it be taught?
At what point should teachers get involved with incidents of cyberbullying among
students (vs. letting the students “work it out” on their own)? At what point
should the teacher bring administration and parents in to the conversation?
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Appendix C – Technical Issues and Troubleshooting: 2 Common Problems & Solutions
If you are already logged in*, and you come across this message while trying to access
your digital citizenship modules:
Login or Group Membership Required / Access Denied
A valid login is required to view the content you are attempting to access. If you
are not yet a member of the Professional Learning Library we invite you to
request an account.
If you are already logged in, you do not have access to the content you are
attempting to view. This Resource may be restricted to ASU Mary Lou Fulton
Teachers College faculty and staff and/or students

Login
You will need to send an email to [email protected] In the email put “Group Membership
Required” and note that you are trying to access the Digital Citizenship Modules, but
you do not have the correct permissions on your account.
If you can take a screenshot and attach it to your email, it will help the PLL Team assist
you.
*You will know you are logged in because you will see “Howdy, <Your Name>” in the upper left. If you see “Log in” in the upper left,
it means that your PLL Session has timed out. Click on “Log in” to log back in.
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If you come across this message while trying to access a digital citizenship module:
Manual enrollments are currently not enabled
You will need to wait 15 minutes, reboot your computer and then log back into the
Professional Learning Library.
If you continue to have trouble accessing the module, email [email protected] In the
email put “Manual Enrollments” and note that you are trying to access a Digital
Citizenship Module, which module you are attempting to access and that you have
attempted a reboot, but continue to encounter this error.
If you can take a screenshot and attach it to your email, it will help the PLL Team assist
you.
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Appendix D – Quiz Questions & Answers.
Please note the quizzes in Blackboard will pull 5 questions at random from these
possible items. If you have any questions about quiz items or the correct answers,
please contact a technology infusion specialist.
Copyright and Fair Use
1. A 5th grade teacher prints several pictures of various animals found through
Google image searches, to develop an activity in which students will practice
classification. The teacher has cited the Web site for each image that she used.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
2. A 2nd grade teacher rents a copy of Toy Story 3 from Blockbuster and plays it for
her class as a reward for good behavior.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
3. An 8th grade social studies teacher records a video documentary about Anne
Frank from a major TV network and plays it the following week for his class that
is learning about the Holocaust and the impact on individuals and families.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
4. A 10th grade English teacher wants the class to analyze a specific poem, so the
teacher photocopies 1 poem (total of 2 pages) out of a poetry book she owns and
distributes it to students.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
5. A 3rd grade teacher has 30 students but the school has only 15 copies of legally
obtained Fantastic Mr. Fox trade books. Thus, he pairs students up to share the
book during shared reading time.
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a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
6. An 11th grade history teacher develops a 3-minute video documentary about
global issues and uses the song “We Are the World” as background music
throughout. He posts the video on his class webpage so students and parents
can access it.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
7. A Kindergarten teacher conducts a Google image search and in doing so, locates
a great image of Mickey Mouse. He downloads the image and adds it the
“Learning is Fun” section of his class webpage, which is accessible via the
Internet.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
8. A 2nd grade teacher purchases a copy of Despicable Me and plays it for her class
as a reward for good behavior.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
9. A 4th grade teacher records a video documentary about Montezuma’s Castle
from a major TV network and plays it the following week for her class that is
learning about Arizona history.
a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
10. A high school science teacher finds several images online illustrating the form
and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and adds them to a PowerPoint
presentation he will use for class. The teacher cites the webpages where he
found each image at the end of the PowerPoint presentation.
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a. This is an example of:
b. Legal use: Either general legal use or fair use
c. Copyright violation
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Digital Footprint and Social Media
1. The following is an example of a Social Media site:
a. Facebook
b. Flickr
c. LinkedIn
d. All of the Above
2. Seeking out a network developed around a specific professional interest is one
way to make a positive online career connection.
a. True
b. False
3. We can take control over the content we post ourselves and we can take
measures to control who sees it.
a. True
b. False
4. Social media can enrich or damage your career.
a. True
b. False
5. According to the Dartmouth College video, approximately what percent of
employers’ human resource departments search a candidates name online?
a. 30%
b. 50%
c. 70%
d. 95%
6. Which of the following examples of online information may cause an employer to
refuse you a job interview:
a. inappropriate email address
b. inappropriate photos on your social media page
c. inappropriate photos in which you are tagged
d. b and c
e. all of the above
7. Which of the following is NOT a part of your digital footprint:
a. your grades
b. your tweets
c. your email
d. your online discussion comments for class
8. Setting all your social media profiles to private will keep your information safe
from being viewed by those you don't want to see it.
a. True
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b. False
9. The more social media friends you have the easier it is to maintain your online
privacy.
a. True
b. False
10. To manage your digital footprint you should:
a. think before you post
b. control who your online friends are
c. protect your privacy with account settings
d. all of the above
11. Inappropriate and/or unprofessional Internet postings by college students have
kept some students from being hired as teachers.
a. True
b. False
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Acceptable Use Policy
1. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a Federal law that
requires that schools and districts, with certain exceptions, obtain parents' written
consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable information from their
child's education records.
a. True
b. False
2. Posting grades listed by a student’s name or student number via ________ is a
violation of FERPA.
a. E-mail
b. Internet/Class Webpage
c. Both
d. Neither
3. Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) are consistent among districts in Arizona.
a. True
b. False
4. A district’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) is a legally binding contract.
a. True
b. False
5. According to the sample AUP from the module, Creighton teachers are allowed
to use their district-issued laptops for:
a. Limited correspondence with non-district entities via email, such as family
members, athletic organizations, or local vendors
b. Limited shopping or banking via the internet
c. Non-school related information searches via the internet
d. a and c
e. All of the above
6. AUPs protect:
a. Technology users
b. Schools and district administrators
c. The network
d. a and b
e. All of the above
Spring 2014
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Fostering Responsible Student Behavior with Technology
1. Students should be taught to keep the following information private
a. Last name
b. Address
c. Parent’s workplace
d. Usernames and passwords
e. All of the above
f. None of the above, as long as parents have signed an Acceptable Use
Policy
2. A tight Internet filtering system will block the inappropriate web sites from being
accessed directly and from coming up in Internet searches.
a. True
b. False
3. Teachers should consistently impose consequences to any student who
accesses profane or otherwise inappropriate websites at school.
a. True
b. False
4. COPPA is a law aimed at website operators to:
a. Help prevent cyberbullying
b. Help protect children’s privacy
c. Help ensure that parents know how teachers are using the Internet
d. Help teachers find safe websites for students
5. According to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), what is the
age under which parent consent is required before providing personal information
to a website?
a. 21
b. 18
c. 13
d. 10
6. Cyberbullying can be even prevalent and difficult to resolve than traditional forms
of bullying.
a. True
b. False
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7. According to Web Wise Kids, how many “common” forms of cyberbullying exist?
a. Two
b. Three
c. Four
d. Five
e. Six
8. To decrease the likelihood of cyberbullying, teachers should (choose the best
answer):
a. Be proactive – teach kids about cyberbullying and its effects before it
happens
b. Be reactive – address cyberbullying if and when it occurs
c. Allow students to “work it out” on their own; teacher interference will only
make it worse
9. Cyberbullying occurs in:
a. Grades K-3
b. Grades 4-6
c. Grades 7-8
d. Grades 9-12
e. Answers b, c and d
f. All of the above
10. Effective classroom management with technology means the same thing as
teaching kids safe, legal, and ethical online behaviors.
a. True
b. False
Spring 2014
25
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