2013/14 ANNUAL REPORT
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THE AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL
VISION
Research for a creative, innovative and productive Australia
MISSION
To deliver policy and programs that advance Australian research and
innovation globally and benefit the community
GUIDING
Excellence
PRINCIPLES
Engagement
Benefit
Accountability
Produced by:
Australian Research Council
Location:
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+61 2 6287 6600
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<www.arc.gov.au>
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© Commonwealth of Australia 2014
All material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution
3.1 Australia licence <www.creativecommons.org/licenses> with the exception of the
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only applies to material as set out in this document. The details of the relevant licence
conditions are available on the Creative Commons website as is the full legal code for the
CC BY 3.0 AU licence <www.creativecommons.org/licenses>.
Requests and enquiries regarding this licence should be addressed to ARC Legal Services on
+61 2 6287 6600.
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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
1 October 2014
The Hon Christopher Pyne
Minister for Education
Parliament House
CANBERRA ACT 2600
Dear Minister
It is with great pleasure that I present the Australian Research Council (ARC) Annual Report for
2013–14.
During 2013–14 the ARC continued to deliver against its identified Outcome: growth of
knowledge and innovation through managing research funding schemes, measuring research
excellence and providing advice.
The annual report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Australian
Research Council Act 2001 (ARC Act) and the guidelines referred to in subsection 63(2) of the
Public Service Act 1999.
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In accordance with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011, I certify that I am
satisfied that the ARC has:
prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans which effectively address the risks
of the ARC
in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection
procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the ARC
taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud in the ARC and to
investigate and recover the proceeds of fraud against the ARC.
Subsection 46(3) of the ARC Act requires you to place a copy of the report before each House of
Parliament within 15 sitting days of that House after the day on which you receive it.
Yours sincerely
Professor Aidan Byrne
Chief Executive Officer
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CONTENTS
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL ........................................................................................................ iii
CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................. iv
LIST OF PHOTOGRAPHS ........................................................................................................... vi
PART 1 OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................1
CHAPTER 1 REVIEW BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER ................................................... 2
CHAPTER 2 THE AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL........................................................... 10
PART 2 PERFORMANCE ............................................................................................ 17
CHAPTER 3 OUTCOME ............................................................................................................. 18
CHAPTER 4 PROGRAM 1.1 DISCOVERY................................................................................. 46
CHAPTER 5 PROGRAM 1.2 LINKAGE ...................................................................................... 62
CHAPTER 6 EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH FOR AUSTRALIA................................................. 84
PART 3 MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY .................................................... 93
CHAPTER 7 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE .............................................................................. 94
CHAPTER 8 EXTERNAL SCRUTINY ....................................................................................... 113
CHAPTER 9 PEOPLE MANAGEMENT .................................................................................... 118
CHAPTER 10 PURCHASING, CONSULTANTS AND ASSET MANAGEMENT ....................... 125
PART 4 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE ..................................................................... 129
CHAPTER 11 FINANCIAL OVERVIEW .................................................................................... 130
CHAPTER 12 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ............................................................................... 133
PART 5 APPENDICES............................................................................................... 205
APPENDIX 1: NATIONAL COMPETITIVE GRANTS PROGRAM, DISCOVERY PROGRAM .. 206
APPENDIX 2: NATIONAL COMPETITIVE GRANTS PROGRAM, LINKAGE PROGRAM ........ 210
APPENDIX 3: PRIZES AND AWARDS ..................................................................................... 216
APPENDIX 4: MEMBERSHIP OF COMMITTEES .................................................................... 220
APPENDIX 5: CLIENT SERVICE CHARTER ........................................................................... 230
APPENDIX 6: WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY ......................................................................... 232
APPENDIX 7: ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH ...................................................... 233
APPENDIX 8: ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT .......................................... 234
APPENDIX 9: CORRECTION OF ERRORS ............................................................................. 238
APPENDIX 10: STAFF STATISTICS ........................................................................................ 239
APPENDIX 11: AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENTS ............................................................ 242
PART 6 REFERENCE ................................................................................................ 247
LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES ............................................................................................ 248
LIST OF CASE STUDIES ......................................................................................................... 250
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ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ....................................................................................... 252
GLOSSARY .............................................................................................................................. 255
COMPLIANCE INDEX............................................................................................................... 259
ALPHABETICAL INDEX............................................................................................................ 264
CONTACT INFORMATION ....................................................................................................... 270
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LIST OF PHOTOGRAPHS
CAPTION
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Front cover: Professor Richard Roberts, an Australian Laureate Fellow at the University of
Wollongong, recording details of the archaeological excavations at ConMoong Cave in
Vietnam. This collaboration with the Institute of Archaeology in Hanoi is part of his
interdisciplinary project, ‘Out of Asia: unique insights into human evolution and interactions
using frontier technologies in archaeological science’.
Part 1: Professor Reg Watson, awarded a Discovery Projects grant, visits the commercial
fishing vessels at Hobart waterfront. The project will develop the means to predict how
Australia’s future seafood production and marine food security will change in response to
climate change and overfishing, and establish how to achieve sustainable growth in fisheries
while safeguarding seafood for Australians.
1
Chapter 1: Victoria Haskins, Associate Professor in History at the University of Newcastle, was
awarded an ARC Future Fellowship for her project ‘In Her Place: state intervention and
Indigenous domestic service in Australia and the United States, 1880-1945’. Associate
Professor Haskins worked in multiple Indigenous archives across Australia and the USA to
undertake this extensive comparative and transnational historical study.
2
Professor Aidan Byrne, ARC Chief Executive Officer (CEO).
3
2014 ARC staff photo.
8
Chapter 2: Professor Jörg Imberger, from The University of Western Australia, deploying a
temperature microstructure probe with the objective of understanding the influence the physical
micro scale environment has on phytoplankton succession. Professor Imberger received a
Discovery Projects grant in 2013 to examine ‘Turbulent vertical mixing in stratified flows’.
10
ARC’s executive staff: Professor Aidan Byrne, Ms Leanne Harvey, Dr Fiona Cameron,
Professor Denise Meredyth, Dr Terry Bowditch, Professor Marian Simms, Professor Brian
Yates.
13
Part 2: Dr Michele Spadari is examining the macro structure of a clay sample from the National
Soft Soil Test Site in Ballina NSW that has been developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence
for Geotechnical Science and Engineering. This site will be used to improve design and
production procedures for transport infrastructure on soft problematic soils, both in Australia
and internationally.
16
Chapter 3: Professor Sharynne McLeod, a Future Fellow from Charles Sturt University, has
talked with many children around the world during her project titled ‘Speaking my languages:
International speech acquisition in Australia’. The aim of the project was to develop innovative
strategies to celebrate, understand and support the speech and language development of
multilingual Indigenous and non-Indigenous children.
18
Professor Rob Brooks.
20
Professor Frank Caruso (R) with Dr Yan Yan (C) and Dr Markus Muellner (L), examining the
internalisation of particles in cancer cells.
21
Dr Melanie Zeppel examining drought-induced mortality in Pinon-Juniper woodland.
22
The project team based at Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences: (L to R) Professor
Ben Boyd, Ms Stephanie Phan (PhD student), Dr Stefan Salentinig (senior postdoctoral
researcher), Mr Jamal Khan (PhD student).
23
Dr Georgios Tsiminis with one of the fibres used for explosives detection.
24
Dr Dayong Jin, Future Fellow and designer of the nanocrystals.
25
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Simon Williams (L) and Professor Bostjan Kobe (R) analysing the crystal structure of the
complex of plant immune receptors RPS4 and RRS1.
26
Chiew Larn Reservoir.
27
Participants in the 2013 Workshop of the Electoral Integrity Project, Harvard University.
28
Associate Professor Andrea Morello and his team at the University of New South Wales: (L to
R) Rachpon Kalra, Dr Juha Muhonen, Fahd Mohiyaddin, Associate Professor Morello, Jarryd
Pla, Juan Pablo Dehollain, Solomon Freer, Dr Arne Laucht.
29
Launch of the Science of Learning Research Centre: (L to R) Professor Perry Bartlett (Director,
Queensland Brain Institute), Professor Peter Høj (Vice Chancellor, The University of
Queensland), Professor Aidan Byrne (Chief Executive Officer, Australian Research Council),
The Hon Ian Walker (Queensland Minister for Science, Information Technology, Innovation and
the Arts), Mr John Story (Chancellor, The University of Queensland), Professor Ottmar Lipp
(former Director SLRC).
31
Launch of the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network.
31
Curtin University undergraduate astronomy students building the Murchison Widefield Array
antennas.
32
Dr Waymamba Gaykama u reads her father’s story from the 1970s for the Living Archive of
Aboriginal Languages (book illustrated by Yambal).
33
Taryn Guinan with a new drug testing device, also called ‘lab-on-a-chip’.
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Professor Terry Spithill.
35
Kate Hughes and Daryl Howard with an image analysis of an early scientific painting produced
using the Australian Synchrotron.
36
Acropora formosa, a staghorn coral under investigation by the ARC Centre of Excellence of
Coral Reef Studies.
37
Dr Monika Murcha examining Arabidopsis thaliana (Thale cress) plants for mutants affecting
protein assembly and breakdown in plants.
38
Chapter 4: Dr Sandra Tanz, a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award recipient from The
University of Western Australia, analysing plant samples for her project ‘Determining organellar
gene expression in distinct cell types: a missing puzzle for the transfer of C4 photosynthesis
into C3 plants’. The aim of the project is to investigate the organellar structure in C4 plants and
how this can be utilised to boost yields in essential food crops.
46
Field work crew heading into Hinchinbrook Island to perform carbon flux measurements in
mangroves.
58
Dr Clare Wright.
59
Dr Joanne Whittaker with the RV Southern Surveyor.
60
Associate Professor Jason Sharples.
61
Chapter 5: Dr Kerry Wilkinson is a Senior Lecturer of Oenology at the University of Adelaide
and a Chief Investigator within the Industrial Transformations Training Centre for Innovative
Wine Production. Her research aims to assist the Australian wine industry to overcome
challenges associated with global warming.
62
Professor Aidan Byrne, ARC CEO, and The Hon Christopher Pyne MP, Minister for Education,
with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation youth advocates at the funding outcomes
announcement for the Special Research Initiative for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes.
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Professor Kevin Galvin, Director of the Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian Iron Ore,
with a Reflux Gravitron for beneficiating fine particles.
82
Executive members of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life
Course, July 2014: (L to R) Professor Janeen Baxter, Professor Mark Western, Professor
Deborah Cobb-Clark and Professor Stephen Zubrick.
82
Chapter 6: Stephanie Villeneuve, Research Associate at the National Centre for Groundwater
Research and Training, measuring water quality parameters as part of the Centre’s research to
better understand groundwater and surface water connectivity.
84
Part 3: Australian Laureate Fellows, Professor Peter Taylor (L) and Professor Lloyd Hollenberg
(R), from The University of Melbourne. Professor Taylor is a mathematician whose project is
entitled ‘New stochastic models for science, economics, social science and engineering’.
Professor Hollenberg is a physicist whose project is entitled `New views of life: quantum
imaging in biology’.
92
Chapter 7: Professor Vaughan Macefield (L) and Professor Kenny Kwok (R) from the
University of Western Sydney conducted a site visit to Sydney CBD to appreciate the
complexity of wind-structure interactions and the potentials of strong winds to excite tall
buildings in an urban environment for their Discovery Projects grant ‘Occupant comfort,
cognitive performance and task performance in wind-excited tall buildings’.
94
ARC Advisory Council: (Back L to R) Professor Peter Buckskin, Professor Aidan Byrne,
Professor Suzanne Miller, Professor Attila Brungs, Professor Stephen Garton. (Front L to R) Dr
Leigh Farrell, Professor Sandra Harding, Professor Sue Thomas, Professor Paul Johnson.
100
Chapter 8: Dr Ross Smith, a Discovery Projects grant recipient from the University of South
Australia, demonstrating his invention the US Patented Digital Foam Sensor. The technology
enables capturing the shape, size and precise touch-based gestures of a deformable substrate.
These capabilities have led to the creation of a number of prototype devices, including a virtualmodelling system for digital sculpturing.
113
Chapter 9: Dr Tariq Ezaz, a Future Fellowship recipient from the University of Canberra,
holding one of the model species, central bearded dragon of his project. The aim of the project
is to identify and characterise candidate sex determining genes in a model reptile, to
understand how genes control sexual differentiation and how they interact with temperature.
118
Chapter 10: Vadim Kamenetsky is a Professor in Earth Science at the University of Tasmania
working on a Linkage Projects grant ‘The supergiant Olympic Dam U-Cu-Au-REE ore deposit:
towards a new genetic model’. The aim is to understand temporal and spatial relationships
between crustal and mantle rocks, melts and fluids, associated with development of this largest
deposit on the planet.
125
Part 4: Associate Professor Michael J. Biercuk, a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of
Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems. Professor Biercuk leads a project entitled
‘Quantum Control and Quantum Simulation with Trapped Ions’, in which he is developing novel
engineering techniques applicable to the quantum domain. The aim of this research is to lay
the foundations for a new generation of quantum-enabled technologies.
128
Chapter 11: Professor Kamal Alameh from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia
examining an advanced clear glass capable of collecting electricity from ultraviolet and infrared
radiation whilst allowing natural light to pass through. The glass is being developed as part of a
Linkage Projects grant ‘Advanced glazing systems for solar energy harvesting and radiation
control’.
130
Chapter 12: Dr Julia Bryant at the Anglo-Australian Telescope in central NSW, alongside a
new instrument called the Sydney-Australian-Astronomical-Observatory Multi-object Integralfield Spectrograph (SAMI). SAMI uses a revolutionary new technology of imaging optical fibre
bundles developed at The University of Sydney, to understand the physics behind the evolution
of galaxies in the local universe. Dr Bryant is a member of the ARC Centre of Excellence for
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All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO).
Part 5: Associate Professor Damien Keating, a Future Fellowships recipient from The Flinders
University of South Australia, analysing protein samples collected from neurons. This was
undertaken as part of his project ‘Identifying novel roles of disease‑related proteins in the
regulation of exocytosis and nervous communication’. The aim of the project is to understand
the molecular mechanisms controlling the signalling that occurs between mammalian cells.
205
Part 6: Professor Laurie Brown from the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling
(NATSEM), at the Institute of Governance and Policy Analysis, University of Canberra, who is
the lead Chief Investigator on a Discovery Projects grant examining the health, socio-economic
and cultural transformation of, and diversity in, Australia’s oldest old population. The project
aims to increase our understanding of what the ‘Fourth Age’ really means and the implications
for policy in Australia.
247
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Professor Reg Watson, University of Tasmania, received a Discovery Projects grant to examine
the future of Australia’s fishing industry. Photo courtesy of Peter Mathew.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PART 1 OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 1:
REVIEW BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
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A review of significant issues and developments during the year and
the outlook for the following year
CHAPTER 2:
THE AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL
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A description of the ARC (its role and functions, structure, and
outcome and program structure)
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 1 REVIEW BY THE CHIEF
EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Associate Professor Victoria Haskins, The University of Newcastle, is undertaking archival
research for her project on Indigenous domestic service. Photo courtesy of Murray McKean.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PROFESSOR AIDAN BYRNE
I am pleased to present the Australian Research Council (ARC) Annual Report for 2013–14. The
ARC is in a unique position in the Australian research sector. The diversity of our schemes
reflect the diversity of the sector which they are designed to stimulate and support, and it is
essential to have a well-defined purpose to our grants, and to target them accurately.
National Competitive Grants Program
The ARC administers a range of schemes through the National Competitive Grants Program
(NCGP) that support both basic and applied research across all disciplines, encompassing
programs of research both small and large. Whether it is a three-year Discovery Projects or
Linkage Projects grant, or seven years of cross-disciplinary research in an ARC Centre of
Excellence, the benefits of research funded by the ARC are demonstrated regularly.
In December 2013 the Minister approved $285 million over seven years for 12 new ARC Centres
of Excellence. These Centres will collaborate with 106 partner organisations from 44 different
countries and will also receive more than $392.2 million in cash and in-kind support from
participating organisations. Several researchers from these Centres are featured throughout this
report. Their work is at the cutting edge of research activity in Australia and we are pleased to
give our them our support.
ARC Centres of Excellence have been very effective in moulding the research landscape for
Australia. All of our Centres are provided with substantial funding over seven years, which allows
for serious and complex challenges to be addressed. They house our most excellent research
leaders, and are the proving grounds for the next generation of research talent, as well as
training those who are just beginning a research career. A single Centre’s influence can
transcend its own discipline, and even beyond the research sector, to become creators and
custodians of knowledge from which the entire community will benefit. They have the capacity to
develop multidisciplinary research teams which may not otherwise develop.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Centres of Excellence span the spectrum from very basic to applied research. They are excellent
at enabling productivity gains by tackling critical industry challenges, they also embed research
and innovative talent within industry. This will help secure the future of our economy and build
sustainable partnerships within the research sector.
The importance of linking industry and research has long been recognised by the ARC—the
Linkage Projects scheme is 12 years old this year. Its predecessor, the Collaborative Research
Grants scheme, was first established in 1991. We are seeking to more clearly demonstrate the
connections between industry and universities which this scheme creates.
The Industrial Transformation Research Program (ITRP) is also building research capacity and
forging strong industry partnerships. The latest rounds of this scheme have focused on priority
areas including manufacturing; food and agriculture; oil and gas; and mining and mining
services. I look forward to seeing our new hubs and centres make their presence felt within the
research landscape and deliver an invigorating boost to Australian industry.
The 2014–15 Federal Budget delivered a milestone moment for the ARC with an ongoing
commitment from the Australian Government to our Future Fellowships scheme. This scheme
was originally funded for a period of five years, with a one-year extension in the 2013–14
Federal Budget. The Australian Government has now made provision for the scheme to be
ongoing, funding 100 four-year fellowships per year from 2015–16 onward.
The Federal Budget also highlighted a number of significant new measures that the ARC will
administer, including $35 million for a Special Research Initiative for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes,
$42 million for a Special Research Initiative for Tropical Health and Medicine, $26 million for
targeted research in the field of dementia and $24 million for a Special Research Initiative for an
Antarctic Gateway. The ARC will be working closely with organisations such as the Juvenile
Diabetes Research Foundation, James Cook University, the National Health and Medical
Research Council (NHMRC), and the University of Tasmania, to deliver these new programs.
Research Excellence
While it has been a busy year on the competitive grants side, it has also been busy in terms of
research excellence, with work well advanced on Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA)
2015. Sector feedback was sought on the submission documentation in early 2014, and there
has been a great deal of activity reviewing close to 12 000 pieces of input on Field of Research
(FoR) allocations and requests for new journals and conferences to be included in ERA 2015.
With the completion of two rounds of ERA evaluations, the ARC is able to track the
achievements of the sector—both over time and relative to world standards. ERA provides a rich
vein of data that will continue to yield valuable insights and future iterations of ERA will provide
additional opportunities to extend ERA’s reach, particularly in relation to indicators of research
application, knowledge transfer and collaboration. The ARC will continue to work with
universities to ensure that ERA remains a dynamic and flexible system of research evaluation—
one that can fully capture the critical contribution university research makes to the Australian
innovation system.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Research is an international pursuit and it is very important to be able to assess where our
research and research investment sits in relation to other activities elsewhere in the world. This
is why ERA is so important.
The benefits of ERA were clearly demonstrated in the last 12 months in an independent Benefits
Realisation Review conducted by ACIL Allen Consulting (September 2013). The Review
recognised benefits in improved research performance, enhanced university planning, strategy
and operation, and better accountability, transparency and policy making.
Core business
A focal point for the ARC this period has been the simplification of our processes. An applicant’s
time is very highly valued by the ARC—when we consider changes to our peer review
processes, which are underpinned by our custom information technology systems, we do not
make them lightly. The ARC is continually seeking efficiencies and this year we have
streamlined and simplified our funding rules to reduce the unnecessary duplication of paperwork
and complexity.
We are working more closely with the NHMRC, where possible, to improve the coordination of
our funding processes and timelines. The ARC and NHMRC meet regularly to explore ways to
improve the consistency of policies and processes. This includes aiming to reduce the
duplication of effort for researchers who may apply to both the ARC and NHMRC for funding,
and improving the exchange of information between our agencies for audit and other purposes.
This strong partnership will continue in 2014–15 with the implementation of the Australian
Government’s dementia research initiative (jointly funded by the ARC and the NHRMC).
This year has also seen continuing developments in the ARC’s Open Access policy which we
promote through our funding rules. Open Access was a primary topic of discussion at the third
annual meeting of the Global Research Council in Beijing which I attended, along with the heads
of research funding councils from about 60 countries. It was very interesting to hear how far the
discussion about Open Access has advanced in one year. The need for a consensus position
among funding bodies is becoming ever more important, as is a continuation of the discussion of
priorities with research publishers.
Always an important consideration for the ARC is Research Opportunity and Performance
Evidence (ROPE) for which a supporting statement was released in February 2014. ROPE
considers working arrangements, career histories and personal circumstances and provides an
acknowledgement of research performance given the opportunities available. The effective
integration of ROPE into the way we identify and fund research excellence is essential to
sustaining a diverse research workforce.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
The year ahead
Looking to 2014–15, the ARC has identified a number of key priorities.
We will continue to fund excellent research and research training through the NCGP, deliver a
number of new initiatives in areas of priority and re-launch the Future Fellowships scheme in its
new ongoing capacity.
Building on the work we began last year, we will continue to look for ways to reduce ‘red tape’ for
all those involved in our granting processes—upgrading and enhancing our information
and communications technology systems and closely monitoring the requirements we place on
researchers and administering organisations applying under the ARC’s funding schemes. In this
context, we will also review our approach to identifying and reporting the benefits of ARC-funded
research.
And not least, we will carry on in our work towards delivering a third ERA evaluation in 2015.
ERA’s contribution to the Australian higher education research landscape is well established and
we are looking forward to adding to the picture developed so far.
Conclusion
In conclusion I would like to thank all those in the sector who have worked with the ARC over the
past 12 months including administering organisations, researchers themselves and our sector
partners. In particular, I would like to thank the members of the ARC Advisory Council, ARC
College of Experts, Selection Advisory Committees and external assessors. Without their
support the ARC would not be able to undertake its role as effectively as it does.
A final thanks to the dedicated and committed staff of the ARC. We are a small agency with a
large workload and the professionalism of the staff I work with on a daily basis never ceases to
amaze me and this deserves public acknowledgement.
Professor Aidan Byrne
Chief Executive Officer
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
KEY PRIORITIES FOR 2014–15
NUMBER
PRIORITY
1
FUND EXCELLENT RESEARCH AND RESEARCH TRAINING THROUGH
THE NATIONAL COMPETITIVE GRANTS PROGRAM
The ARC will fund excellent research and research training across all
disciplines through delivery of the NCGP’s Discovery and Linkage programs.
These programs comprise a number of targeted schemes, with funding being
awarded through a competitive peer review process.
2
DELIVER NEW FUNDING INITIATIVES AIMED AT BOOSTING RESEARCH
INTO TROPICAL HEALTH AND MEDICINE, DEMENTIA, DIABETES AND
THE ANTARCTIC AND SOUTHERN OCEAN
Through the Special Research Initiatives scheme the ARC will deliver the
Australian Government’s commitment to support the above areas of priority.
3
REVIEW THE ARC’S APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING AND REPORTING THE
BENEFITS OF ARC-FUNDED RESEARCH
Working with partners, including industry, the ARC will improve the identification
of research benefits to enhance the nation’s competitiveness. The ARC will also
review schemes to enhance links to industry and provide clearer information on
grant success, research quality and public benefit across the breadth of
research supported by the ARC.
4
IMPLEMENT THE GOVERNMENT’S COMMITMENT TO THE REDUCTION
OF RED TAPE
Building on progress made in 2013–14 the ARC will:
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–
5
continue to upgrade and enhance the ICT systems it has in place to support
all phases of the granting process, including application, assessment, award
and post-award reporting
in consultation with the Department of Education, investigate options for the
development of a single higher education research data collection.
DELIVER ERA 2015
A third ERA evaluation will be undertaken in 2015. The evaluation will be
informed by feedback received from stakeholders in response to a series of
consultations.
6
BUILD A POSITIVE, FORWARD THINKING AND SUSTAINABLE AGENCY
The ARC will continue to look for ways to ensure that: staff know what is
expected of them, the workplace is safe, staff skills and contributions are
recognised and valued, and training and development is provided to support
career progression.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Photo: 2014 ARC staff photo.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Photo: 2014 ARC staff photo.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 2 THE AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH
COUNCIL
Professor Jörg Imberger, The University of Western Australia, is deploying a temperature
microstructure probe.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
ROLE AND FUNCTIONS
–
–
–
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The ARC is a statutory agency responsible for:
funding excellent research and research training
evaluating the quality of research in universities
providing policy advice on research matters to the Australian Government.
National Competitive Grants Program
The ARC manages the National Competitive Grants Program (NCGP) which comprises two
programs—Discovery and Linkage—under which the ARC funds a range of complementary
funding schemes. The NCGP funds basic and applied research across all disciplines.
The Discovery Program supports the growth of Australia’s research and innovation capacity,
which generates new knowledge resulting in the development of new technologies, products and
ideas, the creation of jobs, economic growth and an enhanced quality of life in Australia. The
Linkage Program supports research partnerships within Australia and internationally to
encourage the exchange and transfer of knowledge, ideas and skills as a basis for building
capacity to deliver high quality research outcomes and secure commercial and other benefits of
research. Further information about the funding schemes of the Discovery and Linkage
programs is provided in Part 5, Appendices 1 and 2 respectively.
Excellence in Research for Australia
The ARC manages Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA), which assesses research quality
by research discipline at Australian universities. ERA is an established comprehensive
evaluation framework that provides assurance of the excellence of research conducted in
Australian higher education institutions in a way that allows comparisons nationally and
internationally, for all discipline areas. ERA also provides a national stocktake of discipline-level
areas of research strength and areas where there is opportunity for development in Australian
higher education institutions.
Advice on research policy matters
The ARC provides strategic informed advice to the Australian Government and contributes to the
development of national research policy. The ARC provides advice on competitive funding
schemes as well as broader matters related to the conduct and dissemination of research and
the measurement of research quality and impact. The ARC is committed to providing high quality
advice that is evidence-based, considers national and international developments and, where
appropriate, is informed by consultation and evaluation.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE
The structure of the ARC at 30 June 2014 is illustrated in Figure 2.1.
Figure 2.1: Structure of the Australian Research Council (at 30 June 2014)
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
EXECUTIVE STAFF
The ARC’s executive staff, at 30 June 2014, are pictured below. Further information on their
responsibilities is provided in Part 3, Chapter 7.
Professor Aidan Byrne
Chief Executive Officer
Ms Leanne Harvey
Executive General
Manager
Dr Fiona Cameron
Executive Director,
Biological Sciences and
Biotechnology
Professor Denise
Meredyth
Executive Director,
Humanities and
Creative Arts
Dr Terry Bowditch
Branch Manager,
Strategy Branch
Professor Marian
Simms
Executive Director,
Social, Behavioural and
Economic Sciences
Professor Brian Yates
Executive Director,
Engineering, Mathematics
and Information Sciences
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ARC PERFORMANCE REPORTING FRAMEWORK
Outcome and program structure
The ARC’s 2013–14 outcome and programs structure comprised one Outcome and three
Programs (Figure 2.2).
Figure 2.2: ARC Outcome and Programs, 2013–14
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Legislative requirements
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Under the Australian Research Council Act 2001 the ARC must:
prepare an annual report in accordance with the guidelines referred to in subsection 63(2) of
the Public Service Act 1999 (that is, the Requirements for Annual Reports for departments,
executive agencies and FMA Act bodies, prepared by the Department of the Prime Minister
and Cabinet and approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit)
include in its annual report an assessment of the Chief Executive Officer’s performance of
his or her functions during that year using the performance indicators set out in the ARC
strategic plan.
In accordance with the requirements above, the ARC reports in its annual report against
the performance indicators set out in the agency Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) and the
ARC strategic plan.
–
–
–
–
–
This annual report includes progress toward achieving:
the ARC Outcome (Part 2, Chapter 3)
the deliverables, objectives and key performance indicators (KPIs) of Program 1.1 Discovery
(Part 2, Chapter 4)
the deliverables, objectives and KPIs of Program 1.2 Linkage (Part 2, Chapter 5)
the deliverables, objectives and KPIs of Program 1.3 Excellence in Research for Australia
(Part 2, Chapter 6).
Changes in framework in 2013–14
To facilitate performance reporting the performance indicators in the ARC Strategic Plan for
2013–14 to 2015–16 were aligned with the performance framework outlined in the Portfolio
Budget Statements 2013–14, Budget Related Paper No. 1.12, Industry, Innovation, Climate
Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education Portfolio (2013–14 PBS).
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–
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–
–
In the 2013–14 PBS:
a KPI was removed for Program 1.1 Discovery—Policy advice enhances Australia’s capacity
and excellence in research
an additional measure was added for Program 1.1 Discovery—Number of research students
supported through ARC funding
a KPI was removed for Program 1.2 Linkage—Policy advice enhances Australia’s capacity
and excellence in research
the deliverables and KPIs for Program 1.3 ERA were revised to reflect current activities.
The KPIs relating to policy advice were removed because the ARC’s policy contributions were
thought best to be reported as deliverables.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Dr Michele Spadari, ARC Centre of Excellence for Geotechnical Science and Engineering, is
examining the macro structure of a clay sample. Photo courtesy of Murray McKean.
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PART 2 PERFORMANCE
CHAPTER 3:
OUTCOME
18
A report on the ARC’s effectiveness in achieving its outcome
CHAPTER 4:
PROGRAM 1.1 DISCOVERY
46
A report on achievements during the year in relation to Discovery
deliverables and key performance indicators
CHAPTER 5:
PROGRAM 1.2 LINKAGE
62
A report on achievements during the year in relation to Linkage deliverables
and key performance indicators
CHAPTER 6:
PROGRAM 1.3 EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH
FOR AUSTRALIA
84
A report on achievements during the year in relation to ERA deliverables and
key performance indicators
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CHAPTER 3 OUTCOME
Future Fellow, Professor Sharynne McLeod, Charles Sturt University, is looking at international
speech acquisition by Australian children. Photo courtesy of Charles Sturt University.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DESCRIPTION
Under the Australian Government’s Portfolio Budget Statements 2013–14, Budget Related
Paper No. 1.12, Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary
Education Portfolio, the Outcome statement for the ARC is:
‘Growth of knowledge and innovation through managing research funding schemes,
measuring research excellence and providing advice’.
The case studies in this chapter are examples of new knowledge and innovation arising during
2013–14 from the three activities identified in the Outcome.
‘ Growth of knowledge and innovation through managing research funding schemes...’
The National Competitive Grants Program (NCGP) case studies provide evidence
demonstrating the economic, environmental, social, health and cultural benefits to Australia
arising from ARC-funded research. The range of case studies demonstrates the diversity of
ARC-supported research conducted by individual and teams around Australia.
Unless otherwise indicated, the case studies relate to research projects awarded funding under
the NCGP in previous years that have achieved outcomes in 2013–14. The case studies provide
examples of the benefits of research generated in the short term (that is, during the course of the
research project). The full impact of the ARC’s investment in research and training can be
assessed comprehensively only over the longer term.
‘ Growth of knowledge and innovation through...measuring research excellence...’
The Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) case studies provide evidence of the benefits to
Australia arising from the ARC’s evaluation of research quality in Australian universities.
‘ Growth of knowledge and innovation...by providing advice’
The policy case studies describe areas of ARC policy analysis during 2013–14 aimed at
ensuring the NCGP continues to contribute to building research capacity in Australia.
DISCOVERY
LINKAGE
ERA
POLICY
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ARC FELLOWS RECOGNISED AS AUSTRALIA’S
RESEARCH LEADERS
In 2013–14 ARC-funded researchers continued to be recognised for their research
achievements and contributions to increasing Australia’s research capacity.
Professor Rob Brooks, The University of New South Wales
Professor Rob Brooks is an evolutionary biologist who, in his own words, ‘thinks about sex for a
living’. An ARC Professorial Fellow, Professor Brooks is Director of the Evolution and Ecology
Research Centre at UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales).
Professor Brooks’ ability for engaging the public in the science of evolutionary biology was
recognised through the awarding of the 2013 Australian Government Eureka Prize for Promoting
Understanding of Australian Science Research. This was following a prolific publication output
which includes an award-winning book Sex, Genes & Rock ‘n’ Roll: How Evolution has Shaped
the Modern World (2011), and dozens of articles for The Conversation, as well as regularly
appearing on national television and radio.
Through his writing and community engagement, Professor Brooks sets the challenge to rethink
how our society works by looking at it through an evolutionary prism. He asks people to consider
how the consequences of sexual reproduction could relate to the role of religion, to attitudes
about gender equality, and questions of morality. By initiating discussion and reflection on these
topics, Professor Brooks encourages individuals to undertake their own curiosity-driven
research. Professor Brooks’ research group also conducts ARC-funded evolutionary research on
guppies, field crickets and mice.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Professor Frank Caruso, The University of Melbourne
Professor Frank Caruso is an ARC Australian Laureate Fellow who specialises in developing
advanced materials for biotechnology and medicine. His talents are in bringing together diverse
teams of researchers to combine expertise in chemistry, biology, medicine and engineering.
Professor Caruso’s work has recently been recognised by the award of the prestigious 2013
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Eureka Prize for
Leadership in Science. At the award event, Frank Howarth, Director of the Australian Museum,
praised his work, noting that ‘Frank Caruso has succeeded in creating a new field of science
creating interdisciplinary approaches to push forward the boundaries of nano-medicine, nanobiotechnology and drug delivery’.
During his tenure at The University of Melbourne’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular
Engineering, Professor Caruso has gained a global reputation as a researcher and author of
over 340 peer-reviewed papers. In 2011 he was ranked at number 17 on a list of the world’s top
material scientists, based on a citation impact analysis conducted by Thomson Reuters, and was
named a Highly Cited Researcher in 2014 by Thomson Reuters.
Professor Caruso’s work in engineering nanoparticles for drug delivery has achieved
international media attention. Using advanced techniques to engineer microscopic capsules
made out of natural ingredients, drugs can be precisely delivered where they are needed, and
can be programmed to release their contents at a given time, all of which promises to reduce the
size of the dosage required.
‘These nano-engineered capsules are attracting much attention as drug carriers, as they have
the potential to improve the delivery and effectiveness of drugs while reducing their side effects,’
Professor Caruso said.
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EUCALYPTUS FOREST WATER MANAGEMENT
Dr Melanie Zeppel, Macquarie University Schemes: Discovery Early Career Researcher
Award, Discovery Projects
A Macquarie University researcher has made some remarkable findings about the way
Eucalypts use water and the impact of extreme rainfall on plant growth. Dr Melanie Zeppel’s
analysis of 21 Eucalypt species found that all Eucalypts measured across Australia use the
same amount of water for a certain quantity of leaf material regardless of tree size. Combining
this result with satellite imaging to gauge plant cover, she has been able to calculate the amount
of water used by Australian Eucalyptus forests on a large scale. This result provides important
data to balance forest water needs with other critical requirements.
Dr Zeppel has also been investigating how plants will respond to seasonal changes to
precipitation, including more extreme rainfall. Fewer but more intense heavy rain events and
changes in the timing of seasonal rain will change the soil water content. The study found this
has consequences including delayed flowering, considerably reduced fruit production and
smaller plant size depending on the current conditions in the region and the timing of rainfall
shifts.
The results of Dr Zeppel’s research significantly improve both our understanding of the amount
of water eucalyptus forests use—from single forest up to the continental scale—as well as the
responses of plant and ecosystems to extreme rainfall and seasonal rainfall variations. These
findings will provide invaluable assistance to a range of stakeholders engaged in the
management of Australia’s water and vegetation resources in future changing climatic
conditions.
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NANOSTRUCTURE OF MILK
Professor Benjamin Boyd, Monash University Scheme: Discovery Projects
Although there is considerable research into the nutritional value and composition of milk, little is
known about the way in which milk—and specifically milk fats—are digested by the body. This
includes understanding how babies digest breast milk, through to how adults process cow, goat
and other milk products.
In 2013–14 researchers from Monash University made new discoveries that have furthered our
knowledge of milk digestion and may lead to a range of novel applications. With funding from the
Discovery Projects scheme and utilising specialist instruments at the Australian Synchrotron,
Professor Benjamin Boyd and his team have documented the nanostructure of milk, and how its
fats interact with the human digestive system.
By chemically recreating the human digestion of cow’s milk in laboratory conditions and using
this material in the beamline at the Australian Synchrotron, the researchers were able to
examine the simulated digestion in minute detail and accelerate their research. The team
discovered that, at the nanoscale, milk has a highly geometrically ordered structure when being
digested. This organised structure assists the delivery of milk components to a cell through the
cell membrane.
By unlocking the detailed structure of milk, the research provides a framework for the
development of new milk products, including: milks for premature babies and dairy products for
people with intolerances; as well as milks with an increased nutritional value. It could even
harness milk’s ability to act as a ‘carrier’ to develop new forms of drug delivery.
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IMPROVED DETECTION OF EXPLOSIVES
Dr Georgios Tsiminis, The University of Adelaide Scheme: Super Science Fellowships
In the past, explosives identification has focused on detecting the metals encasing the explosive
substances. However, improvised explosive devices are now more common and often contain
no metal. There is, therefore, an urgent need to be able to detect the explosive material itself.
In 2013–14 a team of researchers from The University of Adelaide created a sensor that can
detect tiny quantities of explosives with the use of light and special glass fibres. The technique
uses a plastic material which emits red light when illuminated with green laser light. The amount
of red light emitted is reduced by the presence of explosives providing an accurate indicator.
The project leader, Dr Georgios Tsiminis, was attracted to Australia to undertake this research
and is funded through the Super Science Fellowships scheme. He has discovered that this
technique is highly sensitive, is able to detect trace quantities of explosive and only takes a few
minutes. Swabs can be taken from a variety of surfaces and produce a result that confirms the
presence of explosives, in concentrations as low as 6.3 parts per million, in real time. These
attributes—combined with the fact that it is inexpensive, quick and easy to use—could make it of
significant benefit to forensics investigators worldwide.
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REVOLUTIONISING HEALTH CARE DIAGNOSTICS
Associate Professor Dayong Jin, Macquarie University Schemes: Discovery Projects,
Future Fellowships
Researchers from Macquarie University have invented a new generation of nanocrystals called
T-dots which have the potential to revolutionise health care diagnostics. The researchers have
discovered a technique to control the length of time that light is emitted from florescent
nanocrystals, which can be used to track pathogens or drugs in the body.
The addition of a time dimension in measuring nanocrystals significantly increases the number of
combinations of T-dot codes that could be used as unique signatures for biomedical screening
and diagnostics, creating vast libraries of nanotags. Tests using T-Dots would be able to quickly
and precisely identify disease agents or detect cancers. T-Dots could also be used to
manufacture unforgeable invisible marks on currency or pharmaceuticals as anti-counterfeit
measures, and by layering T-Dots, improve data storage capacity.
This breakthrough received Discovery Projects scheme funding and was co-led by Associate
Professor Dayong Jin, an ARC Future Fellowship recipient and a chief investigator of the
recently funded ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, who designed and
manufactured the nanoparticles. Continuing their international partnership with colleagues from
the United States and China, the research team have recently successfully detected trace
amounts of multiple viruses’ DNAs within minutes using a single test. They were able to correctly
read and recognise nanotags attached to DNA strands of HIV, Ebola and other viruses at high
speeds. This technique is one of many applications that could save vital time in identifying
diseases, enabling earlier and more cost effective medical interventions.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
UNDERSTANDING PLANT RESISTANCE
Professor Bostjan Kobe, The University of Queensland Scheme: Discovery Projects
Agricultural biosecurity is a significant global issue with pre-harvest crop losses of up to 15 per
cent due to plant disease. A research team led by Professor Bostjan Kobe from The University of
Queensland has provided new insights into the immune system of plants and advanced our
understanding of the plant resistance genes that help fight against common plant diseases.
This study investigated plant responses to two significant pathogens that cause diseases in
kiwifruit, potato and tomato crops. They were able to identify the interaction of two proteins which
are integral to the plant’s immune response. These two receptor molecules recognise the
pathogenic bacteria attacking the plant, and this recognition and interaction activated an immune
response. The researchers found when pathogen disease-causing molecules are recognised by
these two receptor proteins, the immune system signal to the individual infected cell to die,
stopping the spread of infection and providing immunity for the entire plant.
The internationally collaborative study included investigators from the United Kingdom, New
Zealand as well as the CSIRO and utilised the beamlines at the Australian Synchrotron to
examine the proteins in minute detail.
This discovery will assist researchers to develop resistant crop plants and will contribute positively
to the global economic and environmental challenges of food security and sustainable fibre and
biofuel production. With the similarities in the way humans and plants detect and respond to
disease, there could also be implications from this research for understanding human health.
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IMPACT OF DEFORESTATION ON GLOBAL DIVERSITY
Professor William Laurance, James Cook University and Professor Corey Bradshaw, The
University of Adelaide Schemes: Australian Laureate Fellowships, Future Fellowships
The findings of a long-term study of biodiversity in Thailand confirm that fragmentation of forests
can have rapid and devastating effects on the animals living in the region. Professor William
Laurance, a recipient of an Australian Laureate Fellowship from James Cook University and
Professor Corey Bradshaw, a Future Fellowship recipient from The University of Adelaide,
alongside an international research team from Thailand, Singapore, China, the United States
and Canada, examined forest islands created by a large hydro-electric reservoir and the impact
on native small mammals.
The researchers were seeking to understand what happened to creatures in forest separated
into small patches and see if there was time for conservation mechanisms, such as wildlife
corridors, to reduce the detrimental effects of forest isolation. What they discovered was almost
complete extinction of native species within two decades in these forest fragments. When the
forest was broken up, the native mammals were extremely vulnerable the impacts of population
isolation and invasive species. The Malaysian field rat, normally located in agricultural land
rather than pristine forest, invaded with drastic effects when the forests were disturbed.
The speed with which animals were lost surprised researchers and ‘could have frightening
implications for biodiversity’ said Professor Laurance. With tropical forests continuing to be
felled and fragmented into small ‘islands’ around the world, these findings underscore the real
need to conserve large intact forest areas to preserve endangered wildlife. This research will
have far-reaching effects on our understanding of global biodiversity and the impact of
deforestation worldwide.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
ELECTORAL INTEGRITY
Professor Pippa Norris, The University of Sydney Scheme: Australian Laureate
Fellowships
The gradual diffusion of elections to almost every country around the world has generated
growing concern about their integrity—elections are commonly marred by problems; the
regulation of campaign finance, political broadcasting, and online voting has generated new
challenges; and even minor electoral irregularities have sometimes triggered instability.
In response to this issue, Professor Pippa Norris is working to advance our understanding of the
impact of democratic governance upon prosperity, welfare and peace in countries around the
world. In 2013–2014, the Electoral Integrity Project, led by Professor Norris, released Why
Electoral Integrity Matters (Cambridge University Press May 2014) and launched The Year in
Elections 2013—an annual series covering evaluations of 73 presidential and parliamentary
elections held worldwide in 66 countries. Professor Norris also co-edited Advancing Electoral
Integrity (Oxford University Press, June 2014), Comparing Democracies 4 (Sage, April 2014)
and edited a symposium on electoral integrity in Electoral Studies (Oct 2013).
Professor Norris is an ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Australian Laureate Fellow and Professor of
Government and International Relations at The University of Sydney, McGuire Lecturer in
Comparative Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and
Director of the Electoral Integrity Project. The Electoral Integrity Project, based at The University
of Sydney, is supported by the Australian Research Council and other foundations.
In 2014 Professor Norris was recognised by the International Political Science Association as a
prominent scholar engaged in the cross-disciplinary research when awarded the Karl Deutsch
prize. As a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellow, she is an ambassador for women in research
and is engaged in encouraging early-career women researchers to stay in academia, and
research on gender equality in elected office.
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CENTRE FOSTERING TALENTED RESEARCHERS
Associate Professor Andrea Morello, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation
and Communication Technology Schemes: ARC Centres of Excellence, Discovery
Projects
The race is on for the development of a scalable quantum computer that will revolutionise
traditional computing, vastly speeding up the analysis of large amounts of data, and dramatically
improving future calculating. This work depends on quantum physics, the field of science
working at the level of elementary particles, atoms and molecules.
Associate Professor Andrea Morello is at the forefront of this ambitious research goal at the ARC
Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at
The University of New South Wales. His research team has made a major breakthrough towards
the achievement of quantum computing, the first in the world to demonstrate the complete
quantum control of a single atom in silicon, making a fully functional quantum bit.
Receiving the 2013 Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year, Associate
Professor Morello has gained international recognition for his role in developing the silicon
components that will make quantum computing possible.
Within a few years Associate Professor Morello and his colleagues expect to have a small
working prototype of a quantum computer. ‘We have created the intellectual base for the future
of this technology. So this is a fantastic opportunity for Australia to get the lead in the world on a
radically new technology that can revolutionise the way computations are made’, Associate
Professor Morello said.
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SPECIAL RESEARCH INITIATIVES SCHEME BUILDING
CAPACITY
The Special Research Initiatives (SRI) scheme provides funding for new and emerging
fields of research and builds capacity in strategically important areas. In 2013–14 two
initiatives funded under the SRI scheme—the Science of Learning Research Centre and
the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network—were officially opened.
Science of Learning Research Centre
On 15 July 2013, the ARC CEO opened the Science of Learning Research Centre. The centre,
which is administered by The University of Queensland, was awarded $16 million over four years
(2013–2017) under the SRI scheme.
The centre is using a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the learning process and
identifying new teaching practices that are based on solid scientific evidence. It has brought
together education professionals and high quality researchers in education, neuroscience and
cognitive psychology.
With 25 chief investigators across eight research collaborating organisations and nine partner
organisations (including state education departments) the centre is well underway to building
capacity in this important area of research and has commenced publishing outcomes of the
research it is undertaking.
National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network
On 27 November 2013, the ARC CEO attended the opening of the National Indigenous
Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN). The Network, funded for $3.2 million over four
years (2012–2015), is led by Professor Aileen Moreton-Robinson from the Queensland
University of Technology.
NIRAKN describes itself as a ‘national, inclusive, multidisciplinary hub and spokes model
network of Indigenous researchers at various stages of their careers’. The network is committed
to facilitating and establishing Indigenous-led research.
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–
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NIRAKN has commenced building research capacity by bringing together over 40 network
members, representing over 50 Aboriginal nations. The network includes 21 collaborating
universities, the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and five
partner organisations. Since its commencement NIKRAN has:
established a Research Capacity Building Program to mentor, train, support and engage new
and emerging researchers
provided a platform for cross-institutional and multidisciplinary research designed to build the
capacity of qualified Indigenous researchers.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Photo: Launch of the Science of Learning Research Centre: (L to R) Professor Perry Bartlett
(Director, Queensland Brain Institute), Professor Peter Høj (Vice Chancellor, The University of
Queensland), Professor Aidan Byrne (Chief Executive Officer, Australian Research Council),
The Hon Ian Walker (Queensland Minister for Science, Information Technology, Innovation and
the Arts), Mr John Story (Chancellor, The University of Queensland), Professor Ottmar Lipp
(former Director SLRC). Photo courtesy of Dee McGrath.
Photo: Launch of the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network. Photo courtesy
of Associate Professor Wayne Quilliam.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
USING TRIPLE J TO STOP COLLISIONS IN SPACE
Professor Steven Tingay, ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics Scheme:
ARC Centres of Excellence
A combination of pop songs, talkback radio and cutting-edge science has enabled Australian
astronomers to identify a way to prevent catastrophic, multi-billion dollar space junk collisions.
Team leader, Professor Steven Tingay from Curtin University says they can detect space junk by
listening to the radio signals generated by FM radio station Triple J and other radio stations. The
newly operational Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) has already been used to track radio waves
from FM transmitters located near Perth and Geraldton bouncing off the International Space
station as it passed over Western Australia, approximately 500 kilometres above the Earth’s
surface.
‘We have shown that we are able to detect approximately 10 pieces of space junk
simultaneously. Over time this means we are in a position to monitor a significant fraction of the
space junk that is in orbit around the Earth,’ explains Professor Tingay.
‘Space debris is unpredictable and poses a significant collision risk to expensive space
infrastructure, such as communication satellites. An early warning system has the potential to
protect billions of dollars’ worth of vital infrastructure orbiting the Earth, but also prevent
collisions that will result in more space debris being generated.’
The research is supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics,
administered through The University of Sydney. The Murchison Widefield Array is one of three
precursor telescopes for the Square Kilometre Array project, the only low frequency precursor,
and the first of the three to be fully operational.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PRESERVING AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS HERITAGE
Professor Michael Christie, Charles Darwin University Scheme: Linkage Infrastructure,
Equipment and Facilities
For thousands of years, traditional stories have been vehicles through which Indigenous
Australians have passed knowledge and language from one generation to the next. Now the
internet is providing an interface not only to help Indigenous people preserve some of these
stories, but also to provide an educational and research resource for academics and the broader
community.
Awarded a grant under the Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities scheme, Professor
Michael Christie and Associate Professor Brian Devlin from Charles Darwin University, along
with Professor Jane Simpson of The Australian National University, and colleagues from the
Northern Territory Department of Education, started setting up the web-based Living Archive of
Aboriginal Languages in 2012. Launched in early 2014, the project involved collaborating with
language-owning communities to digitise over 800 rare and vulnerable texts and recordings in
over 20 Australian Indigenous languages.
‘As a living archive that will continue to grow, this resource will facilitate connections with
knowledge and language owners, most often descendants or relatives of the original
storytellers,’ says Professor Christie. ‘Australia’s languages have evolved over many thousands
of years to enable and enact unique human relationships with the social, cultural, technical and
natural worlds. This resource will make publically available a large archive of previously
unavailable resources.’
The project was awarded another Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities grant in 2013
(adding new partners Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, Northern Territory
(NT) Library and NT Catholic Education Office) to expand the archive to include previously
unpublished materials, increasing the indigenous languages included in the archive to over 30,
as well as engaging community members, academics and schools in using and enhancing the
collection.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MAKING OUR ROADS AND WORKPLACES SAFER
Professor Nico Voelcker, University of South Australia Scheme: Linkage Projects
Roadside drug testing is a fairly recent phenomenon in Australia; Victoria was the first state to
introduce roadside drug testing in 2004. Now over 100 000 roadside drug tests are undertaken
every year. Researchers from the University of South Australia have developed a quick and
reliable tool for roadside and workplace testing for illicit drugs and explosives.
The test developed by Professor Nico Voelcker and his team from the University of South
Australia uses non-invasive technology (such as saliva and fingerprint testing) and is faster and
more reliable than current technologies.
‘The current drug test used by police on the roadside may detect something in the system, but
the sample then has to go for further testing in a forensic lab,’ Professor Voelcker says. ‘Sending
a sample away for analysis at a forensic lab can often mean long delays between a positive test
and laying charges.’
‘The idea with our tool is that it is rapid, sensitive and provides on the spot confirmation of the
presence of drugs,’ explains Professor Voelcker. ‘The technology could also be applied beyond
roadside or workplace testing to areas such as testing of elite athletes, security screening,
pharmacology, and the monitoring of compliance with methadone programs.’
PhD student Taryn Guinan is currently undertaking field testing of the technology. Industry
partners on the project include the Australian Federal Police, South Australian Police, New
South Wales Police Force and two forensic science organisations.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
LIVESTOCK VACCINE COULD SAVE BILLIONS
Professor Terry Spithill, La Trobe University Scheme: Linkage Projects
Liver fluke is an endemic flatworm parasite found mainly in sheep and cattle, but can affect
pigs, goats, alpacas, deer and even humans. The problem is estimated to cost about $3 billion
a year globally and $60-90 million a year in Australia in lost production, stock deaths and
prevention costs.
Professor of Agricultural Science at La Trobe University Terry Spithill is leading a Linkage
Projects grant to develop a new vaccine against liver fluke infection. ‘The problem with drugs is
that it’s inevitable that parasites will develop resistance, so we think a more sustainable
approach is to develop a vaccine,’ says Professor Spithill.
Previous research by the team with a breed of Indonesian sheep, which are highly resistant to
liver fluke infection, helped identify an immune response which kills the fluke. ‘The sheep make
antibodies which bind to the surface of the liver fluke parasites and also produce white blood
cells which kill the parasite,’ explains Professor Spithill, ‘We’ve identified 229 potential protein
molecules on the fluke’s surface and we’re now sifting through those molecules to find out which
one or ones will induce the required immune response to kill the parasite when we vaccinate an
animal.’
Virbac, a company focused on vaccine manufacture is collaborating on the project. ‘By working
with a company like Virbac we can harness their experience with vaccine manufacturing and
formulation. We’re providing the proteins that we think might be the best candidates; Virbac are
providing the vaccine formulation experience and helping to fund the work.’
The work is being carried out at the new state-of-the-art AgriBio Centre at La Trobe University.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
SYNCHROTRON SOLVES CENTURIES-OLD MYSTERY
Australian Synchrotron Scheme: Special Research Initiatives
Australian Synchrotron scientists and conservators from the State Library of New South Wales
are attempting to establish the origin and authorship of some of the earliest scientific drawings of
Australian flora and fauna. The exquisitely-detailed drawings depicting Australian birds, plants
and fish date from 1790 to 1792, the early days of European settlement in New South Wales and
include intricate gold, silver and brass leaf work with water colours to create iridescent effects.
‘The use of intricate leaf work with watercolours raised doubts over where the drawings were
produced,’ explains Kate Hughes, conservator at the State Library of New South Wales, where
the drawings are held. ‘The lack of resources in the colony caused questions about the likelihood
that gold would be available for the artists at the time. This led to the hypothesis that the works
were produced as copies in India where the technique was common.’
The drawings themselves are very delicate and cannot be touched making analysis difficult.
Using the x-ray fluorescence microscopy beamline at the Australian Synchrotron, Dr Daryl
Howard was able to examine the very fine details of the drawings and map the metallic elements
of the drawings to determine their chemical composition. Preliminary results reveal that the gold
leaf used in the paintings is high quality with very few impurities. ‘This is a really strong indication
that the gold was refined in the UK or Europe,’ says Ms Hughes.
The Australian Synchrotron is funded through the ARC SRI in Synchrotron Science in
partnership with the Victorian State Government, the Science and Industry Endowment Fund,
the New Zealand Synchrotron Group Limited and the Australian Nuclear Science and
Technology Organisation.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
HUMAN RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL DISEASES LINKED TO
CORAL ANCESTRY
Professor David Miller, James Cook University Scheme: ARC Centres of Excellence
Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies have found three genes in
staghorn corals which show a very fast, strong immune response to the presence of bacteria.
The same genes also occur in mammals, including humans.
‘It is early days, but it certainly looks as if key aspects of our ability to resist bacteria are
extremely ancient and may have been pioneered by the ancestor of corals,’ says team leader
Professor David Miller. ‘We were quite surprised at how rapidly and strongly these three genes
in particular reacted to the presence of bacterial proteins. It was spectacular.’
The main goal of the research is to better understand the mechanisms by which most corals
resist attack by bacteria and viruses – an urgent task in view of the upsurge in coral diseases
around the world, which researchers attribute to the impact of human activity on the oceans and
coral reefs.
‘By better understanding the basis of coral immunity we may be able to understand what is
causing the pandemic of coral diseases and how human activity is connected to it. This will
hopefully lead us to better ways of managing our reefs, reduce the impact of disease, and give
corals a better chance of survival during a period of major climatic and environmental change.’
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
WEED STUDY PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO ALZHEIMER’S
Professor Jim Whelan, ARC Centre of Excellence for Plant Energy Biology Scheme: ARC
Centres of Excellence
‘There’s a need to double food production in the next thirty to forty years, the problem is that all
increases in plant productivity in the last twenty to thirty years have required a large input of
resources, water and fertilizers. This approach is very costly and limiting, so we need to come up
with a new way to make plants more efficient and increase yield’, states Professor Jim Whelan
from La Trobe University, a Chief Investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Plant
Energy Biology (administered through The University of Western Australia).
Professor Whelan is looking at how plants might be grown more efficiently, particularly reducing
stress and disease and therefore increasing production. As part of an international collaboration
he has identified and characterized a new enzyme found in thale cress, a small garden weed.
The enzyme destroys small proteins in the plant’s cells that would otherwise become toxic.
While the work on the new enzyme is furthering understanding of disease in plants, it could also
assist our understanding of the equivalent enzyme in human cells. ‘Documenting the biological
pathways which lead to enzymes breaking down proteins and peptides is essential to
understanding disease in animals as well as plants,’ states Professor Whelan. ‘Alzheimer’s
occurs because small proteins that would otherwise become toxic are no longer effectively or
efficiently removed from brain cells.’
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
BENEFITS OF EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH FOR AUSTRALIA
Prior to the introduction of ERA there was no mechanism to identify and assess research
quality across the full spectrum of research activity at Australian higher education
institutions. ERA has fulfilled this role and provided incentives for institutions to improve
their research quality over time.
In 2013 the ARC commissioned ACIL Allen Consulting to undertake an independent benefits
realisation review of ERA. The review explored the monetary and non-monetary benefits flowing
from ERA. It found that ‘ERA helped to increase the social rate of return of research, generate
cost savings, increase university revenue, enhance economic activity and improve
accountability, transparency and policy-making’ (Benefits Realisation Review of ERA, Final
report (September 2013)).
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–
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–
The review identified three key areas where ERA is having a significant influence:
improved research performance
enhanced university planning strategy and operation
better accountability, transparency and policy making.
AREA
INFLUENCE
IMPACT
Research
performance
Better research quality
Increased social rate of return
of university research
Focusing research effort
Enhancing collaboration
Improving resource allocation
Informing human resource decision
making
University
planning, strategy
and operations
Accountability,
transparency and
policy-making
Improved coordination and
management
Cost savings for universities
Enhanced strategic planning
Recognition and promotion
Increased university revenue
and economic activity
Accountability, transparency and
monitoring
Increased accountability,
transparency and more
informed government policymaking
Better informed government policy
Source: ACIL Allen Consulting
The review report is published on the ARC website.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CONTRIBUTION OF ERA TO MAPPING RESEARCH ACTIVITY
IN AUSTRALIA
ERA data can be used as a tool to guide strategic planning, including aligning research
strengths with industry, regional and national priorities to maximise the benefits of public
investment in research.
The Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) is an independent statutory agency tasked
with improving the competitiveness and supply of renewable energy in Australia. The study
commissioned by ARENA is a collaboration by the ARC with the Commonwealth Scientific and
Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) which provides ARENA with detailed analyses of the
scope and focus of R&D activity by Australia’s universities in renewable energy
technologies (RETs).
The study draws significantly on the ERA data set and the techniques which have been
developed by the ARC for the measurement of research quality in ERA.
The study finds that research into RETs in Australia is primarily underpinned by a small number
of Engineering disciplines (most notably Materials Engineering, and Electrical and Electronic
Engineering). In all cases, the research activity in these disciplines is growing as indicated by the
increasing numbers of publications reported between ERA 2010 and ERA 2012.
The overall quality of each discipline is also improving over time, with larger proportions of the
universities that are active in these disciplines judged to be performing research at world
standard or higher in ERA 2012 than in 2010. Within these underpinning disciplines, RETs
research performs strongly on key citation indicators suggesting that while the total output is
relatively focussed, RETs research is a pocket of national strength.
The study indicates a strong set of research disciplines underpinning Australian universities’
R&D into renewable energy technologies, and shows that over time this activity is increasing in
terms of size and quality.
The study is published on the ARENA website at <www.arena.gov.au>.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
RESEARCH WORKFORCE POLICY
The ARC is committed to supporting researchers at all career levels; growing research
workforce participation; and building the capacity of Australia’s research workforce
(through support for mobility, collaboration, broad skills and research training).
In 2013–14 the ARC commenced work on development of a statement that clearly articulated
the agency’s support for the research workforce through the NCGP. This included researchers
from all career levels and key groups such as women, Indigenous and international researchers.
To assist this process, the ARC invited Australian Laureate Fellows to participate in an external
reference group to provide input into the process. The fellows completed a series of surveys
covering gender and career balance, career stage and international issues. They provided
feedback on their own experiences as well as their views on the role of the ARC in addressing
these issues.
As a result of this process, in February 2014 the ARC released a Research Opportunity and
Performance Evidence (ROPE) statement on its website to promote a clearer understanding of
the ARC’s position on ROPE. The ARC first introduced ROPE under the Discovery Projects
scheme of the NCGP for funding commencing in 2011 and subsequently under all other
schemes. It replaced the selection criterion of ‘track record relative to opportunities’.
ROPE was introduced to help provide a more realistic consideration of a researcher’s
capabilities and assist those who have had career interruptions for family and other reasons.
The statement aims to encourage consistent presentation and assessment of NCGP proposals
by providing guidance to assessors and researchers on the application of ROPE.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
WORKING WITH OTHER RESEARCH AGENCIES
The ARC works closely with other research funding agencies on matters of mutual
interest including, where appropriate, to develop consistent or complementary policies.
–
–
–
–
–
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–
–
–
–
To respond to the increased interest in measuring the societal benefits from research and
coordinating better reporting and showcasing of research outcomes, in August 2012 a
number of publicly funded research agencies established a working group. The working
group is aiming to develop a common understanding of terminology, approaches, and
reporting of research impact. The agencies that were active participants of the working group
during 2013–14 included:
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Studies
Australian Institute of Marine Science
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
Australian Research Council
Bureau of Meteorology
CSIRO
Defence Science and Technology Organisation
Geoscience Australia
National Health and Medical Research Council
National Measurement Institute.
In August 2013, the working group publicly released a document containing a definition of
research impact, guiding principles and a glossary of common terms. This document is available
on the ARC website. Work will continue in 2014–15 to identify existing and new data that can be
used to verify the benefits of research.
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INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY
The ARC plays a significant role in supporting international collaboration, by maintaining
a strong presence within the international research community and providing funding
opportunities that bring together Australian and international researchers and
organisations.
During 2013–14 the ARC reviewed its international strategy. The review considered the
possibility of, and options for, strengthening international links, as well as improving the visibility
and effectiveness of ARC support for international collaboration within NCGP funding schemes.
As a result of opportunities identified through the review the ARC established a new
‘International’ page on the ARC website. The page provides information and statistics on recent
international collaborations through ARC funding; updates on the ARC’s international presence
(including recent discussions with overseas agencies and participation in global forums); and
information on funding opportunities for international collaboration.
–
–
–
The ARC continued to strengthen its international links during 2013–14 by increasing its
international engagement through discussions with overseas and domestic organisations. It
also analysed options for improving the effectiveness of ARC support for international
collaboration using:
input from discussions with overseas agencies and domestic organisations
a survey on international collaboration.
In May 2014, the ARC Chief Executive Officer (CEO) participated in the 2014 Annual Meeting of
the Global Research Council. The council involves approximately 70 counterpart science and
research councils from around the world. Through participation in the council, the ARC is an
active player in addressing international issues in research funding, including open access and
sustainability of the research workforce.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OPEN ACCESS POLICY
During 2013–14 the ARC continued to roll-out an open access policy under the NCGP,
including working with other research funding agencies to ensure consistency in
implementation.
–
–
–
–
–
The ARC actively engaged with stakeholders on developments in this area and continued to
refine its advice and key messages to ensure consistency in the implementation of the policy
across the sector. In particular, the ARC:
worked closely with the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) as well as
the Council of Australian University Librarians and the Australian Open Access Support
Group
participated in various seminars, workshops and forums across the country
participated in Open Access Week 2013—Professor Aidan Byrne and Professor Warwick
Anderson, CEO of the NHMRC promoted their agencies’ open access policies at the launch
participated in Queensland University of Technology’s Open Access and Research
Conference 2013—Professor Byrne gave the opening address.
In January 2014, the ARC surveyed Australian universities to gain a better understanding of
institutional preparedness and capacity, as well as sector-wide consistency in approach, to
managing the requirements under the policy. The results of this consultation will inform the
development of further advice, and dissemination of good practice, to the sector.
In recognition of the truly global nature of open access, in 2013–14 the Global Research
Council (GRC) deemed open access as a key issue relevant to the international funding
landscape. Through ARC’s participation in the GRC, the agency has contributed to global efforts
to maximise the progress and benefits of open access, and to minimise any barriers to
international research collaboration.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
ACCESSIBLE DATA
Taking into account the wide variety of practices across disciplines for the generation,
dissemination and storage of research data, the ARC is committed to ensuring that data
generated through ARC-funded research is as accessible as possible.
The ARC is committed to maximising the benefits from ARC-funded research, including
facilitating greater access to research data. In line with its responsibilities outlined in the
Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007) and international best practice,
since 2007 the ARC has encouraged researchers to deposit data arising from research projects
in publicly accessible repositories.
The ARC considers researchers, in consultation with their institutions, to be responsible for
considering the management and future potential of their research data. While the ARC is
not mandating open data, researchers are strongly encouraged to consider the ways in which
they can best manage, store, disseminate and reuse data generated through ARC-funded
research, taking into account the differences that may exist between institutions, disciplines and
research projects.
In January 2014, the ARC continued to foster a culture of good data management and practices
by clarifying its data management expectations. A new requirement for researchers to outline
how they plan to manage research data arising from ARC-funded research was added to the
funding rules and supporting documentation of Discovery Program schemes for 2014 and 2015.
The requirement forms part of the application process to receive funding. In developing and
communicating its new data management requirements the ARC worked closely with the
Australian National Data Service.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 4 PROGRAM 1.1 DISCOVERY
Dr Sandra Tanz, The University of Western Australia, a Discovery Early Career Researcher
Award recipient, is analysing plant samples. Photo courtesy of Matt Galligan.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DESCRIPTION
The Discovery Program supports the growth of Australia’s research and innovation capacity,
which generates new knowledge resulting in the development of new technologies, products and
ideas, the creation of jobs, economic growth and an enhanced quality of life in Australia.
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–
–
–
–
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–
The objectives of the Discovery Program are to:
support excellent, internationally competitive research by individuals and teams that will
produce high quality outcomes
build Australia’s research capacity through supporting and facilitating research training and
career opportunities for excellent Australian and international researchers
support research in priority areas that will deliver national benefits
enhance research capacity and outcomes through support for international collaboration.
The program comprises the following funding schemes:
Australian Laureate Fellowships
Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Discovery Indigenous
Discovery Projects
Future Fellowships.
Performance data for the Discovery Program, unless otherwise indicated, relates to funding
commencing in the 2013–14 financial year (regardless of the date of announcement). Further
information on the Discovery Program (including schemes, grant statistics and additional
performance data) is provided in Part 5, Appendix 1.
Influences on performance in 2013–14
–
–
–
Key Discovery Program developments during 2013–14 included:
the announcement of ongoing funding for the Future Fellowships scheme
the ongoing focus on streamlining grant processes including the consolidation of the
Discovery Program funding rules into a single document.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE
2013–14 performance is summarised in Table 4.1.
Table 4.1: Discovery Program, performance summary
PERFORMANCE
PAGE
Number of grants awarded
1131
49
Number of researchers supported (investigators named in
funded proposals)
2339
50
Amounts awarded to administering organisations
$538 033 432
50
Policy advice relating to research and research training
Achieved
50
Outputs and outcomes arising from ARC-supported
research are of a high quality and produce national benefits
2/2 targets met
52
ARC funding supports excellent researchers
2/2 targets met
53
ARC-supported research contributes significantly to high
quality research training
2/2 targets met
54
ARC fellowship and award schemes attract high quality
international applicants
1/1 target not met
55
ARC-funded research makes a significant contribution to
research activity and capability in areas of national need
2/2 targets met
56
There is a high level of collaboration between ARC-funded
researchers and those within other components of the
national and international innovation systems
1/1 target met
57
Deliverables
Key performance indicators
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DELIVERABLES
Through the Discovery Program schemes, the ARC delivers funding for individual research
projects and research fellowships and awards. Funding is awarded to administering
organisations on the basis of competitive peer review processes involving Australian and
international experts.
Table 4.2: Discovery Program, deliverables
DELIVERABLE
RESULT
Number of grants awarded
2013–14: 1131
2012–13: 1168
2011–12: 1306
Number of researchers supported (investigators named in
funded proposals)
2013–14: 2339
2012–13: 2340
2011–12: 2537
Amounts awarded to administering organisations
2013–14: $538 033 432
2012–13: $528 838 000
2011–12: $547 343 000
Policy advice relating to research and research training
2013–14: Achieved
2012–13: Achieved
2011–12: Achieved
Number of grants awarded
–
–
–
–
–
–
The ARC awarded 1131 new grants under the Discovery Program for funding commencing in
2013–14 comprising:
17 Australian Laureate Fellowships
200 Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards
10 Discovery Indigenous grants
703 Discovery Projects grants
201 Future Fellowships.
The number of new grants awarded in 2013–14 is similar to that awarded in 2012–13 (see
Figure 4.1). The higher number of grants awarded in 2011–12 reflects the larger number of
Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards allocated in that year, the first year of the scheme’s
operation, and the allocation of 50 Super Science Fellowships. The Super Science Fellowships
scheme was a special initiative of the Australian Government which operated for funding
commencing in 2010 and 2011.
Details of Discovery Program grants awarded for funding commencing in 2013–14 are provided
on the ARC website.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Number of researchers supported
–
–
–
The 1131 new grants awarded for commencement in 2013–14 involved 2339 named
researchers. The named researchers included 440 recipients of individual fellowships or
awards (comprising Australian Laureate Fellowships, Discovery Early Career Researcher
Awards, Discovery Indigenous Awards under the Discovery Indigenous scheme, Discovery
Outstanding Researcher Awards under the Discovery Projects scheme, and Future
Fellowships). Other named researchers included:
chief investigators under the Discovery Indigenous scheme
chief investigators and partner investigators under the Discovery Projects scheme.
Amounts awarded to administering organisations
–
–
–
–
–
–
Total funding of $538.0 million was awarded by the ARC to the 1131 new grants under the
Discovery Program for funding commencing in 2013–14. The total funding awarded
comprised:
$47.4 million over five years for the Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme
$75.8 million over three years for the Discovery Early Career Researcher Award scheme
$4.9 million over three years for the Discovery Indigenous scheme
$257.6 million over three years for the Discovery Projects scheme
$152.3 million over four years for the Future Fellowships scheme.
The total amount of funding awarded in 2013–14 is similar to that awarded in 2012–13 and
2011–12 (see Figure 4.2).
Policy advice relating to research and research training
In 2013–14 the ARC provided advice and engaged in discussions on a range of policy matters
relevant to the Discovery Program. During the year, for example, the ARC commenced
development of a Research Workforce statement aimed at articulating clearly the ARC’s support
for researchers. A case study in Chapter 3 (page 41) provides more information about
this statement.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Figure 4.1: Discovery Program, number of proposals funded by scheme, 2011–12
to 2013–14
Figure 4.2: Discovery Program, total funding awarded, 2011–12 to 2013–14
Schemes: DECRA (Discovery Early Career Researcher Award) DI (Discovery Indigenous),
DP (Discovery Projects), FL (Australian Laureate Fellowships), FS (Super Science Fellowships),
FT (Future Fellowships)
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT EXCELLENT RESEARCH
Description
Through the Discovery Program, the ARC aims to support Australia’s highest quality research
conducted in higher education institutions and other eligible organisations. To ensure excellent
research is funded, the ARC uses a rigorous assessment process involving academic peer
review.
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–
In 2013–14 the ARC:
amended the application form asking researchers to provide a statement indicating the
contribution that their research could make to the Australian economy, society, culture,
national security, public policy or services, health, the environment, or quality of life to better
convey the benefits of publicly funded research.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 1: Outputs and outcomes arising from ARC-supported
research are of a high quality and produce national benefits (KPI 1.1 in ARC
strategic plan)
MEASURE 1
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT OF ARC-FUNDED RESEARCH
Target
Significantly exceeds benchmarks where available
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Not measured
2011–12:
Not measured
TARGET MET
In 2013–14 the ARC used the ERA 2012 results as an indicative measure of the quality of ARCfunded research. The ERA results showed that 72.4 per cent of Category 1 research income
was associated with assessed units of evaluation rated above or well above world standard.
Category 1 research income includes all research income universities receive from Australian
Competitive Grants. The funds awarded by the ARC and the National Health and Medical
Research Council form the bulk of this income.
The ARC did not assess this measure in 2012–13 or 2011–12. Previously the ARC
commissioned a bibliometric study to measure the citation impact of ARC-funded research
relative to the Australian and world averages. The ARC released the last study in 2009 and used
the results to report on performance in the ARC Annual Report 2009–10.
During 2013–14 the ARC continued to collect information on the outputs of ARC-funded
research projects from final reports submitted to the agency. Under the Discovery Program,
research projects and fellowships initially funded in 2009 produced on average 15.2 academic
outputs per research project, and a total of 62 commercialisation outputs (see Table A1.3).
MEASURE 2
OUTCOMES ARISING FROM ARC-FUNDED RESEARCH THAT PROVIDE
SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND CULTURAL BENEFITS
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEASURE 2
OUTCOMES ARISING FROM ARC-FUNDED RESEARCH THAT PROVIDE
SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND CULTURAL BENEFITS
Target
Evidence of benefits arising from the outcomes of ARC-funded research
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Met
2011–12:
Met
TARGET MET
The research case studies in Chapter 3 provide examples of the diverse outcomes produced by
ARC-funded research in 2013–14. The case studies document the social, economic,
environmental and cultural benefits generated by ARC-funded research.
Key Performance Indicator 2: ARC funding supports excellent researchers (KPI 1.2 in
ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 3
EXTERNAL RECOGNITION OF THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF ARC-FUNDED
RESEARCHERS
Target
Prestigious prizes and awards are received by ARC-funded researchers
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Met
2011–12:
Met
TARGET MET
In 2013–14 ARC-funded researchers were the recipients of national and international prizes and
awards for their research (see Part 5, Appendix 3 for listing of examples). Researchers at all
career levels were recognised for their research excellence.
MEASURE 4
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT OF RESEARCH CONDUCTED BY ARC-FUNDED
FELLOWS
Target
Exceeds benchmarks where available
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Not measured
2011–12:
Not measured
TARGET MET
Examples of outcomes arising from research conducted by ARC-funded fellows are provided in
the case studies in Chapter 3.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT RESEARCH TRAINING
AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Description
–
–
–
–
–
The ARC provides support for researchers at all career stages through fellowship and
awards administered under the Discovery Program. In addition:
the Australian Laureate Fellowship scheme provides support for research training with
funding provided for up to two Postdoctoral Research Associates and two Postgraduate
Researchers
allowable budget items under the Discovery Projects scheme include salaries for Higher
Degree by Research students and postdoctoral researchers.
In 2013–14:
the ARC commenced work on a statement about its support for the research workforce.
Following consultations with the sector undertaken as part of this process, the ARC
published a Research Opportunity and Performance Evidence statement in February 2014.
Further information is provided in the case study on page 41.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 3: ARC-supported research contributes significantly to high
quality research training (KPI 1.3 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 5
PROPORTION OF ARC-FUNDED RESEARCHERS WHO ARE EARLY
CAREER RESEARCHERS (WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF COMPLETION OF
THEIR PHD)
Target
Greater than 20 per cent
Result
2013–14:
22.3 per cent
2012–13:
21.2 per cent
2011–12:
22.0 per cent
TARGET MET
Under the Discovery Program funding schemes, early career researchers comprised
22.3 per cent of researchers funded in 2013–14. This includes the 201 researchers supported
through the ARC’s dedicated funding scheme for early career researchers—the Discovery Early
Career Researcher Award scheme—and Chief Investigators funded under other schemes that
are within five years of completion of their PhD. This proportion has remained relatively constant
in recent years.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEASURE 6
NUMBER OF RESEARCH STUDENTS SUPPORTED THROUGH
ARC FUNDING
Target
An average of three per grant (Discovery Projects)
Result*
2013–14:
4.2
TARGET MET
* A new measure in 2013–14
Through the Discovery Program funding schemes, ARC-funded research supports high-quality
research training. Indicative data collected from final reports submitted to the ARC showed that
each Discovery Projects grant initially funded in 2009 provided support for an average of
4.2 research students. This includes both domestic and international postgraduates (see Part 5,
Appendix 1, Table A1.4)
Key Performance Indicator 4: ARC fellowship and award schemes attract high quality
international applicants (KPI 1.4 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 7
PROPORTION OF FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS THAT ARE AWARDED
TO INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS (FOREIGN NATIONALS AND
RETURNING AUSTRALIANS)
Target
Greater than 28 per cent
Result*
2013–14:
26.8 per cent
2012–13:
24.4 per cent
TARGET NOT MET
* Not measured in 2011–12
In 2013–14 international applicants (including returning Australians and foreign nationals) were
the recipients of 26.8 per cent of Discovery Program fellowships and awards. The result is below
the target of 28 per cent which was set based on the results achieved in 2011–12. The 2011–12
financial year included the inaugural selection round of the Discovery Early Career Researcher
Award scheme under which 277 awards were made (compared to the approximately 200 awards
made under subsequent selection rounds).
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT RESEARCH IN PRIORITY
AREAS
Description
Under the Discovery Program funding schemes researchers are invited to indicate whether their
research addresses an area of Government priority. In addition, under the Future Fellowships
scheme proposals are encouraged in targeted priority areas.
In 2013–14:
–
–
the Australian Government identified new Strategic Research Priorities (SRPs) for
government-funded research (replacing the National Research Priorities (NRPs)). The year
2013–14 was identified as a year of transition facilitating final reporting against the NRPs and
the establishment of arrangements to report against the new SRPs
the targeted research areas of national significance identified for the 2013 Future Fellowships
selection round were: bioinformatics; computer system security; Indigenous health and
wellbeing; managing innovation, renewable energy and green technology; pattern recognition
and data mining; safeguarding Australia (especially electronic security, surveillance and
detection); understanding culture and communities.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 5: ARC-funded research makes a significant contribution to
research activity and capability in areas of national need (KPI 1.5 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 8
PROPORTION OF FUNDED PROPOSALS THAT ADDRESS NATIONAL
RESEARCH PRIORITIES
Target
Greater than 85 per cent
Result
2013–14:
91.5 per cent
2012–13:
92.0 per cent
2011–12:
91.1 per cent
TARGET MET
Of the new proposals funded under the Discovery Program in 2013–14, 91.5 per cent indicated
that they involved research relevant to one of the Australian Government’s National Research
Priorities. Research projects within the National Research Priority area of ‘Frontier technologies
for building and transforming Australian industries’ made up the largest proportion of funded
proposals at 41.8 per cent.
MEASURE 9
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT IN NATIONAL RESEARCH PRIORITY AREAS
Target
Examples of impact in NRP areas
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Met
2011–12:
Met
TARGET MET
Examples of outcomes arising from ARC-funded research in National Research Priority areas
are provided in the case studies in Chapter 3.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL
COLLABORATION
Description
–
–
–
–
–
Under the Discovery Program, the ARC provides support for international collaboration
through a number of mechanisms including:
International Collaboration Awards under the Discovery Projects scheme to increase
opportunities for collaboration between researchers, research teams and/or research centres
in Australia and overseas
funding up to a specified limit for overseas travel by chief investigators, fellows and other
project personnel and by partner investigators based overseas to travel to Australia.
During 2013–14:
the ARC improved the visibility of the international aspects of its funding schemes by
improving the accessibility and depth of information about international collaboration
opportunities on its website and through international engagement activities. The case study
on page 43 provides further information about the ARC’s international strategy.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 6: There is a high level of collaboration between ARC-funded
researchers and those within other components of the national and international
innovation systems (KPI 1.6 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 10
PROPORTION OF PROJECTS INVOLVING INTERNATIONAL
COLLABORATION
Target
Greater than 65 per cent
Result
2013–14:
65.3 per cent
2012–13:
65.0 per cent
2011–12:
67.6 per cent
TARGET MET
A total of 65.3 per cent of the 1131 new projects funded in 2013–14 under the Discovery
Program funding schemes involved international collaboration. The proportion varied across the
individual funding schemes with the Future Fellowships scheme recording the highest levels of
international engagement. In total the new projects nominated 1617 instances of international
collaboration with over 120 countries.
In the Discovery Projects selection round for funding commencing in 2014, 91 proposals were
awarded one or more International Collaboration Awards.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DISCOVERY RESEARCH COMMENCING IN 2013–14 THE
MANGROVE CARBON PUMP
Dr Isaac R Santos, Southern Cross University Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
scheme
Mangrove forests are highly productive coastal ecosystems which play a key role in the marine
carbon cycle. Many of these forests are under threat from drainage and deforestation to make
room for urban development and aquaculture as well as increasing stress from pollution.
Globally, mangroves are considered important carbon sinks (natural reservoirs that accumulate
and store carbon). While scientists know how much carbon is being absorbed by the mangrove
trees, the quantity of carbon that is subsequently lost to the ocean and how this occurs is
unclear.
Associate Professor Isaac Santos, from Southern Cross University, has been awarded funding
under the Discovery Early Career Researcher Award scheme for an innovative project
investigating carbon pathways in mangroves, using a combination of new experimental and
modelling approaches.
His project will test the hypothesis that carbon is transferred into the soil around mangroves,
then into the groundwater via crab burrows before seeping into the ocean. It aims to investigate
carbon and greenhouse gas cycling in six Australian mangrove tidal creeks and determine
whether underground respiration can close imbalanced mangrove carbon budgets. This
research will contribute to closing a significant gap in our understanding of the coastal carbon
cycle and the ways in which mangroves influence nearby coastal ecosystems.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DISCOVERY RESEARCH COMMENCING IN 2013–14 HISTORY
OF AUSTRALIAN MINING
Dr Clare Wright, La Trobe University Future Fellowships scheme
Though Australia’s past economic prosperity was said to be riding on the sheep’s back, mining
has been a vital industry for Australia’s economic progress. The recent resources boom—and
slowdown—has once again centred mining in the Australian economy and consciousness. Yet
there has not been an updated national history of mining for fifty years.
Dr Clare Wright from La Trobe University, with funding provided through the Future Fellowships
scheme, will redress this deficit by compiling a new history of Australian mining that examines
key events in Australia’s past through the social and cultural settings of mining communities,
environments and industries.
The story of mineral exploration and exploitation will receive a fresh assessment of its social,
cultural and political impact in Australia. By examining records and narrative descriptions of past
encounters around mining sites and communities, this research will explore the complex
interactions of people, land and governments. It will provide an innovative new narrative of the
multiple and diverse historical protagonists and processes created by Australia’s geological
wealth.
Dr Wright was recently awarded the 2014 Stella Prize for her book, The Forgotten Rebels of
Eureka, based on her ARC-funded postdoctoral research into the role of women at the Eureka
Stockade.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DISCOVERY RESEARCH COMMENCING IN 2013–14
GEOLOGICAL PROCESSES AND LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION
Dr Joanne Whittaker, University of Tasmania Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
scheme
From deep within the Earth, plumes of molten rock can rise up and produce enormous eruptions
on the surface of the planet. Despite the size of these plumes and their role in global mass
extinctions, how these molten rocks drive continental movement is not well understood.
Building on her previous work for which she was awarded a 2013 L’Oreal Women in Science
Fellowship, Dr Joanne Whittaker from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the
University of Tasmania aims to further our knowledge of how the internal workings of the Earth
influence and interact with geological processes on the surface. As part of her Discovery Early
Career Researcher Award, she will use global and Australian geological and geophysical data
combined with modelling systems to investigate the impact of plumes on determining continental
and marine landscapes through geological time.
Understanding how these fundamental processes shaped Earth’s surface in the past is key to
predicting how these processes shape the environmentally important, and resources rich,
continental margins and ocean basins. The Australian case studies areas in the Eastern Indian
Ocean and Southwest Pacific are of economic interest to Australia, for their natural reserves and
this research will enable efficient exploration and discovery of deep Earth resources to the
benefit of the Australian economy.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DISCOVERY RESEARCH COMMENCING IN 2013–14
UNDERSTANDING THE BEHAVIOUR OF BUSHFIRES
Associate Professor Jason Sharples, The University of New South Wales Scheme:
Discovery Indigenous scheme
While bushfires have always been an inherent feature of the Australian environment, in recent
years there has been an increase in the number and severity of bushfires. These bushfires have
resulted in loss of life and substantial property damage, with significant social, economic and
ecological follow-on effects.
Associate Professor Jason Sharples, a Discovery Indigenous scheme recipient, is investigating
eruptive bushfire behaviour, an extremely dangerous form of fire activity with a sudden and
unexpected increase in intensity and the rate of spread, also known as fire blow up. While
eruptive bushfires are a global phenomenon, a lack of understanding of dynamic fire behaviour
and the effects of terrain limits the ability to predict the onset of eruptive fire events, which can
pose major threats to firefighter safety and hamper bushfire suppression.
Based at The University of New South Wales Canberra, Associate Professor Sharples is
examining the key physical mechanisms that cause this type of fire behaviour, using laboratory
experiments and mathematical modelling to analyse the role the geometry of the terrain plays in
triggering eruptive bushfire. The aim of his research is to provide better advice to bushfire
authorities and improve the safety and effectiveness of firefighting efforts.
Associate Professor Sharples was a finalist in the 2013 Eureka Prizes for his ground-breaking
work on extreme fire behaviour.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 5 PROGRAM 1.2 LINKAGE
Dr Kerry Wilkinson, The University of Adelaide,is a member of the Industrial Transformation
Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production. Photo courtesy of The University of Adelaide.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DESCRIPTION
The Linkage Program supports research partnerships within Australia and internationally to
encourage the exchange and transfer of knowledge, ideas and skills as a basis for building
capacity to deliver high quality research outcomes and secure commercial and other benefits
of research.
–
–
–
–
–
–
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–
–
–
–
–
–
The objectives of the Linkage Program are to:
support excellent collaborative research initiatives involving partnerships between higher
education organisations and with other sectors, in Australia and internationally
foster research training and career opportunities that enable excellent Australian and
international researchers and research students to gain experience working in industry
settings
support collaborative research in priority areas that will deliver national benefits
enhance capacity to deliver national benefits by investing in large-scale collaborative
research programs.
The program comprises the following schemes:
ARC Centres of Excellence
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
Industrial Transformation Training Centres
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities
Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects
Linkage Projects
Special Research Initiatives.
The ARC also supports co-funded research centres under the Linkage Program. Performance
data for the Linkage Program, unless otherwise indicated, relates to funding commencing in the
2013–14 financial year (regardless of the date of announcement). Further information on the
Linkage Program (including schemes, grant statistics and additional performance data) is
provided in Part 5, Appendix 2.
Influences on performance in 2013–14
–
–
–
–
Key Linkage Program developments during 2013–14 included:
the announcement of a new cohort of ARC Centres of Excellence for funding commencing
in 2014
the announcement of a number of new initiatives aimed in building research capability in
areas of Government priority
continued demand for support under the Industrial Transformation Research Program.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE
2013–14 performance is summarised in Table 5.1.
Table 5.1: Linkage Program, performance summary
PERFORMANCE
PAGE
Number of grants awarded
402
65
Number of researchers supported (investigators named in
funded proposals)
1874
66
Amounts awarded to administering organisations
$546 911 900
66
Policy advice relating to encouraging research collaboration
Achieved
66
There is a high level of collaboration between ARCsupported researchers and those within other components
of the national and international innovation systems
4/4 targets met
68
Outputs and outcomes arising from ARC-supported
research are of a high quality and produce national benefits
2/2 targets met
71
ARC-supported research contributes significantly to high
quality research training
2/2 targets met
72
ARC-supported research makes a significant contribution to
research activity and capability in areas of national need
2/2 targets met
74
Deliverables
Key performance indicators
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DELIVERABLES
Through the Linkage Program schemes, the ARC delivers funding for individual research
projects, hubs and centres. Funding is awarded to administering organisations on the basis of
competitive peer review processes involving Australian and international experts.
Table 5.2: Linkage Program, deliverables
DELIVERABLE
RESULT
Number of grants awarded
2013–14: 402
2012–13: 267
2011–12: 454
Number of researchers supported (investigators named in
funded proposals)
2013–14: 1874
2012–13: 1650
2011–12: 2098
Amounts awarded to administering organisations
2013–14: $546 911 900
2012–13: $130 428 000
2011–12: $194 483 000
Policy advice relating to encouraging research
collaboration
2013–14: Achieved
2012–13: Achieved
2011–12: Achieved
Number of grants awarded
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
The ARC awarded 402 grants for funding commencing in 2013–14 under the Linkage
Program:
12 ARC Centres of Excellence
10 Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
7 Industrial Transformation Training Centres
63 Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities projects
2 Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects
306 Linkage Projects
2 Special Research Initiatives.
The significant increase in the number of grants awarded in 2013–14, compared to the 2012–
13 (see also Figure 5.1), can be attributed to the following:
In 2012 the ARC restructured the Linkage Projects scheme to complement the introduction of
the Industrial Transformation Research Program—which supports fewer grants of a larger
scale. All three schemes were conducted in full for the first time in 2013–14.
A selection round under the ARC Centres of Excellence scheme was conducted for funding
commencing in 2014. New grants have not been awarded under this scheme since 2010–11,
as selection rounds are only conducted periodically.
Details of Linkage Program grants awarded for funding commencing in 2013–14 are provided on
the ARC website.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Number of researchers supported
The 402 new grants awarded for funding commencing in 2013–14 under the Linkage Program
involved 1874 researchers. Researchers, in this instance, are defined as named participants on
successful funding proposals, that is chief investigators and partner investigators under the
Linkage Projects; Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities; Industrial Transformation
Research Hubs; Industrial Transformation Training Centres; ARC Centres of Excellence;
Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects; and Special Research Initiatives schemes.
The total number of researchers supported on new projects in 2013–14 is higher than the
number recorded in 2012–13 due to the 2014 round of ARC Centres of Excellence (as indicated
on page 65, this scheme is only run periodically). There was also a significant drop in 2012–13
as it was a transition year for the Linkage Projects scheme (reducing from two selection rounds
to one selection round each year).
Amounts awarded to administering organisations
–
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–
–
–
–
–
–
The ARC awarded $546.9 million in total funding for 402 new grants in 2013–14 under the
Linkage Program schemes. The funding awarded comprised:
$285.0 million over five years for the ARC Centres of Excellence scheme
$34.6 million over five years for the Industrial Transformation Research Hubs scheme
$15.7 million over three years for the Industrial Transformation Training Centres scheme
$32.0 million for the Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities scheme (predominantly
one year grants)
$0.8 million for over three years for the Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects
scheme
$101.8 million over three years for the Linkage Projects scheme
$77.0 million over four and five years for the Special Research Initiatives scheme.
The total funding fluctuates each year depending on the selection rounds conducted.
The increase in total funding awarded in 2013–14 is due to:
the ARC Centres of Excellence selection round which is conducted periodically
the conduct of a full selection round of the Linkage Projects scheme. The funding awarded in
2012–13 only included Linkage Projects for funding commencing in 2012 round 2.
Policy advice
In 2013–14 the ARC provided advice and engaged in discussion on a range of policy matters
relevant to the Linkage Program. Policy issues relevant to both the Linkage and Discovery
Programs are included in the case studies in Chapter 3, pages 41–45.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Figure 5.1: Linkage Program, number of proposals funded by scheme, 2011–12
to 2013–14
Figure 5.2: Linkage Program, total funding awarded, 2011–12 to 2013–14
Schemes: Centres (ARC Centres of Excellence); ITRP (Industrial Transformation Research
Program (which includes Industrial Transformation Research Hubs and Industrial Transformation
Training Centres)); LASP (Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects); LIEF (Linkage
Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities); LP (Linkage Projects); SRIs (Special Research
Initiatives)
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT COLLABORATION IN
AUSTRALIA AND INTERNATIONALLY
Description
–
–
–
The Linkage Program aims to improve research outcomes and the use of those outcomes by
other sectors within the Australian economy and abroad by fostering long-term strategic
alliances between higher education organisations and a range of end-user organisations,
including industry, government and those in the community sector. The Program facilitates
the development of alliances through:
requirements for involvement of partner organisations making cash and in-kind contribution
eligibility of partner organisations extended to overseas organisations.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 1: There is a high level of collaboration between ARCsupported researchers and those within other components of the national
and international innovation systems (KPI 2.1 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 1
FINANCIAL COMMITMENT (CASH AND IN-KIND) FROM PARTNER
ORGANISATIONS FOR EVERY DOLLAR CONTRIBUTED BY THE ARC
(LINKAGE PROJECTS AND INDUSTRIAL TRANSFORMATION
RESEARCH HUBS)
Target
Linkage Projects (LP): Greater than $1.90
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs (IH): Greater than $1.50
Result
2013–14:
LP: $1.90
2012–13:
LP: $1.87
2011–12:
LP: $2.05
IH: $1.61
TARGET MET
The Linkage Projects scheme and Industrial Transformation Research Hubs both require
universities and partnering organisations to make a financial commitment to the project equal to
or greater than the amount of funding requested from the ARC. Both schemes achieved their
targets for average financial commitment per dollar contributed by the ARC in 2013–14.
Under the Linkage Projects scheme the ARC awarded $101.8 million in funding to 306 new
research projects involving collaborations with federal, state and local government agencies
(26.1 per cent of funding awarded), industry bodies and companies (57.9 per cent of funding
awarded), and community and not-for-profit agencies (10.5 per cent of funding awarded). Just
over five per cent of ARC funding was awarded to projects collaborating with international
government, universities and other sectors. Financial contributions from partner organisations to
the 306 projects funded under the Linkage Projects scheme for funding commencing in 2013 are
depicted in Figure 5.3.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Figure 5.3: Linkage Projects scheme, partner organisation contributions by type
of organisation, 2013–14
MEASURE 2
PROPORTION OF PARTNER ORGANISATIONS THAT INDICATE THAT
THEIR INVOLVEMENT IN PROJECTS WAS BENEFICIAL OR VERY
BENEFICIAL (LINKAGE PROJECTS SCHEME)
Target
Greater than 90 per cent
Result
2013–14:
98.1 per cent (based on 2009 projects)
2012–13:
94.8 per cent (based on 2008 projects)
2011–12:
96.4 per cent (based on 2007 projects)
TARGET MET
Under the Linkage Projects scheme, 98.1 per cent of partner organisations involved in grants
commencing in 2009 indicated that their involvement in the research project was beneficial or
very beneficial. This information is drawn from final reports submitted by applicants following
completion of the research projects.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEASURE 3
PROPORTION OF PROJECTS INVOLVING INTERNATIONAL
COLLABORATION
Target
Greater than 42 per cent
Result
2013–14:
45.5 per cent
2012–13:
44.6 per cent
2011–12:
40.7 per cent (LP and LIEF only)
TARGET MET
A total of 45.5 per cent of new projects funded under the Linkage Program in 2013–14 involved
international collaboration. This figure is marginally higher than last year due to the inclusion of
the 2014 Centres of Excellence. The proportion of Centres of Excellence involving international
collaboration is usually higher than other schemes funded under the Linkage Program. This is
reflected in the fact that all of the newly funded Centres of Excellence involve international
collaboration. There were 431 instances of intended international collaboration reported on the
402 successful proposals funded under the Linkage Program in 2013–14.
In addition, the ARC provided $3.6 million to support Australian membership of the International
Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) over the next two years. The IODP is the largest collaborative
research program in earth and ocean sciences and aims to address fundamental questions
about Earth’s history and processes. Other major international collaborative projects the ARC
continued to fund in 2013–14 were Australian membership of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in
Space mission and access for Australian researchers to the NANTEN2 sub-millimetre telescope
facility in Chile.
MEASURE 4
AVERAGE NUMBER OF ORGANISATIONS INVOLVED IN PROJECTS
FUNDED (LINKAGE INFRASTRUCTURE, EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES)
Target
Greater than 3.5
Result
2013–14:
5.2
2012–13:
4.3
2011–12:
3.9
TARGET MET
The ARC awarded $32.0 million to 63 new research infrastructure, facilities and equipment
projects in 2013–14. Over 90 per cent of these projects involved collaborations between
Australian universities.
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities projects funded in 2013–14 involved an average
of 5.2 collaborating organisations per project, almost one and half times the target. The increase
in collaboration recorded since 2011–12 suggest that it is becoming more common for
organisations to pool their resources to purchase important research infrastructure, equipment
and facilities.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT EXCELLENT RESEARCH
Description
Through the Linkage Program, the ARC aims to support Australia’s highest quality research
conducted in higher education institutions and other eligible organisations in partnership with
end-user organisations. To ensure excellent research is funded, the ARC uses a rigorous
assessment process involving academic peer review.
In 2013–14 the ARC amended the application form asking researchers to provide a statement
indicating the contribution that their research could make to the Australian economy, society,
culture, national security, public policy or services, health, the environment, or quality of life to
better convey the benefits of publicly funded research.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 2: Outputs and outcomes arising from ARC-supported research
are of a high quality and produce national benefits (KPI 2.2 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 5
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT ARC-FUNDED RESEARCH
Target
Significantly exceeds benchmarks where available
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Not measured
2011–12:
Not measured
TARGET MET
Information on assessment of this measure is provided under the similar measure for the
Discovery Program (page 52). During 2013–14 the ARC continued to collect information on the
outputs of ARC-funded research projects from final reports submitted to the agency. Under the
Linkage Program, projects initially funded in 2009 produced an average of 10.1 academic
outputs per research project, and a total of 40 commercialisation outputs. In 2013, ARC Centres
of Excellence (initially funded in 2005, 2007 and 2011) produced an average of 249.8 academic
outputs and a total of 45 patent-related outputs.
MEASURE 6
OUTCOMES ARISING FROM ARC-FUNDED RESEARCH THAT PROVIDE
SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND CULTURAL BENEFITS
Target
Evidence of benefits arising from the outcomes of ARC-funded research
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Met
2011–12:
Met
TARGET MET
The research case studies in Chapter 3 provide examples of the diverse outcomes produced by
ARC-funded research in 2013–14. The case studies document the social, economic,
environmental and cultural benefits generated by ARC-funded research.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT RESEARCH TRAINING
AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT
Description
The ARC supports research training and career opportunities through stipends and project
funds. ARC Centres of Excellence and Linkage Projects schemes allow eligible researchers and
research teams to apply for project support for themselves, research assistants, research
technicians and postgraduate students (further details on personnel supported under the
Linkage Program can be found in Part 5, Appendix 2). Postgraduate and postdoctoral stipends
are awarded under the Industrial Transformation Research Hubs and Centres schemes.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 3: ARC-supported research contributes significantly to high
quality research training (KPI 2.3 in ARC strategic plan)*
MEASURE 7
PROPORTION OF ARC-FUNDED RESEARCHERS WHO ARE EARLY
CAREER RESEARCHERS (WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF COMPLETION OF
THEIR PHD) (LINKAGE PROJECTS)
Target
Greater than 12 per cent
Result
2013–14:
12.7 per cent
2012–13:
13.2 per cent
2011–12:
14.2 per cent
TARGET MET
* See Appendix 9 –Correction of Errors regarding discrepancies between these statistics and
those reported in previous Annual Reports.
In 2013–14, 12.7 per cent of researchers named on successful proposals under the Linkage
Projects scheme were early career researchers. While this appears to indicate that the number
of early career researchers supported by the scheme is trending downwards, this is not believed
to be the case because the number of early career researchers supported under the Linkage
Projects scheme as reported at the end of the project (see Part 5, Appendix 2, Table A2.5) has
been increasing over the last four years. It seems that early career researchers are being
supported by the Linkage Projects scheme, but they are not being named in the original funding
proposals. The ARC is considering new methods for measuring this KPI.
Data on the proportion of early career researchers supported under other Linkage Program
schemes is not reported here as the postgraduates, postdoctoral and other early career
researchers are not named in the application, but are recruited once the project is successful.
Further information on the number of early career researchers supported by the Centres of
Excellence can be found in Part 5, Appendix 2, Table A2.4.
MEASURE 8
SUPPORT FOR RESEARCH TRAINING IN AREAS OF STRATEGIC
IMPORTANCE TO AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRIES
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEASURE 8
SUPPORT FOR RESEARCH TRAINING IN AREAS OF STRATEGIC
IMPORTANCE TO AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRIES
Target
Provide funding to support the establishment of Industrial
Transformation Training Centres
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13
Met
TARGET MET
* Not measured in 2011–12 as the Industrial Transformation Training Centres scheme was first
conducted in 2013.
In 2013–14 the ARC funded seven new Industrial Transformation Training Centres. The new
training centres will support 73 higher degree by research candidates and 20 postdoctoral
fellows in research projects in eight industrial priority areas: defence manufacturing,
manufacturing techniques, product design and development, product opportunities, food
manufacturing capabilities, food processing, future food storage and other food-related research.
More information on the training centres is provided on pages 77–78.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT RESEARCH IN PRIORITY
AREAS
Description
Under the Linkage Program researchers are invited to indicate whether their research addresses
an area of Government priority. Proposals submitted under the Industrial Transformation
Research Program must also address one of the Industrial Transformation Priorities identified for
each funding round. In addition, the ARC provides scope for particular priorities or projects of
national importance through Special Research Initiatives and the Linkage Learned Academies
Special Projects scheme.
–
–
–
In 2013–14:
as noted on page 56, the Australian Government identified new Strategic Research Priorities
(SRPs) for government-funded research (replacing previous National Research Priorities).
priorities were announced for the Industrial Transformation Research Program:
manufacturing, food and agriculture, oil and gas, including petroleum, mining and mining
services, and medical devices and biotechnology.
Performance
Key Performance Indicator 4: ARC-supported research makes a significant
contribution to research activity and capability in areas of national need (KPI 2.4 in
ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 9
PROPORTION OF FUNDED PROPOSALS THAT ADDRESS THE
NATIONAL RESEARCH PRIORITIES (NRPS)
Target
Greater than 90 per cent
Result
2013–14:
97.8 per cent
2012–13:
98.1 per cent
2011–12:
97.1 per cent
TARGET MET
Almost 98 per cent of new proposals funded under the Linkage Program in 2013–14 indicated
that their research was relevant to at least one of the Australian Government’s four national
research priority areas. The proportion of funded proposals indicating that the research is
relevant to at least one national research priority area has remained steady over the last four
years.
Over 40 per cent of new projects funded in 2013–14 addressed the National Research Priority—
frontier technologies for building and transforming Australian industries—including two-thirds of
the new ARC Centres of Excellence. Approximately one fifth, one quarter and one tenth of new
projects funded in 2013–14 respectively address the Environment, Health and Security National
Research Priorities. Less than 2.5 per cent of projects did not address one of the National
Research Priorities.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEASURE 10
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT IN NATIONAL RESEARCH PRIORITY AREAS
Target
Examples of impact in NRP areas
Result
2013–14:
Met
2012–13:
Met
2011–12:
Met
TARGET MET
Support provided by the ARC in past years has contributed to new knowledge and outcomes for
the community in each of the four priority areas nominated by the government. Examples of
these contributions are highlighted in the case studies in Chapter 3.
Professor Aidan Byrne, ARC CEO, and The Hon Christopher Pyne MP, Minister for Education,
with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation youth advocates at the funding outcomes
announcement for the Special Research Initiative for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
OBJECTIVE—TO SUPPORT LARGE-SCALE
COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVES
Description
Under the Linkage Program, the ARC funds large scale collaborative research programs
including centres, hubs and networks.
–
–
–
–
In 2013–14 the ARC finalised the outcomes of:
the ARC Centres of Excellence selection round for funding commencing in 2013–14
three selection rounds conducted under the Industrial Transformation Research Program
funding under two new special research initiatives announced in the 2014–15 budget.
Performance
New research projects commencing in 2013–14
ARC Centres of Excellence
In 2013–14 the ARC completed a selection round for ARC Centres of Excellence for funding
commencing in 2014. Through the ARC, the Australian Government awarded $285.0 million over
seven years to 12 new ARC Centres of Excellence. The 12 Centres of Excellence will support at
least 176 researchers across 18 Australian universities and will collaborate internationally as well
as with local industry, government and community groups.
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course, The University of
Queensland
ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Monash
University
ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, The Australian National University
ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong
ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrated Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University
ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function, Monash University
ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers of Big Data, Big Models,
New Insights, The University of Melbourne
ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, The University of Adelaide
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, The University of Western Australia
ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision, Queensland University of Technology
ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis, The Australian National
University
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Industrial Transformation Research Program
The first round under the Industrial Transformation Research Hubs scheme in 2013–14
funded three hubs in research areas that will advance Australia’s manufacturing industries. The
second round funded seven new hubs to underpin Australia’s future in manufacturing, food and
agriculture, oil and gas (including petroleum), mining and mining services, and medical devices
and biotechnology. Together the ten hubs will support 117 researchers and involve
collaborations between 16 Australian universities and 43 industry partner organisations. Total
funding for the hubs from the ARC is $34.6 million over five years, with industry partners
contributing a further $55.7 million in cash and in-kind financial support.
Round 1
–
–
–
ARC Research Hub for Australian Steel Manufacturing, University of Wollongong
ARC Research Hub for Bioprocessing Advanced Manufacturing, Monash University
ARC Research Hub for Transforming Australia’s Manufacturing Industry through High Value
Additive Manufacturing, Monash University
Round 2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
ARC Research Hub for Advanced Breeding to Transform Prawn Aquaculture, James Cook
University
ARC Research Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian Iron Ore, The University of
Newcastle
ARC Research Hub for Australian Copper-Uranium, The University of Adelaide
ARC Research Hub for Basin GEodyNamics and Evolution of SedImentary Systems
(GENESIS), The University of Sydney
ARC Research Hub for Genetic Diversity and Molecular Breeding for Wheat in a Hot and Dry
Climate, The University of Adelaide
ARC Research Hub for Transforming the Mining Value Chain, University of Tasmania
ARC Research Hub for Transforming Waste Directly in Cost-Effective Green Manufacturing,
The University of New South Wales
The 2014 round of Industrial Transformation Training Centres awarded $15.7 million over
three years to seven training centres that will address research areas vital to the future of
Australia’s food and manufacturing industries. The centres will also encourage close
partnerships between university researchers and industry, with eight Australian universities
collaborating with over 40 industry partner organisations.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
ARC Training Centre for the Australian Food Processing Industry in the 21st Century;
The University of Sydney
ARC Training Centre in Biodevices; Swinburne University of Technology
ARC Training Centre for Food and Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation; The University of
Newcastle
ARC Training Centre for Functional Grains; Charles Sturt University
ARC Training Centre for Innovative Horticultural Products; University of Tasmania
ARC Training Centre for Portable Analytical Separation Technologies; University of
Tasmania
ARC Training Centre for Transforming Australia’s Naval Manufacturing Industry; University of
Tasmania
Special Research Initiatives
Two new initiatives were funded under the Special Research Initiative scheme–the Special
Research Initiative for Tropical Health and Medicine and the Special Research Initiative for
Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes.
The Special Research Initiative for Tropical Health and Medicine provided $42 million of
funding over four years to build Australia’s research capacity in tropical health and biomedical
sciences. The initiative represents the Government’s electoral commitment for ‘Boosting Front
Line Healthcare and Research’ by funding the Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine at James
Cook University. The successful Initiative, led by the Administering Organisation and involving
researchers with track records in quality research outcomes and coordinating team-based crossdisciplinary projects, will ensure that our citizens have the best possible treatments for tropical
health matters.
The Special Research Initiative for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes provided $35 million for the
creation of national collaborative research network to with a core function of significant progress
towards finding a cure for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes. The Program will be a national collaborative
network, led by the Administering Organisation, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
(JDRF) and involve researchers with track records in quality research outcomes and
coordinating team-based cross-disciplinary projects. The network’s core function will include
significant progress towards finding a cure for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes, which affects many
Australian children.
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Research projects receiving ongoing funding in 2013–14
Special Research Initiatives scheme
In 2010 the ARC awarded $50 million to two Australian research teams to develop a bionic eye
under the ARC’s Research in Bionic Vision Science and Technology Initiative. Following an
independent review in 2013 that found both research teams had made exceptional advances,
the ARC awarded an additional $10 million to the research teams to continue their groundbreaking work into 2014. The two teams are working on different methods to develop bionic
vision, each focusing on a different type of blindness. The Monash Vision Group is developing a
device to implant on the visual cortex of the brain, providing treatment for progressive blindness.
Bionic Vision Australia is developing technology that implants a device in the rear of the eye to
enable vision to blind patients suffering from degenerative retinal conditions.
Stem Cells Australia was awarded $21 million over seven years in July 2011 to build Australia’s
capacity to conduct stem cell research. In 2013–14 Stem Cells Australia made technological
advances producing new insights into bone repair and remodelling. They also continued to be
involved in international collaborations using stem cells to create new ways to understand
diseases and test new drugs.
The ARC awarded $25 million under the Special Research Initiative in Synchrotron Science
in 2012 to support access to the Australian Synchrotron over four years. The Australian
Synchrotron is the largest stand-alone piece of scientific infrastructure in the southern
hemisphere and can be used by almost any industry across a wide-range of research fields to
study the most precise nature of any biological or industrial material. Research highlights in
2013–14 include contributing to the research that led to the 2013 Nobel Prize for Physics being
awarded for the theoretical predication of the Higgs boson, and a young synchrotron researcher
developing the first 4D lung x-ray. Case studies highlighting Australian Synchrotron research can
be found in Chapter 3, pages 23 and 36.
The National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN) was awarded
$3.2 million over four years under the Special Research Initiative for an Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Researchers’ Network in 2012. The Network brings together 44 Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander researchers from 21 Australian universities and across many research
disciplines to facilitate collaborative and innovative approaches to research and research
training, and to build the capacity of indigenous Australian researchers to undertake and lead
high quality research at all career stages. Further information on the activities of NIRAKN in
2013–14 can be found in the case study on page 30.
In May 2013 the ARC awarded $16 million over four years to establish a new Science of
Learning Research Centre at the University of Queensland and involving six other Australian
universities, nine partner organisations and the Australian Council for Educational Research.
Further information on the activities of Science of Learning Research Centre in 2013–14 can be
found in the case study on page 30.
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Co-funded research centres
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The ARC and the Grains Research and Development Corporation jointly committed
$47.8 million to fund the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) from
2002 until the end of 2014. ACPFG has four nodes located around Australia at The
University of Adelaide, The University of Melbourne, The University of Queensland and the
University of South Australia. In 2013–14 researchers at the centre continued to investigate
and develop techniques to improve the resistance of wheat, barley and other crops to hostile
environmental conditions such as drought salinity and mineral deficiencies or toxicities. The
centre also announced their involvement in a number of international projects to assist global
food security, health and production including:
the European EURoot research project which aims to enhance the performance of cereal
plants under stress conditions
a partnership with the United States Agency for International Development and India-based
Vibha Agrotech to develop new climate-resilient varieties of rice and wheat
a project with World Vision Australia and the International Food Policy Research Institute to
produce high value and micronutrient-enriched rice grain.
The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) was established
in June 2009 as a joint funding initiative between the ARC and the National Water
Commission (NWC). The ARC and the NWC committed up to $29.5 million to the centre over
five years. In 2013–14 the centre contributed to the development of Australia’s new National
Groundwater Strategy and released a report on the economic value of groundwater in
Australia. International collaboration activities undertaken by the centre in 2013–14 included:
hosting a number of international meetings and conferences, including the International
Association of Hydrogeologists Congress in Perth and the 20th International Congress on
Modelling and Simulation in Adelaide
contributing to the UNESCO-led discussions on a Global Framework for Action to protect the
Earth’s imperilled groundwater resources
cementing a partnership with the Australian Water Association and the US National Ground
Water Association to deliver training and courses in conjunction.
National ICT Australia (NICTA) is jointly funded by the ARC and the Department of
Communications, providing a total of $606.5 million in funding over 15 years (2002–16). NICTA
was established in 2002 to build capacity and strengthen investment in strategic information and
communications technology research in Australia and is currently Australia’s largest organisation
dedicated to ICT research. In 2013–14 NICTA researchers developed a new approach to
optimising bus operations in Canberra, reducing travel times by one third and costing less than
the current system, and developed the first truly scalable and accurate evacuation planning and
scheduling system. A number of NICTA researchers also won awards for their research.
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LINKAGE RESEARCH COMMENCING IN 2013–14,
INDUSTRIAL TRANSFORMATION RESEARCH HUBS
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs support Australia’s best researchers to engage
in cutting edge research on new technologies and economic and social transformation.
The scheme supports collaborative research initiatives between the Australian higher
education sector and industry to achieve strategic outcomes. The ten hubs funded in
2013–14 addressed research in the areas of manufacturing, food and agriculture, oil and
gas (including petroleum), mining and mining services, and medical devices and
biotechnology. Two hubs are highlighted below.
ARC Research Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian Iron Ore
The ARC Research Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian Iron Ore will be based at The
University of Newcastle and will bring together three areas of research strength at the
University—beneficiation, raw materials handling and iron ore utilisation. The collaboration aims
to address the complex issues that arise from different iron ore types that have emerged in
recent years and, if successful, the outcomes should benefit the entire industry.
The Hub will engage with mining organisations, companies and equipment manufacturers with
the aim of establishing new Australian iron ore separation and handling techniques and
supporting the use of Australian ores.
ARC Research Hub for Genetic Diversity and Molecular Breeding for Wheat in
a Hot and Dry Climate
Wheat production is worth over $5 billion annually to the Australian economy and wheat is one of
the most important sources of protein and carbohydrate in the human diet. The Hub, which will
be established at The University of Adelaide, will bring together the Australian Centre for Plant
Functional Genomics (ACPFG) and the Grains Research and Development Corporation as well
as wheat breeding companies to deliver advanced technologies, breeding material and
information to produce new varieties of wheat that are tolerant to stressful environments.
Hub Director, Associate Professor Sigrid Heuer says the Hub has been awarded at an ideal time
to take advantage of a decade of work by ACPFG. ‘This is really wrapping up many years of
research and trying to put it into practice now. A lot of work went into developing heat and
drought tolerance, and we feel we have a lot to pass on to the breeders already.’
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Photo: Professor Kevin Galvin, Director of the Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian
Iron Ore with a Reflux Gravitron for beneficiating fine particles.
Photo: The Executive members of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over
the Life Course, July 2014: (L to R) Professor Janeen Baxter, Professor Mark Western,
Professor Deborah Cobb-Clark and Professor Stephen Zubrick.
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LINKAGE RESEARCH COMMENCING IN 2013–14, ARC
CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE
ARC Centres of Excellence are prestigious foci of expertise through which high-quality
researchers collaboratively maintain and develop Australia’s international standing in
research areas of national priority. The centres involve significant collaboration which
allows the complementary research resources of universities, publicly funded research
organisations, other research bodies, governments and businesses to be concentrated
and support outstanding research.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course
Family background plays a central role in determining the adult outcomes of young people in
Australia. Social disadvantage concentrates in low income communities and specific subgroups
of the population, and is highly likely to reproduce in families across generations. The growing
divide between high and low income earners has become a crucial factor determining life
chances, and is one of the top risks facing Australia over the next few decades, as social
disadvantage has far-reaching human, social and economic costs.
It is in this context that the new ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life
Course (Life Course Centre) has emerged. Centre Director Professor Janeen Baxter states ‘It is
essential that we understand how such disadvantage is produced and reproduced in
contemporary Australia. The Life Course Centre aims to further existing knowledge about the
mechanisms driving social disadvantage in Australia and gather necessary research evidence to
guide and inform future policies aimed at preventing its emergence and transmission.’
ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision
Robots cannot currently understand their environment using the sense of vision and it is this
missing capability that currently prevents robots from performing useful tasks in the complex,
unstructured and dynamically changing environments in which we live and work. The ARC
Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision will deliver the breakthrough science and technologies to
create a new generation of robots that can visually sense and understand complex and
unstructured real-world environments. Robotic automation has transformed manufacturing,
household cleaning and will soon transform the car. The work of this Centre will increase the
application of technology in agriculture, smart manufacturing, construction and remote inspection
and monitoring.
Professor Peter Corke, the Centre Director explains, ‘The technology to build the mechanical
vehicles and robotic devices for these applications is available. The remaining technological
roadblock is the ability to perceive and thereby adapt to the environment, and to seamlessly
integrate perception with action.’
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CHAPTER 6 EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH
FOR AUSTRALIA
Stephanie Villeneuve, a research associate at the National Centre for Groundwater Research
and Training, is measuring water quality.
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DESCRIPTION
Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) evaluates the quality of the research conducted at
Australian universities in all research disciplines (including medical and health sciences).
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ERA aims to improve research outcomes by identifying universities and disciplines that are
internationally competitive and highlighting areas where there are opportunities for further
development and investment. Specifically, ERA aims to:
administer an evaluation framework that gives Government, industry, business and the wider
community assurance of the excellence of research conducted in Australia’s higher
education institutions
provide a national overview of areas of research strength and areas where there may be
opportunity for development
allow for comparisons of Australia’s research nationally and internationally for all disciplines
offered in Australian higher education institutions
allow for comparisons of Australia’s research effort over time.
ERA is an ongoing Australian Government program. The ARC conducted a trial in 2009 and has
now completed two full rounds of evaluation in 2010 and 2012. In December 2012, the previous
government announced a further round of ERA would be conducted in 2015.
Influences on performance in 2013–14
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Key ERA Program developments during 2013–14 included:
the ongoing program of consultation with relevant stakeholders, primarily universities
the continued focus on improving ERA processes for ERA 2015.
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SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE
2013–14 performance is summarised in Table 6.1.
Table 6.1: Excellence in Research for Australia, performance summary
PERFORMANCE
PAGE
Preparation for the ERA 2015 evaluation
Achieved
87
Provide ongoing policy advice on broader research matters
related to the measurement of research quality
Achieved
87
Contribution to best practice evaluation of Australia’s
research investment in universities
Target met
89
ERA results continue to inform other higher education
research policy initiatives
Target met
90
Universities continue to engage with the ARC about
changes to ERA for the next evaluation
Target met
90
Deliverables
Key performance indicators
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DELIVERABLES
Through ERA the ARC delivers a national evaluation of the quality of research undertaken in
Australia’s universities. As ERA evaluations are conducted periodically, deliverables are specific
to each year. The 2013–14 deliverables reflect the preparatory phase for the 2015 round of ERA.
Table 6.2: Excellence in Research for Australia, deliverables
DELIVERABLE
RESULT
Preparation for the ERA 2015 evaluation
Preparations for ERA 2015 are well advanced
and key milestones have been met.
Provide ongoing policy advice on broader
research matters related to the measurement
of research quality
The ARC has provided ongoing policy advice
to a range of government stakeholders on
issues related to the ERA process and
outcomes.
Preparation for the ERA 2015 evaluation
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In 2013–14 the ARC undertook an extensive review of ERA 2012 and consulted with the
university sector to prepare for ERA 2015. Two major public consultations were undertaken
in 2013–14 on the:
draft ERA 2015 Submission Documentation, including an outline of key proposed changes
for ERA 2015.
draft ERA 2015 Journal and Conference Lists, defining which outlets are scholarly, peer
reviewed, publish original research and are eligible for ERA 2015 submissions.
No ERA Research Evaluation Committees were convened in 2013–14, but preparations for the
recruitment of committee members for ERA 2015 commenced.
Policy advice
During 2013–14 the ARC used ERA information to provide ongoing policy advice to government,
including to the Department of Education, the Department of Industry, the Chief Scientist and
other government stakeholders.
The results from ERA 2010 and ERA 2012 provide detailed information about the research
landscape in the Australian university sector. Data on research outputs (including books, journal
articles, conference papers and other non-traditional research outputs) submitted for ERA cover
a six year reference period.
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OBJECTIVE—TO IMPROVE RESEARCH OUTCOMES
BY IDENTIFYING UNIVERSITIES AND DISCIPLINES
THAT ARE INTERNATIONALLY COMPETITIVE
Description
ERA collects a wide variety of indicators for evaluating research quality, research application and
esteem measures. Outcomes of each ERA round are published in a national report. In addition
to the national report, the ARC uses data collected through ERA to analyse research activity
relating to specific areas of research.
The evaluations are conducted by ERA Research Evaluation Committees. The committees
comprise distinguished and internationally-recognised researchers with expertise in research
evaluation. Their judgements are informed by a range of indicators as well as more traditional
measures of quality, such as citation analysis and peer review.
Committees are responsible for determining the rating given for each discipline in Australia’s
higher education institutions. Committees use the ERA information to determine ratings for a unit
of evaluation (UoE). A UoE is a discipline area within a university.
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The ERA rating scale is from 1 to 5, where:
a rating of 1 is for research that is well below world standard
a rating of 2 is for research that is below world standard
a rating of 3 is for research that is at world standard
a rating of 4 is for research that is above world standard
a rating of 5 is for research that is well above world standard.
ERA methodology requires universities to submit comprehensive information about their
research activities, including: information about staff; research publications; awards; grants;
patents; and commercial income. Using the information provided, committees of internationally
recognised experts make judgements about the quality of Australian research relative to world
standards. Reports of previous ERA rounds have provided assurance about the quality of
Australian university research against world benchmarks.
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Performance
Key Performance Indicator 1: Contribution to best practice evaluation of Australia’s
research investment in universities (KPI 3.1 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 1
EVIDENCE OF CONTRIBUTION TO BEST PRACTICE
EVALUATION OF RESEARCH INVESTMENT
Target
Examples of contribution to best practice
Result
Achieved
TARGET MET
To ensure that ERA 2015 is conducted as a best practice evaluation of university research,
during 2013–14 the ARC undertook extensive preparation and consultations with the sector.
The previous ERA rounds, conducted by the ARC in 2010 and 2012, used sophisticated
methodology to determine ratings given to the Unit of Evaluation in each university. As outlined
in the description, committees of internationally recognised experts used information derived
from citation analysis or peer review to make their judgements. The robustness of the ERA
methodology used in ERA 2010 and ERA 2012 has been recognised internationally. An
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) report noted that ERA’s use
of expert review informed by metrics to evaluate quality and promote excellence in research was
‘state of the art’ (Performance-based Funding for Public Research in Tertiary Education
Institutions, OECD 2010).
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To prepare for ERA 2015, the ARC built on the methods used in ERA 2010 and ERA 2012.
Preparations undertaken by the ARC in 2013–14 were aimed at ensuring the ERA framework
continues to be consistently applied. For example, to allow for comparison of 2015 results to
previous rounds, the ARC has ensured:
the length of the reference periods applied to research outputs and other indicators will be
consistent with ERA 2012 and ERA 2010
key data and evaluation methodologies will be consistently applied across ERA rounds.
In addition, the ARC identified possible improvements following further internal analysis and
sector consultation. Possible improvements canvased included:
reintroducing conference list (no ranking)
introducing a book publisher list (for data streamlining and collection only)
including a new research output type: Research Report for an External Body
requesting gender data (not for evaluation)
Open access repository (not for evaluation)
requiring that peer review research outputs must be in an ERA repository
changing staff eligibility to 0.4 full-time equivalent (FTE) or less (publication association
required)
conducting a conference citation trial (for selected fields of research only)
providing a peer review dashboard to participating organisations.
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Key Performance Indicator 2: ERA results continue to inform other higher education
research policy initiatives (KPI 3.2 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 2
EVIDENCE OF IMPACT OF POLICY ADVICE IN HIGHER
EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS AND ACROSS GOVERNMENT
Target
Examples of impact of policy advice and an improved capacity
for the ARC to contribute to the national innovation agenda
Result
Achieved
TARGET MET
In 2013–14 ERA information was used to provide advice to the government on a range of
university research related issues and inform higher education research funding.
For example, ERA 2012 results were used by the Sustainable Research Excellence in
Universities (SRE) scheme to moderate the SRE Threshold 2 funding to universities for 2014.
The SRE scheme, administered by the Department of Education, provides block grants on a
calendar year basis to eligible higher education providers to assist with the indirect cost of
research activities. More information about the SRE scheme is available on the Department of
Education website.
Key Performance Indicator 3: Universities continue to engage with the ARC about
changes to ERA for the next evaluation (KPI 3.3 in ARC strategic plan)
MEASURE 3
SECTOR CONSULTATION CONTRIBUTES TOWARDS FUTURE
DEVELOPMENT OF ERA PROCESSES AND POLICY FOR ERA
2015
Target
Improved process and policy for ERA 2015
Result
Achieved
TARGET MET
During 2013–14 the ARC received extensive input from stakeholders during public consultations
on draft documentation for ERA 2015.
The ARC invited comment on the draft ERA 2015 Submission Documentation, which included an
outline of key proposed changes for ERA 2015. The draft Submission Documentation underwent
public consultation from 10 January to 14 February 2014. The ARC received 72 responses to the
draft ERA 2015 Submission Documentation consultation. A range of stakeholders provided
responses including: universities; peak bodies; discipline groups; other organisations and
individuals. Of the 72 responses, 35 were from the universities who participate in ERA,
representing the majority of the university sector (35 out of 41 ERA eligible institutions).
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Between 3 February and 21 March 2014 the ARC invited comment on the Draft ERA 2015
Journal List and Conference List. The journal and conference lists form an integral part of the
ERA submission process, defining outlets that are scholarly; peer-reviewed; publish original
research; and which are eligible for ERA 2015 submissions. For the Draft ERA 2015 Journal List
and the Draft ERA 2015 Conference List consultations, the ARC received: 6557 journal
comments; 2896 new journal recommendations; 813 conference comments; and 1501 new
conference series recommendations.
Additional consultation with university sector stakeholders was undertaken by the ARC to
determine which journals and conferences met the eligibility criteria for inclusion in ERA 2015
lists.
Universities, individual academics, discipline groups and peak bodies provided a range of
feedback and suggestions during the two consultations. More than 3000 users registered to
provide feedback on the journal and conference lists.
The ARC’s strong commitment to consult with stakeholders to inform the ERA 2015 evaluation
process constructively engaged stakeholders with proposed changes to submission
requirements and resulted in the ARC receiving extensive and on-going input to the draft
documentation.
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Professor Peter Taylor (L) and Professor Lloyd Hollenberg (R), Australian Laureate Fellows at
The University of Melbourne.Photo courtesy of Peter Casamento.
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PART 3 MANAGEMENT AND
ACCOUNTABILITY
CHAPTER 7:
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
94
A statement of the structures and processes the ARC has in place to
implement the principles and objectives of corporate governance
CHAPTER 8:
EXTERNAL SCRUTINY
113
Information on developments in external scrutiny and other mandatory
reporting requirements
CHAPTER 9:
PEOPLE MANAGEMENT
118
An assessment of the ARC’s effectiveness in managing and developing its
staff to achieve its objectives
CHAPTER 10: PURCHASING, CONSULTANTS AND ASSET
MANAGEMENT
An assessment of the ARC’s performance in relation to
consultants and assets management
125
purchasing, use of
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CHAPTER 7 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Professor Vaughan Macefield (L) and Professor Kenny Kwok (R), University of Western Sydney,
are investigating human comfort and performance in tall buildings. Photo courtesy of Sally
Tsoutas.
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DESCRIPTION
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In 2013–14 the ARC continued to maintain a robust corporate government framework to
support delivery of its program. Key elements of the framework included:
a well defined governance structure
comprehensive planning and reporting arrangements
well development arrangements for monitoring financial and service delivery
sound risk management practices
strong framework of standards for ethical conduct
commitment to engage stakeholders where appropriate
monitoring of performance against service charter and complaints.
GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE
Portfolio
Under the amended Administrative Arrangements Order issued by the Governor-General on 18
September 2013, the ARC was appointed to the Education portfolio. The Hon Christopher Pyne
MP (the Minister) was appointed Minister for Education. Prior to the amendment, the ARC was
part of the Industry portfolio.
Legislation
The ARC is established as an independent body under the Australian Research Council Act
2001 (ARC Act). In 2013–14 the ARC was also a prescribed agency under the Financial
Management and Accountability Act 1997 and subject to the Public Service Act 1999.
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Under the ARC Act, the Minister has a range of powers including approving the ARC’s
strategic plan, funding rules and proposals for expenditure under the National Competitive
Grants Program (NCGP). The Minister also has the power to:
establish designated committees to assist in carrying out the functions of the Chief Executive
Officer (CEO)
direct the CEO about the performance of the CEO’s functions
provide notification of the general policies of the Australian Government that are to apply to
the ARC or its components (that is, the ARC committees and staff).
There were no Ministerial directions issued to the ARC during 2013–14. The Minister wrote to
the CEO in April 2014 about his expectations of the ARC in relation to the Government’s
deregulation agenda. Information about the ARC’s contribution to the Government’s deregulation
agenda is provided on the page 97.
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Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013
The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) received Royal
Assent on 29 June 2013 and came into effect on 1 July 2014. The PGPA Act aims to establish a
coherent approach to the use and management of public resources and support greater
efficiencies for Commonwealth entities.
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It is based on the following principles:
government should operate as a coherent whole
a uniform set of duties should apply to all resources handled by Commonwealth entities
performance of the public sector is more than financial
engaging with risk is a necessary step in improving performance.
From 1 July 2014 Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act) agencies and
Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act) bodies will be governed by the
PGPA Act. Consequent changes required of agencies, include: updating the sources of authority
in internal controls and financial delegations; ensuring risks are actively managed through
effective internal systems and controls; and complying with general duties that apply to all
officials. The PGPA Act will be supported by rules and guidance to assist Commonwealth
entities to manage public resources. Some rules and guidelines, such as the property framework
and financial reporting, will not change immediately but others, such as the procurement
framework, the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and the Commonwealth Grants Rules and
Guidelines changed in early July 2014.
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In 2013–14 the ARC commenced preparations for the transition from the FMA Act to the
PGPA Act by:
attending Whole of Australian Government meetings and forums on the implementation of
the PGPA Act and keeping abreast of the information on the Public Management Reform
Agenda website
reviewing and identifying changes required to terminology, internal controls and
documentation, including the Audit Committee Charter, Financial Delegations, Chief
Executive’s Instructions (CEIs) and the ARC’s standard contract templates, as well as
policies and procedures regarding risk management, fraud control, travel, hospitality, the use
of corporate credit cards and conflict of interest
promoting awareness of the changes to staff including via regular updates in all staff
communications and in the ARC’s internal newsletter, an intranet page dedicated to the
introduction, the display of PGPA Act implementation posters throughout the ARC.
The ARC will continue to review and update internal controls and its policy and procedure
documents in 2014–15 in line with the approval and release of the final set of PGPA Rules and
Model Accountable Authority Instructions and any further guidance, as it becomes available.
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ARC contribution to the government’s deregulation agenda
The Government’s deregulation agenda aims to reduce unnecessary red tape costs on
individuals, businesses and community organisations. It applies to any mandatory obligations
imposed by legislation, regulations, or quasi regulations. This includes statutory instruments,
standards, codes of practice, or any other aspect of regulator behaviour that has a measurable
cost burden on business or individuals.
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Elements of the Government’s Deregulation Agenda include:
a committment to cutting the burden of red and green tape by a net $1 billion a year
the establishment of Deregulation Units in each portfolio to implement the deregulation
agenda
the conduct of audits of the regulatory footprint within each portfolio.
Implementation of the Government’s deregulation agenda across the whole of government is
coordinated by the Office of Deregulation, within the Department of the Prime Minister and
Cabinet.
Letter of expectations
The Minister wrote to the CEO in April 2014 about his expectations of the ARC in relation to the
Government’s deregulation agenda. These were that the ARC would actively minimise the
regulatory burden on the research sector by: being transparent and accountable in decision
making, maximising clarity and transparency in approaches, processes and communication, and
taking a risk based approach to compliance where appropriate.
Government-wide stocktake and audit of regulations
The ARC is contributing to the government-wide stocktake and audit of regulations. In 2013–14,
as part of Phase 1 of this process, the ARC identified all regulations administered under its
programs, their estimated compliance requirements and opportunities for reform. The overall
regulatory burden of these programs was assessed independently as being medium.
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Senior staff responsibilities
Executive staff
Professor Aidan Byrne, Chief Executive Officer
The CEO has the following functions under the ARC Act: to make recommendations to the
Minister on which proposals should be approved for funding; to administer the financial
assistance for research provided through the NCGP; to provide advice to the Minister on
research matters; any other functions conferred on the CEO by this or any other Act.
Professor Byrne also has statutory responsibilities for managing and leading the agency in
accordance with the requirements of relevant legislation.
Ms Leanne Harvey, Executive General Manager
The Executive General Manager (EGM) is responsible for the Research Excellence Branch and
the Corporate Services Branch. The Research Excellence Branch comprises three sections:
Program Evaluation; Research Analysis; and Research Evaluation. The branch administers
Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) and undertakes program evaluation. The Corporate
Services Branch comprises four sections: Finance; Legal Services; People and Services; and
Stakeholder Relations and Parliamentary. The branch undertakes finance and legal functions;
people management; property and facilities management; delivery of corporate communications,
media relations and publications activities; and ministerial and parliamentary liaison.
Dr Terry Bowditch, BRANCH Manager, Strategy Branch
The Branch Manager, Strategy Branch is responsible for the Policy and Governance and Policy
and Integrity sections of the ARC. The Strategy Branch undertakes policy development and
advice; coordinates the agency’s strategic and operational planning and performance reporting;
NCGP data analysis; secretariat support to the ARC Advisory Council, Australian Research
Integrity Committee and ARC Audit Committee; and coordination of ARC’s risk management and
internal audit activities.
Dr Fiona Cameron, Executive Director, Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Dr Cameron is responsible for oversight of the ARC Centres of Excellence, Industrial Research
Transformation Research Program and Linkage Projects funding schemes. In addition, she has
particular responsibility for discipline activities in biological sciences and biotechnology.
Professor Denise Meredyth, Executive Director, Humanities and Creative Arts
Professor Meredyth is responsible for oversight of the Australian Laureate Fellowships funding
scheme. In addition she has particular responsibility for discipline activities in the humanities and
creative arts.
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Professor Marian Simms, Executive Director, Social, Behavioural and Economic Sciences
Professor Simms is responsible for oversight of the Discovery Indigenous and Discovery
Projects funding schemes. In addition she has particular responsibility for discipline activities in
the social, behavioural and economic sciences.
Professor Brian Yates, Executive Director, Engineering, Mathematics and Information Sciences
Professor Yates is responsible for oversight of the Discovery Early Career Researcher Award,
Future Fellowships and Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities funding schemes. In
addition he has particular responsibility for discipline activities in engineering, mathematics
and information sciences.
Senior staff
Dr Laura Dan, Chief Program Officer
The Chief Program Officer is responsible for the three sections of the Programs Branch:
Discovery, Linkage and Program Partnerships. The Programs Branch administers the funding
schemes of the NCGP, including activities at all stages of the grants process, from application
through to post award.
Ms Julija Deleva, Chief Financial Officer
The Chief Financial Officer is responsible for delivery of ARC financial functions including
ensuring the application of relevant Australian Government financial standards, preparation of
annual financial accounts and statements, purchasing, tendering, and compliance and
delegations.
Ms Trish Leahey, Chief Information Officer
The Chief Information Officer is responsible for the two sections of the Information and
Communications Technology (ICT) Services Branch: Applications and Operations. The ICT
Services Branch is responsible for the development and ongoing maintenance of in-house ICT
applications supporting delivery of the NCGP and ERA, as well as other ICT functions.
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Committees
The ARC has a number of governance committees and a number of committees that assist with
the delivery of the NCGP and ERA. Committee membership information is provided in Part 5,
Appendix 4.
Governance
ARC Advisory Council
Under section 4 of the ARC Act, the Minister may establish a committee or committees to assist
in carrying out the functions of the CEO. The ARC Advisory Council is the ARC’s only
designated committee. It is established to provide advice to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
about strategic issues relating to the mission of the ARC, including: strategic planning; policy
matters relating to innovation, research and research training; and matters relating to the
evaluation of the quality and outcomes of research and research training in an international
context.
The council comprises up to ten members, including the CEO who chairs the council. Members
are appointed by the Minister for periods of up to three years, based on their distinguished
research records or achievements in business, research and development. The collective
expertise of the council spans a broad range of research and stakeholder knowledge.
During 2013–14 the council met on three occasions. The members discussed and provided
advice on a range of issues, including: development of the ARC strategic plan; NCGP
requirements; ERA processes; and ARC policies (for example, open access).
ARC Advisory Council members: (Back L to R) Professor Peter Buckskin, Professor Aidan
Byrne, Professor Suzanne Miller, Professor Attila Brungs, Professor Stephen Garton. (Front L to
R) Dr Leigh Farrell, Professor Sandra Harding, Professor Sue Thomas, Professor Paul Johnson.
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Audit Committee
The ARC Audit Committee provides the CEO with independent assurance on the risk, control
and compliance framework of the ARC under the FMA Act and undertakes financial statement
responsibilities. It also provides a forum for communication between the CEO, senior staff and
the Auditor-General. During 2013–14 the committee met five times.
Senior Management Group
The Senior Management Group (SMG) provides advice and direction on strategic and
operational issues and coordinates activities across the agency. SMG comprises the CEO;
EGM; Branch Manager, Strategy; Chief Financial Officer, Chief Information Officer and Chief
Program Officer. SMG meetings are scheduled fortnightly. Observers may be invited to assist
the committee on matters under consideration.
Other committees
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Other governance committees in place as at 30 June 2014 included:
ARC Security Committee
Business Continuity Plan Committee
DELTA Project Board
ICT Change Control Committee
ICT Governance Committee
People Management and Development Committee
Salary Review Committee
Work Health and Safety Committee.
National Competitive Grants Program
ARC College of Experts
The ARC College of Experts plays a fundamental role in identifying research excellence,
moderating external assessments and recommending fundable proposals. Members also help
recruit and assign assessors, and implement peer review reforms in established and emerging
disciplines as well as interdisciplinary areas. The members are appointed by the CEO across
five discipline groups for up to three years.
Meetings of the ARC College of Experts are convened during the year depending on scheme
requirements. Generally, larger multi-panel meetings are held in April/May and
August/September each year, while smaller interdisciplinary sub-group meetings may be
convened at the ARC or online at other times.
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In November 2013, following a competitive selection process, the ARC appointed 51 new
members to the ARC College of Experts to participate in deliberations for 2014 onwards. When
appointing new members, the ARC considered the expanding research areas of grant proposals,
gender balance, institutional affiliations and state/territory representation.
The 2014 ARC College of Experts comprises 158 experts of international standing drawn from
the Australian research community—from higher education, industry and public sector research
organisations.
Appeals Committee
The ARC Appeals Committee considers appeals submitted to the ARC in relation to the NCGP.
For each appeal, the committee determines if there was an administrative error related to a
selection process that has adversely affected the proposal. The committee then makes a
recommendation to the CEO about whether the appeal should be upheld or dismissed. The
committee also provides general advice to the ARC in relation to how administrative processes
could be modified or improved. The committee consists of external members appointed by the
CEO.
In 2013–14 the committee met twice to consider nine appeals received by the ARC in relation to
NCGP proposals across the Discovery Projects, Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities
and Linkage Projects schemes. Of these, one appeal was upheld.
Scrutiny Committee
The ARC Scrutiny Committee scrutinises the probity of ARC assessment processes in relation to
funding proposals involving members of the ARC College of Experts and/or ARC staff. On
completion of the process, the committee reports its findings and recommendations to the CEO.
The committee consists of external members appointed by the CEO annually. The committee
met once during 2013–14.
Selection Advisory Committees
The ARC convenes Selection Advisory Committees (SACs), comprising a group of experts
appointed to assist the ARC to evaluate proposals and provide recommendations for funding,
under some ARC schemes. In 2013–14 SACs assessed proposals for funding under the
Australian Laureate Fellowships; ARC Centres of Excellence; Special Research Initiatives,
Learned Academies Special Projects and Industrial Transformation Research Program
schemes.
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Excellence in Research for Australia
The ARC establishes ERA Research Evaluation Committees (RECs) to evaluate research at
Australian higher education institutions by discipline. The committees comprise distinguished
and internationally-recognised researchers with expertise in research evaluation. No ERA RECs
were convened in 2013–14 as it was not an evaluation year.
Australian Research Integrity Committee
The ARC and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) established the
Australian Research Integrity Committee (ARIC) in February 2011. ARIC is comprised of four
expert members and reports to both the ARC and the NHMRC. The committee reviews the
processes by which a university has managed an allegation of research misconduct.
ARIC’s role in reviewing institutional processes in response to allegations of research
misconduct ensures institutions observe proper process in their investigations. In doing so, ARIC
contributes to public confidence regarding the integrity of Australia’s research effort. ARIC review
whether an institution’s investigation of allegations of research misconduct is consistent with the
Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007) and the institution’s own
policies and procedures.
The ARC provides secretariat support for ARIC matters relevant to ARC-funded research.
An important component of the ARC’s involvement is to create an awareness of ARIC and
its responsibilities.
In 2013–14 members of the ARIC were jointly reappointed by the CEO’s of the ARC and
NHMRC for a second three-year term. Members included: Mr Ron Brent (Chair); Dr Kerry Breen;
Ms Julie Hamblin; and Emeritus Professor Sheila Shaver.
During 2013–14 the ARC received two requests for review to be undertaken by ARIC. ARIC
provides findings and, where relevant, recommendations to the CEO of the ARC. Annual, deidentified reports are also provided to the CEO on all activities of the committee. Details of ARIC
investigations are not made publicly available.
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PLANNING AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS
Strategic plan
The ARC Act requires the CEO to prepare a strategic plan each year that sets out the goals,
priorities, policies and strategies to be adopted by the ARC to achieve its objectives. The
strategic plan includes performance indicators which will be used to evaluate the ARC’s
performance in meeting its objectives in the following year.
The ARC Strategic Plan for 2013–14 to 2015–16 was tabled in The Parliament of Australia on
25 June 2013. The plan comprised three program goals based on the Discovery, Linkage and
Excellence in Research for Australia programs; and included four enabling goals based on the
provision of high quality advice to the Australian Government, effective engagement with
national and international stakeholders, efficient and effective program delivery and improving
organisational capability.
Operational plan
Every year the ARC prepares an internal operational plan to support the strategic plan. The ARC
Operational Plan 2013–14 details the actions undertaken by the ARC to address the objectives
and priorities outlined in the strategic plan. Each section of the ARC provides input into the
operational plan and a progress report is produced quarterly to monitor progress of the actions,
and provided to SMG for endorsement.
Portfolio Budget Statements
The Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) are used to inform Senators and Members of Parliament
of the proposed allocation of resources to Australian Government outcomes by agencies within
the portfolio. In 2013–14 the ARC was included as a separate agency within the Portfolio Budget
Statements 2013–14, Budget Related Paper No. 1.12, Industry, Innovation, Climate Change,
Science, Research and Tertiary Education Portfolio.
Annual report
The annual report is the main instrument through which the ARC reports to the Parliament of
Australia (Parliament). In accordance with the ARC Act, at the end of each financial year the
CEO prepares an annual report. The annual report provides an overview of the ARC’s activities
and performance against the performance indicators in the strategic plan and the PBS for that
year.
The annual report must meet the requirements set out in the Requirements for Annual Reports,
and be tabled in Parliament in accordance with the Guidelines for the Presentation of
documents to the Parliament, each published by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.
The ARC Annual Report 2012–13 was tabled in Parliament on 24 October 2013.
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ARRANGEMENTS FOR MONITORING FINANCIAL
AND SERVICE DELIVERY
Internal audit
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Internal audit is an integral part of the ARC’s corporate governance framework. The internal
audit function provides an independent and objective review and advisory service to:
provide assurance to the CEO that the ARC’s financial and operational controls (designed to
manage the organisation’s risks and achieve the ARC’s objectives) are operating in an
efficient, effective, economical and ethical manner
assist management in improving the ARC’s business performance.
The Head, Internal Audit is responsible for providing the CEO with the assurance that the ARC’s
internal audit functions are efficient and effective. In 2013–14 the Branch Manager, Strategy
Branch was the Head, Internal Audit and KPMG was the ARC’s internal auditor. The internal
auditor reports to the Audit Committee through the Head, Internal Audit.
The internal auditor developed the Annual Internal Audit Work Plan 2013–14 in consultation with
the Head, Internal Audit, ARC Executive and senior staff, the Audit Committee and the CEO. In
accordance with the plan, the internal auditor completed audits on the ARC’s risk management
framework, protective security policy framework and Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
scheme. The auditor also carried out a business disruption health check. A planned audit to
review the CEIs and FMA compliance was postponed until 2014–15 to accommodate changes
from the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The Audit Committee
monitored the implementation of agreed recommendations from the audits.
Institutional reviews
During 2013–14 the ARC undertook two institutional reviews. The objective of the reviews was to
monitor and evaluate universities’ compliance with ARC funding agreement requirements. As
part of the reviews, discussions were held with key stakeholders and analysis and testing was
performed on the universities’ internal accounting and research grant administration frameworks.
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SOUND RISK MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
Risk management framework
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The ARC manages risk in accordance with the Australian/New Zealand Standard for Risk
Management (AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009). The ARC risk management framework is designed
to minimise the possibility of loss or damage to operations, staff, property, reputation and
assets, while recognising opportunities to meet the stated objectives of the organisation
within a good corporate governance framework. Key components of the ARC’s risk
management framework include:
a risk management policy
risk management plan and toolkit
annual reviews of strategic risks and six-monthly reviews of operational risks
a network of risk champions.
The ARC participated in the 2014 Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Program and
recorded an improvement on its previous years overall score. Results from the survey indicated
that the ARC’s risk management framework had made improvements in the areas of integration,
positive risk culture, and risk management policies and objectives.
During 2013–14 the ARC’s internal auditor reviewed the ARC’s risk management framework.
The auditors found the framework to be consistent with better practice and noted that the ARC
had a positive risk culture with a relatively mature risk environment. This review, along with the
ARC’s results in the Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Program, informed the
development of an updated risk management policy and plan in June 2014.
Fraud control
During 2013–14 the ARC reviewed and updated its Fraud Risk Assessment Summary and its
Fraud Control Plan. The CEO has certified within the Letter of Transmittal (page iii) that the ARC
has complied with the requirements of the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.
Business continuity and disaster recovery
The ARC reviewed and updated its Business Continuity Plan on May 2014 taking into account
recommendations arising from an internal audit conducted during the year. The ARC tested its
preparedness to respond to a business interruption event through two actual events: a planned
interruption of ICT services for a cabling relocation of the Intra Government Communications
Network (ICON); and an unplanned event resulting in a failover event. These events were
sufficient to evaluate business continuity and disaster recovery plans—they provided the
ARC with assurance of both the impact of disaster scenarios and the procedures required to reestablish services.
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INFORMED AND APPROPRIATE RISK TAKING
During 2013–14 the ARC continued to foster informed and appropriate risk taking through
a clear framework of accountability and responsibility.
Throughout 2013–14 the ARC adhered to its risk management framework and made further
improvements to its risk management capabilities. The ARC undertook regular reviews to
monitor the agency’s risks and continued to raise awareness and understanding of risk
management across the agency. The ARC’s actions provided the CEO with assurance that the
ARC is following best practice in minimising the potential for loss or damage.
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ARC risk management activities included identification, review and implementation of risk
treatments for:
operational risks—conducted by all business groups in July 2013 and January 2014
agency strategic risks—conducted by senior management in May 2014.
Following an internal audit of the ARC’s Risk Management Framework in January 2014, the
ARC updated its Risk Management Plan to include greater guidance to staff on risk treatment
strategies, and revised risk appetite levels to be more practical.
The ARC’s ongoing commitment to improving its risk management practices was reflected in the
improved overall score achieved by the ARC in the 2014 Comcover Risk Management
Benchmarking Program. Improvements made to the ARC’s risk management processes in
2013–14 included increased alignment of planning and risk activities, as well as the
measurement of risks at the inherent level.
In 2013–14 the ARC continued to foster a positive attitude to the management of risk across the
agency by encouraging staff to attend risk management training courses, communicating risk
management requirements on the ARC’s intranet, and including risk management as part of
induction training. The agency’s positive risk management culture was recognised by an internal
audit, which provided validation and recognition of the work done during 2013–14.
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STANDARDS FOR ETHICAL CONDUCT
Staff
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ARC Executive and senior staff are committed to high ethical standards. This commitment is
promoted through:
the ARC Strategic Plan for 2013–14 to 2015–16 which includes among its guiding principles:
‘accountability through adherence to ethical standards’
the incorporation of ethical standards into ARC governance policies and guidelines
the incorporation of the ARC values into performance agreements
an ARC intranet site to promote ethical behaviour and the Australian Public Service
Commission (APSC) Ethics Advisory Service
an ARC Ethics Contact Officer.
The ARC includes an overview and discussion of the Australian Public Service (APS) Values
and Code of Conduct as part of induction training for new appointees. Copies of the values and
the code are provided to new appointees, who are required to acknowledge that they understand
and adopt these before their appointments are finalised. Furthermore, biannual individual
performance reviews provide ongoing opportunities for staff and supervisors to address ethical
issues.
The State of the Service Report 2012–2013, published by the APSC in December 2013,
reported 84 per cent of ARC staff believed that ARC senior executives act in accordance with
the APS values, compared to 69 per cent APS wide.
ARC-funded researchers
ARC funding rules and funding agreements
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The NCGP funding rules clearly state the ethical compliance requirements for ARC-funded
researchers. All ARC-funded research projects must conform to the principles outlined in the
Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007). Where applicable, ARCfunded research projects must also conform with the:
National Principles of Intellectual Property Management for Publicly Funded Research
(published on the ARC website)
National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007)
NHMRC Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Health Research (2003)
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Guidelines for Ethical
Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (2011)
Australian Code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes (2013).
Funding agreements between the ARC and any organisation in receipt of ARC funding also
require institutions to comply with the provisions of any relevant statutes, regulations, by-laws,
and requirements of any Commonwealth, State, Territory or local authority; and acknowledge
that Chapter 7 of the Criminal Code provides for offences which attract substantial penalties,
including theft of Commonwealth property and other property offences, obtaining property or
financial advantage by deception, offences involving fraudulent conduct, bribery, forgery and
falsification of documents.
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Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes (2013)
In July 2013, the NHMRC released the new edition of the Australian Code for the care and use
of animals for scientific purposes. The Code is endorsed by the ARC, Commonwealth Scientific
Industrial Research Organisation and Universities Australia. The new edition of the Code
provides information on the ethical, humane and responsible care and use of animals for
scientific purposes. It outlines the governing principles and ethical framework to guide the
decisions and actions of researchers and teachers involved and in all situations where animals
are used.
Research misconduct
The ARC Complaints Handling Policy and Procedures (2013) includes a formal process for
handling research misconduct allegations related to scientific fraud, ethical breaches and
research misconduct that is external to the ARC, but associated with research funded by the
ARC. If the ARC reasonably considers there is fraud, misleading or deceptive conduct on the
part of an organisation, or any specified personnel, associated with ARC funding, the ARC may
terminate a funding agreement and recover any or all funding associated with the breach. The
ARC may also consider imposing other sanctions.
The ARC Complaints Handling Policy and Procedures (2013) also outlines reporting processes
for ARC College members and assessors who discover a possible case of research misconduct
during the peer review of a proposal.
The ARC has a Research Misconduct Officer responsible for maintaining a register and
managing the investigation process for research misconduct allegations. Further information
about research misconduct allegations reported to the ARC is provided on page 112. The
Research Misconduct Officer may recommend that an allegation of research misconduct be
referred to ARIC if the case falls within the scope of ARIC. Further information about ARIC is
provided earlier in this chapter (see page 103).
ARC committee members and assessors
As a public research funding body, the ARC is required to maintain a high standard of
professionalism and ethical conduct in its operations. The ARC is committed to preserving public
confidence in the integrity, legitimacy, impartiality and fairness of its business, and in particular
its peer review process.
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Conflict of Interest
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All people carrying out ARC business, including ARC committee members and assessors,
are bound by the ARC Conflict of Interest and Confidentiality Policy (December 2013) which
requires that they:
observe the APS Values and Code of Conduct
act with integrity, objectivity, openness and honesty
be accountable for their decisions and actions
be subject to an appropriate level of scrutiny
provide assurances to the ARC that they will abide by the ARC confidentiality requirements
disclose any conflicts of interest related to their official duties.
The guidelines are made available to any relevant parties and are available on the ARC website.
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ENGAGEMENT OF STAKEHOLDERS
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In delivering its programs, the ARC engages with a diverse group of stakeholders with
differing expectations and interests. The ARC’s primary stakeholders are:
the Australian Parliament
institutions and researchers within the higher education sector
partner organisations—industry, government (international, Australian, state and local), notfor-profit organisations and international organisations
departments and agencies of the Australian Government
the Australian community.
Consultations
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The ARC undertook a number of stakeholder consultations during 2013–14 in relation to:
submission requirements for the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) 2015
streamlining NCGP application processes
ARC support for the research workforce.
In May and June 2014 ARC staff conducted a roadshow as part of the ARC’s project to
redevelop its ICT systems. The roadshow provided the opportunity for the ARC and the sector to
exchange ideas and experiences of the present system and identify possible areas of
improvement. The sessions were attended by Research office staff representing 29 universities.
Provision of information
ARC/NHMRC Research Administrators’ Seminar
The ARC, together with Australasian Research Management Society (ARMS) and the National
Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), holds an annual research administrators’
seminar. The ARC held the 2013 seminar on 25–26 November 2013 in Canberra. Approximately
300 people from 70 institutions attended the event. This event is important in providing
information to the sector about changes to NCGP funding schemes, ERA and a range of other
policy and program matters.
ARC Centre Directors’ Forum
The ARC hosted the Centre Directors’ Forum in Sydney, a one-day information and networking
event for Centre leaders and chief operations officers or delegates of ARC Centres of
Excellence; Industrial Transformation Research Hubs and Training Centres; Special Research
Initiatives; and Co-funded Centres. Eighty-eight delegates attended from across Australia.
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MONITORING PERFORMANCE AGAINST SERVICE
CHARTER AND COMPLAINTS
Client Service Charter
The ARC Client Service Charter, sets out the standards of service clients and stakeholders
should expect from the ARC and provides guidance for the process clients and stakeholders can
follow if they are dissatisfied with the level of service they have received. The charter is available
on the ARC website.
In 2013–14 the ARC received no complaints in relation to the client service charter mechanism.
Part 5, Appendix 5 provides details of the ARC’s performance against the service standards in
the charter.
Complaints handling
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The ARC Complaints Handling Policy and Procedures is published on the ARC website. This
policy aims to assist clients and stakeholders if they have:
a general complaint about the ARC
an appeal about the administrative processes of the National Competitive Grants Program
(NCGP)
research misconduct allegations relating to scientific fraud, ethical breaches and research
misconduct external to the ARC, but associated with ARC–funded research.
A report on appeals, general complaints and research misconduct allegation is provided to the
Senior Management Group every six months. In 2013–14 nine appeals about NCGP
administrative processes, one general complaint and five research misconduct allegations were
submitted to the ARC. Information about the outcomes of appeals submitted to the ARC is
provided on page 102.
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CHAPTER 8 EXTERNAL SCRUTINY
Dr Ross Smith, University of South Australia, is demonstrating his invention—the US Patented
Digital Foam Sensor.
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DESCRIPTION
As an agency of the Australian Government, the ARC is subject to external scrutiny by
Parliamentary Committees, the Australian National Audit Office and a number of other external
bodies. It is also subject to a range of reporting requirements through legislation and other
government policies. The mandatory reporting requirements which must be dealt with in annual
reports are addressed in this chapter.
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES
The ARC appeared before the Senate Economics Legislation Committee at estimates hearings
held in October 2013, February 2014 and June 2014.
The ARC responded to 32 Questions on Notice arising from these hearings. It also provided
input to 117 Questions on Notice directed to the ARC’s portfolio departments during 2013–14 —
the Department of Education and the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change,
Science, Research and Tertiary Education.
On 19 March 2014 the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee released its
report on annual reports for the agencies for which it is responsible (Annual reports—No. 1 of
2014). The committee reported that the ARC Annual Report 2012–13 was well presented and
easily navigated. The committee considered that the report fulfilled all requirements (as specified
under section 63 of the Public Service Act 1999, the Financial Management and Accountability
Act 1997 and the Australian Research Council Act 2001).
AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE
The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) audited the ARC’s annual financial statements for
the year ended 30 June 2014. The report for this audit can be found in Part 4, Chapter 12.
In 2013–14 the ARC provided input into phase one and two of the cross-agency audit Managing
Conflicts of Interests in FMA Agencies Audit Report No. 47 which was tabled by the ANAO on
23 June 2014. The ARC agreed to the one recommendation made by the report, that is, that
APS agencies as part of their normal enterprise wide risk reviews, should give specific attention
to conflicts of interest matters.
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The ARC also reviewed, and considered the recommendations made within a number of
relevant ANAO audit reports released during 2013–14, including:
Confidentiality in Government Contracts: Senate Order for Departmental and Agency
Contracts (Calendar Year 2012 Compliance), Audit Report No. 4 tabled on 26 September
2013
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Audits of the Financial Statements of Australian Government Entities (for the Period Ended
30 June 2013), Audit Report No. 13 tabled on 18 December 2013
Management of Complaints and Other Feedback, Audit Report No. 19 tabled on
12 February 2014
Pilot Project to Audit Key Performance Indicators, Audit Report No. 21 tabled on
27 February 2014
Indigenous Employment in Australian Government Entities, Audit Report No. 33 tabled on
29 May 2014
Implementation of ANAO Performance Audit Recommendations, Audit Report No. 34 tabled
on 29 May 2014
Interim Phase of the Audits of the Financial Statements of Major General Government Sector
Agencies for the year ending 30 June 2014, Audit Report No. 44 tabled on19 June 2014
The Management of Physical Security, Audit Report No. 49 tabled on 24 June 2014
Cyber Attacks: Securing Agencies’ ICT Systems, Audit Report No. 50 tabled on 24 June
2014
Establishment and Use of Multi Use Lists, Audit Report No. 54 tabled on 26 June 2014.
In 2013–14 the ANAO released two Better Practice Guides relevant to the ARC’s activities:
Implementation of Better Practice Grant Administration (December 2013)
Public Sector Governance: Strengthening performance through good governance
(June 2014).
OTHER EXTERNAL BODIES
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During 2013–14:
the Commonwealth Ombudsman’s Office did not initiate any investigations about ARC
business
the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commissioner did not refer any complaints to the
ARC
no complaints about the ARC were referred to the Federal Privacy Commissioner
the ARC received no claims under the Compensation for Detriment for Defective
Administration scheme (which allows people adversely affected by the maladministration of
an Australian Government agency to receive compensation when they have no legal redress)
there were no requests from the office of the Australian Information Commissioner to review
ARC freedom of information decisions.
There was one judicial decision involving the ARC under the Administrative Decisions (Judicial
Review) Act 1977 (which provides for judicial review of most administrative decisions made
under the Commonwealth enactments on grounds relating to legality, rather than merits, of
decisions). This matter did not result in any findings that have had, or may have a significant
effect on the agency’s operations.
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MANDATORY REPORTING IN ANNUAL REPORTS
Legislative requirements
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In accordance with specific legislative requirements, annual reports must include matters in
relation to:
work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011)
advertising and market research (section 311A, Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918)
ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (section 516A,
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)
compliance with the agency’s obligations under the Carer Recognition Act 2010.
Appendices 6, 7 and 8 respectively provide reports against the first three requirements above.
The ARC does not have any obligations with regard to the Carer Recognition Act 2010; that is, it
is not an agency as defined in the Public Service Act 1999 (PS Act) that is responsible for the
development, implementation, provision of evaluation of policies, programs or services directed
to carers or the persons for whom they care.
Other requirements
Grant programs
The ARC administers a number of research funding schemes under the NCGP. A full list of
these schemes is in Part 5, Appendices 1 and 2. Further information on the grants awarded by
the ARC during the period 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014 is available on the ARC website.
Disability reporting
Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as
policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability
Strategy. In 2007–08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public
Service Commission’s (APSC) State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin.
These reports are available on the APSC website <www.apsc.gov.au>. From 2010–11,
departments and agencies have no longer been required to report on these functions.
The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy
2010–2020, which sets out a ten year national policy framework to improve the lives of people
with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly
report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the Strategy and present a
picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these reports will be available in late
2014 on the Department of Social Services website <www.dss.gov.au>.
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Information Publication Scheme
Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish
information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is
in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8
statement in an annual report.
Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in
accordance with the IPS requirements. ARC information relating to the IPS and the FOI
disclosure log is published on the ARC website.
Correction of errors
Errors or omissions of fact that were identified in the ARC Annual Report 2012–13 are detailed in
Part 5, Appendix 9.
OTHER REPORTING
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–
–
The Annual Report guidelines note that reporting and analysis in an annual report, as a
document of record, is complementary to the ongoing availability of information through the
internet. A range of information on the ARC website is published in accordance with formal
reporting requirements including details of:
all grants awarded
freedom of information requests
agency contracts.
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CHAPTER 9 PEOPLE MANAGEMENT
Future Fellow, Dr Tariq Ezaz, University of Canberra, is holding a central bearded dragon. Photo
courtesy of Michelle McAulay.
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DESCRIPTION
In 2013–14 the ARC effectively managed and developed staff to achieve its objectives.
Strategies employed to assist in retaining skilled staff included:
–
–
–
–
–
workforce planning
flexible conditions of employment
access to training and development opportunities
safe and healthy work environment
development of supportive workplace culture (including good communication and rewards
and recognition).
STAFF STATISTICS
At 30 June 2014 (including the CEO):
–
–
–
–
–
the ARC had 119 staff—this has reduced from 125 in 2012–13
the largest number of staff were at Executive Level 1
96.6 per cent of total staff were ongoing employees
66 per cent of staff were female with the largest number of females employed at the APS 4–5
(ARC Level 2)
95.8 per cent of employees were employed under the Enterprise Agreement.
The ARC had less staff turnover in 2013–14, with 16 separations compared to 20 separations in
2012–13.
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–
Detailed staff statistics are provided in Part 5, Appendix 10, including:
ARC employees by classification level, full-time/part-time status, gender and employment
arrangements
staff separations by classification level and employment category.
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WORKFORCE PLANNING
The ARC undertakes a workforce planning exercise each year as part of internal budget
deliberations. In 2013–14 the priorities for 2014–15 and the resources required to meet those
priorities were determined using this process. In addition, various committees provided input to
ensure the needs of the organisation and its individuals were met. Being a small agency,
workforce planning at the ARC also includes staff rotations within the organisation, training,
knowledge management and succession planning.
EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS
During 2013–14 the ARC employed staff under a range of different arrangements including the
ARC Enterprise Agreement 2011–14, Australian Workplace Agreements, Individual Flexibility
Arrangements and Common Law Contracts.
Workplace arrangements
Non-SES staff
Enterprise agreement
The current ARC Enterprise Agreement expired on 30 June 2014. The Australian Government
Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy was released in March 2014. Consultation with staff
is currently underway in preparation for a new Enterprise Agreement.
Australian Workplace Agreements
At 30 June 2014, five non-Senior Executive Service (SES) staff continued to be covered by
Australian Workplace Agreements (AWAs). These AWAs were in place prior to the changes to
the Workplace Relations Act 1996, which stipulated that no new AWA may be entered into on or
after 13 February 2008.
Individual flexibility arrangements
Employees covered by the ARC Enterprise Agreement 2011–14 may agree to make an
Individual Flexibility Agreement (IFA) to vary the effect of terms of the agreement. IFAs within the
ARC generally deal with retention allowances or remuneration allowing the Chief Executive
Officer (CEO) to remunerate specialised employees based on market forces and experience.
Section 24(1) determinations
Under Section 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999, the CEO can make determinations to offer
staff remuneration or conditions that supplement those available under an enterprise agreement
or AWA in order to avoid disadvantage. Section 24(1) determinations used in the ARC are
individual arrangements and in general provide for a specified retention allowance. The ARC
Enterprise Agreement 2011–14 obviates the need for new determinations, although existing
determinations will continue.
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SES staff
Common law contracts
Employee arrangements under common law contracts set the terms and conditions for SES
staff. As at 30 June 2014 there were four Common Law Contracts in place for SES staff.
Remuneration
Non-SES staff
Salary ranges for non-SES staff reflect various workplace arrangements. The salary ranges for
2013–14 are provided in Table 9.1 below, they include salaries under all workplace
arrangements outlined above.
Table 9.1: Salary ranges of non-SES staff by classification (at 30 June 2014)
CLASSIFICATION
SALARY RANGE
Executive Level 2
$114 414–$166 794
Executive Level 1
$95 355–$120 420
APS 6
$74 657–$86 711
APS 5
$67 431–$72 685
APS 4
$62 069–$65 592
APS 3
$55 212–$58 345
APS 2
$49 437–$53 706
APS 1
$45 730–$46 900
SES staff
Individual common law contracts determine the nature and amount of remuneration provided to
SES employees. Remuneration is reviewed annually taking into account the individual’s personal
skills, knowledge, experience and capabilities as well as achievements against goals set in the
preceding performance cycle.
At 30 June 2014 the notional salary range for SES Band 1 and Band 2 officers was between
$170 000 and $285 000. In the Financial Statements, Note 14 provides additional information on
executive remuneration in 2013–14 (see Part 4).
Performance pay
The ARC does not provide access to performance pay.
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Non-salary benefits
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Non-salary benefits offered included:
flu vaccinations
health allowance
access to salary packaging arrangements.
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT
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–
During the year all new employees were required to attend three induction programs:
Introduction to the ARC; Introduction to the APS; and Introduction to Administrative Law. The
ARC also provided in-house training to staff on:
mental health
preventing bullying and harassment
performance management
project management
minute taking
transition to Executive Level 1.
The ARC spent a total of $132 403 on learning and development activities including formal
training programs in 2013–14 (Table 9.2). On average the ARC spent $1112 per person (based
on 119 employees) on training and development—with an average attendance of 2.5 days per
person. The ARC spent a total of $12 860 on studies assistance for seven staff members to
undertake studies approved under the ARC Studies Assistance Guidelines during 2013–14.
Table 9.2: Training and development by classification, 2013–14
CLASSIFICATION
STAFF
DAYS USED
EXPENDITURE
(NO.)
(NO.)
($)
CEO and SES
6
4
3 318
Executive Level 1–2
53
156
59 268
APS 1–6
60
179
69 817
Total
119
298
132 403
SAFE AND HEALTHY WORK ENVIRONMENT
Part 5, Appendix 6 provides information on the ARC’s work health and safety performance,
as required under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth).
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AGENCY MULTICULTURAL PLAN
Under the Australian Government’s Multicultural Access and Equity Policy all
government departments are required to develop and implement a biennial Agency
Multicultural Plan from 1 July 2013.
The ARC’s vision for the Agency Multicultural Plan (AMP) 2013–2015 is to ‘enhance knowledge
and capacities in matters relating to culturally and linguistically diverse employees, indirect
stakeholders and the community’. By strengthening the availability of data, evidence, analysis
and research, the ARC aims to better inform the programs, policies and services developed in
other agencies for people from a culturally and linguistically diverse background.
Actions to date
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In July 2013 Senior Management Group appointed the Executive General Manager as the
Multicultural Champion and tasked the People and Services section with monitoring
implementation of the plan. A Multicultural Access and Equity Action Group (MAEAG) was
also established to discuss and promote the AMP obligations.
The AMP was published on the ARC website and made available to employees on the
intranet. The ARC promoted awareness of the multicultural access and equity obligations to
employees.
Where relevant the ARC’s procurement guidelines, contracts and Memoranda of
Understanding were reviewed to incorporate whole-of-government multicultural access and
equity requirements.
A skills register is being developed to capture employee’s diversity and language capacity
that will be circulated to our Portfolio Department and Agencies in an effort to utilise the skills
of all employees more widely.
Next steps
–
–
In July 2014 the MAEAG will commence the development of a Multicultural Access and
Equity Policy and the AMP external communication plan.
A mechanism is being explored to: identify ways to enhance program data collection to meet
multicultural access and equity reporting requirements; and to help ensure effective and well
informed policy and program development for the future.
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STATE OF THE SERVICE CENSUS RESULTS
Each year the Australian Public Service Commission publishes a State of the Service
report. The report draws on a range of information sources including a survey sent to all
Australian Public Service (APS) agencies employing 20 or more staff under the Public
Service Act 1999 and the results of an APS employee survey.
The results of the 2013 census highlighted the ARC’s strengths and weaknesses compared to
other APS Agencies. The profile of staff, together with the results of the survey, provided the
ARC with a valuable resource to assist in staff planning.
Seventy-three per cent of ARC staff participated in the 2013 State of the Service census. At the
time the survey was conducted 79 per cent of staff indicated that their job gave them a feeling of
personal accomplishment (compared to an APS-wide percentage of 65).
Strengths
–
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The ARC performed more strongly than the overall APS in all areas, but particularly in the
following:
recognition for doing a good job (79 per cent compared to the APS average of 55 per cent)
effective communication between senior leaders and other employees (65 per cent
compared to the APS average of 38 per cent)
employees feel valued for their contribution (82 per cent compared to the APS average of
50 per cent)
leadership is of a high quality (79 per cent compared to the APS average of 46 per cent).
Improved performance
The 2012 State of the Survey census highlighted a weakness for the ARC in the area of
providing access to effective learning and development. As a result, emphasis was placed on
this area in 2013. The success of this strategy is reflected in the 2013 census results (76 per
cent for the 2013 year compared to 61 per cent for the ARC 2012 result, and 60 per cent for the
2013 APS average).
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 10 PURCHASING, CONSULTANTS
AND ASSET MANAGEMENT
Professor Vadim Kamenetsky, University of Tasmania, is holding a pyrite-encrusted carbonate
concretion.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DESCRIPTION
This chapter provides details of the ARC’s approach to purchasing, its use of consultants and
details of assets management.
PURCHASING
The ARC’s approach to purchasing is consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules
and is set out in the ARC’s Chief Executive’s Instructions (CEIs), the ARC Procurement Manual
and other specific policy and procedure guides (such as those for travel and use of
Commonwealth credit cards), all of which are updated periodically.
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The Commonwealth Procurement Rules represent the Government’s policy framework under
which agencies govern and undertake procurement. The key rules are:
value for money
encouraging competition
efficient, effective, economical and ethical procurement
accountability and transparency in procurement
procurement risk
procurement method.
The Finance Section has overall responsibility for procurement within the ARC. Finance Section
staff provide information and training about procurement policies and procedures as required.
The ARC provides information on procurements in the ARC’s annual procurement plan,
available from the AusTender website <www.tenders.gov.au>. This plan gives potential suppliers
early notice of significant planned procurements for the coming year.
CONSULTANTS
Policy on selection and engagement of consultants
The ARC’s policy on selecting and engaging consultants is set out in the ARC’s CEIs and in
related procurement instructions and guidance material. The ARC engages consultants primarily
where there is a need for independent research or assessment or where a specialist skill or
expertise is required. Consultants are engaged through a meritorious selection or procurement
process.
Consultancy services are distinguished from other contracts for services by the nature of the
work performed, which typically involves the development of an intellectual output that assists
with agency decision-making and reflects the independent views of the service provider. By
contrast, other (non-consultancy) contracts for services are typically far more restrictive in the
degree of latitude afforded to the contractor.
Details of contracts for services are available from the Austender website.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Expenditure
During 2013–14 the ARC entered into 63 new consultancy contracts involving total actual
expenditure of $2 874 246. In addition, 132 ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the
2013–14 year, involving total actual expenditure of $7 600 852. The majority of the new
consultancy contracts in 2013–14 were for services relating to membership of ARC committees,
primarily the ARC College of Experts and various Selection Advisory Committees.
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–
–
–
Over the past three years the ARC’s expenditure on consultancy contracts was:
$1 722 263 in 2013–14
$2 929 267 in 2012–13
$1 081 686 in 2011–12.
Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies.
Information on the value of individual contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender
website.
Exempt contracts
The Chief Executive Officer did not exempt any contracts from publication on the AusTender
website on the basis that their release would disclose exempt matters under the Freedom of
Information Act 1982.
Australian National Audit Office access clauses
All contracts let for goods and services during the reporting period of $100 000 or more
(inclusive of GST) provided for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.
ASSET MANAGEMENT
Asset management is not a significant part of the ARC’s strategic business. The ARC’s assets
include office fit out, furniture, IT software and ‘portable and attractive’ equipment held at the
ARC office. The ARC reviews its asset holdings annually to ensure cost effectiveness and
whole-of-life asset utilisation. In 2013–14 the annual stocktake was conducted in March 2014.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Associate Professor Michael J. Biercuk,v a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence
for Engineered Quantum Systems. Photo courtesy of The University of Sydney.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PART 4 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
CHAPTER 11: FINANCIAL OVERVIEW
130
Discussion and analysis of the ARC’s financial performance for the year
CHAPTER 12: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
133
A copy of the audited financial statements
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 11 FINANCIAL OVERVIEW
Professor Kamal Alameh, Edith Cowan University, is examining advanced glass.
Page 130
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
INTRODUCTION
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–
–
This chapter provides a summary of the ARC’s 2013–14 financial performance. The
Parliament of Australia provides the ARC with two types of funding, administered and
departmental, where:
administered funding is managed by agencies on behalf of government, including for
example, grants, subsidies and benefits
departmental items are assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses that are controlled by the
agency in providing its outputs, including for example, employees expenses, supplier
expenses, and other operational expenses.
ANALYSIS OF PERFORMANCE
–
–
–
The ARC’s total annual appropriated resources for 2013–14 were $910.0 million. This
comprised:
$887.1 million for the administered appropriation ($883.9 million special appropriation for the
National Competitive Grants Program and $3.1 million for the annual administered
appropriation)
$22.6 million for the departmental appropriation ($19.8 million for operating expenses,
$0.9 million for the Departmental Capital Budget and $1.9 million for an equity injection).
In 2013–14 the ARC disclosed an operating deficit of $1.676 million due to the removal of
depreciation funding as part of the Operation Sunlight net cash appropriations framework.
A resource summary of the ARC’s departmental and administered expenses is provided in Part
5, Appendix 11. Actual expenses at year-end varied from budgeted expenses in the following
area:
The 2013-14 departmental operating expenses are $1 million less than the budget estimate. This
is due to the implementation of a range of strategies to manage departmental expenditure.
Further information on the financial performance of the ARC is in the financial statements and
accompanying notes. The Australian National Audit Office found that the ARC’s financial
statements, including lead schedules and reconciliations, were appropriate for the needs of
the audit.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
ARC SIGNIFICANT MEASURES IN THE 2014–15
BUDGET
The 2014–15 budget announced in May 2014 contained a number of significant measures for
the ARC.
The Budget highlighted a number of significant new measures that the ARC will administer,
including:
–
–
–
–
Special Research Initiative for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes—ARC funding $35 million
This initiative will fund a national collaborative network to coordinate team-based crossdisciplinary research projects.
Special Research Initiative for Tropical Health and Medicine—ARC funding $42 million
This initiative will support the expansion of the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and
Medicine at James Cook University.
Special Research Initiative for an Antarctic Gateway—ARC funding $24 million
This initiative will facilitate scientific collaboration between the University of Tasmania,
CSIRO and the Australian Antarctic Division and improve the partnerships which provide
observations of land, sea and ice in the Antarctic.
Boosting Dementia Research—ARC funding $26 million
This proposal, in consultation with the National Health and Medical Research Council
(NHMRC), is to ensure that dementia research takes into account the social, economic and
cultural impacts and complex consequences of dementia. Research supported under this
initiative will translate into better treatments, care and services to dementia sufferers, carers
and their communities. A dedicated research effort is needed to help accelerate progress
towards finding a cure for dementia as it is a multi-dimensional problem not just confined to
the health of the dementia patients. All calls for applications will be made through the
NHMRC in close collaboration with the ARC.
The Government will achieve savings of $74.9 million over three years from 2015–16 by
applying a one-off 3.25 per cent efficiency dividend in 2015–16 to the ARC’s administered
funding.
The budget also contained an ongoing funding commitment for the Future Fellowships scheme
enabling the award of 100 fellowships per year in the forward estimates. The Future Fellowships
scheme supports Australia’s best and brightest mid-career researchers to undertake research in
areas of critical national importance. The Government has committed $139.5 million over four
years for the continuation of the Future Fellowships scheme.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CHAPTER 12 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Dr Julia Bryant alongside a new instrument called SAMI at the Anglo-Australian Telescope.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
INTRODUCTION
The following pages provide the financial statements for the ARC for the financial period ended
30 June 2014.
CONTENTS
PAGE
Audit Report
135
Statement by the Chief Executive and Chief Financial Officer
137
Statement of Comprehensive Income
138
Statement of Financial Position
139
Statement of Changes in Equity
140
Cash Flow Statement
141
Schedule of Commitments
142
Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income for not-for-profit Reporting
Entities
144
Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities
145
Administered Reconciliation Schedule
146
Administered Cash Flows
147
Schedule of Administered Commitments
148
Notes of the Financial Statements
149
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Future Fellow, Associate Professor Damien Keating, The Flinders University of South Australia,
is analysing protein samples collected from neurons.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PART 5 APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1: NCGP, DISCOVERY PROGRAM
206
APPENDIX 2: NCGP, LINKAGE PROGRAM
210
APPENDIX 3: PRIZES AND AWARDS
216
APPENDIX 4: MEMBERSHIP OF COMMITTEES
220
APPENDIX 5: CLIENT SERVICE CHARTER
230
APPENDIX 6: WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY
232
APPENDIX 7: ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH
233
APPENDIX 8: ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
234
APPENDIX 9: CORRECTION OF ERRORS
238
APPENDIX 10: STAFF STATISTICS
239
APPENDIX 11: AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENTS
242
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 1: NATIONAL COMPETITIVE
GRANTS PROGRAM, DISCOVERY
PROGRAM
This appendix provides additional information to support the performance data for the Discovery
Program provided in Chapter 4.
DISCOVERY PROGRAM, FUNDING SCHEMES
Table A1.1: Discovery Program, funding schemes
DESCRIPTION
Australian Laureate Fellowships
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2009
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme is aimed at attracting
and retaining outstanding researchers in Australia. The scheme
provides fellows with project funding in addition to a salary
supplement and salary-related (on-cost) support.
Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2012
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Discovery Early Career Researcher Award scheme is aimed at
supporting early career researchers.
Discovery Indigenous
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2002 (Discovery Indigenous Researchers
Development); funding commencing in 2012 (Discovery Indigenous)
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Discovery Indigenous scheme supports the development of
Indigenous researchers’ skills and expertise.
Discovery Projects
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2002
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Discovery Projects scheme provides funding for research
projects undertaken by excellent individual researchers and research
teams.
Future Fellowships
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2009
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Future Fellowships scheme is aimed at supporting mid-career
researchers.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DISCOVERY PROGRAM, GRANT STATISTICS
Table A1.2: Discovery Program, funding commencing in 2011–12 to 2013–14
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
Australian Laureate Fellowships
2011
2012
2013
Number of proposals
139
108
112
Number of awards
17
17
17
Total funding ($)
44 516 902
46 654 655
47 432 835
Success rate (%)
12.2
15.7
15.2
Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
2 159
1 281
1 468
Number of awards
277
200
200
Total funding ($)
103 875 000
72 321 876
75 789 232
Success rate (%)
12.8
15.6
13.6
Discovery Indigenous
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
29
32
26
Number of awards
10
10
10
Total funding ($)
3 850 751
4 320 000
4 886 142
Success rate (%)
34.5
31.3
38.5
Discovery Projects
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
3 544
3 425
3 534
Number of awards
778
732
703
Total funding ($)
236 837 254
253 982 000
257 632 541
Success rate (%)
22.0
21.4
19.9
Future Fellowships
2011
2012
2013
Number of proposals
661
603
1 234
Number of awards
203
209
201
Total funding ($)
144 342 673
151 559 267
152 292 682
Success rate (%)
30.7
34.7
16.3
Super Science Fellowships
2011
2012
2014
Number of proposals
124
n/a
n/a
Number of awards
50
n/a
n/a
Total funding ($)
13 920 000
n/a
n/a
Success rate (%)
40.3
n/a
n/a
Note
n/a not applicable
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
DISCOVERY PROGRAM, ADDITIONAL
PERFORMANCE DATA
Table A1.3: Discovery Program, number of research outputs, funding
commencing in 2007 to 2009*
2007
2008
2009
Books and book chapters
1 791
1 170
864
Journal articles
8 177
6 874
4 696
Conference publications
6 348
5 084
2 539
Other
1 281
854
351
Total
17 597
13 982
8 450
Invention disclosures
58
33
9
Licences executed
5
5
2
Patents filed
63
58
34
Patents pending
32
18
11
Plant breeder rights
–
–
3
Start-up companies
10
4
3
Total
168
118
62
Number of final reports
765
724
557
Academic outputs
Commercialisation outputs
Note
* Outputs arising from research projects funded under the Discovery Program for which final
reports had been submitted to the ARC as at 30 June 2014.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Table A1.4: Discovery Projects scheme, number of research personnel outputs,
funding commencing in 2009*
TYPE OF PERSONNEL
NUMBER
Research
PhD students receiving stipends and research support
207
Masters students receiving stipends and research support
24
PhD students receiving research support but not stipends
715
Masters students receiving research support but not stipends
149
Honours students receiving research support but not stipends
667
Overseas PhD students involved in the project
325
Overseas research Masters students involved in the project
93
Overseas Honours students involved in the project
86
Early career researchers (excluding those named in the application)
457
Other employed personnel
Research associates/assistants funded (full-time)
261
Research associates/assistants funded (part-time)
676
Professional and/or technical officers
182
Industry partner employees
17
Other personnel involved
270
Number of final reports
537
Total number of research projects awarded funding
845
Note
* Research personnel on projects funded under the Discovery Projects scheme for which final
reports had been submitted to the ARC as at 30 June 2014.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 2: NATIONAL COMPETITIVE
GRANTS PROGRAM, LINKAGE PROGRAM
This appendix provides additional information to support the performance data for the Linkage
Program provided in Chapter 5.
LINKAGE PROGRAM, FUNDING SCHEMES
Table A2.1: Linkage Program, funding schemes
DESCRIPTION
ARC Centres of Excellence
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2003
Frequency
Periodic
Description
The ARC Centres of Excellence scheme is aimed at building critical
mass in areas of research priority. Funding of between $1 million and
$4 million per annum for up to seven years may be awarded for each
ARC Centre of Excellence.
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2012
Frequency
Periodic
Description
The Industrial Transformation Research Hubs scheme supports
collaborative research activity between the Australian higher
education sector and industry.
Industrial Transformation Training Centres
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2013
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Industrial Transformation Training Centres scheme fosters close
partnerships between university-based researchers and other
research end-users to provide innovative Higher Degree by
Research and postdoctoral training for the end-user focused
research industries vital to Australia’s future.
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2002
Frequency
Annual
Description
The Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities scheme
encourages institutions to develop collaborative organisational
arrangements to develop research infrastructure.
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Table A2.1: (continued)
DESCRIPTION
Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2002
Frequency
Every three years
Description
The Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects scheme funds the
Australian Council of Learned Academies and the Learned
Academies to undertake research projects.
Linkage Projects
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2002
Frequency
Annual (previously twice per year until 2012)
Description
The Linkage Projects scheme supports collaborative research and
research training between universities and partner organisations.
Special Research Initiatives
First selection round
Funding commencing in 2002
Frequency
As required
Description
Under the Special Research Initiatives scheme, the ARC identifies
new or emerging areas of research for funding. Applications for
funding may be submitted only when invited by the ARC by means of
a call for proposal(s).
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LINKAGE PROGRAM, GRANT STATISTICS
Table A2.2: Linkage Program, funding commencing in 2011–12 to 2013–14
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
ARC Centres of Excellence1
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
n/a
n/a
103
Number of awards
n/a
n/a
12
Total funding ($)
n/a
n/a
284 999 996
Success rate (%)
n/a
n/a
11.7
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
2011
2012
2013
Number of proposals
n/a
12
21
Number of awards
n/a
4
10
Total funding ($)
n/a
14 500 000
34 619 005
Success rate (%)
n/a
33.3
47.6
Industrial Transformation Training Centres
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
n/a
13
13
Number of awards
n/a
4
7
Total funding ($)
n/a
9 300 204
15 667 347
Success rate (%)
n/a
30.8
54.0
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and
Facilities
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
170
169
148
Number of awards
77
72
63
Total funding ($)
28 300 078
29 025 000
31 982 047
Success rate (%)
45.3
42.6
42.6
Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects
2012
2013
2014
Number of proposals
6
n/a
5
Number of awards
6
n/a
2
Total funding ($)
10 000 000
n/a
834 160
Success rate (%)
100
n/a
40.0
Linkage Projects²
2011–12
2012 (rd 2 only)
2013
Number of proposals
953
504
785
Number of awards
370
185
306
Total funding ($)
110 182 704
58 404 739
101 809 345
Success rate (%)
38.8
36.7
39.0
Special Research Initiatives3
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
Number of proposals
3
4
2
Number of awards
2
2
2
Total funding ($)
46 000 000
19 198 392
77 000 000
Page 212
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Notes
n/a
not applicable
1. The ARC Centres of Excellence scheme includes a preliminary expression of interest (EOI) stage. The
number of proposals recorded in Table A2.2 is the number of EOIs received for consideration in each
selection round.
2. The Linkage Projects scheme was restructured in 2012 following the introduction of the Industrial
Transformation Research Program and now has only one selection round each year (for funding
commencing on 1 July). Prior to and including 2012, two selection rounds were conducted each year
under the Linkage Projects scheme. As a result the 2010–11 and 2011–12 calendar years include two
selection rounds; 2012–13 only includes Linkage Projects for funding commencing in 2012 (round 2);
and 2013 is the first year in which only one selection round was conducted.
3. Special Research Initiatives includes the Special Research Initiative in Stem Cell Science (funding
commencing in July 2011); the Special Research Initiative in Synchrotron Science (funding commencing
in January 2012); the Special Research Initiative for an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Researchers’ Network (funding commencing in July 2012); the Special Research Initiative for a Science
of Learning Research Centre (funding commencing in December 2012); the Special Research Initiative
for Tropical Health and Medicine (funding commencing in 2014); and the Special Research Initiative for
Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes (funding commencing in 2014).
LINKAGE PROGRAM, ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE
DATA
Table A2.3: Linkage Program, number of research outputs, funding commencing
in 2007 to 2009*
2007
2008
2009
Books and book chapters
555
307
208
Journal articles
2 685
2 225
1 349
Conference publications
2 643
1 799
1 054
Other
797
1 457
188
Total
6 680
5 788
2 799
Invention disclosures
20
14
8
Licences executed
8
36
1
Patents filed
36
19
19
Patents pending
9
9
7
Patents unknown
1
1
–
Plant breeder rights
–
4
1
Start-up companies
3
9
4
Total
77
92
40
Number of final reports
461
386
278
Academic outputs
Commercialisation outputs
Note
* Outputs arising from research projects funded under the Linkage Program for which final reports had been
submitted to the ARC as at 30 June 2014.
Page 213
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Table A2.4: ARC Centres of Excellence, number of research outputs, 2013
TYPE OF OUTPUT
2005
CENTRES
2007
CENTRES
2011
CENTRES
Books
26
12
20
Book chapters
103
38
110
Journal articles (articles in scholarly refereed journal)
1 271
101
1 537
Journal articles (other)
7
8
255
Unpublished reports
111
7
81
Major reviews
11
-
6
Conference publications
876
101
1 420
Audio-visual recording
1
-
67
Computer software
4
-
29
Patents filed
17
-
12
Patents pending
-
-
16
Creative works
1
-
36
Exhibition curatorship
-
1
4
Number of national collaborating institutions (average per
centre)
16
13
26
Number of international collaborating institutions
(average per centre)
66
6
52
Number of countries involved in collaboration (average
per centre)
19
6
24
Number of countries from which international visitors
originated (average per centre)
12
5
21
Number of international visitors (average per centre)
19
19
18
Number of overseas visits by Centre personnel (average
per centre)
54
71
86
Number of PhD graduated
113
4
99
Number of Masters students graduated
30
2
40
Number of Honours students graduated
59
2
110
Number of PhD students enrolled
490
63
638
Number of Masters students enrolled
104
2
64
Number of Honours students enrolled
67
4
126
Number of early career researchers
(within 5 years of PhD completion)
168
15
368
Training programs/teaching packages conducted
167
16
198
Number of Centres
11
1
13
Research
Collaboration
Training
Page 214
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Table A2.5: Linkage Projects scheme, number of research personnel outputs,
funding commencing in 2009*
TYPE OF PERSONNEL
2009
Research
PhD students receiving stipends and research support
115
Masters students receiving stipends and research support
10
PhD students receiving research support but not stipends
122
Masters students receiving research support but not stipends
52
Honours students receiving research support but not stipends
160
Overseas PhD students involved in the project
68
Overseas research Masters students involved in the project
48
Overseas Honours students involved in the project
25
Early career researchers (excluding those named in the application)
135
Other employed personnel
Research associates/assistants funded (full-time)
103
Research associates/assistants funded (part-time)
225
Professional and/or technical officers
84
Industry partner employees
172
Other personnel involved
159
Number of final reports
186
Total number of research projects awarded funding
457
Note
* Research personnel on projects funded under the Linkage Projects scheme for which final
reports had been submitted to the ARC as at 30 June 2014.
Page 215
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 3: PRIZES AND AWARDS
This appendix supports the performance report provided for Measure 3 under the Discovery
Program, that is, external recognition of the achievements of ARC-funded researchers
(Part 2, Chapter 3). Prizes awarded to ARC-funded researchers in 2013–14 included those listed
in the table below.
Table A3.1: Prizes and awards, ARC-funded researchers, 2013–14
RESEARCHER, INSTITUTION
ARC SUPPORT
2013 Prime Minister’s Science Prizes
Professor Terry Speed, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical
Research 2013 (Prime Minister’s Prize for Science)
Chief Investigator
Professor Angela Moles, The University of New South Wales
(2013 Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year)
Queen Elizabeth II Fellow
(Discovery Projects)
Associate Professor Andrea Morello, The University of New
South Wales (2013 Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical
Scientist of the Year)
Chief Investigator
2013 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes
Professor Frank Caruso, The University of Melbourne
(2013 CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science)
Australian Laureate Fellow
Dr Kerrie Wilson, The University of Queensland
(2013 Macquarie University Eureka Prize for Outstanding Young
Researcher)
Future Fellow
Professor Jamie Rossjohn, Monash University (The University
of New South Wales Eureka Prize for Scientific Research (joint
winner))
Federation Fellow
Professor Lloyd Hollenberg, Quantum Bio-probes, The
University of Melbourne (2013 University of New South Wales
Eureka Prize for Excellence in Interdisciplinary Scientific
Research)
Australian Laureate Fellow
Professor Rob Brooks, The University of New South Wales
(Australian Government Eureka Prize for Promoting
Understanding of Australian Science Research)
Australian Professorial
Fellow (Discovery Projects)
Professor Rick Shine AM FAA, The University of Sydney
(University of Technology, Sydney Eureka Prize for Outstanding
Mentor of Young Researchers)
Australian Laureate Fellow
2014 Australian Academy of Science Awards
Dr Gavin Young, The Australian National University (Mawson
Medal and Lecture for Outstanding contributions to Earth
Sciences)
Chief Investigator
Professor Min Gu FAA, Swinburne University of Technology (Ian
William Wark Medal and Lecture)
Australian Laureate Fellow
Page 216
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
RESEARCHER, INSTITUTION
ARC SUPPORT
Associate Professor David Warton, The University of New South
Wales (Christopher Heyde Medal for research in probability
theory, statistical methodology and their applications)
Future Fellow
Professor Christian Turney, The University of New South Wales
(Frederick White Prize)
Australian Laureate Fellow
Dr Maria Seton, The University of Sydney (Dorothy Hill Award for
female researchers in the Earth sciences including reef science,
ocean drilling, marine science and taxonomy in marine systems)
Future Fellow
Associate Professor Richard Payne, The University of Sydney (Le
Fèvre Memorial Prize for outstanding basic research in chemistry)
Future Fellow
Professor Geoffrey Pryde, Griffith University (Pawsey Medal for
outstanding research in physics)
Future Fellow
Professor Katherine Belov, The University of Sydney (Fenner
Medal for research in biology (excluding the biomedical sciences))
Future Fellow
Associate Professor Kieran Harvey, Peter MacCallum Cancer
Centre (Gottschalk Medal for outstanding research in the medical
sciences)
Chief Investigator
Winthrop Professor Ryan Lister, The University of Western
Australia (Ruth Stephens Gani Medal for distinguished research in
human genetics)
Future Fellow
Professor Mark Burgman, The University of Melbourne (2013
Royal Society of Victoria Medal for Excellence in Scientific
Research)
Chief Investigator
Professor Emma Johnston, The University of New South Wales
(Inaugural Nancy Millis Medal for Women in Science)
Chief Investigator
Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering Clunies Ross Awards
Professor Kevin Galvin, ARC Research Hub for Advanced
Technologies for Australian Iron Ore, The University of Newcastle
Hub Director
Winthrop Professors Eugene Ivanov and Michael Tobar, The
University of Western Australia
Chief Investigator;
Australian Laureate Fellow
2014 Australian Academy of the Humanities Max Crawford Medal
Dr Tom Murray, Macquarie University
Discovery Early Career
Researcher Award
(DECRA)
2013 Young Tall Poppy Science Awards
Dr Alexander Argyros, The University of Sydney
Australian Research
Fellow (Discovery
Projects)
Dr Julian Berengut, The University of New South Wales
DECRA
Associate Professor Nick Birbilis, Monash University
Australian Research
Fellow (Discovery
Projects)
Page 217
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
RESEARCHER, INSTITUTION
ARC SUPPORT
Dr Norman Do, Monash University
DECRA
Dr Cara Doherty, CSIRO
DECRA
Dr Drew Evans, University of South Australia
Chief Investigator
Dr Jessica Grisham, The University of New South Wales
Chief Investigator
Associate Professor Baohua Jia, Swinburne University of
Technology
DECRA
Professor Ryan Lister, The University of Western Australia
Future Fellow
Dr Carol Maher, University of South Australia
Chief Investigator
Dr Peter Macreadie, University of Technology, Sydney
DECRA
Dr Paul Medwell, The University of Adelaide
DECRA
Dr James Miller-Jones, Curtin University of Technology
Chief Investigator
Dr Sarah Perkins, The University of New South Wales
DECRA
Dr Jose Polo, Monash University
Chief Investigator
Dr Dennis Stello, The University of Sydney
DECRA
Dr Adam Vogel, The University of Melbourne
Chief Investigator
2013 Scopus Young Researcher Awards
Dr Zenobia Jacobs, The University of Western Australia
Queen Elizabeth II Fellow
(Discovery Projects)
Professor Bryan Gaensler, ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky
Astrophysics, The University of Sydney
Australian Laureate Fellow
and Centre Director
Dr Da-Wei Wang, ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional
Nanomaterials, The University of New South Wales
Chief Investigator
Professor Barry Brook, The University of Adelaide
Future Fellow
2013 State Scientists of the year
NSW: Professor Graeme Jameson, The University of Newcastle
Discovery Outstanding
Researcher Award
(DORA) (Discovery
Projects)
WA: Professor Mark Randolph, The University of Western
Australia
Federation Fellow, DORA
(Discovery Projects)
Other Australian awards
Dr Jose Polo, Monash University (Metcalf Prize for Stem Cell
Research)
Chief Investigator
Dr Joanne Whittaker, University of Tasmania (L’Oreal For Women
in Science Fellowship)
DECRA
Page 218
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
RESEARCHER, INSTITUTION
ARC SUPPORT
International awards
Professor Pippa Norris, The University of Sydney (Karl Deutsch
Award for 2014 (International Political Science Association))
Australian Laureate Fellow
Professor John Grundy, Swinburne University of Technology
(2014 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Technical
Council on Software Engineering Distinguished Education Award)
Chief Investigator
Professor Geoff Fincher, ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell
Walls, The University of Adelaide (Thomas Burr Osborne Medal
(AACC International))
Centre Director
Ms Emma Gray, Macquarie University (2014 UNESCO—L’Oreal
for Women in Science International Fellowship)
PhD student
Page 219
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 4: MEMBERSHIP OF
COMMITTEES
GOVERNANCE
Table A4.1: ARC Advisory Council, 2013–14
MEMBER, INSTITUTION
DATE OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor A Byrne, Australian Research Council
(Chair)
23/07/2012
23/07/2017
Professor A Brungs, University of Technology,
Sydney
01/01/2013
31/12/2014
Professor P Buckskin, University of South Australia
01/01/2011
31/12/2014
Dr L Farrell, d3 Medicine LLC
01/01/2013
31/12/2014
Professor S Garton, The University of Sydney
01/01/2011
31/12/2014
Professor S Harding, James Cook University
01/01/2013
31/12/2014
Professor P Johnson, The University of Western
Australia
01/01/2011
31/12/2014
Professor S Miller, Queensland Museum Network
01/01/2013
31/12/2014
Professor S Thomas, Charles Sturt University
01/01/2013
31/12/2014
MEMBER
DATE OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Dr E Arthur, External
01/11/2013
31/10/2015
Mr C Gammon, Australian Research Council
01/01/2014
31/12/2015
Mr P Kennedy, External (Chair)
01/01/2010
30/09/2014
Ms T Leahy, Australian Research Council
10/04/2012
10/12/2013
Mr G Rankin, External
01/11/2013
31/10/2015
Ms E Visher, Australian Research Council
01/11/2012
30/09/2014
Table A4.2: ARC Audit Committee, 2013–14
Table A4.3: ARC Senior Management Group, 2013–14
COMMITTEE
MEMBERSHIP
Senior Management
Group
Six members comprising the Chief Executive Officer (Chair);
Executive General Manager; Chief Information Officer; Branch
Manager, Strategy; Chief Financial Officer; and Chief Program
Officer. Observers may be invited to assist the committee on matters
under consideration.
Page 220
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
NATIONAL COMPETITIVE GRANTS PROGRAM
ARC Appeals Committee
Table A4.4: ARC Appeals Committee, 2013–14
MEMBER
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Ms K Campbell PSM
2014
31/12/2014
Professor A Lawson
2014
31/12/2014
Emeritus Professor R MacDonald
2008
31/12/2013
Emeritus Professor M Poole
2011
31/12/2013
Emeritus Professor P Sheehan AO (Chair 2011–14)
2008
31/12/2014
ARC College of Experts
Table A4.5: ARC College of Experts, 2013–14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor A Ammit, The University of Sydney
2014
31/12/2016
Professor A Ball, RMIT University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor M Bellgard, Murdoch University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor K Belov, The University of Sydney
2011
31/12/2013
Professor D Bowman, University of Tasmania
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Boyages, Macquarie University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Buckley, University of South Australia
2014
31/12/2016
Professor H Chan, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Professor C Dickman, The University of Sydney
(Chair, 2013)
2011
31/12/2013
Professor A Dulhunty, The Australian National
University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor G Egan, Monash University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor M Elgar, The University of Melbourne
2013
31/12/2015
Professor G Fincher, The University of Adelaide
2014
31/12/2016
Dr W Gerlach, self-employed (Chair, 2013)
2011
31/12/2013
Professor L Griffiths, Queensland University of
Technology
2012
31/12/2014
Professor C Grof, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor G Hardy, Murdoch University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor G Halliday, The University of New South
Wales
2014
31/03/2014
Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Page 221
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor A Hill, The University of Melbourne
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M Hindell, University of Tasmania
2013
31/12/2015
Professor T Huber, The Australian National University
2014
31/12/2016
Associate Professor H Irving, Monash University
2013
31/12/2015
Winthrop Professor G Kendrick, The University of
Western Australia
2014
31/12/2016
Professor B Kobe, The University of Queensland
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D Lambert, Griffith University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M Leishman, Macquarie University (Chair,
2014)
from 9/03/2012
31/12/2014
Dr J Luck, Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research
Centre
2011
31/12/2013
Professor E McLaughlin, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Meikle, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D Miller, James Cook University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor J Mitchell, The Flinders University of South
Australia
2012
31/12/2014
Professor P Newsholme, Curtin University of
Technology
from 19/03/2012
31/12/2015
Professor B Nowak, University of Tasmania
2014
31/12/2016
Professor G Otting, The Australian National University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor D Raftos, Macquarie University
2013
31/12/2015
Winthrop Professor Z Rengel, The University of
Western Australia
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Robinson, The University of Wollongong
2014
31/12/2016
Professor C Saint, University of South Australia
2014
31/12/2016
Professor M Sleeman, Monash University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor W Stock, Edith Cowan University
2013
31/12/2015
Associate Professor D Traini, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Professor A Ward, Deakin University
2014
31/12/2016
Associate Professor P Young, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Professor H Abbass, The University of New South
Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Armfield, The University of Sydney
2012
31/12/2014
Professor J Armstrong, Monash University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor J Bell, Queensland University of Technology
(Chair, 2013)
2012
31/12/2014
Engineering, Mathematics and Informatics
Page 222
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Winthrop Professor M Bennamoun, The University of
Western Australia
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M Blumenstein, Griffith University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor N Boland, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor P Bouwknegt, The Australian National
University
2014
31/12/2016
Winthrop Professor M Cassidy, The University of
Western Australia
2011
31/12/2013
Professor Y Chen, Deakin University
2013
31/12/2014
Professor Y Du, The University of New England
2014
31/12/2016
Professor G Evans, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Filar, The Flinders University of South
Australia
2013
31/12/2015
Professor K Galvin, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor A Grant, University of South Australia
2014
31/12/2016
Dr A Grisogono, Defence Science and Technology
Organisation
2014
31/12/2016
Professor H Hao, Curtin University of Technology
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Keller, The University of Queensland
2011
31/12/2013
Professor B Kirk, Curtin University of Technology
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Kitipornchai, The University of Queensland
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D Lewis, The Flinders University of South
Australia
2014
31/12/2016
Professor C Lim, The University of Melbourne
2014
31/12/2016
Professor J Lloyd, The Australian National University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor A Lucey, Curtin University of Technology
(Chair, 2014)
2012
31/12/2014
Professor R Mahony, The Australian National University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor B Mans, Macquarie University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor R Middleton, The University of Newcastle
2014
31/12/2016
Professor M Miller, The University of Newcastle
2014
31/12/2016
Professor B Ninness, The University of Newcastle
2011
31/12/2013
Professor P Pollett, The University of Queensland
2013
31/12/2015
Winthrop Professor C Praeger, The University of
Western Australia (Chair, 2013)
2011
31/12/2013
Professor S Qiao, The University of Adelaide
2014
31/12/2016
Professor R Ramer, The University of New South
Wales
2014
31/12/2016
Professor K Rasmussen, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Page 223
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor T Robertson, University of Technology,
Sydney
2014
31/12/2016
Scientia Professor V Sahajwalla, The University of New
South Wales (Chair, 2013)
2011
31/12/2013
Professor M Sanderson, RMIT University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor A Sharma, The University of New South
Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D Sheng, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor P Shi, The University of Adelaide
2014
31/12/2016
Professor C Standing, Edith Cowan University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor L Sterling, Swinburne University of
Technology
2012
31/12/2014
Professor M Tade, Curtin University of Technology
2014
31/12/2016
Professor V Varadharajan, Macquarie University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor C Wang, RMIT University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor H Wang, Monash University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor A Whittaker, The University of Queensland
2013
31/12/2015
Professor C Zhang, University of Technology, Sydney
2012
31/12/2014
Professor J Zhu, The University of Queensland
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Barwick, The University of Sydney
2014
31/12/2016
Professor D Carter, The University of Queensland
2014
31/12/2016
Professor A Corn, The Australian National University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor D Del Favero, The University of New South
Wales
2014
31/12/2016
Professor K Demuth, Macquarie University
2014
31/12/2016
Dr P Edmonds, University of Tasmania
2013
31/12/2015
Professor T Flew, Queensland University of Technology
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Hartley, Curtin University of Technology
2011
31/12/2013
Associate Professor H James, The Australian National
University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor J Macarthur, The University of Queensland
2014
31/12/2016
Associate Professor M Macintyre, The University of
Melbourne
2012
31/12/2014
Professor G Mackenzie, Bond University (Chair, 2013 &
2014)
2012
31/12/2014
Associate Professor K Message, The Australian
National University
2014
31/12/2016
Dr J Moss, The University of Melbourne
2014
31/12/2016
Humanities and Creative Arts
Page 224
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor Pauline Nestor, Monash University
2012
14/12/2013
Professor S O’Connor, The Australian National
University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor B Opeskin, Macquarie University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor P Patton, The University of New South Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor L Ryan, The University of Newcastle
2013
31/12/2015
Professor E Scheer, The University of New South
Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor B Sherman, Griffith University
2014
31/12/2016
Dr C Smith, La Trobe University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Tompkins, The University of Queensland
2011
31/12/2013
Associate Professor S Ulm, James Cook University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Ware, RMIT University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor G Wigglesworth, The University of Melbourne
2011
31/12/2013
Professor J Willis, The University of Melbourne
2013
31/12/2015
Professor A Abell, The University of Adelaide
2011
31/12/2013
Professor J Aitchison, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Professor N Barnett, Deakin University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor P Bernhardt, The University of Queensland
(Chair, 2013)
2011
31/12/2013
Professor M Coffin, University of Tasmania
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M Coote, The Australian National University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M de Sterke, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Dou, University of Wollongong
2012
31/12/2014
Professor C Easton, The Australian National University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Foden, The University of Adelaide
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Gale, Curtin University of Technology
2013
31/12/2015
Professor K Glazebrook, Swinburne University of
Technology
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D Jamieson, The University of Melbourne
2012
31/12/2014
Professor S Kable, The University of New South Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor G Lewis, The University of Sydney
2013
31/12/2015
Dr D Mallants, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial
Research Organisation (CSIRO)
2014
31/12/2016
Professor P Marriott, Monash University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D McClelland, The Australian National
University
2013
31/12/2015
Physics, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Page 225
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor N McClure-Griffiths, CSIRO
2012
31/12/2014
Professor G Metternicht, The University of New South
Wales
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Morawska, Queensland University of
Technology
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Moresi, The University of Melbourne
2012
31/12/2014
Professor S Perrier, Monash University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor W Price, University of Wollongong
2013
31/12/2015
Associate Professor L Rendina, The University of
Sydney
2014
31/12/2016
Professor F Separovic, The University of Melbourne
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Staveley-Smith, The University of Western
Australia
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M Stenzel, The University of New South
Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor A Stuchbery, The Australian National
University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor L Sullivan, Southern Cross University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor A Williams, The University of Adelaide
(Chair, 2014)
2012
31/12/2014
Professor H Wiseman, Griffith University
2012
31/12/2014
Dr E Wolanski, James Cook University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Adkins, The University of Newcastle
2011
31/12/2013
Professor J Baxter, The University of Queensland
2012
31/12/2014
Professor A Beer, The University of Adelaide
2012
31/12/2014
Professor P Bordia, The Australian National University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor K Cornish, Monash University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor P Creed, Griffith University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor M Drew, Griffith University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor M Dungey, University of Tasmania
2011
31/12/2013
Professor P Fairbrother, RMIT University
2011
31/12/2013
Professor D Fiebig, The University of New South Wales
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Given, Charles Sturt University
2012
31/12/2014
Professor B Gleeson, The University of Melbourne
2014
31/12/2016
Professor N Haslam, The University of Melbourne
2013
31/12/2015
Professor B Hayes, The University of New South Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor B Head, The University of Queensland
2012
31/12/2014
Social, Behavioural and Economic Sciences
Page 226
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PANEL; MEMBER; INSTITUTION
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor A Holbrook, The University of Newcastle
2014
31/12/2016
Professor J Jetten, The University of Queensland
2013
31/12/2015
Associate Professor M Kelaher, The University of
Melbourne
2013
31/12/2015
Professor L Lockyer, Macquarie University (Chair,
2013)
2011
31/12/2013
Professor T Lowrie, University of Canberra
from 01/07/2011
31/12/2014
Professor G Marston, Queensland University of
Technology
2014
31/12/2016
Professor C McGarty, Murdoch University
2013
31/12/2015
Professor P Miller, Curtin University of Technology
2013
12/12/2013
Professor A Neal, The University of Queensland
2013
31/12/2015
Professor S Roach Anleu, The Flinders University of
South Australia
2013
31/12/2015
Professor J Roberts, The University of New South
Wales
2013
31/12/2015
Professor D Schofield, The University of Sydney
2012
31/12/2014
Professor J Sharman, Griffith University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor L Taksa, Macquarie University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor C Tilbury, Griffith University
2014
31/12/2016
Professor G Venville, The University of Western
Australia
2012
31/12/2014
Professor S Ville, University of Wollongong
2014
31/12/2016
Professor E Wertheim, La Trobe University
2013
31/12/2015
MEMBER
YEAR OF
APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF
APPOINTMENT
Professor W Couch, Australian Astronomical Observatory
2013
31/12/2013
Professor R Fitzgerald, University of Canberra
2012
31/12/2013
Professor S Hemelryk Donald, The University of New South
Wales (Chair, 2012–13)
2011
31/12/2013
ARC Scrutiny Committee
Table A4.6: ARC Scrutiny Committee, 2013–14
Page 227
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ARC Selection Advisory Committees
Table A4.7: ARC Selection Advisory Committees, 2013–14
MEMBER; INSTITUTION
Professor M Adams, University of Western Sydney
Dr I Appelqvist, CSIRO
Mr B Biddington, self employed
Professor M Boland, Massey University, New Zealand
Professor J Carver, The Australian National University
Professor M Cassidy, The University of Western Australia
Professor M Corballis, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Emeritus Professor I Dawes, The University of New South Wales
Professor D Day, The Flinders University of South Australia
Professor K Demuth, Macquarie University
Professor M Finnane, Griffith University
Dr R H Frater AO, ResMed Ltd
Professor S Golding, The University of Queensland
Professor P Grimshaw, The University of Melbourne
Prof H Hao, Curtin University of Technology
Dr V Haritos, CSIRO
Mr M Heard, META
Dr J Herrman, National Measurement Institute
Dr A Hill, CSIRO
Dr D Hudson, self employed
Professor A Johnston, The University of Sydney
Professor L Johnson, Australian Academy of the Humanities (Chair)
Dr J Keniry (Chair), self employed
Professor W Laurance, James Cook University
Mr J Law, CSIRO
Professor P Lay, The University of Sydney
Dr J Luck, Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre
Professor C Mackenzie, Macquarie University
Professor E McLaughlin, The University of Newcastle
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEMBER; INSTITUTION
Professor T Monro, The University of Adelaide
Professor L Padgham, RMIT University
Professor J Piggott, The University of New South Wales
Professor J Ramagge, University of Wollongong (Chair)
Winthrop Professor M Randolph, The University of Western Australia
Professor M Reeder, Monash University
Professor K Reynolds, The Flinders University of South Australia
Professor J Roddick, The Flinders University of South Australia
Dr J Ryan, self employed
Scientia Professor V Sahajwalla, The University of New South Wales
Mr P Schutz, self employed
Scientia Professor M Simmons, The University of New South Wales
Professor P Taylor, The University of Melbourne
Mrs D Tompson, self employed
Professor J Ward, Curtin University of Technology
Professor J Walter, Monash University
Professor A Wee, National University of Singapore
Dr J West, Australian National Botanic Gardens
Mr R Wilkinson, self employed
OTHER
Australian Research Integrity Committee
Table A4.8: Australia Research Integrity Committee, 2013–14
MEMBER
YEAR OF APPOINTMENT
EXPIRY OF APPOINTMENT
Dr K Breen
2011
31/12/2016
Mr R Brent (Chair)
2011
31/12/2016
Ms J Hamblin
2011
31/12/2016
Emeritus Professor S Shaver
2011
31/12/2016
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 5: CLIENT SERVICE CHARTER
Table A5.1: Summary of performance against the ARC client service charter,
2013–14
STANDARD
2013–14 PERFORMANCE
Communication
In our dealings with you we will be courteous;
treat you fairly and professionally; provide timely
advice that is clear, concise, accurate and
complete; and keep any confidential information
provided to us as in confidence, except where
disclosure is required by law.
The ARC did not receive any general
complaints in relation to the
communication standards set out in the
client service charter.
If you phone us we will answer phone calls
promptly during normal business hours and
identify ourselves; and aim to resolve your
enquiry during the call, or if we can’t, take your
details and arrange for the appropriate person to
return your call as soon as possible.
The ARC did not receive any general
complaints in relation to answering
and/or resolving phone call queries.
If you write to us we will, for simple requests, aim
to respond to you within ten working days; or for
more complex enquiries, aim to respond within 20
working days.
The ARC did not receive any general
complaints in relation to response times
to written requests.
Administration of NCGP
We will make available on our website accurate
advice and information about our funding
schemes.
The ARC website contains extensive
information about NCGP funding
schemes including information about
application processes and funding
outcomes.
We will promote equitable access to our schemes
and services.
NCGP funding rules aim to provide
equitable access to funding for eligible
researchers.
We will act fairly, in accordance with our
published guidelines, criteria, regulations or
legislation.
NCGP funding rules make provision for
an appeals process, whereby appeals
will be considered against administrative
process issues. Details of the number of
appeals received in 2013–14 are
provided in Chapter 7.
We will, when reviewing funding schemes and
scheme funding rules, consult widely and provide
reasonable timeframes for consultation with
interested parties.
In 2013–14 the ARC consulted relevant
stakeholders when reviewing and
developing NCGP schemes. Further
information on the consultations
undertaken is provided in Chapter 7.
Administration of ERA
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
STANDARD
2013–14 PERFORMANCE
We will make available on our website accurate
advice and information about the initiative.
The ARC website contains extensive
information about the ERA initiative. In
2013–14 all invitations to provide
comments on the ERA 2015 draft
documentation were posted on the
website.
We will act fairly in accordance with our published
guidelines.
An ERA evaluation was not conducted
during 2013–14. The ARC did not
receive any general complaints in
relation to the administration of ERA.
We will, when reviewing ERA policy and
processes, consult widely and provide reasonable
timeframes for consultation.
ERA consultations were undertaken in
2013– 14 with feedback informing the
development of the rules and
documentation for ERA 2015. Further
information on the consultations
undertaken is provided in Chapter 6.
Policy advice
We will consult with appropriate parties to ensure
the views of all stakeholders are properly
considered.
Where appropriate the ARC has
consulted stakeholders when developing
policy advice.
We will ensure policy decisions are evidencebased.
Wherever possible the ARC analyses
collected data to inform policy decisions.
NCGP analyses conducted in 2013–14,
for example, included trends in
international collaboration and
researcher participation.
We will provide a reasonable timeframe for
comments.
The ARC did not receive any general
complaints in relation to timeframes
provided when seeking comments.
We will provide information about our decision.
Where appropriate the ARC provides
information about decisions to
stakeholders directly or by publishing on
the ARC website.
Online services
We will aim to have the ARC website accessible
at least 98 per cent of the time. There may be
times when it is not accessible due to technical
upgrades or scheduled maintenance. The ARC
will endeavour to keep ‘down times’ to a
minimum.
The ARC website was available greater
than 99.93 per cent of the time during
2013–14.
Privacy
We will respect the confidentiality of your
personal information and use it only in
accordance with the law. We will give you access
to your personal information if you request it.
The ARC has clearly defined procedures
for dealing with personal information
gathered as part of the agency’s
responsibilities for the NCGP and ERA.
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APPENDIX 6: WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY
Under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act), agencies are required to report in their
annual report on the following matters:
a) initiatives taken during the year to ensure the health, safety and welfare of workers who carry
out work for the ARC
b) health and safety outcomes achieved as a result of the initiatives mentioned
c) statistics of any notifiable incidents of which the ARC became aware during the year that
arose out of the conduct of businesses or undertakings by the agency
d) any investigations conducted during the year that related to businesses or undertakings
conducted by the ARC, including details of all notices given to the entity during the year
under Part 10 of the WHS Act
e) such other matters as are required by the guidelines approved on behalf of the Parliament by
the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit.
HEALTH AND SAFETY INITIATIVES
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
The ARC held Work Health and Safety Committee meetings and continued to provide:
first aid training to nominated first aid officers within the ARC
employer-subsidised eyesight testing for screen-based work
training for fire wardens and health and safety representatives
influenza vaccinations to employees and contractors
workstation assessments
mental health awareness training and health checks.
HEALTH AND SAFETY OUTCOMES
Four incidents were reported to the Director, People and Services, in accordance with the
department’s incident notification and reporting procedures.
NOTIFIABLE INCIDENTS
Under the WHS Act, a notifiable incident is one involving death of a person, serious injury or illness of
a person, or a dangerous incident. The ARC had no notifiable incidents during 2013–14.
INVESTIGATIONS INCLUDING DETAILS OF ALL
NOTICES
Under the WHS Act, improvement, prohibition or non-disturbance notices may be issued to the
agency. The ARC was not issued with any notices and there were no investigations undertaken
during 2013–14.
ANY OTHER MATTERS
There are no other matters required by the guidelines.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 7: ADVERTISING AND MARKET
RESEARCH
Under section 311(a) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, agencies are required to report
in their annual report on payments made to advertising agencies, market research organisations,
polling organisations, direct mail organisations and media advertising organisations.
ADVERTISING AGENCIES
During 2013–14, the ARC paid a total of $19 924 (including GST) to Adcorp Australia Ltd for
advertising costs. The advertising was undertaken to advertise ARC programs. No advertising
campaigns were undertaken by the ARC during 2013–14.
MARKET RESEARCH OR POLLING ORGANISATIONS
During 2013–14, the ARC did not employ the services of any market research, polling or direct
mail organisations.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 8: ECOLOGICALLY
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Under section 516(a) of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999,
agencies are required to report in their annual report on ecologically sustainable development
and environmental matters.
ACCORDANCE OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE
ORGANISATION AND THE ADMINISTRATION OF
LEGISLATION BY THE ORGANISATION WITH THE
PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT
The NCGP provides funding for all disciplines including research relevant to ecologically
sustainable development and environmental protection. ‘An environmentally sustainable
Australia’ was one of four national research priorities of the Australian Government. A summary
of research projects with funding commencing in 2013–14 in the area of an environmentally
sustainable Australia is provided in Table A8.1. Note that the National Research Priorities were
replaced by Strategic Research Priorities in June 2013, and 2013–14 was nominated as a
transition year to allow agencies to put processes in place to support the new priorities.
Reporting in future years will be against strategic research priorities.
CONTRIBUTION OF THE OUTCOMES SPECIFIED IN A
RELEVANT APPROPRIATION ACT TO
ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
The ARC receives its administered funding through an appropriation in the Australian Research
Council Act 2001. This funding is reported in the Portfolio Budget Statements under a single
outcome: Growth of knowledge and innovation through managing research funding schemes,
measuring research excellence and providing advice.
Under the NCGP the ARC supports a research capability that addresses issues of national significance
including health, social welfare, defence, transport, communications, and the environment.
EFFECT OF THE ARC’S ACTIVITIES ON THE
ENVIRONMENT
As indicated in Table A8.1, under the NCGP the ARC supports a broad range of research
relevant to ecologically sustainable development. The research outcomes will benefit Australians
by increasing understanding of, and offering solutions to, problems such as how to use finite
resources more efficiently and sustainably.
The ARC recognises its daily activities have a negative impact on the environment through the
use of electricity, vehicles, water, paper and other materials, and the generation of waste.
Measures to minimise such impact are outlined in the next section.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Table A8.1: New ARC-funded research projects in the area of an environmentally
sustainable Australia, funding commencing in 2013–14
SCHEME
PROJECTS
(NO.) AND
% OF
TOTAL
TOTAL
FUNDING ($)
AND % OF
TOTAL
Environment proposals funded
2
5 622 516
Total funded proposals
17
47 432 835
Environment as % of total
11.8
11.9
Environment proposals funded
45
34 073 540
Total funded proposals
201
152 292 682
Environment as % of total
22.4
22.4
Environment proposals funded
120
472 30 337
Total funded proposals
703
257 632 541
Environment as % of total
17.1
18.3
Environment proposals funded
35
13 431 642
Total funded proposals
200
75 789 232
Environment as % of total
17.5
17.7
Environment proposals funded
3
1 363 000
Total funded proposals
10
4 886 142
Environment as % of total
30.0
27.9
Environment proposals funded
2
50 000 000
Total funded proposals
12
284 999 996
Environment as % of total
16.7
17.5
Total funded proposals
7
15 667 347
Environment as % of total
0
0
Environment proposals funded
76
27 332 018
Total funded proposals
306
101 809 345
Environment as % of total
24.8
26.8
Environment proposals funded
11
6 826 095
Total funded proposals
63
31 982 047
Environment as % of total
17.5
21.3
Discovery Program
Australian Laureate
Fellowships 2013
ARC Future Fellowships
2013
Discovery Projects 2014
Discovery Early Career
Researcher Award 2014
Discovery Indigenous
2014
Linkage Program
ARC Centres of
Excellence 2014
Linkage Projects 2013
Linkage Infrastructure,
Equipment and Facilities
2014
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
MEASURES BEING TAKEN TO MINIMISE THE
IMPACT OF THE ARC’S ACTIVITIES ON THE
ENVIRONMENT
Building
The ARC leases office space in 11 Lancaster Place, Canberra Airport, Canberra. This location
houses one of the largest tri-generation plants in Australia. Tri-generation is a process wherein
natural gas is used as the single input source of energy to generate electricity. Excess energy
that would have been lost during the production of electricity is used to heat the buildings in
winter and cool them in summer.
In addition to producing three forms of energy, tri-generation provides efficiencies of 90 per cent.
This far surpasses the Commonwealth Green Lease Requirement of 4.5 Star NABERS (the
National Australian Building Environment Rating System). It also equates to less than half the
carbon dioxide emissions of a 5 Star NABERS building.
In 2013–14 ARC staff participated in the ‘Earth Hour 2014’ initiative held on 29 March 2014 by
switching off computers and other electrical appliances. Staff were asked not to enter ARC
offices during this period. The initiative aimed to raise awareness about energy usage.
Information Communication Technology (ICT) services
In 2013–14 the ARC reduced its data centre server fleet by four servers in the Transact hosting
facility as part of a legacy business application reduction. This is expected to reduce power
usage and costs.
The Australian Government ICT Sustainability Plan provides target guidelines for agencies to
measure against over the five-year plan. In terms of the summary measures of the plan the
ARC can record the achievements in Table A8.2.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Table A8.2: Australian Government ICT Sustainability Plan–summary of
measures
TARGET JULY 2015
2013–14
Implemented in all
procurement
processes
Two physical
servers were
purchased during
the year.
The ARC’s fully
virtualised ICT
server and
storage systems
continued to meet
targets.
100% recycled
100% recycled
Internal copy paper per end user (reams per
annum)
9
8.6
Desktop computers to printer ratio
20:1
7.7:1
Desktop devices per end user
1.2:1
1.4:1
e-waste reused or recycled
75%
n/a
ICT packaging recycled
65%
80%
Desktop energy per end user (kWh per annum
and averaged across agency)
250
105
Power usage effectiveness(1) in data centres
and server room
1.9
1.45
Desktop computers off after hours
90%
91%
Sustainable procurement
Relevant ICT equipment meets ISO14024 or
ISO14021 standards at a level of EPEAT silver
or equivalent as a minimum standard
ICT equipment complies with current energy
star version
Product take-back and appropriate resource
reused or recovery for mobiles; toner cartridges
and ICT equipment covered by national ewaste recycling scheme of NWP
General use office copy paper
Managing resource consumption and
demand
Managing waste
Managing energy consumption
Notes
1. Power usage effectiveness figures provided by Data Centre Provider (TransACT
Communications).
2. n/a not applicable
Page 237
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 9: CORRECTION OF ERRORS
Under the Annual Report requirements, agencies are required to identify errors in their previous
annual report.
ERRORS IN ARC ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13
–
–
The ARC has identified the following errors in the ARC Annual Report 2012–13:
The results for Measure 7 on page 76 of the ARC Annual Report in 2012–13 (see table
below) were not comparable. The parameters for the results were slightly different for each
reporting period listed. They have been adjusted in this annual report to enable comparisons
between reporting periods (see page 72 and also below). The target was still met.
Excerpt from page 76, ARC Annual Report 2012–13
Correction
PROPORTION OF ARC-FUNDED RESEARCHERS WHO ARE EARLY CAREER
RESEARCHERS (WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF COMPLETION OF THEIR PHD) (LINKAGE
PROJECTS)
REPORTING PERIOD
2012–13 ANNUAL REPORT
ADJUSTED FIGURES
2012–13
18.3 per cent
13.2 per cent
2011–12
13.3 per cent
14.2 per cent
2010–11
13.1 per cent
15.1 per cent
Page 238
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 10: STAFF STATISTICS
Under the Annual Report requirements, agencies are required to provide a range of staff
statistics.
CLASSIFICATION LEVEL
Table A10.1: All staff by classification level (at 30 June 2012, 2013 and 2014)
CLASSIFICATION
2012
2013
2014
CEO
0
1
1
SES Band 2
0
1
1
SES Band 1
4
4
4
Executive Level 2
16
15
15
Executive Level 1
36
40
38
APS 6 (ARC Level 3)
32
27
27
APS 4–5 (ARC Level 2)
32
34
33
APS 1–3 (ARC Level 1)
5
3
0
Total
125
125
119
EMPLOYMENT STATUS
Table A10.2: All staff by employment category, employment status and gender
(at 30 June 2013 and 2014)
EMPLOYMENT
CATEGORY/
STATUS
MALE
FEMALE
TOTAL
FEMALES AS
% OF TOTAL
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
Full-time
38
38
67
68
105
106
63
64
Part-time
0
0
13
9
13
9
100
100
Sub-total
38
38
80
77
118
115
68
67
Full-time
3
2
4
2
7
4
57
50
Part-time
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sub-total
3
2
4
2
7
4
57
50
Total
41
40
84
79
125
119
67
66
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
GENDER
Table A10.3: All staff by classification level and gender (at 30 June 2013
and 2014)
CLASSIFICATION
MALE
FEMALE
TOTAL
FEMALES AS
% OF TOTAL
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
CEO
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
SES Band 2
0
0
1
1
1
1
100
100
SES Band 1
1
2
3
2
4
4
75
50
Executive Level 2
5
6
10
9
15
15
67
60
Executive Level 1
17
17
23
21
40
38
57
55
APS 6 (ARC Level
3)
6
7
21
20
27
27
78
74
APS 4–5 (ARC
Level 2)
10
7
24
26
34
33
71
79
APS 1–3 (ARC
Level 1)
1
0
2
0
3
0
67
0
Total
41
40
84
79
125
119
67
66
STAFF SEPARATIONS
Table 10.4: Staff separations by classification level and employment category (at
30 June 2013 and 2014)
CLASSIFICATION
ONGOING
NON-ONGOING
TOTAL
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
SES Bands 1–2
0
1
1
0
1
1
Executive Level 2
3
2
1
0
4
2
Executive Level 1
6
2
1
0
7
2
APS 6 (ARC Level 3)
2
2
3
0
5
2
APS 4–5 (ARC Level 2)
5
3
3
3
8
6
APS 1–3 (ARC Level 1)
0
1
1
2
1
3
Total
16
11
10
5
26
16
Page 240
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
EMPLOYMENT ARRANGEMENTS
Table A10.5: Employment arrangements covering staff (at 30 June 2013
and 2014)1
EMPLOYMENT ARRANGEMENT
ARC Enterprise Agreement
Australian Workplace Agreements
Common Law Contracts
s. 24(1) Determinations
Individual Flexibility Arrangements
STAFF
2013
2014
(NO.)
(NO.)
SES
0
0
Non-SES
119
114
SES
0
0
Non-SES
6
5
SES
5
4
Non-SES
0
0
SES
0
0
Non-SES
2
1
SES
0
0
Non-SES2
9
12
Notes
1. The CEO is not included in these staffing figures.
2. Non-SES employees with a section 24(1) Determination or Individual Flexibility Arrangement
(IFA) are also covered by the ARC Enterprise Agreement. As a result the total number of
agreements is higher than the total number of staff by the number of s. 24(1) Determinations
and IFA.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
APPENDIX 11: AGENCY RESOURCE
STATEMENTS
Table A11.1: Agency Resource Statement, 2013–14
ACTUAL
AVAILABLE
APPROPRIATIO
N FOR 2013–14
$’000
(A)
PAYMENT
S MADE
BALANCE
REMAINING
2013–14
2013–144
$’000
$’000
(B)
(A) – (B)
Ordinary annual services
Departmental appropriation1
26 144
18 385
7 759
Total
26 144
18 385
7 759
Outcome 1
3 111
2 528
Total
3 111
2 528
29 255
20 913
Equity injections2
2 514
2 033
481
Total
2 514
2 033
481
2 514
2 033
31 769
22 946
883 959
883 284
883 959
883 284
Administered expenses
Total ordinary annual services
A
Other services
Departmental non-operating
Total other services
B
Total available annual
appropriations and payments
Special appropriations
Special appropriations limited by
criteria/entitlement
ARC Act 2001
Total special appropriations
C
Special accounts
Page 242
ARC Annual Report 2013-14
ACTUAL
AVAILABLE
APPROPRIATIO
N FOR 2013–14
$’000
(A)
Opening balance
PAYMENT
S MADE
BALANCE
REMAINING
2013–14
2013–144
$’000
$’000
(B)
(A) – (B)
16 664
16 664
Appropriation receipts
Appropriation receipts – other
agencies3
Payments made
9 997
Total special account
D
16 664
9 997
Total resourcing and payments
A+
B+
C+
D
932 392
916 227
932 392
916 227
6 667
Less appropriations drawn from
annual or special appropriations
above and credited to special
accounts through annual
appropriations
Total net resourcing and
payments for ARC
Notes
1. Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2013-14. This includes Prior Year departmental appropriation and
s.31 relevant agency receipts. Includes an amount of $0.948m in 2013-14 for the
Departmental Capital Budget. For accounting purposes this amount has been designated as
‘contributions by owners’.
2. Appropriation Bill (No.2) 2013-14. This includes Prior Year departmental capital
appropriation.
3. Appropriation receipts from other agencies credited to ARC’s Endowment Account (special
account).
4. The remaining balance for 2013-14 differs from the unspent annual appropriations (as per
Financial Statements Note 27C). This is due to the payments made in 2013-14 including
payments from ARC’s cash account in addition to the amounts drawn down, whereas note 27
considers only the drawdowns from the appropriations account.
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Table A11.2: Expenses and Resources for Outcome 1
OUTCOME 1: GROWTH OF KNOWLEDGE AND
INNOVATION THROUGH MANAGING
RESEARCH FUNDING SCHEMES,
MEASURING RESEARCH EXCELLENCE AND
PROVIDING ADVICE
BUDGET
2013–14
$’000
(A)
ACTUAL
EXPENSE
S 2013–14
$’000
VARIATIO
N 2013–14
$’000
(A) – (B)
(B)
Program 1.1: Discovery—Research and Research Training
Administered expenses
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
1 044
912
132
Special appropriations
557 688
588 837
- 31 149
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
7 483
6 920
563
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the
Budget year
1 062
1 121
- 59
Total for Program 1.1
567 277
597 791
- 30 514
Departmental expenses
Program 1.2: Linkage—Cross-Sector Research Partnerships
Administered expenses
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
1 067
729
338
Special appropriations
319 174
316 054
3 120
Special Accounts
9 997
9 997
-
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
9 523
8 807
716
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the
Budget year
1 062
1 121
- 59
Total for Program 1.2
340 823
336 709
4 114
1 000
741
259
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
2 740
2 534
206
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the
Budget year
1 062
1 121
- 59
Total for Program 1.3
4 802
4 397
405
Departmental expenses
Program 1.3: Excellence in Research for Australia
Administered expenses
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
Departmental expenses
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OUTCOME 1: GROWTH OF KNOWLEDGE AND
INNOVATION THROUGH MANAGING
RESEARCH FUNDING SCHEMES,
MEASURING RESEARCH EXCELLENCE AND
PROVIDING ADVICE
BUDGET
2013–14
$’000
(A)
ACTUAL
EXPENSE
S 2013–14
$’000
VARIATIO
N 2013–14
$’000
(A) – (B)
(B)
Outcome 1: Totals by appropriation type
Administered Expenses
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
3 111
2 383
728
Special appropriations
876 862
904 891
- 28 029
Special Accounts
9 997
9 997
-
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)
19 746
18 261
1 485
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the
Budget year
3 186
3 364
- 178
Total expenses for Outcome 1
912 902
938 896
- 25 995
Departmental expenses
Average Staffing Level (number)
2012–13
2013–14
115
116
Note
* Full-year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2013-14 Budget.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Professor Laurie Brown, University of Canberra, is examining Australia’s oldest old population.
Photo courtesy of Michelle McAulay.
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
PART 6 REFERENCE
LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES
248
LIST OF CASE STUDIES
250
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
252
GLOSSARY
255
COMPLIANCE INDEX
259
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
264
CONTACT INFORMATION
270
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LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES
FIGURES
NO.
TITLE
PAGE
2.1
Structure of the Australian Research Council
12
2.2
ARC Outcome and Programs, 2013–14
14
4.1
Discovery Program, number of proposals funded by scheme
51
4.2
Discovery Program, total funding awarded
51
5.1
Linkage Program, number of proposals funded by scheme
67
5.2
Linkage Program, total funding awarded
67
5.3
Linkage Projects scheme, partner organisation contributions by type of
organisation, 2013–14
69
TABLES
NO.
TITLE
PAGE
4.1
Discovery Program, performance summary
48
4.2
Discovery Program, deliverables
49
5.1
Linkage Program, performance summary
64
5.2
Linkage Program, deliverables
65
6.1
Excellence in Research for Australia, performance summary
86
6.2
Excellence in Research for Australia, deliverables
87
9.1
Salary ranges of non-SES staff by classification
121
9.2
Training and development by classification, 2013–14
122
A1.1
Discovery Program, funding schemes
206
A1.2
Discovery Program, funding commencing in 2010–11 to 2013–14
207
A1.3
Discovery Program, number of research outputs, funding commencing
in 2007 to 2009
208
A1.4
Discovery Projects scheme, number of research personnel outputs,
funding commencing in 2009
209
A2.1
Linkage Program, funding schemes
210
A2.2
Linkage Program, funding commencing in 2010–11 to 2013–14
212
A2.3
Linkage Program, number of research outputs, funding commencing in
213
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NO.
TITLE
PAGE
2007 to 2009
A2.4
ARC Centres of Excellence, number of research outputs, 2013
214
A2.5
Linkage Projects scheme, number of research personnel outputs,
funding commencing in 2009
215
A3.1
Prizes and awards, ARC-funded researchers, 2013–14
216
A4.1
ARC Advisory Council, 2013–14
220
A4.2
ARC Audit Committee, 2013–14
220
A4.3
ARC Senior Management Group, 2013–14
220
A4.4
ARC Appeals Committee, 2013–14
221
A4.5
ARC College of Experts, 2013–14
221
A4.6
ARC Scrutiny Committee, 2013–14
227
A4.7
Members of Selection Advisory Committee, 2013–14
228
A4.8
Australian Research Integrity Committee, 2013–14
229
A5.1
Summary of performance against the ARC client service charter, 2013–
14
230
A8.1
New ARC-funded research projects in the area of an environmentally
sustainable Australia, funding commencing in 2013–14
235
A8.2
Australian Government ICT Sustainability Plan–summary of measures
237
A10.1
All staff by classification level
239
A10.2
All staff by employment category, employment status and gender
239
A10.3
All staff by classification level and gender
240
A10.4
Staff separations by classification level and employment category
240
A10.5
Employment arrangements covering staff
241
A11.1
Agency Resource Statement, 2013–14
242
A11.2
Expenses and Resources for Outcome 1
244
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LIST OF CASE STUDIES
TITLE
PAGE
Chapter 3: Outcome
Discovery: ARC fellows recognised as Australia’s research leaders
20
Discovery: Eucalyptus forest water management
22
Discovery: Nanostructure of milk
23
Discovery: Improved detection of explosives
24
Discovery: Revolutionising health care diagnostics
25
Discovery: Understanding plant resistance
26
Discovery: Impact of deforestation on global diversity
27
Discovery: Electoral integrity
28
Linkage: Centre fostering talented researchers
29
Linkage: Special Research Initiatives scheme building capacity
30
Linkage: Using Triple J to stop collisions in space
32
Linkage: Preserving Australian Indigenous heritage
33
Linkage: Making our roads and workplaces safer
34
Linkage: Livestock vaccine could save billions
35
Linkage: Synchrotron solves centuries-old mystery
36
Linkage: Human resistance to bacterial diseases linked to coral ancestry
37
Linkage: Weed study provides insight into Alzheimer’s
38
ERA: Benefits of Excellence in Research for Australia
39
ERA: Contribution of ERA to mapping research activity in Australia
40
Policy: Research workforce policy
41
Policy: Working with other research agencies
42
Policy: International strategy
43
Policy: Open access policy
44
Policy: Accessible data
45
Chapter 4: Discovery
Discovery: The mangrove carbon pump
58
Discovery: History of Australian mining
59
Discovery: Geological processes and landscape evolution
60
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TITLE
PAGE
Discovery: Understanding the behaviour of bushfires
61
Chapter 5: Linkage
Linkage: Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
81
Linkage: ARC Centres of Excellence
83
Chapter 7: Corporate Governance
Governance: Informed and appropriate risk taking
107
Chapter 9: People Management
People Management: Agency Multicultural Plan
123
People Management: State of the Service census results
124
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ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
A
ACPFG
AMP
ANAO
APS
APSC
ARC
ARC Act
ARENA
ARIC
ARMS
AWA
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics
Agency Multicultural Plan
Australian National Audit Office
Australian Public Service
Australian Public Service Commission
Australian Research Council
Australian Research Council Act 2001
Australian Renewable Energy Agency
Australian Research Integrity Committee
Australasian Research Management Society
Australian Workplace Agreement
C
CAASTRO
CEIs
CEO
CSIRO
ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics
Chief Executive’s Instruction
Chief Executive Officer
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
D
DI
DECRA
DORA
DP
Discovery Indigenous scheme
Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Discovery Outstanding Researcher Award
Discovery Projects scheme
E
ECR
EGM
EOI
ERA
early career researcher
Executive General Manager
expression of interest
Excellence in Research for Australia
F
FL
FMA Act
FOI Act
FoR
FS
FT
FTE
Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme
Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997
Freedom of Information Act 1982
Field of Research
Super Science Fellowships
Future Fellowships scheme
full-time equivalent
G
GRC
GST
Global Research Council
goods and services tax
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I
ICON
ICT
IFA
IH
IODP
IPS
ITRP
Intra Government Communications Network
information and communications technology
Individual Flexibility Agreements
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
International Ocean Discovery Program
Information Publication Scheme
Industrial Transformation Research Program
J
JDRF
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
K
KPI
kWh
key performance indicator
kilowatt hour
L
LASP
LIEF
LP
Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects scheme
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities scheme
Linkage Projects scheme
M
MAEAG
MWA
Multicultural Access and Equity Action Group
Murchison Widefield Array
N
NABERS
NCGP
NCGRT
NHMRC
NICTA
NIRAKN
NRP
NT
NWC
National Australian Building Environment Rating System
National Competitive Grants Program
National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
National Health and Medical Research Council
National ICT Australia
National Indigenous Research Knowledges Network
national research priority
Northern Territory
National Water Commission
O
OECD
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
P
PBS
PGPA Act
PhD
PS Act
Portfolio Budget Statements
Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013
Doctor of Philosophy
Public Service Act 1999
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R
R&D
REC
RET
ROPE
research and development
Research Evaluation Committee
Renewable Energy Technology
Research Opportunity and Performance Evidence
S
SAC
SAMI
SES
SMG
SRE
SRP
SRI
Selection Advisory Committee
Sydney-Australian-Astronomical-Observatory Multi-object Integral-field
Spectograph
Senior Executive Service
Senior Management Group
Sustainable Research Excellence
strategic research priority
Special Research Initiatives scheme
U
UNESCO
UoE
United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization
unit of evaluation
W
WHS Act
Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth)
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
GLOSSARY
Administered funding
Funding that is managed by agencies on behalf of the government.
Bibliometric study
A study that uses statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical
development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication and use.
Citation
A reference to a research publication in another research publication. The number of citations
received by a publication is considered to provide an indication of the potential use of a
researcher’s work by fellow researchers. The basic premise is that a frequently cited paper has had
a greater influence on subsequent research activities than a paper with no citations or only a few.
Collaborating organisations
Include Administering Organisations, Eligible Organisations and Partner Organisations.
Departmental items
Those assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses controlled by agencies or authorities and used
in producing their outputs.
Discovery Program
Program 1.1 of the 2013–14 Portfolio Budget Statements, which provides funding for
investigator-initiated research projects and research fellowships and awards through the
Australian Laureate Fellowships, Discovery Early Career Researcher Award, Discovery
Indigenous, Discovery Projects, Future Fellowships and Super Science Fellowships schemes.
Early career researcher
A researcher who has held a PhD or equivalent qualification for a period less than or equal to
five years at the time of their application.
Excellence in Research for Australia Program
Program 1.3 of the 2013–14 Portfolio Budget Statements, which provides Government, industry,
business and the wider community assurance of the excellence of research conducted in
Australia’s higher education institutions through an evaluation framework that identifies
universities and disciplines that are internationally competitive and highlights areas where there
are opportunities for further development and investment.
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Field of Research (FoR) classification
A classification based on the methodology used in the R&D that is being considered. The
Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) develops the FoR codes in consultation with stakeholders
in the research sector. Full code descriptions are available on the ABS website
<www.abs.gov.au>.
Final report
A report to the ARC that researchers must submit within 12 months of completing their research
project. The report includes a range of data and information including a description of research
outcomes, academic and commercialisation outputs and details of collaboration.
Funding agreement
The agreement entered into by the ARC and an Administering Organisation when a proposal
from that organisation is approved for funding.
Funding round
The year funding for new grants commences.
Funding rules
Documents published on the ARC website for each funding scheme which provide applicants
with information about a scheme, eligibility requirements, the application, selection and approval
processes, and requirements for the administration of funding.
Invention disclosure
That which occurs when a device, substance, method or process that is apparently new, useful
and involves an inventive step is made known to personnel within an institution who have
responsibility for managing the institution’s patenting and research commercialisation activities.
Linkage Program
Program 1.2 of the 2013–14 Portfolio Budget Statements, which provides funding for research
projects, infrastructure, hubs and centres that foster collaboration among researchers and
research teams in Australia and internationally, and with industry and other end-users of
research. The Linkage Program comprises the ARC Centres of Excellence; Co-funded Research
Centres; Industrial Transformation Research Hubs; Industrial Transformation Training Centres;
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities; Linkage Learned Academies Special Projects;
Linkage Projects and Special Research Initiatives schemes.
Mid-career researchers
A researcher with between 5 and 15 years research experience since the award of a PhD or
equivalent qualification at the time of their application.
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National Competitive Grants Program
The program under which the ARC funds a range of complementary schemes to support the
highest-quality fundamental and applied research, research training and collaboration or
partnerships and infrastructure across all research disciplines.
National Research Priorities
A set of priority areas identified by the Australian Government. In 2012–13 the Australian
Government’s four National Research Priorities were: An environmentally sustainable Australia
(Environment); Promoting and maintaining good health (Health); Frontier technologies for
building and transforming Australian industries (Frontier technologies); and Safeguarding
Australia. In 2013 the National Research Priorities were replaced by Strategic Research
Priorities.
Non-traditional research outputs
Research outputs which do not take the form of traditional research books, book chapters,
journal articles, conference publications.
Open access
The idea that research outcomes, particularly those arising from publicly funded research
projects, should be available as broadly as possible.
Open data
The idea that data collected and used as part of a research project, particularly a publicly funded
research project, should be freely available to other researchers and the wider community.
Partner investigator
Researchers who are not eligible to be Chief Investigators under Discovery Projects and Linkage
Projects grants, but who are taking significant intellectual responsibility for the research.
Partner organisations
National or international organisations that satisfy the eligibility criteria for a partner organisation
as defined under Linkage Program funding rules, and contribute to the research project in
accordance with the requirements of the scheme.
Patent
An intellectual property right relating to inventions. A patent for an invention is granted to the
applicant, and gives him or her the right for a limited period to stop others from making, using or
selling the invention without permission.
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Peer review
Evaluation of research proposals or outputs by experts in the same research discipline.
Start-up companies
Companies engaged in businesses that were dependent, for their formation, upon licensing or
assignment of technology developed in ARC-funded research projects.
Strategic Research Priorities
Priority research areas identified by the Australian Government, and available via the ARC
website.
Success rate
The number of awards made in a year or funding round as a percentage of the total number of
applications. Withdrawn applications are excluded from calculations.
Units of evaluation
A discipline for a specific higher education institution at the two- or four-digit field of research
level.
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COMPLIANCE INDEX
AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL ACT 2001
REF
REPORT SECTION / DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENT
PAGE(S)
Description
33C
Particulars of any Ministerial directions about performance
of the ARC’s functions
Mandatory
95
45
An assessment of the CEO’s performance against the
performance indicators set out in the strategic plan
Mandatory
48, 52–57
64, 68–80
86, 89–91
46
Preparation in accordance with guidelines of the Joint
Committee of Public Accounts and Audit (JCPAA)
Mandatory
See below
Mandatory
56, 74–75
Ministerial directions issued under the ARC Act
In December 2002 the Minister provided a direction to the
ARC about the implementation of national research
priorities. The direction included a requirement (part (e))
that ‘the ARC will report on national research priorities
through documents such as its strategic plan, annual
report and the Innovation Report’. In June 2013, the
Australian Government announced that the national
research priorities would be replaced by strategic research
priorities. Further information about implementation of the
new priorities is provided in Chapter 4 (page 56).
REQUIREMENTS FOR ANNUAL REPORTS
REF*
PART OF REPORT/ DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENT
PAGE(S)
8(3) &
Letter of transmittal
Mandatory
iii
A.5
Table of contents
Mandatory
iv
A.5
Index
Mandatory
264
A.5
Glossary
Mandatory
255
A.5
Contact officer(s)
Mandatory
270
A.5
Internet home page address and Internet address for
report
Mandatory
ii, 270
9
Review by Chief Executive Officer
9(1)
Review by Chief Executive Officer
Mandatory
2–7
9(2)
Summary of significant issues and developments
Suggested
2–7
9(2)
Overview of performance and financial results
Suggested
2–7
9(2)
Outlook for following year
Suggested
6–7
A.4
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
REF*
PART OF REPORT/ DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENT
PAGE(S)
9(3)
Significant issues and developments–portfolio
Portfolio
departments–
suggested
N/A
10
Departmental overview
10(1)
Role and functions
Mandatory
11
10(1)
Organisational structure
Mandatory
12
10(1)
Outcome and program structure
Mandatory
14
10(2)
Where outcome and program structures differ from PB
Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements
accompanying any other additional appropriation bills
(other portfolio statements), details of variation and
reasons for change
Mandatory
N/A
10(3)
Portfolio structure
Portfolio
N/A
departments–
mandatory
11
Report on performance
11(1)
Review of performance during the year in relation to
Mandatory
17–91
Mandatory
47–57 63–
programs and contribution to outcomes
11(2)
Actual performance in relation to deliverables and KPIs set
out in PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements
80 85–91
11(2)
Where performance targets differ from the PBS/PAES,
details of both former and new targets, and reasons for the
change
Mandatory
N/A
11(2)
Narrative discussion and analysis of performance
Mandatory
17–91
11(2)
Trend information
Mandatory
49–57 65–
75
11(3)
Significant changes in nature of principal
Suggested
N/A
If applicable,
N/A
functions/services
11(3)
Performance of purchaser/provider arrangements
suggested
11(3)
Factors, events or trends influencing departmental
performance
Suggested
N/A
11(3)
Contribution of risk management in achieving objectives
Suggested
106
11(4)
Performance against service charter customer service
standards, complaints data, and the department’s
response to complaints
If applicable,
mandatory
230
11(5)
Discussion and analysis of the department’s financial
Mandatory
131
Mandatory
131
performance
11(6)
Discussion of any significant changes in financial results
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
REF*
PART OF REPORT/ DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENT
PAGE(S)
Mandatory
242
Mandatory
iii
Mandatory
94–112
from the prior year, from budget or anticipated to have a
significant impact on future operations.
11(7)
Agency resource statement and summary resource tables
by outcomes
12
Management and accountability
Corporate governance
12(1)
Agency heads are required to certify that their agency
complies with the ‘Commonwealth Fraud Control
Guidelines’.
12(2)
Statement of the main corporate governance practices in
place
12(3)
Names of the senior executive and their responsibilities
Suggested
98–99
12(3)
Senior management committees and their roles
Suggested
100–103
12(3)
Corporate and operational plans and associated
performance reporting and review
Suggested
104
12(3)
Internal audit arrangements including approach adopted to
Suggested
105–107
Suggested
108–110
Suggested
121
identifying areas of significant financial or operational risk
and arrangements to manage those risks
12(3)
Policy and practices on the establishment and
maintenance of appropriate ethical standards
12(3)
How nature and amount of remuneration for SES officers
is determined
External scrutiny
12(4)
Significant developments in external scrutiny
Mandatory
113–117
12(4)
Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals
Mandatory
115
Mandatory
114–115
Mandatory
118–124
and by the Australian Information Commissioner
12(4)
Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary
Committee. the Commonwealth Ombudsman or an agency
capability review
Management of human resources
12(5)
Assessment of effectiveness in managing and developing
human resources to achieve departmental objectives
12(6)
Workforce planning, staff retention and turnover
Suggested
120
12(6)
Impact and features of enterprise or collective agreements,
Suggested
120
Suggested
122
individual flexibility arrangements (IFAs), determinations,
common law contracts and Australian Workplace
Agreements (AWAs)
12(6)
Training and development undertaken and its impact
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
REF*
PART OF REPORT/ DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENT
PAGE(S)
12(6)
Work health and safety performance
Suggested
122, 232
12(6)
Productivity gains
Suggested
N/A
12(7)
Statistics on staffing
Mandatory
119, 239–
241
12(8)
Enterprise or collective agreements, IFAs, determinations,
common law contracts and AWAs
Mandatory
120–121
12(9) &
Performance pay
Mandatory
121
If applicable,
127
B
Assets management
12(10)-
Assessment of effectiveness of assets management
(11)
mandatory
Purchasing
12(12)
Assessment of purchasing against core policies and
Mandatory
126
Mandatory
127
Mandatory
127
Mandatory
127
Mandatory
133–203
Mandatory
232
Mandatory
233
principles
Consultants
12(13)(22)
The annual report must include a summary statement
detailing the number of new consultancy services
contracts let during the year; the total actual expenditure
on all new consultancy contracts let during the year
(inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy
contracts that were active in the reporting year; and the
total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the
ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). The
annual report must include a statement noting that
information on contracts and consultancies is available
through the AusTender website.
Australian National Audit Office access clauses
12(23)
Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the
Auditor-General
Exempt contracts
12(24)
Contracts exempted from publication in AusTender
Financial statements
13
Financial Statements
Other mandatory information
14(1) &
Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work
C.1
Health and Safety Act 2011)
14(1) &
Advertising and Market Research (Section 311A of the
C.2
Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on
advertising campaigns
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REF*
PART OF REPORT/ DESCRIPTION
REQUIREMENT
PAGE(S)
14(1) &
C.3
Ecologically sustainable development and environmental
performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection
and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)
Mandatory
234
14(1)
Compliance with the agency’s obligations under the Carer
If applicable,
N/A
Recognition Act 2010
mandatory
Grant programs
Mandatory
116
14(3) &
D.2
Disability reporting – explicit and transparent reference to
agency-level information available through other reporting
mechanisms
Mandatory
116
14(4) &
Information Publication Scheme statement
Mandatory
117
14(5)
Correction of material errors in previous annual report
If applicable,
mandatory
238
E
Agency Resource Statements and Resources for
Mandatory
242–245
Mandatory
259–263
14(2) &
D.1
D.3
Outcomes
F
List of requirements
* Requirements for Annual Reports for Departments, Executive Agencies and FMA Act Bodies,
Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 29 May 2014
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ALPHABETICAL INDEX
Page numbers in italic indicate photographs.
Audit Committee 101, 220
A
Australian Academy of Science Awards
216–17
abbreviations 252–4
Australian Academy of the Humanities Max
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
Researchers’ Network see National
Indigenous Research and Knowledges
Network
Academy of Technological Sciences and
Engineering Clunies Ross Awards 217
accessible data 45
acronyms 252–4
administering organisations, grants made to
50, 66
advertising agencies 233
Crawford Medal 217
Australian Code for the Care and Use of
Animals for Scientific Purposes 109
Australian Code for the Responsible
Conduct of
Research 45, 103, 108
Australian Government ICT Sustainability
Plan 236
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait
Islander Studies Guidelines for Ethical
Research in Australian Indigenous
Studies 108
Agency Multicultural Plan 123
agency resource statements 242–5
Antarctic Gateway 132
appeals 102, 112, 230
Australian Laureate Fellowships 21, 27, 28,
47, 49–51, 54, 206–7, 235
Appeals Committee 102, 221
Australian Museum Eureka Prizes 216
ARC Advisory Council 100, 220
Australian National Audit Office 114–15,
127
ARC Centre Directors’ Forum 111
ARC College of Experts 101–2, 221–7
ARC Fellows, recognition of leadership 20–
21
ARC/NHMRC Research Administrators’
Seminar 111
assessors, ethical conduct by 109–10
assets, management of 127
Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space mission
70
audit
Australian Research Council Act 2001, 95,
259
Australian Research Integrity Committee
103, 229
Australian Synchrotron 23, 26, 36, 79
Australian Workplace Agreements 120, 241
awards see prizes and awards
B
Auditor’s Report 135–6
Benefits Realisation Review of ERA, Final
report 5, 39
Australian National Audit Office reports
114–5
Bionic Vision Science and Technology
Initiative 79
internal arrangements 105–7
Boosting Dementia Research 132
see also Australian National Audit
Office
Bowditch, Dr Terry 12, 13, 98
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Brungs, Professor Attila 100
Excellence in Research for Australia
103
Buckskin, Professor Peter 100
National Competitive Grants Program
101–2
Budget, significant measures in 132
business continuity 106
Byrne, Professor Aidan 3, 12, 13, 31, 44,
75, 100, 137, 220
see also Chief Executive Officer
common law contracts 121, 241
Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines
iii, 106
Commonwealth Grants Rules and
Guidelines 96
C
Commonwealth Procurement Rules 96, 126
Cameron, Dr Fiona 12, 13, 98
complaints handling policy 112
case studies, list of 250–1
compliance index 259
ARC Centres of Excellence 3–4, 16, 25, 29,
conflict of interest 110, 114
32, 37–8, 63, 65–7, 70–2, 74, 76, 83,
98,
consultancy services 126–7
102, 210, 212, 214, 235
corporate governance 94–112, 220
for All-sky Astrophysics 32
correction of errors 117, 238
consultation 87, 89–91, 111, 230–1
for Children and Families over the Life
Course 83
for Coral Reef Studies 37
for Plant Energy Biology 38
for Quantum Computation and
Communication Technology 29
for Robotic Vision 83
Chief Executive Instructions 96, 126
Chief Executive Officer 12, 13, 100–1, 220
functions and responsibilities 98
letter of transmittal iii
D
Dan, Dr Laura 12, 99
Deleva, Julija 99, 137
Department of Education 7, 87, 90, 114
see also Education portfolio
Department of Industry 87
Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate
Change, Science, Research and
Tertiary Education 114
review by 1–6
Department of the Prime Minister and
Cabinet 15, 97, 104
see also Byrne, Professor Aidan
deregulation 97
Chief Financial Officer 99, 101, 137, 220
disability reporting 116
Chief Information Officer 99, 101, 220
disaster recovery 106
Chief Program Officer 12, 99, 101, 220
Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
47, 49–51, 54–5, 58, 60, 206–7, 235
Client Service Charter 112, 230–1
co-funded research centres 80
committees
ethical conduct 109–10
membership 220–9
ARC governance 100–1
Australian Research Integrity
Committee 103
Discovery Indigenous Awards 47, 49, 50–1,
61, 206–7, 235
Discovery Program 11, 45, 46–61, 206–9,
235
case studies 20–28, 58–61
deliverables 48–51
description 47
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funding schemes 206–9
Financial Management and Accountability
Act 1997, 95, 96, 101, 114
international collaboration 57
financial performance
expenses and resources 244
key performance indicators 48, 52–57
agency resource statements 242–5
National Research Priorities 56
analysis of 131
objectives 47, 52–57
financial statements 133–203
performance 46–57
contents 134
performance data 208
notes to 149–203
policy advice 66
fraud control iii, 106
see also ethical standards
Discovery Projects 3, 22–3, 25–6, 29, 41,
47 49, 50–1, 54–5, 57, 102, 206–7,
209, 235
Future Fellowships 4, 6, 25, 27, 47, 49–51,
56–7, 59, 132, 206–7, 235
E
G
ecological sustainable development 234–7
Garton, Professor Stephen 100
Education portfolio 95
glossary 255–8
employment arrangements 120–2, 241
governance see corporate governance
enterprise agreements 120, 241
governance committees 100–1
ethical standards 108–10
grants see National Competitive Grants
Program
Excellence in Research for Australia 4–5,
19, 84–91
guiding principles of ARC ii
case studies 39–40
consultation 87, 89–91, 111, 231
deliverables 86–7
description 85
function 11
key performance indicators 86, 89–91
H
Harding, Professor Sandra 100
Harvey, Leanne 12, 13, 98
objective 88
I
performance 85–91
Individual Flexibility Arrangements 120, 241
policy advice 87
Industrial Transformation Research Hubs
63, 65–8, 72, 77, 81, 210, 212
Research Evaluation Committees 103
executive staff 13, 98–9, 121
see also senior staff
exempt contracts 127
external scrutiny 113–17
F
Farrell, Dr Leigh 100
figures, list of 248
Industrial Transformation Research
Program 4, 63, 65, 67, 74, 76–7
see also Industrial Transformation
Research
Hubs; Industrial Transformation
Training Centres
Industrial Transformation Training Centres
63, 65–7, 73, 77, 210, 212
Information Communication Technology
services, sustainability of 236–7
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Information Publication Scheme 117
performance 63–80
institutional reviews 105
performance data 213
internal audit 105–7
policy advice 66
international applicants 55
international awards for researchers 219
Linkage Projects 4, 34–5, 63, 65–9, 72,
102, 211–2, 215, 235, 238
international collaboration 43, 57, 70
list of photographs vi–ix
International Ocean Discovery Program 70
L’Oreal for Women in Science Fellowship
218
international strategy 43
M
J
Johnson, Professor Paul 100
juvenile diabetes 4, 75, 78, 132
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 4,
75, 78
mandatory reporting in Annual Reports 116,
259–263
mapping research, ERA contributions to 40
market research 233
Meredyth, Professor Denise 12, 13, 98
Metcalf Prize for Stem Cell Research 218
K
Miller, Professor Suzanne 100
key priorities 7
ministerial arrangements 3, 95, 97, 98, 100
directions 95, 259
L
Minister for Education iii, 75, 95
see also Pyne, Christopher
Leahey, Trish 12, 99
Learned Academies Special Projects 63,
65–7, 74, 211–2
legislative requirements and legislation 15,
95, 116
letter of transmittal iii
Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and
Facilities 33, 63, 65–7, 70, 102, 210,
212, 235
Linkage Program 7, 11, 62–83, 210–5, 235
mission statement of ARC ii
Multicultural Access And Equity Policy 123
N
National Centre for Groundwater Research
and Training viii, 80, 84
National Competitive Grants Program 3, 7,
11, 19, 95, 108, 111–2, 116, 230–1, 234
committees 101–2, 221–9
case studies 29–38, 81–3
policy case studies 41, 43, 44, 45
deliverables 64–7
see also Discovery Program; Linkage
Program
description 63
expenses and resources 244
funding schemes 210–11
National Health and Medical Research
Council 5, 42, 44, 103, 109, 111, 132
international collaboration 70
National ICT Australia 80
key performance indicators 64, 68–75
National Indigenous Research and
Knowledges Network 30–1, 79
National Research Priorities 74–75
objectives 63, 68–80
National Principles of Intellectual Property
partner organisations 68–9
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
Management for Publicly Funded
Research 108
policy advice 11, 15, 19, 231
Discovery Program 50
National Research Priorities 56, 74–5, 234,
257, 259
see also Strategic Research Priorities
Excellence in Research for Australia 87
Linkage Program 66
portfolio arrangements 95, 114
National Statement on Ethical Conduct in
Human Research 108
Portfolio Budget Statements 15, 19, 104
NHMRC Values and Ethics: Guidelines for
Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Health Research
108
priorities see key priorities; National
Research Priorities; Strategic Research
Priorities
Prime Minister’s Science Prizes 216
prizes and awards 216–19
Programs 14–5
O
1.1 see Discovery Program
Open Access policy 5, 44
1.2 see Linkage Program
Operational Plan 104
Organisational structure 12
1.3 see Excellence in Research for
Australia
outcomes 18–45
outcome and program structure 14–15
case studies 20–45, 58–61, 81–3, 107,
123–4, 250
Public Governance, Performance and
Accountability Act 2013, 96
expenses and resources 244–5
program structure and 14, 18–45
Public Service Act 1999, iii, 15, 95, 114,
116, 120, 124
see also research outputs
purchasing 126
Pyne, Christopher iii, 75, 95
see also ministerial arrangements
P
parliamentary committees 114
people management 118–24
R
performance 14, 17–92, 96, 104, 112
reporting 14, 104, 116, 259–263
Discovery Program 46–57
Excellence in Research for Australia
84–91
Research Opportunity and Performance
Evidence statement 5, 41, 54
research outputs
indicators see key performance
indicators
Centres of Excellence 214
financial see financial performance
Linkage Program 213, 215
Linkage Program 62–80
service see Client Service Charter
Performance-based Funding for Public
Research in Tertiary Education
Institutions 89
performance pay 121
Performance Reporting Framework 14–15
planning 104
Discovery Program 208–9
see also outcomes
research students 54–5, 72–3, 209, 215
researchers
best practice evaluation 89
ethical conduct 108–9
number supported 50, 66, 209, 214–5
prizes and awards to 216–19
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
training and career opportunities 54–5,
72–4
separations by employment level 240
workforce policy 41
remuneration 121–2
statistical information 239–41
risk management 106–7
training and development 122
role and functions of the ARC 11
workplace arrangements 120
workplace health and safety 122, 232
S
stakeholder engagement 111
safe and healthy work environment 122,
232
State of the Service census 124
State Scientists of the Year 218
Science of Learning Research Centre 30–
1, 79
Stem Cells Australia 79
Scopus Young Researcher Awards 218
Strategic Research Priorities 56, 74, 234,
258, 259
Scrutiny Committee 102, 227
strategic plan 15, 104
see also National Research Priorities
Section 24(1) determinations 120, 241
Selection Advisory Committees 102, 228–9
Super Science Fellowships 24, 49, 51, 207
Senate Committees 114
Sustainable Research Excellence in
Universities scheme 90
Senior Management Group 101, 220
senior staff 99
see also Executive staff
T
Simms, Professor Marian 12, 13, 99
tables, list of 248–9
Special Research Initiatives 7, 30–1, 65–7,
78–9, 132, 211–3
Thomas, Professor Sue 100
see also Antarctic Gateway; Bionic
Vision Science and Technology
Initiative; Boosting Dementia Research;
National Indigenous Research and
Knowledges Network; Science of
Learning Research Centre; Stem Cells
Australia; Australian Synchrotron;
Tropical Health and Medicine; juvenile
diabetes
staff
training and development 122
Tropical Health and Medicine 78
V
vision statement of ARC ii
W
website ii, 231, 270
classification levels 121, 239
Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 116,
122, 232
ethical conduct 108
workforce planning 120
ARC staff photograph 8–9
executive staff 12, 13, 98–9
gender by employment level 240
Y
management of 118–24
Yates, Professor Brian 12, 13, 99
senior staff 99
Young Tall Poppy Science Awards 217–18
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ARC Annual Report 2013-14
CONTACT INFORMATION
ARC OFFICE
11 Lancaster Place
Canberra Airport ACT 2609
GPO Box 2702
Canberra ACT 2601
ANNUAL REPORT
General enquiries and comments about this report can be directed to:
Director, Policy and Governance
Australian Research Council
+61 2 6287 6600
+61 2 6287 6601
[email protected]
A copy of this report and additional information about the ARC are available at www.arc.gov.au.
Page 270
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