Crawford University
STUDENTS’ HANDBOOK
(2011 - 2013)
SOCIOLOGY
i
Sociology
A Publication of Crawford University
P.M.B. 2001
Km 8, Ota – Atan - Agbara Road
Faith City, Igbesa, Ogun State
Nigeria
Copyright ©CRU March 2012
College Colour:
Royal Blue
Cover Designed and Printed by:
Mustard Communication
10 Adeoye Fatore Street,
PAB B/ Stop Ikotun Idimu Road
Email [email protected]
080333040269
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Sociology
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pages
Title Page
i
Copyright Page and Publication History
ii
Table of Contents
iii
Addresses
iv
Objectives of the University
v
Visitor and Principal Officers of the University
vii
Foreword
viii
Officers of the University
ix
Dean’s Remarks
x
General Information
1
Department
26
iii
Sociology
ADDRESSES
Requests for information regarding the University should be sent to:
The Registrar:
Crawford University
Faith City, Igbesa, Ogun State.
Postal Address:
P.M.B. 2001, Igbesa, Ogun State, Nigeria.
Website:
www.crawforduniversity.edu.ng
E-mail:
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Telephone:
Vice-Chancellor: 08056697800
Registrar: 08056697802
Deputy Vice-Chancellor: 08056697805
Dean’s Office: 08056697803
Academic Planning Unit: 08031183200
Public Relations and Information Unit:
UNIVERSITY PRO 0803545652
Telephone Room:
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Sociology
VISITOR AND PRINCIPAL OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
VISITOR
Rev. Emmanuel Adebayo Adeniran
District Superintendent, Apostolic Faith Mission
West and Central Africa Headquarters, Lagos
CHANCELLOR
Chief Oludolapo Ibukun Akinkugbe CON
PRO-CHANCELLOR AND CHAIRMAN GOVERNING COUNCIL
Professor Peter Akinsola Okebukola OFR
VICE-CHANCELLOR
Professor Samson Adenola Ayanlaja
B.Sc (Hons Ibadan), MBA, Ph.D (Reading), Cert. Irrig (Israel)
DEPUTY VICE CHANCELLOR
Professor Emmanuel Abiodun Fayose
B.Sc, Ph.D (Wales)
REGISTRAR & SECRETARY TO COUNCIL
Mr. Tunde Oluite Adekoya
B.Sc (Hons), M.ILR (Ibadan), M.PP (Ogun), MNIM, AIPM
UNIVERSITY BURSAR
Rev. Elijah O. Ajayi
FCA, ACMA
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
Mr. Thomas Akinbayo Adigun
B.Sc. (Hons) Ife, MLS. (Ibadan)
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Sociology
OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY
Crawford University, was established in 2005 as a Multi-Campus, NonResidential University, Seven years after, the University is manifesting
the dream of its founding father, put together in form of the objectives
of the University, to meet the peculiar needs of Ogun State as follows:
The objectives of the University are:
 To give the opportunity of acquiring a higher education to all;
 To provide relevant courses of instruction and other facilities for
the pursuit of learning in such branches of knowledge as the
University may desire to foster and in so doing make those
facilities available on proper terms to such persons as are
equipped to benefit from them;
 To promote scholarship and encourage the advancement of
learning;
 To conduct relevant research into human problems and their
alleviation;
 To relate its activities to the social, cultural and economic needs
of the people of Nigeria in particular, and the world in general,
 To undertake any other activities appropriate for a University of
high repute, and
 To produce well-rounded graduates, who will be academically
sound, creative, with good morals and the fear of God.
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OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE
DEAN
Prof Olusola Ojo
B.A., M.Sc, PhD
COLLEGE OFFICER/ASST REGISTRAR
Mr. Oni Ogunleye Kolawole
M.Ed, B.Ed, Dip Ed
SECRETARY TO THE DEAN
Mr. Sunday Ogunkorode
NCE, Dip in Computer Studies, WASC
OFFICE OF THE DEAN
S/N NAME
1.
Prof. Olusola Ojo
2.
Mr. Sunday
Ogunkorode
3
Miss. Victoria
Udoh
DESIGNATION
Dean
Personal Secretary
Executive Officer
QUALIFICATION
PhD, M.Sc., B.A
NCE, Dip. in Computer
Studies, WASC
B.Sc, WASC
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HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS
DEPARTMENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
HEADS
Management Studies
Sociology & IRPM
Economics, Accounting & Finance
Political Science & International Relations
Prof. P.O. Yalokwu
Prof Alaba Simpson
Dr. O.J. Macaver
Dr. G.L. Adeola
S/N PROGRAMMES
HEADS
QUALIFICA
TIONS
1
2
Business Administration
Marketing
Prof P.O. Yalokwu
PhD, MBA,
B.Ed.
3
4
Sociology
Industrial Relations &
Personnel Management
Political Science &
International Relations
Economics
Accounting
Banking & Finance
Prof. Alaba Simpson
PhD, M.A.,
B.A.
PhD, M.Sc,
B.Sc.
5
6
7
8
Dr G.L. Adeola
Dr. O. J. Macaver
PhD, M.Sc.,
B.Sc.
COLLEGE OFFICIALS
S/N NAME
1.
Mr. Ogunleye
Kolawole Oni
2.
Mrs. Temitope
Ruth Imafidon
3
Mr. Joseph
Majasan
4.
Mr. Nwabueze
Nwankwo
DESIGNATION
College Officer
QUALIFICATION
M.Ed, B.Ed, Dip Ed
Assistant Executive
Officer
Data Processing
Officer
NYSC Member
B.Sc (Ed), Dip Ed
B.Sc (Computer
Science)
B.Sc. (Agric)
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PAST AND CURRENT DEANS OF THE COLLEGE
1.
2.
3.
2005 – 2008
2008 – 2009
2009 – till date
Prof. B. A. Babalola
Prof. F. O. Adewunmi
Prof. Olusola Ojo
PAST AND .CURRENT COLLEGE OFFICERS OF THE
COLLEGE
1.
2.
3.
4.
Mrs. P. A. Ajeyalemi
Mrs. C. M. Majasan
Mrs. C. G. Ogugua
Mr. O. K. Oni
2008/2009
2009/2010
February 2010-September 2010
September 2010 till Date
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FOREWORD BY THE COLLEGE DEAN
The College of Business and Social Sciences was one of the two
Colleges the University started with in October 2005. The programmes
in the College were grouped under two Departments, Social Sciences
and Administration.
When the University started, there were only 156 students in all the
programmes in the College. This has increased to 915 during the current
session. At the beginning of 2009/2010 session, the programmes in the
College were arranged into four Departments. These are Economics,
Accounting and Finance; Management Studies; Political Science and
International Relations; and Sociology and Industrial Relations and
Personnel Management. Our Programmes are regularly updated to take
account of new innovations and developments in the various
disciplines.
The College currently runs B.Sc Degree programmes in Accounting;
Banking and Finance; Business Administration; Economics; Industrial
Relations and Personnel Management, Marketing; Political Science and
International Relations; and Sociology.
The College has now graduated three sets of students. Many of our
graduates are establishing themselves and are making waves in their
various chosen careers. Some are pursuing postgraduate programmes in
reputable Universities in Nigeria, Europe North America and South
America. We intend to run postgraduate programmes in some
disciplines as soon as the University enters into its second phase of the
development
DEAN, COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Prof. Olusola Ojo
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GENERAL INFORMATION
1.
Historical Background
The College of Business and Social Sciences was established at the
inception of Crawford University in October 2005. Currently, the
College runs four departments viz:
i. Department of Economics, Accounting and Finance
ii. Department of Sociology and Industrial Relations and Personnel
Management
iii. Department of Political Science and International Relations
iv. Department of Management Studies
All the Departments offer courses leading to the award of B.Sc Degree
in all the above mentioned disciplines.
2.
Organizational/Administration Structure
The Dean of the College is the administrative Head of the College that
exercise general control over the academic and administrative affairs of
the College. The Dean is assisted by the Heads of Departments and the
College Secretary. The Heads of the departments are responsible
through the Dean to the Vice-Chancellor for the smooth running of their
Departments.
The College Secretary is the head of all the non-academic staff of the
College. He/she is the Secretary to all the College Boards and
Committees. He/she also ensures the implementation of their decisions
and directives. Also, he/she ensures the proper organization of the
students’ records in the Dean’s office.
Students in the College organize academic and social activities under
the aegis of the Students’ Association relevant to the academic
disciplines in the College. Such association draws its membership from
all matriculated students in the particular academic discipline. The
Departments also organize career and motivational talks from time to
time for the students among other activities
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3.
College Standing Committees
The Board and other Statutory Committees of the College are
concerned with the consideration of all academic matters, for example,
curriculum development, conduct of examinations and consideration of
results, academic staff matters, determination of students’ academic
standing and welfare, among other issues that might be brought before
them from time to time. The Boards and Committees are:
a.
College Board
Composition
 Vice-Chancellor – Chairman
 Dean, College of Business and Social Sciences
 All Heads of Departments in the College of Business and
Social Sciences
 All Professors in the College of Business and Social
Sciences
 One (1) Representative from the College of Natural and
Applied Sciences
 The Librarian or his/her Representative
 College Officer, College of Business and Social Sciences
– Secretary
b.
College Board of Studies
Composition
 Vice-Chancellor – Chairman
 Dean, College of Business and Social Sciences
 All Heads of Departments in the College of Business and
Social Sciences
 All Coordinators of programmes in the College
 All full time members of Academic Staff in the College
of Business and Social Sciences not below the rank of a
Lecturer II
 The Librarian or his/her Representative
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
College Officer, College of Business and Social Sciences
– Secretary
c.
College Board of Examiners of Business & Social Sciences
Composition
 Vice-Chancellor – Chairman
 Dean, College of Business and Social Sciences
 All Heads of Departments in the College of Business and
Social Sciences
 All Coordinators of Programmes in the College
 All full time members of Academic Staff in the College
of Business and Social Sciences not below the rank of a
Lecturer II
 One (1) Representative from the College of Natural and
Applied Sciences
 Head, Examinations & Records Division or his/her
Representative
 The Librarian of his/her Representative
 College Officer, College of Business and Social Sciences
– Secretary
d.
College Review Panel (Academic) Committee
Composition
 Dean, College of Business and Social Sciences(Chairman)
 All Heads of Department, Heads of Units
 All Professors in the College
 College Officer – College of Business and Social
Sciences – (Secretary)
e.
College Seminars Committee
Composition
 Nominee of the Dean as Chairman
 One (1) Representative from each Department
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
f.
College Officer- Business and Social Sciences(Secretary)
College Management Committee
Composition
 Dean, College of Business and Social Sciences
 All Heads of Department in the College
 Programme Coordinators
 College Officer, Business and Social Sciences –
Secretary
STRUCTURE OF THE COLLEGE
The College has four (4) Departments as listed below:
1. Economics, Accounting and Finance
2. Sociology and Industrial Relations & Personnel Management
3. Political Science and International Relations
4. Management Studies
The following Degrees are awarded:
1. Economics, Accounting and Finance
a. B.Sc. Economics
b. B.Sc. Accounting
c. B.Sc. Banking and Finance
2. Sociology and Industrial Relations & Personnel Management
a. B.Sc. Sociology
b. B.Sc. Industrial Relations and Personnel Management
3. Political Science & International Relations
a. B.Sc. Political Science & International Relations
4. Management Studies
a. B.Sc. Marketing
b. B.Sc. Business Administration
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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT PROGRAMMES DEGREE
NOMENCLATURE
Economics,
Accounting,
B.Sc Accounting
Accounting &
Economics,
B.Sc Banking& Finance
Finance
Banking &Finance B.Sc Economics
Management
Business
B.Sc Business
Studies
Administration
Administration
Marketing
B.Sc Marketing
Political Science Political Science
B.Sc Political Science&
and International & International
International Relations
Relations
Relations
Sociology &
Sociology &
B.Sc Sociology
IRPM
IRPM
B.Sc IRPM
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PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES
1.
Philosophy
The philosophy underlying the programmes of the College is to produce
graduates who are quite knowledgeable and competent to meet the
demands of the world’s business, socio – economic and political
activities.
2.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
Objectives
To produce graduates who have the ability to understand the
basic language of all the disciplines in the social and business
environment globally.
To produce graduates possessing the intellectual ability to
identify and apply the state of art in various disciplines to solve
prevailing problems in our economy.
To produce graduates who can comprehend, and proffer
solutions to the basic challenges confronting the nation.
To prepare the students for career prospects in Industrial
Relations, Sociology, Economics, Accounting, Finance, Political
Science, Management Studies and Marketing.
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Sociology
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
COURSE
PROGRAM
ME
REQUIREMENTS
UTME
UTME
SUBJECTS
SPECIAL
CONSIDE
RATION
OR
/WEAVER
REMARKS
Foundation
Exams such
as
ICAN/Acco
unting or
ICMA
Banking
and Finance
Direct Entry
i) Two “A” Level
pass in Accounting or
Economics and one
other subjects
ii) NCE with passes
at merit level in
relevant Subjects
iii) ND at credit level
UTME
Five SSCE
credits
including
English
Language and
Mathematics &
Economics
Maths, one
Social
Science
Subject and
any other
Subject
Economics
NCE or Two (A
Level) Passes in
Economics any one
of Maths, Statistics,
Geography, Physics,
Agric Sc.,
Accounting, Business
Management, History
& Government
Five SSCE
credit Passes in
English
Language
Maths, Econs,
and any two of
Arts Social
Sciences
Subjects
Economics
Maths and
any of
Government
, History,
Geog,
Literature in
English
French and
CRK
OND Upper
Credit in
Economics,
Marketing
Bus. Admin
or Banking
and Finance
Accounting
NCE or Two A
Level Passes in
including Economics
Five SSCE
credit passes
including
English
Language
Maths, Econs.
Econs,
Statistics
and any
other Social
Sciences
subjects
Foundation
Programme
of Crawford
University
for
Accounting
Business
Adm./
Marketing
NCE or Two (A
level) passes
including Economics
Five SSCE
credits passes
including
English Mathes,
Economics,
Maths any
other from
Government
, History or
Crawford
accepts NCE
with Upper
credit in
Marketing,
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Sociology
Econs
Lit-inEnglish
Bus. Admin,
or Banking
and Finance
Sociology /
IRPM
Two A level Passes
chosen from Econs,
Accounting, Business
Management
Government,
Commerce or
Statistic
Five SSCE
credit passes
including
English, Maths,
Econs, plus any
two subjects
listed under the
Direct Entry
Column
Mathematics
, Economics
plus one
other
relevant
subjects
Diploma at
Upper
Credit level
in relevant
discipline
OND/HND
not
admissible
for Direct
Entry
Political
Science and
Internation
al Relations
Two or (A) level
passes in
Government and one
other Social Sciences
subjects
Five SSCE
credit passes
including
English
Language
History and at
least pass in
Mathematics
Three Art or
Social
Science
subject
Crawford
accepts NCE
with at least
Merit
OND/HND
in relevant
subjects not
lower than
lower credit,
Foundation
Programme
of Crawford
University
or other
University
recognize by
Senate
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ELIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION
An applicant must have completed 12 years pre-tertiary education i.e.
someone who has finished six years of Primary School, three of Junior
Secondary School (JSS) and three in the Senior Secondary School
(SSS) in the Nigerian Educational System or to possess
equivalent/superior credentials. In addition, applicants must take the
mandatory University Matriculations Examination (UME)
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
B.Sc. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
1.
UME Admission: Candidates for admission into the four
year degree programme should possess a Senior Secondary
School Certificate Examination or National Examination
Council or their equivalents with at least five credit passes of
which must include English Language, Mathematics and
Economics; the other remaining two credits required for
registration are determined by the department.
2.
Direct Entry: Candidates for direct entry admission shall
possess 5 credit passes in the Senior Secondary School
Certificate or General Certificate Examination or their
equivalents of which at least 2 shall be at the Advanced level
or 4 credit passes of which at least 3 shall be at the
Advanced level provided that such passes are not counted at
both levels of the examinations. Sometimes Crawford
Foundation, National Certificate of Education (NCE) and
Diploma may be considered as A-level equivalents. B.Sc.
degree of a recognized University in a related field. OND
upper credit or HND, in relevant courses. Students with
professional qualification such as ACA, ACCA, may be
considered.
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Sociology
UNIVERSITY MATRICULATION EXAMINATION
1.
Candidates must satisfy the requirements as specified in
(1) above.
2.
Candidates must also have acceptable passes in
University Matriculation Examination (UME).
3.
UME subjects are: English Language, Mathematics,
Economics and Government.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
The Programme is planned over a four-year period
consisting of eight semesters. Each semester consists of
about seventeen (17) weeks, fifteen (15) of which are
devoted to formal teaching, peri-curriculum instruction
and assessments. Each course (especially 3-unit credit
courses) includes a scheduled mandatory one (1) hour
tutorial class per week. The general requirements for
graduation include the following
(i)
The completion of a minimum of 170 credit units
including core, elective and general university education
(GST) courses. Direct entry students are required to
complete a minimum of 129 credit units;
(ii)
A minimum of 15 credit courses outside the department;
(iii)
Complete, report and defence of a research project
supervised by a Supervisor
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REGISTRATION PROCEDURE
1.
Requirements for Registration
a) Photocopies of credentials
b) Birth Certificate
c) Eight (8) passport photographs
d) JAMB Notification of Results
e) University Admission letter
2.
Procedure for Course Registration
(i)
All students should note that Registration of courses
commence on resumption for each semester. Students
are therefore expected to register twice in a session. i. e.
at the beginning of each semester.
(ii)
After the payment of school fees students should proceed
to the Bursary with proof of bank payment for a pin code
for on-line registration.
(iii)
Students are expected to collect registration forms from
Department and then complete on consultation with the
course adviser. Thereafter, the forms are forwarded to
the Edu - Portal for proper documentation.
(iv)
Students are allowed a maximum of seven (7) weeks for
registration and an additional two (2) weeks for late
registration
(v)
Any student that fails to register within this period ceases
to be a bonafide student of Crawford University.
3. Add and Delete of Courses
Any student wishing to delete course(s) will be allowed to do
so within the nine (9) weeks of registration. Any student
wishing to add additional course(s) will be allowed to do so
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within the first seven (7) weeks of registration for both first and
second semester.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE AWARD OF BACHELOR’S
DEGREE
(FULL TIME)
(A)
1.
2.
A programme of study shall be provided leading to a Bachelor’s
degree to be denoted
by the letters. B.Sc. (or such other abbreviation as Senate may
approve from time to time) which may be awarded with honours
or as a pass degree. The programme normally extends over a
period of three or four academic years, depending on the student
entry qualifications as follows:
i.
Three years for direct entry candidate with prescribed
GCE Advanced Level.
Crawford Foundations students or equivalent admitted to
the 200 level
ii.
Four years for students with WASC, GCE, Ordinary or
equivalent qualifications, admitted to the 100 level.
i.
A full-time student is one who carries not less than
the minimum load stipulated in the College
The minimum duration for graduation for a four year
programme is 8 semester and 6 semester for three year
programme; while the maximum length of time required
in the College shall not be more than 12 semester for the
four year programme and 10 semester for the three-year
programme.
ii.
iii.
The maximum load permissible per semester is 24 credit
units, whilst the minimum load is 18 credit units for full12
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time studentship and 6 semesters for three year
programme, while the maximum length of time required
in the College shall not be more than 12 semester for the
four year programme and 10 semester for the three-year
programme.
(B)
iv.
The maximum load permissible per semester is 24 credit
units, whilst the minimum load is 18 credit units for fulltime studentship.
v.
The University Senate may permit students in
exceptional cases to carry less than the minimum load or
more than the maximum load, upon the recommendation
by the Head of Department through the Dean of the
College.
Graduation Requirements
To be eligible for the award of a B.Sc. degree, a student must
obtain a stipulated minimum total of units, for a three-year
programme or a maximum total of units for a 4 year programme
as stated in the Table below:
Programme
Economics
Accounting
Banking & Finance
Political Science & International
Relations
Sociology
Industrial Relations & Personnel
Management
Marketing
Business Administration
Minimum
108
129
126
144
Maximum
165
170
171
225
160
144
168
192
105
109
148
150
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Student Academic Status
A student academic status shall be determined on the basis of his/her
performance in the Harmattan and Rain Semester Examination for each
of the 100, 200, 300 and 400 levels of the degree programme. The
following categorization of students’ status shall be used:
(i)
Good Standing:
To be in good standing, a student must;
 Pass a minimum of 24 units per session and,
 Have a Grade Point Average (GPA) of not less than 1.0
(ii)
Probation:
i. A student shall be placed on “PROBATION” if;
 he/she has not passed a minimum of 24 units for a
particular level and/or
 his/her GPA is less than 1.0
ii.
The period of probation shall be a maximum of two
semesters
iii.
A student on probation is allowed to register for courses
at the next higher level in addition to his/her probation
level courses provided that:
(a) The regulations in respect of student workload are
complied with; and
(b) The pre-requisite courses of the higher level courses
have been passed.
iv.
A student on probation who fails to improve on his/her
cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 1.0 and 24
units in the subsequent semester, such as to place
him/her in good standing shall have another chance,
thereafter he/she will be advised to withdraw from the
University;
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Transfer Cases
i.
Students who transfer from other Universities shall be
credited with only those courses relevant to the programme
of the University, which the candidates have already passed.
Such students shall however, be required to pass the
minimum number of units, provided that these students shall
spend less than two (2) year (4 semesters in order to earn a
degree of the University.
ii.
Students who transfer from one College (Faculty) to another
within the University for any reason shall be credited with
those units passed that are within the curriculum of the
receiving College (Faculty)
COURSE ADMINISTRATION AND ASSESSMENT
(A)
Courses and Units
i.
A course unit is a series of one hour lectures or
tutorials or an equivalent combination of this type
of instruction. No course shall be less than two
units and more than six units.
ii.
There shall be four levels of courses for the 4 year degree programme and 3 levels for the 3year
100 – 199 – (100 level courses)
200 – 299 – (200 level courses)
300 – 399 – (300 level courses)
400 – 499 – (400 level courses)
Course numbers shall be prefixed by a three character course
code which designated the academic discipline.
(B)
Course Status
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The following standard terminologies are used in all
units of the Departments to indicate the status of each
course.
(C)
i.
Compulsory: courses specified by a department
which students must take and pass.
ii.
Required Course: A course which a student
must register for and pass at 40% before a degree
can be awarded but which is not counted towards
degree classification e.g. General Studies,
Library use.
iii.
Elective: courses specified by a department from
which a student must take in order to make up the
required additional units for the award of the
degree
iv.
Pre-requisite: A course whose knowledge is
essential prior to taking another specified
courses. A pre-requisite requirement is fulfilled
by completing and passing the pre-requisite
courses which may also be waived for suitably
qualified candidates by the College Board on the
recommendation of the Department
v.
Audited course: A course which the student
attends but in which he/she is not examined.
Course Assessment
i.
ii.
All courses shall normally be evaluated by
examinations and Continuous Assessment shall
be done through essay and tests.
Scores from Continuous Assessment shall
constitute 30% of the final marks for courses,
which are primarily theoretical.
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(D)
(E)
Examinations
i.
Each course shall normally be completed and
examined at the end of the Semester in which it
offered.
ii.
A written examination shall last a maximum of
three hours for three units of courses and
minimum of two hours for two units of course.
Conduct during Examination
i.
Candidates must be seated at least 15 minutes
before the commencement of each examination.
Thereafter, no candidates will be allowed into the
examination room except at the discretion of the
Chief Invigilator. Candidate will not normally be
allowed to leave the examination room. Outside
these periods candidates may leave the room
temporarily only if accompanied by an attendant.
ii.
Candidates shall not be allowed to take into the
examination room or have in their possession
during the examination, any book or paper,
mobile phone, printed or written document
(whether relevant to the examination or not)
iii.
Any proven attempt made by candidate directly
or indirectly to influence the process of
examination or any part therefore with a view to
obtaining undue advantage shall lead to the
candidate’s disqualification from the whole
examination.
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iv.
Silence shall be maintained throughout the period
of examination and communication among the
candidates will not be allowed;
v.
Candidates shall comply with all instructions set
out in the examination answer booklet or other
examinations materials. They shall also comply
with all instructions given to them by the
invigilators
vi.
Whenever there is an alleged examination
malpractice, the candidates involved shall be
required to make a signed statement immediately.
Failure to comply shall constitute a serious
offence and lead to disqualification from the
examination and any other disciplinary action
deemed appropriate.
Candidates must present themselves to all
University examinations for which they have
been duly registered. Candidates who fail to do
so for reasons other than illness or accident
attested to by the Chief Medical Officer or the
University shall be deemed to have scored Zero
in that examination.
vii.
viii.
Examination offences are considered as breach of
the matriculation oath and it may attract the
following sanctions:
18
Sociology
S/N
Offence
Punishment
(maximum)
Unless
otherwise stated
(i)
Non-display of ID card
Suspension
(ii)
Noise making during an examination Suspension
(iii)
Refusal to submit oneself for search Suspension
by an invigilator
(iv)
Use of scrap papers with written Suspension
notes in Examination hall
(v)
Illegal possession of the University Suspension
Answer sheets (Whether used or
unused)
(vi)
Mutilation or removal of any paper Suspension
or answer script supplied
(vii) Failure to submit answer script to Suspension
invigilator after an examination
(viii) Oral
communication
between Suspension
candidates during an examination
(ix)
Impersonation
Suspension
(x)
Other examination related offences
To be determined based
on the gravity of the
offence committed.
(F)
Pass-mark
The minimum pass-mark in any course shall be 40%,
(for Prerequisite purpose, 35% is the specified
minimum).
(G)
Grading System: Grading of courses shall be done
by a combination of Percentage marks and letter
grades translated into graduated system of grade point
equivalent. For the purpose of determining a student’s standing.
At the end of every session, and for the final degree
classification, Grade Point Average (GPA) system shall be
calculated, that is:
19
Sociology
GPA = TCP/TNU
Where
TCP (GP x Unit)
TNU (Total Number of Units courses taken),
TCP (Total Cumulative Point)
Each course unit shall be graded out of a maximum of 100 marks and
assigned appropriate letter grade point equivalent as in the following
table:
MARKS
(H)
LETTER
GRADE
GRADE
POINT
70 AND
ABOVE
A
5
60 – 69
B
4
50 – 59
C
3
45 – 49
D
2
40 – 44
E
1
0 – 39
F
0
Presentation of Results
Result from the Department shall be presented to and
considered by the College Board of Examiners at the end
of each semester. The standard format approved by
Senate shall be used. The approved results shall be
forwarded through the Head of Department and Dean to
the Exams & Records Division for processing.
20
Sociology
(I)
Classification of Degree
The determination of the class of degree shall be based
on the Cumulative Grade Point Average at the 100, 200,
300 and 400 levels, the Cumulative Grade Point Average
(CGPA) shall be determined at the end of each semester
taking into consideration, all the courses so offered, and
approximated to 2 decimal places.
The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) shall
be used for the determination of the class of degree
according to the following ranges:
CGPA
4.50 – 5.00
3.50 – 4.49
2.40 – 3.49
1.50 – 2.39
1.0 – 1.49
CLASS OF DEGREE
First Class Honours
Second Class Upper
Second Class Lower
Third Class
Pass
COUNSELLING
Students counseling is an important activity of the Departments,
which is aimed at ensuring academic success for all the students.
Students are normally attached to a lecturer who is regarded as a
senior partner for the success of the students. The lecturer is
referred to as the Level Coordinator/Adviser. He/she is
responsible to the entire students for that level in each
department.
INFORMATION MEDIUM
Information meant for students are normally pasted on the notice
boards. It is the responsibility of students to go to these boards
21
Sociology
regularly to ensure that they keep abreast of the happenings in
the Department and College as regards their programme in the
University. The Department and College would therefore not be
responsible for negligence on the part of the students for failing
to comply with any directives of the departments or its units
given through the medium of the notice boards.
Students Colloquium}
Parents Forum
}
The University Management holds a ‘Students Colloquium’ at
least once every semester for both students and lecturers. This is
an interactive session that touches on all aspects of student life;
that is welfare, student behavior, dressing and attendance at
church services and other related activities. In addition, the
Parent Forum holds regular meetings at least twice in a session
to discuss matters related to the welfare of their wards the good
governance, and progress of the University at large.
DISCIPLINE
The College does not take kindly to acts of indiscipline on the
part of students. Degrees are awarded for deserving student by
the Departments having been found worthy in character and in
learning
GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAMME
All students of the University are required to pass the General
Studies Programme courses (GST) as a condition for graduation.
The General Studies Courses are University based. These
include use of English/Library and Information Sources;
22
Sociology
Introduction to Logic and Philosophy, Music Appreciation.
These (GST) courses are compulsory for all students
irrespective of their level of admission. This also applies to
students transferring from other Universities.
ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
Based on the Federal Government directives to all Nigerian
Universities, the University has introduced two courses on
Entrepreneurship. These courses pertain to both theoretical and
practical aspects of Entrepreneurship and are taken by students
at the 200 Level and 300 Level in the College.
23
Sociology
HOD’S REMARKS
The handbook for the Department of Sociology and Industrial Relations
and Personnel Management contains within it the teaching and learning
of the discipline by lecturers and students within the Department.
Without any doubt, Sociology is the life force of the Social Sciences,
being the discipline that analysis the intricate human behaviour as it
other disciplines. The Department houses a crop of lecturers who are
specialists in different fields of Sociology, Industrial Relations and
Personnel Management. This enables them to combine the theoretical
with the practical in terms of producing students who are groomed to
study human relationship in both societal and global perspectives.
The courses taught within the Department are handled by lecturers who
have hands-on experience in areas like Industrial Sociology were
students are brought up to understand the sociology of work and
occupation in their varied dimensions.
Also, areas like Medical Sociology, Family, Criminology, Ethnography,
Gender, Religion, Community Relations and Development Studies, are
handled by specialists in these respective areas. Courses taught in the
Department are therefore expected to breed solution providers to the
ongoing problems of the society, aspects which are in line with the
vision of Crawford University.
It therefore gives me great pleasure to present the handbook of the
Department of Sociology, College of Business and Social Sciences,
Crawford University.
Prof. Alaba Simpson
Head of Department
24
Sociology
Sociology
25
Sociology
ACADEMIC STAFF
S/N
FULL NAME
QUALIFICA
TION
BA, MA, Ph.D
SPECIALI
SATION
Ethnograph
y & Gender
1.
PROF. ALABA
SIMPSON
2.
PROF. B. A.
BABALOLA
BA, MA, M.Ed,
Ph.D
Instructional
Strategy
Professor
3.
DR. A. O.
ABISOYE
Ph.D. M.Sc.
B.Sc.
Lecturer I
4.
DR. JOHN
AYODELE
DR. MATHEW
EGHAREVA
B..A., M.A,
M.Sc, Ph.D
B.Sc, M.Sc,
Ph.D
DR. CHARLES
IRUONAGHE
DR. S. A.
ASAYA
MR. MATHIAS
O. OJO
MR.
RAYMOND
AKINLOTAN
B.Sc, M.Sc
Ph.D
B.Ed, M.Ed,
Ph.D
B.Sc., M.Sc
Political
Sociology/D
evelopment
Medical
Sociology
Human
Developmen
t & Political
Sociology
Rural
Sociology
Education
Criminology
Lecturer II
Social
Work,
Social
Problems
and The
Family
Lecturer II
5.
6.
7.
4.
5.
B.Sc, MSW,
MPA, M.Sc,
PGDE, FCPA
DESIGNATION
Professor
Senior Lecturer
Senior Lecturer
(Associate Staff)
Senior Lecturer
(Associate Staff)
Senior Lecturer
26
Sociology
COURSE STRUCTURE
100 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER (Harmattan)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
2
Compulsory
2.
SOC 103
Introduction to
Anthropology
2
Compulsory
3.
SOC 105
Introduction to African
Societies and Culture
2
Compulsory
4.
SOC 107
Elements of Scientific
Thoughts and Methods
2
Compulsory
5.
GST 101
Use of English &Library
Information Sources I
2
Compulsory
6.
GST103
Music Appreciation I
1
Compulsory
7.
CSC 101
Introduction to General
Computing
3
Compulsory
8.
GST 105
Introduction to Logic and
Philosophy
2
Compulsory
9.
PSR 101
Introduction to Political
Science
3
Elective
10.
BSS 105
Mathematics for
Business & Social
Sciences I
3
Compulsory
11.
GST107
Introduction to
Psychology
2
Required
TOTAL
24 Units
27
Sociology
100 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER (Rain)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 102
Elements of Social
Work
3
Compulsory
2.
SOC 104
Nigerian Heritage &
Culture
3
Compulsory
3.
GST 112
Entrepreneurial
Development Studies II
1
Compulsory
4.
PSR 104
Citizen and State &
Culture II
2
Elective
5.
GST 102
Use of English &
Library Information
Sources II
2
Compulsory
6.
GST 104
Music Appreciation II
1
Required
7.
GST 110
History & Philosophy
of Science
2
Compulsory
8.
GST 106
Nigerian People and
Society
3
Compulsory
9.
BSS 106
Mathematics for
Business & Social
Sciences II
3
Compulsory
10.
GST 108
Foundation of
Psychology II
2
Required
TOTAL
22 Units
28
Sociology
200 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER (Harmattan)
S/N
COURSE COURSE TITLE
CODE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 201
History of Social Thought
3
Compulsory
2.
BSS 211
Statistics for Business &
Social Sciences I
3
Compulsory
3.
SOC 205
Social Change
3
Compulsory
4.
SOC 207
Social Psychology
2
Compulsory
5.
SOC 211
Sociology of Education
2
Elective
6.
SOC 213
Theories of Social Work
3
Required
7.
SOC 217
Sociology of the Family
2
Elective
8.
GST207
Music Appreciation III
1
Compulsory
9.
PSR 201
Nigerian Government and
Politics
2
Elective
10.
GST 209
Peace and Conflict
Studies
2
Compulsory
11.
GST 201
Entrepreneurial
Development Studies III
1
Compulsory
TOTAL
24 Units
N.B.At least one elective course must be taken plus the compulsory and
required courses
29
Sociology
200 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER (Rain)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 202
Gender in Society
3
Compulsory
2.
SOC 208
Language in Society &
Culture
3
Compulsory
3.
SOC 210
Structure of the
Nigerian Society
3
Compulsory
4.
SOC 214
Sociology of Mass
Communication
2
Elective
5.
SOC 216
Sociology of Military
& the State
2
Elective
6.
GST 208
Music Appreciation
1
Compulsory
7.
PSR 212
Introduction to Local
Government
3
Elective
8.
GST 202
Entrepreneurial
Development Studies
IV
1
Compulsory
9.
BSS212
Statistics for Business
& Social Sciences II
3
Compulsory
10.
CSC 212
Information
Management System
1
Compulsory
TOTAL
22 Units
N.B. One elective each must be taken from within and outside the
department
30
Sociology
300 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER (HARMATTAN)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 301
Methods of Social
Research & Statistics I
(Qualitative)
3
Compulsory
2.
SOC 303
Social Inequality
3
Compulsory
3.
SOC 305
Sociology of Crime &
Delinquency
3
Compulsory
4.
SOC 309
Rural Sociology
3
Compulsory
5.
SOC 311
Social Stratification &
Mobility
3
Compulsory
6.
SOC 313
Sociology of the Aged
2
Elective
7.
SOC 315
Social Group Work
2
Required
8.
GST 301
Entrepreneurial
Development Studies V
1
Compulsory
TOTAL
20 Units
N.B. One elective must be taken and passed
31
Sociology
300 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER (RAIN)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 302
Methods of Social
Research & Statistics II
(Quantitative)
3
Compulsory
2.
SOC 304
Penal Institution
3
Compulsory
3.
SOC 308
Political Sociology
3
Compulsory
4.
SOC 310
Inter group Relations
3
Required
5.
SOC 314
Sociology of Urban Life
2
Elective
6.
SOC 316
Sociology of Religion
2
Elective
7.
SOC 318
Formal Organizations
3
Compulsory
8.
SOC 306
Sociology of Law
3
Required
9.
GST 302
Entrepreneurial
Development Studies VI
1
Compulsory
TOTAL
23 units
N.B. One Elective Course must be taken and passed plus the required
course
32
Sociology
400 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER (Harmattan)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 401
Contemporary
Sociological Theories
3
Compulsory
2.
SOC 403
Demography
3
Compulsory
3.
SOC 405
Sociology of the Third
World Countries
3
Compulsory
4.
SOC 407
Urbanization and
Labour Migration
3
Compulsory
5.
SOC 411
Industrial Sociology
2
Required
6.
SOC 415
Sociology of Medicine
2
Elective
7.
SOC 417
Sociology of Work &
Occupations
2
Elective
8.
SOC 499
Research Project I
3
Compulsory
9.
GST 401
Entrepreneurial
Development Studies
VII
TOTAL
1
Compulsory
22 Units
N.B. One Elective Course must be taken and passed plus the required
33
Sociology
400 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER (Rain)
S/N
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
UNITS
STATUS
1.
SOC 402
Sociology of
Development
3
Compulsory
2.
SOC 404
Regional Ethnography of
Sub-Saharan Africa
3
Compulsory
3.
SOC 406
Principles and Methods of
Social Work
3
Compulsory
4.
SOC 414
Sociology of Deviant
Behaviours
2
Elective
5.
SOC416
Culture & Personality
2
Elective
6.
SOC 499
Research Project II
3
Compulsory
TOTAL
16 Units
N.B. The Student must register and pass all the compulsory courses and at
least two elective courses within the department.
RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM NUMBER OF UNITS PER LEVEL
LEVELS
HARMATTAN
RAIN
100
23
22
200
24
22
300
20
23
400
22
16
34
Sociology
COURSE CONTENT FOR SOCIOLOGY
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology I
3 Units
Introductory analysis, description of Social Structure and Dynamics of
Human Society. Field of Sociology; and other Social Sciences. Basic
concepts and principles of Sociology. 30 h (T) C
SOC 102 Elements of Social Work
3 Units
This course introduces the students to the concept of social pathology.
Major contemporary problems in Nigeria are identified, while the
causes and possible solutions to these problems/pathologies are
discussed.
30 h (T) C
SOC 103:
Introduction to Anthropology
3 Units
Introduction to and survey of human origins and cultural achievements.
Social Anthropology; Historical, Theoretical and Methodological
perspectives of African Kinship, Descents, Family and Marriage
System. African Belief System e.g. witchcraft in Azande land.
Anthropology and other Social Sciences (interrelationships and
differences). 30 h (T) C
SOC 104:
Nigeria Heritage and Culture
3 Units
A brief Historical and Sociological study of the major ancient and
contemporary African civilizations, situated in the geographical area
known as present Nigeria-Nok civilization, the Bornu, the YorubaIfe/Benin(Edo) and Igbo-Ukwu Civilizations. The important festivals
within the cultural context of Nigeria society. Socio-Anthropological
functions of Village Square in Nigerian Society with particular
reference to Igbo people. Museum and its socio-economic development
35
Sociology
functions. The heritage of words of Arts, beliefs and ideas as
foundation of a Nation determined to survive and forge a head
undauntedly in common destiny.
30 h (T) C
SOC 105: Introduction to African Societies and Cultures 2 Units
The theoretical knowledge on the peculiar nature of African Societies.
Exposition of some Sociological Studies relating to the study of Society
and Culture. The features that are, unique to African societies.
30 h (T) C
SOC 106 Introduction to Psychology (GNS)
45 h (T) C
3 Units
SOC 107:
3 Units
Elements of Scientific Thought I
Studies of the development of Scientific Thought from Philosophy to
Science, and from Speculations during the Greek period to the
subsequent systematized structure of Contemporary Sciences
30 h (T) C
PSR 104:
Citizen and the State
30 h (T) E
SOC 201:
History of Social Thought
2 Units
3 Units
An introduction to the main contributors to social thought and to the
rise and development of modern sociology, including its historical
background (both Western and Islamic), Modern classical sociologists
and Contemporary African theories about society.
30 h (T) C
36
Sociology
SOC 203:
Social Statistics
3 Units
Roles of statistics in social science inquiry. Nature of measurement,
presentation of data. Central values. Measures of deviation, correlation,
nature of Sampling. Probabilities and normal distribution, inference
hypothesis testing. Test of significance.
30 h (T) C
SOC 204:
Social Change
3 Units
Theories, Principles and Elements in Socio-Cultural change are
critically examined in the light of the contribution of Classical
Sociologists such as Comte, Spencer, Max weber, Karl Marx etc. and
recent sociologists like Talcott Parsons, Elzentadtt, Mazrue.
Sociological factor in the origin and spread of Innovation.
30 h (T) C
SOC 207:
Social Psychology
3 Units
Socialization; Social Learning, Internalization and Conscience
Formation. Values and Attitude, Prejudice and Decimations.
Stereotypes, Development and Change of Attitudes; Social Movement.
Development and change of attitudes, Collective behaviour of Social
Movements. The crowd, the mob, the public etc.
30 h (T) C
SOC 208:
Language in Society and culture
3 Units
An examination of the social and cultural functions of language with
reference to Nigeria and other West African Societies. Language and
societal development, problems of new states.
30 h (T) C
SOC 202:
Gender in Society
3 Units
37
Sociology
An introduction to women studies, a survey of traditional and
contemporary attitudes of Male centred societies to women; factors
which shape these attitudes. Public policy on role of women in
political, social, economical settings etc. in the past and contemporary
times. References should be made to women of excellence in Nigerian
society past and present.
30 h (T) E
SOC 210:
Structure of Nigeria Society
3 Units
The structure of Nigerian society is described in terms of core analytical
Sociological and Anthropological Concepts; the course starts with an
analysis of the patterns of Socio-economic elements of continuity and
change and concludes with the examination of the Major Social
Problems of African Societies.
30 h (T) C
SOC 211:
Sociology of Education
2 Units
Education as a social institution and a social process, the role of
Education in social stability and change. A comparison among various
educational systems. Education and African social and cultural
development, The politics of education.
30 h
(T) E
SOC 213:
Theories of Social Works
3 Units.
The study of social causes and effects of such problems as poverty,
delinquency, crime, family discord, industrial, racial and nationality
conflicts, mental disorders. Theories of social work relevant to social
work practices. Contemporary Nigerian social work. organization,
function and practice in public and private agencies, including Social
Security Systems.
30 h (T) R
38
Sociology
SOC 214:
Units
Sociology of Mass Communication
2
The Course provides some basic Foundation for the Studies of Human
Communication.
It is designed to aid students to the better
understanding of the Nature, Functions and Concepts of the Mass
Media and their Institutions. The Theoretical, Conceptual and the
Evaluative aspects of Human Communication will be examined. Also
to be considered, are the implications of growth of Mass Media
Institutions, the way in which they shape Views, Modify Behaviour,
and help to fashion Society now and in the Future. 30 h (T) E
SOC 215:
Peoples and Cultures of Nigeria
2 Units
Survey of the main societies in Nigeria, and their associated cultures
with special attention to their geographical distribution, religion and
world view.
30 h(T) E
SOC 216:
Sociology of the Military and the State
2 Units
An introductory study from a social science perspective of the Military
as rulers, law makers and law appliers.The role of the Military in
national and international politics and peacemaking, civil-military
relations; the military and the political development of Africa.
30 h (T) E
SOC 217:
Sociology of the Family
2 Units
Analysis of the Principle of Kinship Classification and of the Types and
Functions groups formed on those Principles. Study marriage as a social
institution.
30 h (T) E
SOC 301:
Methods of Social
(Qualitative) 3 Units
Research
and
Statistics
I
39
Sociology
Formation of social issues as research questions; general concepts
concerning scientific methods. Research method as procedural skills in
the use of refined instruments for adequately conceptualizing research
problems. Systematic data collection and analysis of data.
30 h (T) C
SOC 302:
Methods of Social Research and Statistics II
(Quantitative)
3 Units
Strategies of descriptive research and historical research. Tools of
research: Various types, methods and their advantages and
disadvantages.
30 h (T) C
SOC 303:
Social Inequality
3 Units
Analysis of forms and functions of social inequality. Theories
concerning the origins, persistence and consequences of social systems
of stratification. Types of social probability in Nigeria.
30 h(T) C
SOC 304:
Sociology of Crime and Delinquency
3 Units
Nature and extent of crime, theories of crime, causation. Traditional
control of deviancy in African societies; Its implication in the
Contemporary Administration of Justice, Criminal Behaviours in
Nigeria and its relation to Personal and Cultural Conditions.
30 h(T) C
SOC 308
Political Sociology
3 Units
The Nature Scope and Development of Political Sociology. Theories of
State. The Concept of Power, Authority, Legitimacy. An Examination
of the Social and Cultural Contexts of Political Activity and
Behaviours. Political Organizations, Trade Unions Elite Group, the
40
Sociology
Development of Movements for Political Change.
30 h (T) C
SOC 309:
Rural Sociology
3 Units
The fundamental features of rural societies; their ecological systems and
patterns of transformation.
The identifications, evaluation and
utilization of nature and human resources. Social change in rural
societies. Rural social institutions and their adaptation to change.
30 h (T) C
SOC 310:
Inter-group Relations
3 Units
The Nature and Dynamics of Intergroup Transactions. An Examination
of Relations among Peoples of Different Cultures, Religions,
Ethnicities, Ideologies, etc. with special references to Plural Nigeria.
30 h (T) R
SOC 311:
Social Stratification and Mobility.
3 Units
An Examination of the Theoretical Models of Stratification Systems;
the Course attempts a Comparative Analysis of the Stratification
Process and Social Mobility in Industrial and Developing Societies with
Special Reference to Africa.
30 h (T) C
SOC 315:
Social Group Work
2 Units
The course examines concepts, models and methods of institutionalized
provisions for social and developmental services and compares them in
41
Sociology
terms of their historical background, their cultural context and their
relevance to societal needs.
30h (T) E
SOC 304
Penal Institution
3 Units
A sociological treatment of the social origins and consequences of law.
Traditional African legal cultures and their contemporary relevance, the
structure and functioning of legal sanctions, law and society, law and
the economy, law and cultural Process.
30 h (T) E
SOC 313:
Sociology of the Aged
2 Units
The social needs of the aged in transitional and modern societies.
Comparative study of human maturity. Aging and Death as they are
perceived in different Cultures. Western versus African attitudes
towards the Aged.
30 h (T) E
SOC 314:
Sociology of the Urban Life.
2 Units
Introduction to urban theories. Types of cities- pre-industrial and
industrialized cities Conditions for the emergence of cities. Ecological,
organizational and social characteristics of cities. The urban
community, town, city, metropolis and urban social problems. History
and geography of selected cities in African, Asia and Europe.
30 h (T) E
SOC 316
Sociology of Religion
2 Units
42
Sociology
The functions of religious institutions on societies. The relationship
between religion and society in relatively stable, small communities.
The approaches of Social Anthropology to African religions. The rise of
new religious and reform movements. The place of religion in modern
complex societies. Religious leaders and leadership. Religious groups in
Nigerian society. Religion and social change.
30 h (T) E
SOC 318:
Formal Organization
3 Units.
Structure properties of organizations and their consequences.
Bureaucracies and complex formal organization in various institutional
settings and the relationship among organizations in the community.
Major theoretical and methodological problems in studying complex
organizations problems of formal organizations in the New States.
30 h(T) C
SOC 401:
Contemporary Sociological Theories
3 Units
Major theories and schools of thought in the 20 th and 21st centuries.
Contemporary developments of classical sociological theories. The
major orientations in contemporary sociological theories; functionalism,
symbolic interactions and conflict Theory. 30 h (T) C
SOC 403:
Demography
3 Units
The nature and development of population study. Its scope and
methods. Some basic concepts of population analysis. International
comparisons of population growth. Problems of population in Africa.
Issues of population Policy.
30 h (T) C
43
Sociology
SOC 404:
Regional Ethnography of Sub-Saharan African
3 Units
Advance study of sub-saharan African as a major ethnological region.
Human origins and early man. Physical anthropology and archeology;
race and racism. The cultural regions of Africa; language and
population migration in history. Peoples and cultures of Africa.
30 h (T) C
SOC 405
Sociology of the third world
3 Units
Decolonization and the emergence of the third world, the characteristics
of third world Peoples, their cultural profiles, north-south interactions
and conflicts..
30 h (T) C
SOC 407:
Urbanization and Labour Migration I
3 Units
Population movement in Africa, pre-colonial and post colonial trends in
migration. Migration theory and classification, impact of labour
migration. Characteristics of Nigeria cities. An analysis of basic
concepts in urbanization and labour migration studies. Causes and
forms of labour migration.The phenomenon of urban growth in various
pattern of the world. Problems of African cities.
30 h (T) C
SOC 411:
Industrial Sociology
2 Units.
The analysis of major management theories. The process of
industrialization in developing countries. Industrial works groups and
informal organization. Relationship between workers and management.
30 h(T) R
44
Sociology
SOC 414:
Sociology of Deviant Behaviour
2 Units
Background concepts; Social Norms, Values, Social Integration and
Disorganization. Social Deviation, Causes of Deviation, Survey of
Theories of Deviant Behaviours and Control Techniques. Types of
Individual and Sub Cultural Deviance.
30 h (T) E
SOC 415:
Sociology of Medicine.
2 Units
The sociology of health and illness behaviour as it relates to social
structure. Medical organizations and progressions; the professionalism
of medicine. The politics of medical care. Traditional and modern forms
of health delivery systems in Africa, their respective uses and social
effects, Public health policies in Nigeria. The hospital as a social
system, and the mental hospital as a total institution. The poor, the
doctor and the society.
30 h (T) E
SOC 416:
Personality and Motivation
2 Units
The Course attempts to familiarize the Students with Major Issues in
Personality and Motivation including Theory and Practices of
Personality Measurements; the Structure of Personality and
Relationship between Personality and Psychopathology.
30 h
(T) E
SOC 419:
Sociology of Works and Occupations
2 Units
This Course will equip the Students with Ethical Issues in the Work
Environment. It emphasizes the Human Side of Organizational Routine
and Enterprise and will promote Proper Attitudes to Work on
Graduation.
30 h (T) E
SOC 499:
Research Project/ Essay
6 Units.
A piece of original Research in Sociology or Social Anthropology
conducted under the supervision of a member of staff.
30 h (T) C
45
Sociology
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