Aid Effectiveness in the Health Sector: A civil
society perspective
Elaine Ireland
Policy Adviser: Global Health
Global Health Policy Forum
9th September 2010
www.actionforglobalhealth.eu
Aid Effectiveness in the Health Sector
Paris Declaration
Accra Agenda for Action
IHP+
JANS
HSS Funding Platform
Action for Global Health & Aid Effectiveness
 IHP+:
 Northern Civil Society Representative to Executive Team &
SuRG
 HSS Funding Platform
 TTHATS:
 Contribution to OECD Interim Report
 CS representation in TTHATS; specific focus on democratic
ownership
 Policy reports:
 ‘Healthy Aid’
 ‘Health in Crisis’
Progress on Aid Effectiveness (IHP+)
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JANS:
Conducted in Nepal, Uganda, Ethiopia
Upcoming in Vietnam, Ghana, Mali
Lessons learned:


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Helpful as structured approach to analysing draft plan
Enabled broader participation (incl. CS)
Expected to improve quality of plans
Suggestions not always new, but can emphasise key issues to
be addressed
 Nepal: GAVI used JANS in approving support; others already
committed to funding plan
 Ethiopia: awaiting responses from development partners
regarding what they will do differently.
Progress on Aid Effectiveness (IHP+)
IHP+ Results:
Annual monitoring of IHP+ commitments
Putting mutual accountability into practice
Developed an agreed set of Standard
Performance Measures
Coordinating efforts with OECD/DAC
Production of country scorecards
Progress on Aid Effectiveness (IHP+)
 IHP+ Results:
 Expected Results:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Commitments are documented & mutually agreed
Support is based on country plans & strategies
Funding commitments are increased &/or long-term
Funds are disbursed predictably and as committed
Country systems for procurement & public financial
management are used & strengthened
6. Resources are being managed for Development
results
7. Mutual accountability is being demonstrated
8. Civil society is actively engaged
Challenges & Risks for IHP+ in 2010
Challenges:
 Countries moving faster than development partners
 Are development partners really committed?
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Ensuring behaviour change
Understanding mutual accountability
Demonstrating results
Turning the rhetoric into action
Sustaining donor interest
Filling the financing gaps
Opportunities, Challenges & Risks for IHP+ in 2010
 Risks:
 IHP+ is about catalysing change but risks becoming a
stand-alone project
 All signatories need to take responsibility for the
success of the IHP+
 All partners must be responsible for meeting
commitments made
 IHP+ needs to be responsive to new developments in
global health financing
 2010: need for greater focus on
 Joint Assessment of National Strategies (JANS)
 Mutual Accountability
Progress on Aid Effectiveness
 HSS Funding Platform (GAVI, Global Fund, World
Bank, WHO)
 Strengthen country systems
 Mobilise new & existing funds for HSS
 Align & harmonise HSS support
 NOT: a new global fund or pool for HSS resources
 Platform will be: country-driven; results-focused;
involve relevant stakeholders
 Based on supporting: One national plan; One financial
management & procurement arrangement; One
performance assessment framework, shared annual
report, & one M&E system
The HSS Funding Platform

Track 1: Better harmonisation between existing GAVI & GFATM
projects

Track 2: How new funding should be allocated, 2 options:
1.
2.

Merging of current GAVI & GFATM HSS applications – to become
operational in 2011
Funding of national health sector strategies/plans
Track 2, option 2:
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
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IHP+ JANS tool to be used as basis for funding decisions
Donors work together to decide which parts of national health sector
strategies/plans they will fund
Funding allocated through existing mechanisms, but more coordinated
and transparent
Global Health Initiatives in 2010
 Agenda for Action on the MDGs
 MDG Contracting
 MDG Review Summit
 EC Global Health Communication
 Muskoka Initiative
 Global Strategy for Women and Children’s
Health
Making progress on aid effectiveness in health?
 Challenges in applying Paris Declaration principles on:
 Managing for results
 Mutual accountability
 Democratic ownership (incl. civil society involvement)
 How are new initiatives responding to aid
effectiveness principles?
Action for Global Health & Aid Effectiveness
 Aid effectiveness fact-finding missions
 Countries:
 Uganda, Tanzania, El Salvador, Mozambique, India, Vietnam
 Objective:
 Gather evidence and experience from Southern partners on progress on
aid effectiveness
 Scope:
 Ownership, including CS & MP participation in the health sector
 Impact of donor coordination on health spending in developing countries
 Role of aid in progress towards the MDGs and universal access to
primary health care.
Action for Global Health & Aid Effectiveness
 Aid effectiveness Online Dialogue, Oct 2010-March 2011:
 2 parallel online discussions
 Thematic Axes:
 Ownership, including CS & MP participation in the health sector
 Impact of donor coordination on health spending in developing countries
 Role of aid in progress towards the MDGs and universal access to
primary health care.
 Roundtables on aid effectiveness:
 EU Donor Roundtable (April 2011)
 Joint CSO/Donor Roundtable (June 2011)
THANK YOU!
www.actionforglobalhealth.eu
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Delivering Effective Aid for Health: International Health