Nuclear Fission and
Fusion
Warm - Up
What do you know, or think you know, about nuclear fission
and fusion?
Objectives
Today I will be able to:
Distinguish between different types of radiation with respect to
their penetration power.
Complete a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast nuclear
fission and fusion.
Review atom concepts to prepare for an exam
Homework
Study for the Atom Exam on Monday/ Tuesday of Next
Week
Keep working on data collection for STEM fair
Agenda
Warm – up
Collect STEM introductions
Review Gamma, Positron and Electron Capture
Radioactivity Equation Practice
Nuclear Chemistry Notes
Fission vs. Fusion Venn Diagram
Atom Exam Review
Exit Ticket
Radiation
Alpha
Beta
Gamma
Composition
& Symbol
Is shielded or
stopped by?
Radiation
Composition
& Symbol
Alpha
2 p+ and 2 n0
Beta
Stream of high
speed e-
Gamma
Very high energy
electromagnetic
radiation
Is shielded or
stopped by?
Shielding Radiation
, aluminum
Radiation
Composition
& Symbol
Is shielded or
stopped by?
Alpha
2 p+ and 2 n0
paper
Beta
Stream of high
speed e-
Clothing, wood
Gamma
Very high energy Concrete, lead
electromagnetic
radiation
Nuclear Fission
A heavy nucleus splits into more stable nuclei of intermediate
mass.
Atomic Bombs
Atomic bombs are an example of Fission
Reactions.
“Little boy” and “Fat man” were Atomic
bombs made from fission reactions with
uranium and plutonium respectively.
A fission chain reaction is started and
continues until the bomb destroys itself.
Little Boy and Fat Man
Nuclear Power Plants
map: Nuclear Energy Institute
Nuclear Power Plants
Uranium-235 undergoes nuclear fission and releases
thermal (heat) energy.
This turns water to steam which spins turbines.
The turbines produce electrical energy.
Nuclear waste is fuel rods with unreacted uranium and
radioactive products of fission. Right now this waste is
buried in waste management facilities, like Yucca
Mountain.
Maryland Nuclear Power Plant
Calvert Cliffs is Maryland’s
nuclear power plant
http://www.cleanenergyinsight.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/yuccamountain.jpg
Nuclear Fusion
Low-mass nuclei combine to form a heavier, more
stable nucleus.
Hydrogen Bombs
Hydrogen bombs are an example of nuclear fusion.
Two isotopes of hydrogen, 2H and 3H, fuse together
and produce a lot of energy in the process.
H-bombs release significantly more energy than atomic
bombs.
The Sun: Nuclear
Fusion
Sun
+
+
1
41H
Four
hydrogen
nuclei
(protons)

0
2 -1 e
Two beta
particles
(electrons)
4
2
He +
One
helium
nucleus
Energy
Nuclear Fission
Nuclear Fusion
Nuclear Fission
A heavy atom
splits into two
or more lighter
nuclei
Ex: Atomic
Bombs &
Nuclear
reactors
Nuclear Fusion
Release
huge
amounts of
energy
Produce
nuclear
waste
High temp and
pressure are
used to
combine light
atoms to make
heavier atoms
Ex: Fuels the
sun and stars
& Hydrogen
Bombs
Comparing Fission and Fusion
http://media-1.web.britannica.com/eb-media/03/72203-035-4D92BDBC.jpg
Did You Know ?
http://www.ambrosevideo.com/resources/documents/89.jpg
The Next Slide
The next slide shows a great flow diagram that links
a lot of radioactive decay concepts.
http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20060611033960/schools/images/0/0b/Chart.JPG
Exit Ticket
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Nuclear Fission and Fusion