Adverbs
Lesson 1: Identifying adverbs and
the verbs they modify.
Adverb
Verb
An adverb is a word that can
modify a verb.
Adverbs that modify verbs
answer these questions:
HOW? WHERE? WHEN?
Here are some examples!
• HOW?
Alma left quickly.
• WHERE?
She arrived there.
• WHEN?
Then she arrived.
Try It Out!
1.
Yesterday we packed.
2. I enjoyed our trip immensely.
3. Mom drove carefully and well.
4. Dad always checked the maps.
5. Finally, we arrived safely.
Adverbs
Lesson 2: Identifying adverbs and the
adverbs and adjectives they modify.
Adverb
Adjective or Adverb
An adverb can also modify
an adjective
or another adverb.
Adverbs that modify an adjective
or another adverb, usually tell
to what extent.
Here is an example!
A very large crowd
gathered quite quickly
after the accident.
Try It Out:
What word does each underlined adverb modify?
1.
a terribly long way
2.
completely safe elevator
3.
reads quite carefully
4.
very realistic dreams
5.
burns less brightly
6.
sings very beautifully
7.
smiles so happily
Adverbs
Lesson 3:
Comparing with adverbs
Comparing two or more actions!
To compare two actions:
use the comparative form (-er)
Dan arrived later than Sidney.
To compare more than two actions:
use the superlative form (-est)
I arrived latest of all.
Comparing two or more actions!
If an adverb ends with –ly,
add more or most
to make comparisons.
Jim answered more loudly than Sidney.
Using less or least
When you compare actions or qualities
that are less rather than more,
use less and least to make comparisons.
Dan rows less often than Lisa does.
Their coach complains least often of all.
Some adverbs have irregular
forms of comparison.
ADVERB
Comparative
Superlative
well
better
best
badly
worse
worst
little
less
least
much
more
most
Adverbs
Lesson 4:
Negatives
Be Positive!
A word that means “no” is called a negative.
A negative can reverse the meaning of a sentence.
Annie is on the team.
Annie is not on the team.
Common Negatives
Some of the most common negatives are
no, none, not, no one, never, nothing,
hardly, nowhere, and nobody.
The n’t in a contraction is also a negative.
Doug never mows the yard.
Carolyn couldn’t go with us.
YIKES! Double Negatives!
Two negatives used together are called
a
double negative.
Incorrect:
I can’t find nothing to wear.
Correct:
I can find nothing to wear.
Correct:
I can’t find anything to wear.
Avoiding a double negative!
(1) Drop the not (n’t).
Correct: I can find nothing to wear.
(2) Substitute a positive word
for a negative word.
Correct: I can’t find anything to wear.
Most negative words have
matching positive words!
NEGATIVE
nothing
neither
never
nobody
no
none
POSITIVE
anything
either
ever
anybody
any
some
Adverbs
Lesson 5:
Adjectives or Adverbs?
Adjective or Adverb?
Remember:
• Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns.
We took a quick walk through the park.
• Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and
other adverbs and sometimes end in –ly.
We walked quickly through the park.
Good or Well?
• Good is always an adjective.
It is a good day to take pictures.
Carly’s pictures are always good.
• Well is usually an adverb. However, when
well means “healthy”, it is an adjective.
Adverb:
I played baseball well.
Adjective:
I didn’t feel well when I awoke.
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Adverb Powerpoint (Lessons 1