The Rodale Institute
works with farmers,
educators and
policymakers worldwide
To achieve a regenerative food system
that renews and improves
environmental and human health.
What is
Regenerative
Farming?
Regenerative farming is a longterm, holistic approach towards
agriculture that attempts to grow as
much food using as little resources
as possible, in a way that revitalizes
the soil rather than depleting it.
Rodale’s
Philosophy:
“Healthy Soil =
Healthy Food =
Healthy People”
By caring for the soil,
regenerative farming can help
benefit farmers, the community
and the environment.
Here’s how…
Farmers benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Gaining access to
new markets.
Organic produce is a
valuable commodity
that buyers will pay
a premium for.
This can translate into profits.
Farmers benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Reducing expenses.
With fewer
expenses related to
pesticides, fertilizers
and tillage, farmers
can save money.
This can also
translate into profits.
Farmers benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Growing fresher and
healthier foods.
Producing fresher,
healthier foods isn’t
just the right thing
to do…
…it helps to improve farmers’
relationships with their customers.
Farmers benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Less contact with
dangerous chemicals.
By reducing the use
of chemical
pesticides and
fertilizers, farmers
also make life safer
for their families,
customers and employees.
Communities benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Getting cleaner water.
Agricultural runoff is one of the
biggest causes of water pollution.
Regenerative farming
reduces pollution.
Communities benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Paying less for water.
Clean water requires less treatment,
which can help bring water costs down.
Communities benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Eating fresher food.
Community
members who
eat organic food
benefit from a
cleaner, safer,
fresher product.
Communities benefit from
regenerative farming by…
Less contact with
dangerous chemicals.
Farms that reduce
their use of chemical
pesticides and
fertilizers…
…prevent these chemicals
from affecting their neighbors.
The environment benefits from
regenerative farming through…
Less carbon dioxide in
the atmosphere.
Carbon dioxide is a leading
greenhouse gas. Regenerative
farming helps store carbon dioxide in
the soil, in turn helping to lessen
global warming.
The environment benefits from
regenerative farming through…
Reduced pesticides
and fertilizers in the
environment.
Farms that don’t rely on phosphate and
nitrate-based fertilizers and pesticides
prevent these chemicals from making
their way into the water.
That’s good for
the environment.
The environment benefits from
regenerative farming through…
Less soil erosion and
healthier soil.
Farms that use cover crops and other
regenerative farming techniques help
keep nutrients in the soil and have
significantly less soil erosion.
That’s also good for
the environment.
The environment benefits from
regenerative farming by…
Less fossil fuel use.
With less tillage, fertilizer and
pesticide application, farmers can
potentially spend less time out in the
field using heavy machinery — thus
using less fossil fuels.
That’s also good for
the environment.
Without a doubt, regenerative farming
is helping farmers, communities and
the environment…
…and the Rodale Institute is
helping regenerative farming.
Through its scientific research, support
for farmers and community education
programs, the Rodale Institute is taking
a leading role in the study and promotion
of regenerative farming.
Here’s how…
The Rodale Institute runs an
Experimental Farm and houses
functioning research laboratories.
Farmers and scientists from
around the world use Rodale’s
facilities to compare different
agricultural systems.
Rodale’s scientific research
has helped to…
Show the relationship
between agricultural practices
and the environment
Rodale has
documented how
different farming
systems influence the
spread of nutrients
and chemicals from
the soil into our water
supplies.
Rodale’s scientific research
has helped to…
Refine cover crop
strategies for improving
soil and water quality.
By experimenting with unusual cover
crops, such as hairy vetch, Rodale is
finding new ways for farmers to
reduce tillage and the need for
fertilizers and pesticides.
Rodale’s scientific research has
helped to…
Find profitable, real-world
solutions for farmers.
Rodale doesn’t just test out different
crops. It sells them. In doing so,
Rodale is able to figure out which
agricultural systems make the most
money in the real world.
When the Rodale Institute finds
regenerative farming techniques that
can benefit farmers, it shares them.
Rodale’s education and
outreach programs are making
regenerative farming a reality.
Rodale’s education and
outreach has helped to…
Educate farmers about
alternative practices.
Rodale provides farmers with
information on all sorts of
regenerative techniques.
This helps farmers do more to
protect human health and the
environment and to enter into new,
profitable markets.
Rodale’s education and
outreach has helped to…
Teach young people about
science and environmental
stewardship.
Rodale’s support of environmental
education helps make the basics of
reading, writing and arithmetic
exciting for students, while teaching
them the importance of civic
involvement.
Rodale’s education and outreach
has helped to…
Teach consumers about how
their choices affect their
health, the environment and
family farms.
By promoting healthy, organic
foods and educating consumers
about its benefits, Rodale is
helping to increase the market for
it, while protecting health and the
environment.
Rodale’s education and
outreach has helped to…
Teach policy makers to
understand the connections
between agriculture and the
environment.
By educating policy makers about
agriculture’s impact on the
environment, Rodale also
demonstrates the importance of
supporting farmers making the switch
to regenerative agricultural practices.
Regenerative farming renews and
improves environmental and human
health, with the potential to make
farmers money.
Everybody wins…
And everyone can help.
To learn how you can get
involved, contact:
The Rodale Institute
(610) 683-1400
www.rodaleinstitute.org
Parents and teachers, please
visit our kids’ site:
www.kidsregen.org
Farmers and gardeners,
please be sure to visit:
www.newfarm.org
Funding for this presentation
was presented by: