Making Good PowerPoint Slides
Points to be Covered
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Outline
Slide Structure
Fonts
Color
Background
Graphs
Spelling and Grammar
Conclusions
Questions
Some details
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FIRST SLIDE: PUT YOUR NAME AND
AFFILIATION, AND NAMES OF ALL GUIDES
AND THEIR AFFILIATIONS (DEPTS,
ORGANIZATIONS, etc.)
TIME FOR SYNOPSIS: 25 MIN + 5 MIN Q&A;
MAX 15 SLIDES (STRICTLY)
TIME FOR ABSTRACTS: 40 MIN + 10 MIN
Q&A; MAX 30 SLIDES (STRICTLY)
Outline
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Make your 1st slide an outline of your
presentation
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Follow the order of your outline
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Only place main points on the outline slide
Slide Structure
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Plan for about 1.5-2 minutes per slide in your
presentation
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Write in point form, not complete
sentences, i.e., use key words and phrases
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Not everything needs to be presented:
choose material to be put on slides
Slides should be un-cluttered and
use bullets
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Fonts
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Use 28-point (Caps) font-size for text and 32
point (Caps) for titles/headings
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Use a standard font like Times New Roman or
Arial
Color
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Use colors so that the text contrasts sharply
with the background
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Make a mock presentation and see your slides
presented on a screen/wall (and not on a
computer screen only)
Background
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Use backgrounds such as this one that are
attractive but simple
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Use backgrounds which are light
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Use the same background consistently
throughout your presentation
Graphs
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Use graphs rather than charts and words
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Data in graphs is easier to comprehend and retain
than is raw data
Trends are easier to visualize in graphical form
Always title your graphs
Spelling and Grammar
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Proof your slides for:
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spelling mistakes
the use of repeated words
grammatical errors you might have made
If English is not your first language, please
have someone else check your presentation
REFERENCES: STYLE
(FULL INFORMATION NEEDED)
FOR RESEARCH PAPERS, USE:
Chiu, W. Y., Carratt, G. M. and Soong, D. S., A
Computer Model for the Gel Effect in Free-Radical
Polymerization, Macromolecules, 16, 348-357
(1983).
FOR BOOKS, USE:
Beveridge, G. S. G. and Schechter, R. S.,
Optimization: Theory and Practice, New York:
McGraw-Hill, New York, 1970.
Conclusion
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Use a conclusion slide to:
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Summarize the main points of your presentation
Suggest future avenues of research
Questions??
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End your presentation with a simple question
slide to:
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Invite your audience to ask questions
Provide a visual aid during question period
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