Two Useful Adjective
Clause Devices
Lesson 30
A special type of adjective clause is useful
when you wish to state a act about only a
part or a number of a larger group.
Gloria has three sisters, one of whom is
a nurse.
The adjective clause state a fact about (all,
one) of the sisters
A special type of adjective clause is useful
when you wish to state a act about only a
part or a number of a larger group.
Gloria has three sisters, one of whom is
a nurse.
The adjective clause state a fact about (all,
one) of the sisters
Along the coast are many small
islands, some of which are uninhabited.
The clause states a fact about (some, all)
of the islands.
Along the coast are many small
islands, some of which are uninhabited.
The clause states a fact about (some, all)
of the islands.
These adjective clauses begin with such
words as one of whom, several of
whom, two of which, most of which.
The room has three windows, one of
which is always locked.
The word in the clause that specifies the
number to which the statement applies is
the (first, last) word.
These adjective clauses begin with such
words as one of whom, several of
whom, two of which, most of which.
The room has three windows, one of
which is always locked.
The word in the clause that specifies the
number to which the statement applies is
the (first, last) word.
The number of the group that these clauses
single out may vary from none of whom,
to all of whom.
Fill in the missing words to show that none
of the coins are rare. (None may take
either a singular or plural verb.)
I have many old coins, ______ are rare.
The number of the group that these clauses
single out may vary from none of whom,
to all of whom.
Fill in the missing words to show that none
of the coins are rare. (None may take
either a singular or plural verb.)
I have many old coins, none of which are
rare.
Fill in the missing words to show that all
the coins are rare:
I have many old coins, _________ are
rare.
Fill in the missing words to show that all
the coins are rare:
I have many old coins, all of which are
rare.
Fill in the missing words to show that a few
of the coins are rare:
I have many old coins, ________ are
rare.
Fill in the missing words to show that a few
of the coins are rare:
I have many old coins, a few of which
are rare.
In using this type of clause, be careful to
use whom, and not which, to refer to
people.
The Adamos have three sons, two of
(which, whom) are now attending college.
In using this type of clause, be careful to
use whom, and not which, to refer to
people.
The Adamos have three sons, two of
(which, whom) are now attending
college.
Customs official, may of (whom, which)
speak English, examine your luggage.
Customs official, may of (whom, which)
speak English, examine your luggage.
In this and the following frames,
subordinate the italicized statement by
changing it to an adjective clause built on
the “one of which” or “some of whom”
pattern:
We have three clocks, and none of them
keeps good time.
We have three clocks, ________ keeps
good time.
In this and the following frames,
subordinate the italicized statement by
changing it to an adjective clause built on
the “one of which” or “some of whom”
pattern:
We have three clocks, and none of them
keeps good time.
We have three clocks, none of which
keeps good time.
Rita baby-sits with two children, and
one of them is very mischievous.
Rita baby-sits with two children,
________ is very mischievous.
Rita baby-sits with two children, and
one of them is very mischievous.
Rita baby-sits with two children, one of
whom is very mischievous.
The air is full of bacteria, but most of
them are harmless.
The air is full of bacteria, _________ are
harmless.
The air is full of bacteria, but most of
them are harmless.
The air is full of bacteria, most of
which are harmless.
The college has eight hundred
students, and many of them come from
foreign countries.
The college has eight hundred
students, ________ come from foreign
countries.
The college has eight hundred
students, and many of them come from
foreign countries.
The college has eight hundred
students, many of whom come from
foreign countries.
The school has twelve rooms, and three
of them are not used.
The school has twelve rooms,
_________ are not used.
The school has twelve rooms, and three
of them are not used.
The school has twelve rooms, three of
which are not used.
Ralph brought his parents, and I had
met neither of them before.
Ralph brought his parents, _________ I
had met before.
Ralph brought his parents, and I had
met neither of them before.
Ralph brought his parents, neither of
whom I had met before.
In a similar type of adjective clause, a noun
precedes the words of which; for
example, the price of which, the result
of which, the purpose of which.
There are many words the meanings of
which have changed.
What noun precedes of which?
In a similar type of adjective clause, a noun
precedes the words of which; for
example, the price of which, the result
of which, the purpose of which.
There are many words the meanings of
which have changed.
What noun precedes of which?
meanings
Mr. Kerr bought several stocks the
value of which is very doubtful.
What noun precedes of which?
Mr. Kerr bought several stocks the
value of which is very doubtful.
What noun precedes of which?
value
Ordinarily, the relative pronoun whose
provides a smoother sentence than of
which and requires fewer words.
I read a novel the ending of which is
disappointing.
b. I read a novel whose ending is
disappointing.
a.
Sentence b is ______ words shorter than
sentence a.
(How many?)
Ordinarily, the relative pronoun whose
provides a smoother sentence than of
which and requires fewer words.
I read a novel the ending of which is
disappointing.
b. I read a novel whose ending is
disappointing.
a.
Sentence b is two words shorter than
sentence a.
(How many?)
The relative pronoun whose, unlike who
and whom, can be used for things as well
as persons.
I ordered a French soup the name of
which I can’t pronounce.
b. I ordered a French soup whose name
I can’t pronounce.
a.
Are both sentences correct? (Yes, No)
The relative pronoun whose, unlike who
and whom, can be used for things as well
as persons.
I ordered a French soup the name of
which I can’t pronounce.
b. I ordered a French soup whose name
I can’t pronounce.
a.
Are both sentences correct? (Yes, No)
Even though whose may be used for
things, there are times when you might
prefer the of which construction. Change
the whose to the of which construction.
She makes chili whose preparation takes
an entire day.
She makes chili ___________ takes an
entire day.
Even though whose may be used for
things, there are times when you might
prefer the of which construction. Change
the whose to the of which construction.
She makes chili whose preparation takes
an entire day.
She makes chili the preparation of
which takes an entire day.
Change the whose to the of which
construction:
The minister told a story whose point
most people missed.
The minister told a story _________
most people missed.
Change the whose to the of which
construction:
The minister told a story whose point
most people missed.
The minister told a story the point of
which most people missed.
Change the whose of the of which
construction:
The doctor recommended a cough
medicine whose name I can’t recall.
The doctor recommended a cough
medicine __________ I can’t recall.
Change the whose of the of which
construction:
The doctor recommended a cough
medicine whose name I can’t recall.
The doctor recommended a cough
medicine the name of which I can’t
recall.
Write the following answers on your
own sheet of paper.
In this and the following frames,
subordinate each italicized statement to
an of which construction, preceded by a
noun (“the cause of which,” “the price of
which”):
Our school had an assembly, and the
purpose was to improve sportsmanship.
1.Our school had an assembly
________was to improve sportsmanship.
My tropical fish contracted a disease,
and the cause of it is not known.
2. My tropical fish contracted a disease
________ is not known.
Our television set has a knob, and I
have never discovered its purpose.
3. Our television set has a knob
________ I have never discovered.
The county constructed a road, and the
need for it was very great.
4. The county constructed a road
________ was very great.
We studied a poem by Alice walker,
and its meaning was very difficult.
5. We studied a poem by Alice Walker
_________ was very difficult.
We camped at the foot of Silver
Mountain, and its top is snow-capped.
6. We camped at the foot of Silver
Mountain ___________ is snow-capped.
You are done!!!
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Two Useful Adjective Clause Devices