Tertiary Education in the Context
of
Globalization.
Translating vision into reality,
the case
of Mauritius.
By
Dr Nittin Essoo
Director Rushmore Business School
Mauritius
Presentation outline
• The Mauritian tertiary education landscape
• Rushmore Business School
• The vision for Mauritius
• Global and regional trends in student mobility
• Mauritius as a knowledge hub
• Conclusion
Tertiary Education Landscape in Mauritius
• Public and private providers
• National Qualifications Framework
• Regulation and quality assurance
Tertiary Education Commission
Mauritius Qualifications Authority
• Degree Awarding Powers
• Collaborative partnerships and presence of
overseas institutions
• Knowledge hub - provision for foreign students
RUSHMORE BUSINESS SCHOOL
Overview
• Private Higher Education Institution founded in 2002
providing academic and professional courses to
school leavers, graduates and the business
community.
• All courses are accredited by the Tertiary Education
Commission/Mauritius qualifications Authority
(MQA) and British Accreditation Council UK (first in
Africa)
• Collaborative provision with British Universities, a
French Ecole de Commerce and a number of
awarding institutions
RUSHMORE BUSINESS SCHOOL
Aim & Mission
• To be one of the leading institutions of higher
education within the Indian Ocean Rim region.
•To transfer solutions to management
problems through our students, research and
consultancy.
Courses
•
•
•
•
•
Business Courses
Hospitality and Tourism
Engineering
Architecture
Built Environment – quantity surveying,
construction management
• Health and Social Sciences
Programmes range from Level 4 certificates to PhD.
RUSHMORE BUSINESS SCHOOL
Academic Partners
EUROPEAN BUSINESS SCHOOL
La plus concrète des grandes écoles
RUSHMORE BUSINESS SCHOOL
Business Model
• All degrees awarded by British or French partner
institutions.
• Franchise agreement or fly-in faculty from partner
institutions.
• All courses are accredited by local regulator.
• Some 50 academic staff (FT and PT), 15 administrative
staff.
• Study abroad semester or academic year for European
students.
• 10% foreign students
• Academic output: some 600 graduates to date
Rushmore Campus
Translating vision into reality
http://www.investmauritius.com/download/edu
cation.wmv
THE VISION
Increase access for local
residents
Internationalization
Knowledge Hub
The Vision
• Internationalisation
• Knowledge Hub
Global Demand for International Education
•
Out of 152 million students worldwide in 2007, 2.8 million were international
students, representing around 4% of the total student population worldwide
•
Demand for international higher education is set to increase from 1.8 million
international students in 2000 to 7.2 million students in 2025
•
Asia will represent some 70% of total global demand, of which China and India will
be the key growth drivers, representing over half of global demand and Africa will
play a major role.
•
Australia’s share of global demand is set to increase from 3% to 8% with a total
forecasted number of around one million students
•
Offshore programmes in Australia will account for 44% of this total demand
•
Asia will continue to dominate the global demand for Australian higher education
reaching 92% in 2025
Supply Countries (2007)
• China:
• India:
• Republic of Korea:
• Germany:
• Japan:
• France:
• Malaysia:
• Russia:
421,100
153,300
105,300
77,500
54,500
54,000
46,500
42,900
These countries account for 37.5% of world’s mobile students.
The whole of SADC countries in Africa accounted for 89,000
of mobile students in 2009.
Regional Profiles in Student Mobility
•
Sub-Saharan Africa: about 5.8% of all tertiary education students study
Abroad
•
Central Asia: 5% of world’s mobile students
•
Arab States: 7% of world’s mobile students
•
East Asia and the Pacific: 29% of world’s mobile students, of which, China account for 15%
•
South and West Asia: 9% of world’s mobile students, of which, India is 5.5%
•
Central and Eastern Europe: 11% of world’s mobile students
•
Latin America and the Caribbean: 6% of world’s mobile students
•
North America and Western Europe: 18% of world’s mobile students
•
Others: around 10% of world’s mobile students
Africa
• Yet, Sub-Saharan Africa is the region that faces the greatest
challenges in the provision of higher education
• An average annual growth rate of 8.4% compared to 4.3% for
the world as a whole.
• Currently, over 4.8 million students are enrolled in higher
education institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa.
• At the current rate of expansion, it is projected that by 2015
Africa will have twice as many tertiary students as in 2006 i.e.
about 18.6 million enrolments in 2015 (World Bank, 2010).
Africa
• Students from the SADC region are the most mobile in the
world.
• But they tend to stay close to home.
• In 2009, over 1.5 million SADC students were enrolled in
higher education institutions, of that 89,000 studied abroad,
which represents almost 6% of tertiary enrolment, compared
to 2% worldwide.
• Almost half of them (48%) went to South Africa.
• South Africa hosted 61,000 foreign students (known as
internationally mobile students), two-thirds of which came
from other SADC countries.
• 69% of internationally mobile students from other parts of
sub-Saharan Africa opted to study in Europe or North America
Africa
ISCED 56 Enrolment (million)
Explosive growth in SSA
5.0
growth: 6.5 %
4.5
4.0
growth: 11.1
%
3.5
3.0
2.5
growth: 8 %
2.0
1.5
growth: 13.8
%
1.0
growth: 10.3
0.5
%
0.0
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
4517
3769
2344
1273
497
196
GED 2009:
update with GED2010
GED 2010:UIS
Mauritius
Cape Verde
Togo
Benin
Ghana
Botswana
Côte d’Ivoire
Senegal
Cameroon
Guinea
Namibia
Democratic
Mali
Uganda
Swaziland
Lesoth
o
Ethiopia
Kenya
Madagascar
Burund
i
Angola
Eritrea
Malawi
Niger
Central
Chad
Tanzania
GER ISCED 56
GGER for tertiary education in sub- Saharan Africa
Saharan Africa
25
20
15
10
5
0
The global share of mobile
students is relatively stable
Number of mobile students from a given region as a percentage of tertiary
enrolment in that region (outbound mobility ratio), 1999 and 2007
Outbound mobility ratio by country
Outbound mobility ratio (%)
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Uganda
South Africa
Ghana
Tanzania
Malawi
Mauritius Lesotho
Botswana
Why Mauritius?
• Cost of living
• Hospitable and vibrant nation
• Safe and secure environment – low crime rate
• Multi-cultural environment
• Bi-lingual or multi-lingual society
• Enriching Student experience
• Possibilities for internships and occupational permits in the
medium term
• Presence of brand institutions with relatively low tuition fees
• Mauritius has more to offer
Conclusion
• International student mobility is changing the global higher education
landscape.
• Increasing number of students going abroad to pursue tertiary education.
• Africa’s growth rate in terms of mobile students growing faster than
elsewhere in the world.
• A large number of African students go to South Africa for studies.
• Visa Schemes and immigration procedures seem to play an increasingly
important role in the decision process – students not only seeking
employment but (temporary) residency.
• Countries which facilitate the arrival and integration of international
students through these schemes will be more competitive.
• “Student Experience” is an important motivational factor.
• Cost of higher education will prove to be a competitive edge.
• Mauritius seems to satisfy most of the criteria.
• Brand Universities need to consider establishing presence in SSA beyond
the traditional franchise model.
Information Sources
• UNESCO Institute for Statistics: Global Education Digest (2009)
• “Global Student Mobility 2025”. Bohm, Davis,
Meares and Pearce (2002)
• “International Student Mobility”. World Education News and
Reviews (2007)
Study in Mauritius
The new Sub- Saharan African knowledge hub
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Tertiary Education in the Context of Globalization. Translating vision