Postsecondary Education & Training
Webinar 2
Strategies for
Success
PRESENTED BY:
The Center for Change in Transition Services
CCTS Webinar Series
Welcome to the 2014-2015 Webinar series on
postsecondary education and training.
Presented by the Center for Change in Transition Services
(CCTS), a Special Education State Needs Project housed at
Seattle University and funded through the Office of the
Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).
CCTS has been serving special need students, their
families and schools since 1990.
Registration
1) Everyone participating in the webinar
needs to type the following in the chat box
– Name
– Email Address
2) You will be sent a link following the
webinar to register for Clock Hours. You
must complete the registration process
to apply for clock hours!
Thank you for joining us today!
Closed Captioned (CC)
This webinar is closedcaptioned. To view the
captioning click on the CC
icon just above the video.
Webinar Norms
Raise your hand and wait to be called on by
moderator
If you have a microphone, please keep it turned off
until called on.
You may ask questions by typing in the chat box or
by raising your hand (if you have a microphone).
CCTS Introductions
Cinda Johnson
Ed.D., Principal
Investigator
Sue Ann Bube
Julia Schechter
Ed.D., Director
M.Ed., Doctoral
Research Assistant
Meet today’s guest participant
Kim Thompson
Dean of Students
Shoreline Community College
CCTS Contact Information
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 206.296.6494
http://www.seattleu.edu/ccts
2014-2015 Webinars
Strategies for Success
November 12th
Self-determination and self-advocacy are key attributes students should possess for success beyond graduation. Learn
how these skills can be acquired in high school and applied in higher education environments.
December 10th
What are the education opportunities for students with disabilities post-high school? Options including on-line education,
vocational education, and 2- & 4-year colleges and universities will be reviewed.
Identifying Options
Applying for Admissions
January 14th
Navigating admissions is challenging for everyone. This webinar will explore admissions issues specific to students with
disabilities.
February 11th
Join us to explore how students with disabilities are impacted by the differences in law when transition
between k-12 schools and higher education.
March 11th
Students with disabilities must seek their own accommodations after leaving high school. This webinar
will explore what to expect and how this process works at different types of postsecondary institutions.
April 8th
Exploring financial aid resources and opportunities to finance postsecondary education
will be the subject of this webinar.
IDEA vs. ADA and 504
Accommodations
Affordable?
Transition Planning
May 13th
The focus of our final webinar will be preparing for a successful transition by learning how to
write postsecondary education goals into the IEP and how to use the Summary of Performance (SOP)
document as a passport to education.
Strategies for success
Students with
disabilities: From
high school to
postsecondary
Strategies for Success
Strategies for Success
1. Self-advocate
2. Self-determination
3. Academic preparedness
4. Understand legal protections
5. K-12 vs higher education
6. Access disability services
Resources, Q & A
Roadmap to Success
Students with disabilities
need the same
competencies as any
other college student
PLUS whatever special
skills or strategies are
needed to cope with his or
her disability.
Kim Thompson, Dean of Students, Shoreline
Community College
•
Research
• 19% of youth with disabilities are enrolled full-time
in postsecondary settings compared to 40% from
the general population (Newman, 2005)
• Teaching self-determination is one of the key
practices in facilitating transition (U.S. Dept. of Ed., 2002)
• Self-determination and other empowering student
strategies can be learned and are linked to student
success. (Morningstar et al., 2005)
Strategies for success
1. Selfadvocate
4. Understand
legal protections
2. Practice selfdetermination
5. Recognize
differences
between K-12
and college
3. Be
academically
prepared
6. Access
disability
services
Hamblet (2011)
1. Self-advocate
Components
Knowing
one’s rights
Selfadvocacy
Communicating
effectively
Understanding
one’s disability
Hamblet (2011)
Building self-advocacy
Component
Activity
Responsibility for daily organization
tasks
• Completing and turning in
assignments
Responding to challenges
• Identifying areas of need
• Seeking help
• Working out conflicts effectively
Developing postsecondary goals
•
•
•
•
Participation in IEP meetings
Identifying accommodations
Understanding postsecondary options
Choosing appropriate high school
courses
Hamblet (2011)
The IEP
IDEA 2004 calls for increased student participation by
adding the consideration of student strengths to the
previously mandated focus on preference, interests
and needs when developing the transition plan.
Konrad, Walker, Fowler, Test & Wood (2008)
2. Practice Self-determination
Self-determination
Selfdetermination is
the ability to
identify and
achieve goals
based on a
foundation of
knowing and
valuing oneself
To receive
support in higher
education
students must
disclose their
disabilities
Selfdetermination
training while in
secondary is
critical to
receiving
postsecondary
supports
Eckes & Ochoa, 2005; Wehmeyer (2004)
Assessments
Zarrow Center for Learning and Enrichment
Components
Self Determination
F
Environment
Know Yourself and
Your Environment
Value Yourself
Plan
Act
Experience
Outcomes and Learn
Field & Hoffman
(2007)
Process
SET A
GOAL
FORM A
PLAN
WITH
STEPS TO
ACHIEVE
GOAL
ACQUIRE
SKILLS &
KNOWLEDGE
TO ACHIEVE
GOAL
EXECUTE
PLAN
REFLECT
ON PLAN
Hamblet (2011)
For teachers & counselors
• Explain self-determination to the student.
• Encourage students to be proactive.
• Understand the laws as they pertain to selfdetermination.
• Provide instruction.
• Provide opportunities to practice SD skills.
• Create a supportive school environment.
GWU Heath Resource Center
Campus resources
Disability Service
Office
Trio Center
Faculty office hours
Counseling
center
Peer
mentoring
programs
Tutoring centers
Skills workshops
Faculty syllabi
Kim Thompson, Dean of
Students, Shoreline
Community College
3. Academic preparedness
Flowchart
Transition strategies
• Understand the functional limitations, strengths &
weaknesses that result from one’s disability.
• Actively participate in IEP or Section 504 meetings.
• Practice explaining one’s disabilities and needs as
a way to gain confidence for having such
conversations in postsecondary settings.
• Take appropriate preparatory curriculum.
U.S. Dept. of Ed., Office of Civil Rights, 2014
Ask questions
• Is the campus a good fit for me? (e.g., accessibility,
supports, size, welcoming)
• Do I have the study & time management skills I
need and understand the expectations for study
time per class?
• Has my coursework prepared me for admissions
and success, if not what are the options?
Kim Thompson, Dean of
Students, Shoreline
Community College
4. Understand the differences in laws
governing K-12 and higher education
Legal differences
IDEA
ADA
Success
Access
Guarantee of services to
those that qualify
Prohibits discrimination
Ages 3 - 21
All ages
FAPE
Equivalent access
IEP
No formal plan
IEP Team Responsible
Student/Employee
Responsible
Legal protections change
COLLEGES
DO HAVE TO
PROVIDE:
COLLEGES
DON’T HAVE
TO:
EQUAL ACCESS TO
THE CURRICULUM
“LEVEL THE PLAYING
FIELD”
FUNDAMENTALLY
ALTER ADMISSIONS,
TEST, COURSE,
MAJOR OR
GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS
“REASONABLE”
ACCOMODATIONS
PROVIDE
“PERSONAL
SERVICES” SUCH AS
TUTORS
Hamblet (2011)
5. Recognize differences between K12 and postsecondary
Accessing supports is different
in K-12 vs. higher education
Services given to
student in K-12
without asking
Student must
seek out
services in
higher education
Academic adjustments
Unlike K-12, higher education institutions are not
required to lower essential academic standards or
fundamentally alter their program.
• For example, the college may be required to
provide extra testing time but not required to
change the substantive content of the test.
Academic adjustments may include:
 Substitution of some classes.
 Permission to tape record classes.
 Additional time to complete tests.
U.S. Dept. of Ed. Office of Civil Rights (2014)
GWU Heath Resource Center
Balance of participation
80
20
Kim Thompson, Dean of Students, Shoreline
Community College
Students
transition
to be their
own
advocates
Parents
transition
to
becoming
mentors
START EARLY
PRACTICE incrementally
Roles transition
6. Disability services and supports
Self-initiated activities
Get help
Go to
office
hours
Identify
recurring
problems
Time
management
Plan
ahead
Map out
time
Study
Good
practice
Be active
Create a
routine
Sit near
front of
class
Learn
how you
learn
Organize
your
space
Put
phone
away
Recopy
notes
Attend
entire
class
Learning
Identify
issues
Kim Thompson, Dean of Students, Shoreline Community College
Disability services
Registering with campus disability service office for:
• Determination of eligibility for academic
adjustments.
• Coordination of adjustments with faculty (e.g.
extended test time, large print books, priority
seating).
• Referrals to other campus support programs.
• Referrals to outside agencies when appropriate.
• Computer adaptive equipment/assistive technology.
Prevatt, Johnson, Allison & Proctor (2005)
In conclusion: Strategies for success
Strategies for success
Understand
disability
Articulate
strengths and
weaknesses
Participate in IEP
meeting
Selfdetermination
& advocacy
Understand
differences
between K-12 &
postsecondary
Identify best
accommodations
Attitude, self-advocacy and preparation
Understand disability
Own responsibility
Take appropriate
curriculum
• Functional limitations, strengths & weaknesses.
• Assume responsibility for success & failure.
• Meet essential standards.
Research
• Types of institutions, financial aid, supports.
postsecondary options
Learn time
management
• Keep a calendar, understand time-on-task.
Get involved
• Join a club, volunteer, make a friend.
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights
Dos & Don’ts
DO
FORM A PARTNERSHIP WITH
DS OFFICE & VISIT OFTEN
DON’T
EXPECT ANYONE TO WORK
HARDER THAN SELF
KNOW MOTIVATION FOR
BEING IN SCHOOL
TAKE TIME TO FIND BEST
ACCOMODATIONS
THINK PARENTS CAN
SPEAK FOR STUDENT
UNDERSTAND STUDENT, NOT
PARENT IS CLIENT
BE PASSIVE
HAVE A PLAN
Kim Thompson, Dean of Students,
Shoreline Community College
Questions and Answers
Thank you for
Participating!
Resources
George Washington University HEATH Resource Center
http://heath.gwu.edu/
The GWU HEATH Resource Center Clearinghouse provides information on transition to higher education
including information about disability support services, policies, procedures, accommodations, and financial
assistance. The Heath Guidance and Career Counselor Toolkit provides extensive resources.
ThinkCollege! http://www.thinkcollege.net/index.php
This website provides resources for students, families, and professionals supporting youth with intellectual
disabilities exploring postsecondary education options
University of Washington DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking and Technology)
http://www.washington.edu/doit/
DO IT serves to increase the success of people with disabilities in challenging academic programs and
careers. The website provides extensive college planning resources including a list of scholarships by
disability. DO-IT produces: Preparing for College: An Online Tutorial:
http://www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/cprep.html
United States Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html
The USDE Office of Civil Rights has many resources and publications to support students, families and
professionals explore options for transitioning to postsecondary education. One such publication is:
Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities.
Resources
Self-Determination Assessments. The Zarrow Center http://www.ou.edu/content/education/centers-andpartnerships/zarrow/self-determination-assessment-tools.html
The AIR Self-Determination Assessment focuses on two main components: Capacity and
Opportunity. Capacity refers to the knowledge, abilities, and perceptions which allow the student to be selfdetermined. Opportunity refers to the student's chances to use their knowledge and abilities.
1.The AIR Self-Determination Scale is available free of charge in a variety of forms: student
form, (Spanish) student form, parent form, and educator form.
2.The ARC Self-Determination Scale was developed by Dr. Michael Wehmeyer and colleagues to measure
strengths and weaknesses of adolescents with disabilities, facilitate student involvement in educational
planning and instruction to promote self-determination as an educational outcome, and assess student selfdetermination skills for research purposes.
3.The ChoiceMaker Self-Determination Assessment is used to measure the self-determination skills of
middle and high school students with mild to moderate disabilities.
•George Washington University, National Clearinghouse on Postsecondary Education for Individuals with
Disabilites. (2006). Guidance and Career Counselor Toolkit: Advising high school students with disabilities
on postsecondary options (U.S.Dept. of Education H326H01005). Retrieved from
https://heath.gwu.edu/sites/heath.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Toolkit%202014.pdf
References
•
AIR Self determination Assessments (2014, November). Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment.
Retrieved October 30, 2014, from http://www.ou.edu/content/education/centers-and-partnerships/
•
Eckes, S. E., & Ochoa, T. A. (2005). Students with disabilities: Transitioning from high school to higher
education. American Secondary Education, 33(3), 6-20.
•
Field, S. & Hoffman, A. (2007). Self-Determination in Secondary Transition Assessment. Assessment
for Effective Intervention, 32(3), 181-190.
•
George Washington University, National Clearinghouse on Postsecondary Education for Individuals
with Disabilites. (2006). Guidance and Career Counselor Toolkit: Advising high school students with
disabilities on postsecondary options (U.S. Dept. of Education H326H01005). Retrieved from
https://heath.gwu.edu/sites/heath.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Toolkit%202014.pdf
•
Konrad, M., Walker, A. R., Fowler, C. H., Test, D. W., & Wood, W. M. (2008). A model for aligning selfdetermination and general curriculum standards. Teaching Exceptional Children, 40(3), 53-64.
•
Hamblet, E. C., & Council for Exceptional Children. (2011). 7 steps for success: High school to college
transition strategies for students with disabilities. Arlington, VA: Council For Exceptional Children.
References
•
Morningstar, M. E., Frey, B. B., Noonan, P. M., Ng, J., Clavenna-Deane, B., Graves, P., . . . WilliamsDiehm, K. (2010). A preliminary investigation of the relationship of transition preparation and selfdetermination for students with disabilities in postsecondary educational settings. Career Development
for Exceptional Individuals, 33(2), 80-94. doi:10.1177/0885728809356568
•
Newman, L. (2005) Postsecondary education participation of youth with disabilities. In M. Wagner, L.
Newman, R. Cameto, N. Garza, & P.Levine, After high school: A first look at post-school experiences of
youth with disabilities. Retrieved November 11, 2008, from
http://www.nlts2.org/reports/2005_04/nlts2_report_2005_04_ch4.pdf
•
Prevatt, F., Johnson, L. E., Allison, K., & Proctor, B. E. (2005). Perceived usefulness of
recommendations given to college students evaluated for learning disability. Journal of Postsecondary
Education & Disability, 18(1), 71-79.
•
U.S. Department of Education. (2002, July). Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE):
Key findings. Washington D.C: Author. Available: http://www.spense.org
•
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, Transition of students with disabilities to
postsecondary education: A guide for high school educators, Washington D.C., 2011.
•
Wehmeyer, M. L., & Schalock, R. L. (2001). Self-determination and quality of life: Implications for
special education services and supports. Focus on Exceptional Children, 33(8),
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Strategies for Success