Certificate in Latin Literature
Basic structure
Candidates enter two of:
• Themed Latin literature
• Narrative Latin literature
• Teacher’s choice of literature
(via Controlled Assessment)
List of units available
9531/9541
Latin Literature Themes
Level 1 or 2
9532/9542
Latin Literature Narratives Level 1 or 2
9533/9543
Latin Literature Study 1
Level 1 or 2
9534/9544
Latin Literature Study 2
Level 1 or 2
Rules of unit combination:
These are necessary to prevent candidates from
submitting controlled assessment on the same text
they have prepared for a written paper.
Study 1 excludes texts set for Literature Themes.
Study 2 excludes texts set for Literature Narratives.
Latin Literature Themes
• Choice between two themes.
• Level 2: approx. 120 lines of Latin literature,
comprised of extracts on a common theme.
• Mixture of prose and verse.
• Open book: candidate is supplied with the full
text and vocabulary in the examination.
• Level 1: half the corresponding Level 2 text in
Latin, half in English.
• Borderline candidates: may enter Level 1 and
Level 2 in the same examination series.
Latin Literature Themes
Theme A: otium (Passages from the Cambridge Latin Anthology)
MARTIAL:
The good life
(Epigrams V.20)
HORACE:
The pleasures of country life
(Epodes II.1-8, 23-8)
CATULLUS Catullus invites a friend to dinner
(Carmina 13)
OVID:
A good place to find a girl
How ordinary people enjoy a festival
(Ars Amatoria 1.89-100)
(Fasti III.523-40)
PLINY:
A day in the life of Pliny the Elder
Ummidia Quadratilla
(Letters 3.5.9-16: extracts)
(Letters 7.24: extracts)
Theme B: Love and Marriage
anon.
Epitaph to Claudia (dated c.150 BC)
(C.I.L. 1.2.1211)
CICERO:
Letter to his friend Atticus
(ad Att. 5.1)
CATULLUS: Five poems
(Carmina 5, 8, 70, 72, 83)
OVID:
Advice to a rejected lover
(Ars Amatoria 1.469-478)
MARTIAL:
Marital equality?
(Epigrams 8.12)
PLINY:
To Calpurnia Hispulla, his wife’s aunt
Faithful unto death
(Letters 4.19)
(Letters 6.24)
Latin Literature Narratives
• Choice between two narrative texts: either
prose, or verse.
• Level 2: approx.120 lines of a single text.
• Open book: candidate is supplied with the full
text and vocabulary in the examination.
• Level 1: half the corresponding Level 2 text in
Latin, half in English.
• Borderline candidates: may enter Level 1 and
Level 2 in the same examination series.
Latin Literature Narratives
Section A: Tacitus (adapted), Nero et Agrippina
Section B: Virgil, Aeneid 2, lines 13-62 and 195-267
Controlled assessment:
approach - 1
Teaching the text
• Either candidates prepare the texts prescribed for
the equivalent written paper,
• or the teacher makes own choice of text (or group
of texts) of approximately the same length as the
equivalent written paper (examples on next slide).
• L2: approx. 120 lines
L1: approx. 60 lines in Latin + 60 lines in translation
• Teacher teaches the text in exactly the same way
as for a written paper.
Controlled assessment:
acceptable texts
• Any original texts from the 3nd century BC to the
3rd century AD
• Adapted or unadapted texts selected from:
The Cambridge Latin Anthology
Cupid and Psyche
Ecce Scriptores Romani
Introducing Cicero
The Millionaire’s Dinner Party
The Oxford Latin Reader
Two Centuries of Roman Poetry
Two Centuries of Roman Prose.
• Another text or anthology by written agreement
with the WJEC Subject Officer for Latin.
Controlled assessment:
approach - 2
Choosing the assignments
•
The teacher and candidate identify:
(i) a passage of 10-15 lines of Latin for
close analysis;
(ii) a wider selection/the whole text for thematic
discussion (see examples on next slide.)
•
The teacher and candidate agree on questions
for the two tasks above.
•
It is preferable (though not compulsory) for
candidates from the same Centre to choose
different Latin passages and different essay titles.
Controlled assessment:
approach – examples of titles
For close analysis
‘In what ways does […..] make this an exciting/disturbing/moving
passage?’ Refer to details of the Latin in your answer.
‘We learn more about Catullus than Lesbia from this poem.’
To what extent do you agree with this statement, and why?
You should refer to details of the Latin in your answer.
Thematic discussion
Which author – Catullus or Ovid – approaches the theme of love in
a more interesting way? Give reasons for your choice. You should
illustrate your answer with Latin from the poems of both authors.
What impression of Verres do you get from reading Cicero? In what
ways does Cicero use his literary skills to create this impression?
‘Pliny is only really interested in writing about himself.’ To what
extent is this a fair judgment on his literary output?
Controlled assessment:
approach - 3
Preparing for the submissions
• Candidates have up to 10 hours of study time
• May use texts, vocabularies, dictionaries, and
secondary sources (including translations).
• All class work or a combination of class work and
homework.
• There should be no formal teaching at this time.
• Any notes made by the candidate should be
collected and kept by the teacher, to be made
available to the Moderator, if requested.
Controlled assessment:
approach - 4
Writing the submissions
• Candidates have up to 4 hours in controlled
conditions to write their final submissions.
• They may have with them an unmarked copy
of the full text they have studied, together with
a vocabulary/dictionary - but no further notes.
• The 4 hours may be split into shorter sessions,
but any work produced must be kept safe by the
teacher and no new material may be brought in
to subsequent sessions.
Controlled assessment:
approach - 5
Marking the submissions
• Teachers assess the written tasks using the
Assessment Grids provided.
• If more than one teacher is involved, internal
moderation takes place between them.
• A sample of candidates’ work will be requested
to be sent to WJEC for moderation - consisting of
the written answers, a copy of the text(s) studied,
and the controlled assessment coversheet.
• Any notes made by the candidate should be
retained by the teacher, to be made available to
the Moderator, if requested.
Differences from GCSE
• Thematic and Narrative papers ][ prose and verse
• Allows wider choice of authors
• ‘Open book’ examination + vocabulary available
• No translation of chunks of set texts
• Option of Controlled Assessment
• Even choosing your own set texts!
• Free support from CSCP: texts, notes, vocab etc
• Level 1: same literature, but partly in translation
Delivery possibilities
Schools may wish to prepare candidates only
for the Certificate in Latin Literature.
More commonly
Years 1 and 2:
language/language & civilisation course,
culminating in Certificate in Latin Language
or Latin Language and Roman Civilisation.
Year 3, or Years 3 - 4:
further language teaching and preparation
for Certificate in Latin Literature.