WELCOME
to Edge Hill
University
Mentor Training
(Professional
Development Area)
Session Objectives:
For Mentors to know:
 Undergraduate
Professional
Development (UGPD) Area
Priorities;
 The nature and demands of
the UGPD Programmes;
 The role of the Mentor;
 The requirements of the
setting-based modules;
 The partnership relationship.
UGPD Area Priorities
NSS scores – Organisation and
Management
 Mentor training
 Placement Review and Improvement
Meetings - PRIMs
 Student tracking system - PDST
 Employability

UGPD Programmes
Early Years Mentors
 Foundation Degree in Early Years Practice
and Leadership
 BA (Hons) Early Years Leadership,
Management and Enterprise (previously
known as Professional Practice and
Leadership)
UGPD Programmes
Primary Education Phase Mentors
 BA (Hons) Children and Young People’s
Learning and Development
 BA (Hons) Teaching, Learning and
Mentoring Practice
 BA (Hons) Teaching, Learning and Child
Development
Do you know who your students
are?
Please contact
[email protected] if you are
not sure
Distinctive features of the Undergraduate
Professional Development (UGPD)
Programmes
◦ Face-to-face sessions alongside
setting-based experience
◦
Setting-based tasks, which show
how theoretical knowledge is
implemented in practice
◦
Support from Edge Hill Visiting
Tutors and setting-based
Mentors
The Mentor
It is the responsibility of the educational setting
to provide a Mentor. The role of the Mentor is to
provide access to learning activities and
opportunities to enable students to gain the
necessary practice knowledge in the placement
and facilitate opportunities for students to
undertake set tasks.
 The Mentor has a personal responsibility for
each student during their placement.
 The Mentor plays a key role in supporting
students on UGPD programmes and ensuring the
delivery of an outstanding placement experience.

The Mentor
The role and the responsibilities of a Mentor vary
to the role of a due to the requirement of the
individual programmes, however, essentially:
 the role of the Mentor is to discuss with students
and provide appropriate support and advice in
agreeing realisable and appropriate targets and
action plans.
 It is the responsibility of the Mentor to review
student progress at the mid-point of the
placement and at the end of each placement year.
 In addition, the Mentor will facilitate
opportunities for students to undertake set tasks,
support student development and, if necessary,
re-negotiate agreed targets.
Supporting Target Setting
1.
Check accuracy of student’s judgement about their skills
2.
Help to transfer development needs into targets in the Action
Plan
3.
Ensure not too many targets are chosen (3-6 targets are
recommended)
4.
Make sure targets are SMART
5.
Consider targets determined by the setting
Placement Evaluations


To ensure that we maintain and continually enhance the
quality of our provision, Placement Review and
Improvement Meetings (PRIMs) are scheduled to
take place twice a year with the aim to review every
placement in order to evaluate the quality of the
student and mentor experiences and to improve future
placement provision.
Your voice is important to us! We request that Mentors
complete mid-year and end-of-year placement
evaluations to enable us to enhance your future
mentoring experience
Key Skills for Mentors
To be clear of the role and purpose of a Mentor
 To be able to support students on the UGPD Programme
 To be able to work effectively with the student and Edge Hill
Visiting Tutor
 To be able to offer advice and feedback to students on target
setting and in professional practice.

What makes a good Mentor?
Research findings:
Views of
Mentors/s:
 Good listener
 Supportive
 Able to offer
guidance
 Good knowledge
across age ranges
 Good role model
 Approachable
 Caring
Views of students:
 Approachable
 Understanding
 Knowledgeable
 Good listener
 Supportive
 Friendly and
caring
What makes a good student?
Research findings:
Views of
Mentors/s:
 Willing to take
advice
 A willing listener
 Professional
 Well organised
Views of students:
 Ability to listen
and learn
 Acts on advice
 Flexible
 Hardworking
 Enthusiastic
What not to do when Mentoring…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1j0be
Tn8_U&feature=related
Giving and Accepting Constructive Feedback:
Mentor’s Perspective







Own the feedback
Start with the positive
Only refer to behaviour that can be changed
Be specific and descriptive
Offer alternatives
Leave the recipient with the choice of change
Think about what your feedback says about
you.
Troubleshooting
Ways of Overcoming Problems:
 Rational analysis of problem – is it innate to the
mentee, is it to do with the relationship between
you, is it to do with lack of shared understanding
of role, is it about time? What will help?
 Keep this professional - not personal
 Bring in additional support – university or setting
(an independent view)
 Negotiate more time or as a last resort, a change
of Mentor
The Partnership
Reflection on tasks, achieve targets,
self-review
Student
Respect
Open
Communication
Work based
tasks
Trust
Respect
Trust
Approachability
Open communication
Respond positively
Self-directed
study
Mentor
Edge Hill
Visiting Tutor
Monitor agreed targets
Support and advise
Mark assignments
Analysis and reflection
Monitor Progress
Resolve Difficulties
Professional
Dialogue
Agree targets, evaluate
progress, facilitate tasks,
Support and advise,
challenge thinking, model
good practice
Our online Mentor Training support:

http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/educationpartnership/professi
onal-development/placement-information/mentortraining-information/

For programme-specific information please refer to the
Placement Handbooks in the Placement Information
section of our Partnership page
http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/educationpartnership/professi
onal-development/placement-information/
Mentor Training Evaluation

If you are completing this Mentor Training
online, please do not forget to complete
the Evaluation Form from our Partnership
page and e-mail it to
[email protected]
Thank you for your attention!