Human rights in the United States

2017-07-29T02:21:33+03:00[Europe/Moscow] en true Furman v. Georgia, African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68), Black site, Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Guantanamo Bay detention camp, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Roe v. Wade, Troy Davis, Kent State shootings, Griswold v. Connecticut, Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District, Scottsboro Boys, Stanley v. Georgia, Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber, Plessy v. Ferguson, PRISM (surveillance program), Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Montgomery bus boycott, Ninth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Twenty-fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution, Epperson v. Arkansas, Edwards v. Aguillard, Smith Act, Stand in the Schoolhouse Door, Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, Korematsu v. United States, Enhanced interrogation techniques, Third Amendment to the United States Constitution, Roper v. Simmons, Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Buck v. Bell, Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. v. Williams, Eisenstadt v. Baird, Dred Scott v. Sandford, United States Bill of Rights, Brown v. Board of Education, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, List of U.S. states by incarceration and correctional supervision rate, Red Onion State Prison, Golden Venture, Second Bill of Rights, Zoia Horn, The New Jim Crow, Right to keep and bear arms in the United States, Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights under Law flashcards Human rights in the United States
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  • Furman v. Georgia
    Furman v. Georgia, 408 U.
  • African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68)
    The Civil Rights Movement or 1960s Civil Rights Movement (sometimes referred to as the "African-American Civil Rights Movement" although the term "African American" was not widely used in the 1950s and 1960s) encompasses social movements in the United States whose goals were to end racial segregation and discrimination against African Americans and to secure legal recognition and federal protection of the citizenship rights enumerated in the Constitution and federal law.
  • Black site
    In military terminology, a black site is a location at which an unacknowledged black project is conducted.
  • Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Sixth Amendment (Amendment VI) to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights that sets forth rights related to criminal prosecutions.
  • Guantanamo Bay detention camp
    The Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a United States military prison located within Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, also referred to as Guantánamo or GTMO (pronounced 'gitmo'), which fronts on Guantánamo Bay in Cuba.
  • Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and requires any warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause.
  • Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Eighth Amendment (Amendment VIII) to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights (ratified December 15, 1791) prohibiting the federal government from imposing excessive bail, excessive fines, or cruel and unusual punishment.
  • Roe v. Wade
    Roe v. Wade, 410 U.
  • Troy Davis
    Troy Anthony Davis (October 9, 1968 – September 21, 2011) was an American man convicted of and executed for the August 19, 1989, murder of police officer Mark MacPhail in Savannah, Georgia.
  • Kent State shootings
    The Kent State shootings (also known as the May 4 massacre or the Kent State massacre) occurred at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, in the United States and involved the shooting of unarmed college students by the Ohio National Guard on Monday, May 4, 1970.
  • Griswold v. Connecticut
    Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.
  • Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District
    Tammy Kitzmiller, et al.
  • Scottsboro Boys
    The Scottsboro Boys were nine black teenagers falsely accused in Alabama of raping two White American women on a train in 1931.
  • Stanley v. Georgia
    Stanley v. Georgia, 394 U.
  • Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber
    Louisiana ex rel.
  • Plessy v. Ferguson
    Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) was a landmark constitutional law case of the US Supreme Court.
  • PRISM (surveillance program)
    PRISM is a clandestine surveillance program under which the United States National Security Agency (NSA) collects internet communications from at least nine major US internet companies.
  • Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Fifteenth Amendment (Amendment XV) to the United States Constitution prohibits the federal and state governments from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
  • Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution prohibits any United States citizen from being denied the right to vote on the basis of sex.
  • Montgomery bus boycott
    The Montgomery bus boycott, a seminal event in the Civil Rights Movement, was a political and social protest campaign against the policy of racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama.
  • Ninth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Ninth Amendment (Amendment IX) to the United States Constitution addresses rights, retained by the people, that are not specifically enumerated in the Constitution.
  • Twenty-fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Twenty-fourth Amendment (Amendment XXIV) of the United States Constitution prohibits both Congress and the states from conditioning the right to vote in federal elections on payment of a poll tax or other types of tax.
  • Twenty-sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Twenty-sixth Amendment (Amendment XXVI) to the United States Constitution prohibits the states and the federal government from using age as a reason for denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States who are at least eighteen years old.
  • Seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Seventh Amendment (Amendment VII) to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights.
  • Epperson v. Arkansas
    Epperson v. Arkansas, 393 U.
  • Edwards v. Aguillard
    Edwards v. Aguillard, 482 U.
  • Smith Act
    The Alien Registration Act of 1940 (Smith Act), 76th United States Congress, 3d session, ch.
  • Stand in the Schoolhouse Door
    The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door took place at Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.
  • Second Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Second Amendment (Amendment II) to the United States Constitution protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms and was adopted on December 15, 1791, as part of the first ten amendments contained in the Bill of Rights.
  • Korematsu v. United States
    Korematsu v. United States, 323 U.
  • Enhanced interrogation techniques
    "Enhanced interrogation techniques" is a euphemism for the U.
  • Third Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Third Amendment (Amendment III) to the United States Constitution places restrictions on the quartering of soldiers in private homes without the owner's consent, forbidding the practice in peacetime.
  • Roper v. Simmons
    Roper v. Simmons, 543 U.
  • Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Fifth Amendment (Amendment V) to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights and protects a person from being compelled to be a witness against himself in a criminal case.
  • Buck v. Bell
    Buck v. Bell, 274 U.
  • Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. v. Williams
    Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc.
  • Eisenstadt v. Baird
    Eisenstadt v. Baird, 405 U.
  • Dred Scott v. Sandford
    Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 US 393 (1857), also known simply as the Dred Scott case, was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court on US labor law and constitutional law.
  • United States Bill of Rights
    The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.
  • Brown v. Board of Education
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.
  • Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments.
  • List of U.S. states by incarceration and correctional supervision rate
    This article has lists of U.
  • Red Onion State Prison
    Red Onion State Prison (ROSP) is a supermax state prison located in Wise County, Virginia, near Pound.
  • Golden Venture
    The Golden Venture was a 147-foot-long (45 m) cargo ship that smuggled 286 undocumented immigrants from China (mostly from Fujian province) along with 13 crew members that ran aground on the beach at Fort Tilden in Rockaway Beach in Queens, New York on June 6, 1993, at around 2 a.
  • Second Bill of Rights
    The Second Bill of Rights is a list of rights that was proposed by U.
  • Zoia Horn
    Zoia Markovna Horn (née Polisar; March 14, 1918 – July 12, 2014), born in Ukraine, became in 1972 the first United States librarian to be jailed for refusing to share information as a matter of conscience.
  • The New Jim Crow
    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness is a book by Michelle Alexander, a civil rights litigator and legal scholar.
  • Right to keep and bear arms in the United States
    The right to keep and bear arms in the United States is a fundamental right protected by the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, part of the Bill of Rights, and by the constitutions of most U.
  • Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights under Law
    The Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law (LDB) is an independent, unaffiliated, nonprofit corporation established to advance the civil and human rights of the Jewish people and promote justice for all.