Formal languages

2017-07-30T09:16:50+03:00[Europe/Moscow] en true Two-level grammar, Abstract syntax tree, Context-sensitive grammar, SCIgen, Backus–Naur Form, Formal grammar, Abstract rewriting system, String (computer science), Regular expression, Erasing rule, Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation, Turing machine, Tell-tale, Production (computer science), Metacharacter, Conference on Implementation and Application of Automata, Antimatroid, Descriptional Complexity of Formal Systems, Descriptive interpretation, International Conference on Developments in Language Theory flashcards Formal languages
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  • Two-level grammar
    A two-level grammar is a formal grammar that is used to generate another formal grammar , such as one with an infinite rule set .
  • Abstract syntax tree
    In computer science, an abstract syntax tree (AST), or just syntax tree, is a tree representation of the abstract syntactic structure of source code written in a programming language.
  • Context-sensitive grammar
    A context-sensitive grammar (CSG) is a formal grammar in which the left-hand sides and right-hand sides of any production rules may be surrounded by a context of terminal and nonterminal symbols.
  • SCIgen
    SCIgen is a computer program that uses context-free grammar to randomly generate nonsense in the form of computer science research papers.
  • Backus–Naur Form
    In computer science, Backus–Naur Form or Backus Normal Form (BNF) is one of the two main notation techniques for context-free grammars, often used to describe the syntax of languages used in computing, such as computer programming languages, document formats, instruction sets and communication protocols; the other main technique for writing context-free grammars is the van Wijngaarden form.
  • Formal grammar
    In formal language theory, a grammar (when the context is not given, often called a formal grammar for clarity) is a set of production rules for strings in a formal language.
  • Abstract rewriting system
    In mathematical logic and theoretical computer science, an abstract rewriting system (also (abstract) reduction system or abstract rewrite system; abbreviation ARS) is a formalism that captures the quintessential notion and properties of rewriting systems.
  • String (computer science)
    In computer programming, a string is traditionally a sequence of characters, either as a literal constant or as some kind of variable.
  • Regular expression
    In theoretical computer science and formal language theory, a regular expression (sometimes called a rational expression) is a sequence of characters that define a search pattern, mainly for use in pattern matching with strings, or string matching, i.
  • Erasing rule
    In a formal grammar, an erasing rule is a rule which maps a string of symbols to the empty string (ε).
  • Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation
    Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation is an influential computer science textbook by John Hopcroft and Jeffrey Ullman on formal languages and the theory of computation.
  • Turing machine
    A Turing machine is an abstract machine that manipulates symbols on a strip of tape according to a table of rules; to be more exact, it is a mathematical model of computation that defines such a device.
  • Tell-tale
    A tell-tale or telltale is an indicator, signal, or sign that conveys the status of a situation, mechanism, or system.
  • Production (computer science)
    A production or production rule in computer science is a rewrite rule specifying a symbol substitution that can be recursively performed to generate new symbol sequences.
  • Metacharacter
    A metacharacter is a character that has a special meaning (instead of a literal meaning) to a computer program, such as a shell interpreter or a regular expression engine.
  • Conference on Implementation and Application of Automata
    CIAA, the International Conference on Implementation and Application of Automata is an annual academic conference in the field of computer science.
  • Antimatroid
    In mathematics, an antimatroid is a formal system that describes processes in which a set is built up by including elements one at a time, and in which an element, once available for inclusion, remains available until it is included.
  • Descriptional Complexity of Formal Systems
    DCFS, the International Workshop on Descriptional Complexity of Formal Systems is an annual academic conference in the field of computer science.
  • Descriptive interpretation
    According to Rudolf Carnap, in logic, an interpretation is a descriptive interpretation (also called a factual interpretation) if at least one of the undefined symbols of its formal system becomes, in the interpretation, a descriptive sign (i.e., the name of single objects, or observable properties).
  • International Conference on Developments in Language Theory
    DLT, the International Conference on Developments in Language Theory is an academic conference in the field of computer scienceheld annually under the auspices of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science.