Athabaskan languages

2017-07-27T21:10:37+03:00[Europe/Moscow] en true Dena'ina language, Gwich’in language, Tahltan language, Jicarilla language, Tagish language, Sekani language, Dogrib language, Sarcee language, Slavey language, Kaska language, Upper Kuskokwim language, Plains Apache language, Chilcotin language, Lipan language, Mattole language, Carrier language, Lower Tanana language, Ahtna language, Holikachuk language, Dane-zaa language, Galice language, Tutchone language, Hän language, Deg Xinag language, Koyukon language, Tanacross language, Western Apache language, Chipewyan language, Hupa language, Upper Tanana language, Babine-Witsuwit'en language, Cahto language, Tolowa language, Tututni language, Wailaki language, Mescalero-Chiricahua language flashcards Athabaskan languages
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  • Dena'ina language
    Dena’ina /dᵻˈnaɪnə/, also Tanaina, is the Athabaskan language of the region surrounding Cook Inlet.
  • Gwich’in language
    The Gwich’in language is the Athabaskan language of the Gwich’in indigenous people.
  • Tahltan language
    Tahltan is a poorly documented Northern Athabaskan language historically spoken by the Tahltan people (also "Nahanni") who live in northern British Columbia around Telegraph Creek, Dease Lake, and Iskut.
  • Jicarilla language
    Jicarilla (Jicarilla Apache: Abáachi mizaa) is an Eastern Southern Athabaskan language spoken by the Jicarilla Apache.
  • Tagish language
    Tagish is an endangered Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Tagish people in the Yukon Territory in Canada.
  • Sekani language
    The Sekani language is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Sekani people of north-central British Columbia, Canada.
  • Dogrib language
    The Dogrib language, or Tlinchon (/ˈtlɪntʃɒn/; Tłı̨chǫ Yatıì [tɬʰĩtʃʰõ jatʰîː]), is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Tłı̨chǫ (Digrib people) of the Canadian Northwest Territories.
  • Sarcee language
    Blitze (Sarsi), also Tsuut’ina (Tsuu T’ina, Tsu T’ina, Tsúùtínà) is a language spoken by the people of the Tsuu T'ina Nation band government whose reserve and community is near Calgary, Alberta.
  • Slavey language
    Slavey (/ˈsleɪvi/; also Slave, Slavé) is an Athabaskan language spoken among the Slavey First Nations of Canada in the Northwest Territories where it also has official status.
  • Kaska language
    Kaska is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Kaska people in the southeastern Yukon territory and northern British Columbia in Canada.
  • Upper Kuskokwim language
    The Upper Kuskokwim language (also called Kolchan or Goltsan or Dinak'i) is an Athabaskan language of the Na-Dené language family.
  • Plains Apache language
    The Plains Apache language (or Kiowa Apache) is a Southern Athabaskan language spoken by the Plains Apache peoples living primarily in central Oklahoma.
  • Chilcotin language
    Chilcotin (also Tsilhqot’in, Tsilhqut’in, Tzilkotin) is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken in British Columbia by the Tsilhqot’in people.
  • Lipan language
    Lipan is an Eastern Southern Athabaskan language spoken by the Lipan Apache.
  • Mattole language
    Mattole, or Mattole–Bear River, is an extinct Athabaskan language once spoken by the Mattole and Bear River peoples of northern California.
  • Carrier language
    The Carrier language is a Northern Athabaskan language.
  • Lower Tanana language
    Lower Tanana (also Tanana and/or Middle Tanana) is an endangered language spoken in Interior Alaska in the lower Tanana River villages of Minto and Nenana.
  • Ahtna language
    Ahtna or Ahtena is the Na-Dené language of the Ahtna ethnic group of the Copper River area of Alaska.
  • Holikachuk language
    Holikachuk (own name: Doogh Qinag) was an Athabaskan language formerly spoken at the village of Holikachuk (Hiyeghelinhdi) on the Innoko River in central Alaska.
  • Dane-zaa language
    Beaver, also known as Tsattine and by the people themselves as Danezaa (ᑕᓀᖚ Dane-zaa, Dunneza) or Dane-zaa Zaageʔ ("people-regular language"), is an Athabascan language of western Canada.
  • Galice language
    Galice /ɡəˈliːs/, or Galice-Applegate or Upper Rogue River, is an extinct Athabaskan language once spoken by the two Upper Rogue River Athabaskan tribes the Galice (Taltushtuntede) tribe and Applegate (Nabiltse, Dakubetede) tribe of southwestern Oregon.
  • Tutchone language
    Tutchone is a threatened Athabaskan language spoken in the Yukon Territory in Canada.
  • Hän language
    The Hän language (Dawson, Han-Kutchin, Moosehide) is a Native American endangered language spoken in only two places: Eagle, Alaska and Dawson City, Yukon.
  • Deg Xinag language
    Deg Xinag is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Deg Hit’an peoples in Shageluk and Anvik and at Holy Cross along the lower Yukon River in Alaska.
  • Koyukon language
    Koyukon (also called Denaakk'e) is the geographically most widespread Athabascan language spoken in Alaska.
  • Tanacross language
    Tanacross (also Transitional Tanana) is an endangered Athabaskan language spoken by fewer than 60 persons in eastern Interior Alaska.
  • Western Apache language
    The Western Apache language is a Southern Athabaskan language spoken among the 14,000 Western Apaches living primarily in east central Arizona.
  • Chipewyan language
    Chipewyan /tʃɪpəˈwaɪən/, ethnonym Dënesųłiné [tenɛsũɬinɛ́], is the language spoken by the Chipewyan people of northwestern Canada.
  • Hupa language
    Hupa (native name: Na:tinixwe Mixine:whe', lit. "language of the Hoopa Valley people") is an Athabaskan language (of Na-Dené stock) spoken along the lower course of the Trinity river in Northwest California by the Hupa (Na:tinixwe), and before European contact by the Chilula and Whilkut peoples to the west.
  • Upper Tanana language
    Upper Tanana (also known as Tabesna or Nabesna) is an endangered Athabaskan language spoken in eastern Interior Alaska, mainly in the villages of Northway, Tetlin, and Tok, and adjacent areas of Canada's Yukon Territory.
  • Babine-Witsuwit'en language
    Babine–Witsuwit'en or Nadot’en-Wets’uwet’en is an Athabaskan language spoken in the Central Interior of British Columbia.
  • Cahto language
    Cahto (also spelled Kato) is an extinct Athabaskan language that was formerly spoken by the Kato people of the Laytonville and Branscomb area at the head of the South Fork of the Eel River.
  • Tolowa language
    The Tolowa language (also called Chetco-Tolowa, or Siletz Dee-ni) is a member of the Pacific Coast subgroup of the Athabaskan language family.
  • Tututni language
    Tututni (Dotodəni, alternatively "Tutudin"), also known as Coquille and (Lower) Rogue River, is an extinct Athabaskan language once spoken by 3 Tututni (Lower Rogue River Athabaskan) tribes: Tututni tribe (including Euchre Creek band), Coquille tribe, and Chasta Costa tribe who are part of the Rogue River Indian peoples of southwestern Oregon.
  • Wailaki language
    Wailaki, also known as Eel River, is an extinct Athabaskan language once spoken by the people of the Round Valley Reservation of northern California, one of four languages belonging to the California Athabaskan cluster of the Pacific Coast Athabaskan languages.
  • Mescalero-Chiricahua language
    Mescalero-Chiricahua (also known as Mescalero-Chiricahua Apache) is a Southern Athabaskan language spoken by the Mescalero and Chiricahua tribes in Oklahoma and New Mexico.