Phlebotomy - Arkansas Northeastern College

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Arkansas Northeastern College
Phlebotomy Technician
Syllabus
Instructor:
Office Location:
Class Meeting Days:
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Prerequisite:
Co-requisite:
Jack Neil
Burdette Campus
M.W.H.
0900-1200
Room 509, Sim Building Burdette Campus
As posted or by appointment.
870-762-1020 Ext 1421
Phlebotomy Technician
AH-16006 Phlebotomy
Applicants must submit recent Compass testing with a Reading score of 61 or higher. A High school diploma
or GED is required.
AH 16011 Medical Terminology is a co requisite to the Phlebotomy
Course.
Course Catalog Description
Certificate of Proficiency Program - Phlebotomy Technician
The Phlebotomy Technician course is a fifty-eight (58) hour lecture/lab and a 120-hour externship that includes skill
development in the performance of blood collection methods using proper techniques and universal precautions. This program
includes vacuum collection devices, syringes, capillary skin puncture, butterfly needles and blood culture specimen collection.
Emphasis is on infection prevention, proper patient identification, labeling of specimens and quality assurance, specimen
handling, processing, and accessioning. The 120-hour externship is an individualized plan for training and experiences under
the supervision of facility staff at a medical office, clinic, laboratory or hospital chosen by college staff. There is no
financial reimbursement for students participating in clinical externship.
Required Text:
Phlebotomy Handbook (W/CD), 8th Edition, 2010 Prentice Hall, Diana Garza
ISBN: 9780131133341
Q & A Review for Phlebotomy (W/CD), 6th edition, 2006 Prentice Hall. Kathleen Becan-McBride
ISBN: 9780131183261.
Course Rationale: The course is designed to provide fundamental elements of phlebotomy using didactic teaching methods
combined with hands-on learning. After the student acquires the core competencies in the classroom and clinical lab, training
will continue with in a clinical setting and where students will gain further skills under direct supervision.
Course Objectives:
Upon Completion of this course, the student will successfully:
1.
Demonstrate knowledge of the roles and functions of a phlebotomist in the health care industry and the
basics of anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on the circulatory system.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of safety procedures and infection control in the workplace and documentation and
transportation procedures needed for safe handling of biohazardous specimens.
3. Demonstrate proper techniques in utilizing the equipment and supplies available to phlebotomists.
1
4.
5.
6.
7.
Demonstrate understanding of actual techniques used in phlebotomy, and the clinical and technical
complications that may occur during the procedure.
Demonstrate knowledge of pediatric phlebotomy procedures, arterial and IV collections, and the special
considerations for the elderly, homebound, and long-term care patients.
Perform vein and capillary procedures using a variety of methods and equipment.
Receive CPR certification by the American Heart Association before beginning clinical rotations.
Unit Objectives.
Topical/Unit Outline:
The content is divided into five parts:
Part I: Overview & Safety Procedures: Provides a knowledge base of the roles and functions of a phlebotomist in the
health care industry provides information about safety and infection control in the workplace, and the basics of anatomy and
physiology with a \n emphasis on the circulatory system.
Part II: Phlebotomy Equipment & Procedures: Provides comprehensive coverage on the latest equipment and supplies, the
most updated information and comprehensive description of the actual techniques used in phlebotomy, documentation and
transportation procedures needed for safe handling of biohazardous specimens, and reviews clinical and technical
complications that may occur during the procedure.
Part III: Point of Care Testing & Special Procedures: Provides information about pediatric phlebotomy procedures,
arterial and IV Collections, and special considerations for the elderly, homebound, and long term care patients.
Clinical Lab: Phlebotomy Procedures provides the most updated information and comprehensive description of the actual
techniques used in phlebotomy and review clinical and technical complications that may occur during the procedure.
CPR: This mini course provides students with cardio pulmonary resuscitation instruction that includes demonstration and
student skill validation provided by instructors certified by the American Heart Association.
Part 1. Overview and Safety Procedures
Chapter 1. Phlebotomy Practice and Quality Essentials
Rational: Understanding ones professional role within the care team is necessary to insure delivery of quality competent
integrated care in a professional manner.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter I, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Define Phlebotomy and identify the health professional who perform phlebotomy procedures.
2. Identify the importance of phlebotomy procedures to the overall care of the patient.
3. List professional competencies for phlebotomists and key elements of an employer’s performance assessment.
4. List members of a health care team who interact with phlebotomists.
5. Describe the roles of clinical laboratory personnel and common laboratory departments/sections.
6. Describe health care settings in which phlebotomy services are routinely performed.
7. Explain components of professionalism and desired character traits for phlebotomists.
8. Describe coping skills that are used for stress in the workplace.
9. List the basic tools used in quality improvement activities and give examples of how a phlebotomist can participate
in quality improvement activities.
10. Define the difference between quality improvement and quality control.
Chapter 2. Communication, Computerization, and Documentation
Rational: Provides an understanding of how verbal, non-verbal, and cultural cues affect understanding. Knowing how too
effectively communication with a patient is necessary to establish therapeutic rapport prior to performing assessment and
procedures.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 2, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Outline the basic communication loop.
2. Describe methods for effective verbal and nonverbal communication, active listening, and written communication.
3. List examples of positive and negative body language.
2
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Describe methods to achieve cultural competence and sensitivity in the workplace.
Describe the basic components of the medical record.
Provide examples of maintaining confidentiality and privacy related to patient information.
Describe essential elements of laboratory test requisitions, specimen labels, and test results.
Identify potential clerical or technical errors that may occur during labeling or documentation of phlebotomy
procedures.
9. Identify essential components and functions of computers in health care.
10. Describe ways that health care workers may use computer systems to accomplish job functions.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 2, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Demonstrate the ability to communicate with the deaf or blind patient. (Procedure 2-1 p.46)
Chapter 3. Professional Ethics, Legal, and Regulatory Issues
Rational: Provides an understanding of ethical & legal considerations related to clinical practice.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 3, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Define basic ethical and legal terms and explain how they differ.
2. Describe types of consent used in health care settings, including informed consent and implied consent.
3. Describe how to avoid litigation as it relates to blood collection.
4. Define standard of care from a legal and a health care provider’s perspective.
5. Identify key elements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
6. List key factors common to health professional liability insurance policies.
7. List common issues in lawsuits against health care providers and prevention tips
to avoid lawsuits in
phlebotomy.
Chapter 4. Infection Control
Rational: Provides an understanding related to the prevention of infection transmission, and personal protection during the
patient interaction and the specimen transportation and evaluation phase.
Didactic Objectives:: Upon completion of Chapter 4, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Explain the infection control policies and procedures that must be followed in specimen collection and
transportation.
2. Define the terms health care-associated, health care-acquired, and nosocomial infections.
3. Identify the basic programs for infection control and isolation procedures.
4. Explain the proper techniques for hand washing, gowning, gloving, masking, double bagging, and entering/exiting the
various isolation areas.
5. Identify steps to avoid transmission of blood-borne pathogens.
6. Identify ways to reduce risks for infections and accidental needle sticks.
7. Describe measures that can break each link in the chain of infection.
8. Identify the steps to take in the case of blood-borne pathogen exposure.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 4, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Demonstrate proper hand-washing technique. (Procedure 4-1 p.117)
2. Demonstrate the ability to don and remove gloves properly for specimen collection. (Procedure 4-2 p.119)
3. Demonstrate the ability to don and remove commonly used PPE including a gown and mask. (Procedure 4-3 p.124)
(Procedure 4-4 p. 127)
4. Demonstrate how to dispose of contaminated items properly. (Procedure 4-5 p. 129)
5. Demonstrate how to transport specimens properly from a patient in isolation. (Procedure 4-6 p.130)
Chapter 5. Safety and First Aid
Rational: Understanding the role of the phlebotomist when emergencies situations are necessary for the safety of the
patients and the practitioner.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter IV, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Discuss safety awareness for health care workers.
2. Explain the measures that should be taken for fire, electrical, radiation,
mechanical,
and chemical
safety in a heath care facility.
3. Describe the essential elements of a disaster emergency plan for a health care
facility.
4. Explain the safety policies and procedures that must be followed in specimen
collection and
transportation.
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5. Describe the safe use of equipment in health care facilities.
6. List three precautions that can reduce the risk of injury to patients.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 5, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Identify respiratory failure, and deliver pulmonary first aid. (Procedure 5-1 p. 152)
Chapter 6. Medical Terminology, Anatomy and Physiology of Organ Systems
Rational: A basic understanding of medical terminology and the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory system is
necessary to perform the duties of a phlebotomist effectively.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 6, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Define medical terminology using word elements such as roots, prefixes, and suffixes.
2. Define words commonly used in the clinical laboratory.
3. Describe how laboratory testing is used to assess body functions and disease.
4. Define the differences among the terms anatomy, physiology, and pathology.
5. Describe the directional terms, anatomic surface regions, and cavities of the body.
6. Describe the role of homeostasis in normal body functioning.
7. Describe the purpose, function, and structural components of the major body systems.
8. Identify examples of pathologic conditions associated with each organ system.
9. Describe the types of specimens that are analyzed in the clinical laboratory.
10. List common diagnostic tests associated with each organ system.
Chapter 7. The Cardiovascular and Lymphatic Systems
Rational: A intermediate understanding of the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems is necessary to perform the duties of a
phlebotomist effectively. As these systems are where most specimens originate.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 7, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Define the functions of the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems.
2. Identify and describe the structures and functions of the heart.
3. List pathologic conditions and common laboratory tests associated with the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems.
4. Trace the flow of blood through the cardiovascular system.
5. Describe the properties of arterial blood, venous blood, and capillary blood.
6. Identify and describe the cellular and noncellular components of blood.
7. Describe the differences and similarities between whole blood, serum, and plasma.
8. Identify and describe the structures and functions of different types of blood vessels.
9. Locate and name the veins most commonly used for phlebotomy procedures.
10. Define hemo-stasis and describe the basic process of coagulation and fibrinolysis.
Part II. Phlebotomy Equipment and Procedures
Chapter 8. Blood Collection Equipment
Rational: To provide an understanding of the equipment necessary to collect a variety of specimens in an appropriate manner
is necessary to ensure proper collection, transfer and processing.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 8, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Describe the latest phlebotomy safety supplies and equipment and evaluate their effectiveness in blood collection.
2. List the various types of anticoagulants used in blood collection, their mechanisms of actions on collected blood
examples of tests performed on these tubes, and the vacuum-collection-tube color-codes for these anticoagulants
and additives.
3. Identify various supplies that should be carried on a specimen collection tray when a skin puncture specimen must
be collected.
4. Identify the types of safety equipment needed to collect blood by venipuncture and skin puncture.
Chapter 9. Pre-analytical Complications Causing Medical Errors in Blood Collection
Rational: A thorough understanding of the pre-analytical phase/process can reduce potential errors in primary and
secondary collection.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 9, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Describe pre-analytical complications related to phlebotomy procedures and impacting patient safety.
2. Explain how to prevent and/or handle complications in blood collection.
3. List at least five factors about a patient’s physical disposition (i.e., make-up) that can affect blood collection.
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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
List examples of substances that can interfere in clinical analysis of blood constituents and describe methods used
to prevent these interferences.
Describe how allergies, a mastectomy, edema, and thrombosis can affect blood collection.
List pre-analytical complications that can arise with test requests and identification.
Describe complications associated with tourniquet pressure and fist pumping.
Identify how the pre-analytical factors of syncope, petechiaae, neurological complications, hemo-concentration,
hemo-lysis, and intravenous therapy affect blood collection.
Describe methods used to prevent these interferences.
Chapter 10. Veni-puncture Procedures
Rational: Understanding the complete process from needed equipment to tourniquation, site selection and collection is
necessary to assure safe collection and processing.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 10, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Describe the steps a health care worker should take in preparing him- or herself
for a veni-puncture
procedure.
2. List supplies and equipment used in a typical veni-puncture procedure.
3. Describe detailed steps in the patient identification process and what to do if information is missing.
4. Describe methods for hand hygiene.
5. Identify the most appropriate sites for veni-puncture and situations when these sites might not be acceptable.
6. Identify alternate sites for the veni-puncture procedure.
7. Describe the process and time limits for applying a tourniquet to a patient’s arm.
8. Describe the decontamination process and the agents used to decontaminate skin for routine blood tests and blood
cultures.
9. Describe the steps of a veni-puncture procedure using the evacuated tube method, syringe method, and butterfly
method according to the CLSI approved standard.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 10, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Demonstrate proper preparation for the patient encounter including, needed equipment / supplies, positive
professional appearance / temperament, patient identifiers and special considerations. (Procedure 10-1 p. 305)
2. Demonstrate hand hygiene and gloving technique. (Procedure 10-2 p.307)
3. Demonstrate the steps to proper patient identification. (Procedure 10-3 p317)
4. Demonstrate how to safely use a tourniquet, and properly palpate a vein. (Procedure 10-4 p.328)
5. Demonstrate proper decontamination of the selected puncture site. (Procedure 10-5 p.331)
6. Perform a Venipuncture using a vacationer and a butterfly needle. (Procedure 10-6 p.334)
7. Demonstrate how to draw blood using a syringe. (Procedure 10-7 p.343)
Chapter 11. Capillary Blood Specimens
Rational: Alternate collection methods are sometimes necessary. Many studies may be accomplished using less invasive
means such as capillary collections.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 11, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Describe the reasons for acquiring capillary blood specimens.
2. Explain why capillary blood from a skin puncture is different from blood taken by veni-puncture and the impact on
laboratory tests.
3. List the laboratory tests for which capillary specimens may be collected.
4. Identify the proper sites for performing a skin puncture procedure.
5. Explain why it is necessary to control the depth of the incision.
6. Describe the procedure for performing a skin puncture.
7. Describe the procedure for making blood smears.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 11, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Acquiring a capillary blood specimen. (Procedure 11-1 p.371)
2. Pre-pareing blood smears / film for microscopic slides. (Procedure 11-2 p.376)
Chapter 12. Specimen handling, transportation, and processing
Rational: Accurate resulting is dependent on proper collection and handling. Understanding the post-collection process is
necessary to insure the accuracy of resulted values.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 12, the learner is responsible for the following:
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1.
2.
3.
4.
Describe at least three sources of pre-examination error that can occur during blood specimen handling.
Describe at least three sources of pre-examination error that can occur during blood specimen transportation.
Describe at least three sources of pre-examination error that can occur during specimen processing or storage.
Name three methods commonly used to transport specimens.
Part III. Procedures and Point-of Care Testing
Chapter 13. Pediatric and geriatric procedures
Rational: Certain patient populations have require specific special considerations that should be considered when collecting
specimens. Understanding these considerations is necessary to assure appropriate collection.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 13, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Describe fears or concerns that children in different developmental stages might
have toward the blood
collection process.
2. List suggestions that might be appropriate for parental and health care worker behavior during a veni-puncture or
skin puncture.
3. Identify puncture sites for a heel stick on an infant and describe the procedure.
4. Describe the veni-puncture sites for infants and young children.
5. Discuss the types of equipment and supplies that must be used during micro-collection and veni-puncture of infants
and children.
6. Explain the special precautions and types of equipment needed to collect capillary blood gases.
7. Describe the procedure for specimen collection for neonatal screening.
8. Define five physical and/or emotional changes that are associated with the aging process.
9. Describe how a health care worker should react to physical and emotional changes associated with the elderly.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 13, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Perform infants heal stick procedure. (Procedure 13-1 p. 417)
2. Perform capillary blood gas testing collection. (Procedure 13-2 p.422)
3. Perform capillary blood for neonatal screening collection. (Procedure 13-3 p.425)
4. Perform in clinical lab blood collection from heparin or saline lock. (Procedure 13-4 p.433)

This procedure is performed by an R.N. in most inpatient settings. In the state of Arkansas, collection of
blood from a “hep lock” is outside the scope of practice for a phlebotomist.
5. Perform in clinical lab blood collection from a central venous catheter. (Procedure 13-5 p.434)

This procedure is always performed by an R.N. In the state of Arkansas, collection of blood from a “central
line” is outside the scope of practice for a phlebotomist.
Chapter 14. Point-of-Care collections
Rational: Point of care tests are performed “at bedside” and usually provide an immediate result. Understanding the
necessity of and proper collection of “point of care tests” is necessary to provide the care team with relevant and accurate
assessment information.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter XIV, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
List two other terms that are synonymous with point-of-care testing.
2. Identify four analyses whose levels can be determined through point-of-care testing.
3. Define quality assurance and its requirements in point-of-care testing.
4. Describe the equipment that is used to perform the bleeding-time test.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 14, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Obtain a blood specimen for glucose testing. (Procedure 14-1 p.448)
2. Perform a bleeding time test “Surgicutt”. (Procedure 14-2 p. 457)
Chapter 15 Arterial, intravenous and Special Collection Procedures
Rational: Understanding the culture collection process is necessary despite the fact that collection is often gained by
Nursing Staff not Phlebotomists. Process understanding assures process logic and valid collection.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 15, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
List the steps and equipment in blood culture collections.
2. Discuss the requirements for the glucose and lactose tolerance tests.
3. Explain the special precautions and types of equipment needed to collect arterial blood
gases.
4. Differentiate cannulas from fistulas.
5. List the special requirements for collecting blood through intravenous (IV) catheters.
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6. Differentiate therapeutic phlebotomy from antilogous transfusion.
7. Describe the special precautions needed to collect blood in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) procedures.
8. List the types of patient specimens needed for trace metal analyses.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 15, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Identify and perform site preparation for blood culture collection. (Procedure 15-1 p.467)
2. Perform blood culture collection with a safety syringe. (Procedure 15-2 p.469)
3. Perform blood culture collection with a safety butterfly assembly. (Procedure 15-3 p.471)
4. Perform blood culture collection using an evacuated tube system. (Procedure 15-4 p.473)
5. Perform post collection preparations after previous methods. (Procedure 15-5 p.414)

Radial ABG procedures will not be performed in this class. (Procedure 15-6 p.482)

Blood collection through a CVC will not be performed in this class. (Procedure 15-7 p.489)
Chapter 16. Urinalysis, Body Fluids, and Other Specimens
Rational: Collection of non serum specimens is occasionally required. A fundamental understanding of how these specimens
are collected is necessary to assure the validity of the test.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter 16, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Identify body fluid specimens, other than blood, that are analyzed in the clinical
laboratory, and identify the
correct procedures for collecting and/or transporting these specimens to the laboratory.
2. Describe the correct methodology for labeling urine specimens.
3. Identify specimens collected for microbiological, throat, sputum, and nasopharyngeal cultures and the protocol
that must be followed when transporting these specimens.
Clinical Lab Objective: Upon completion of Chapter 16, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Perform and or provide instructions for a clean catch midstream urine collection for women. (Procedure 16-1 p.505)
2. Perform and or provide instructions for a clean catch midstream urine collection for women. (Procedure 16-2 p.506)
3. Perform and or provide instructions for a 24-hour urine specimen collection. (Procedure 16-3 p.507)
4. Perform a sputum specimen collection. (Procedure 16-4 p.512)
5. Perform a throat swab for culture collection. (Procedure 16-5 p514)
Chapter 17. Drug Use, Forensic Toxicology, Workplace Testing, Sports Medicine, and Related Areas
Rational: Understanding specialty collection founded in a logical process of critical thinking assures process outcomes that
are valid and useful to the care team or relevant reporting organization.
Didactic Objectives: Upon completion of Chapter XVII, the learner is responsible for the following:
1.
Define toxicology and forensic toxicology.
2. Give five examples of specimens that can be used for forensic analysis.
3. Describe the role of the health care worker when working with forensic specimens.
4. Describe the role of the health care worker, or “collector”, in federal drug-testing programs.
5. Describe the function of a chain of custody, and of the custody and control form.
6. Give examples of situations in which drug testing might be valuable.
7. Describe how to detect adulteration of urine specimens.
8. List two examples of how blood alcohol content is measured.
9. Describe at least three factors that affect testing for alcohol content.
CPR Course:
Rational: All health care workers what practice in an in-patient setting are required to be certified competent in CPR by an
accrediting organization. This assures that these health care professionals are competent to react to emergency medical
situations.
Didactic Objectives: This course provides students with cardio pulmonary resuscitation instruction that includes
demonstration and student skill validation provided by instructors certified by the American Heart Association.
1.
Perform adult and pediatric CPR including one and two-rescuer scenarios with the use of the bag mask.
2. Identify and respond to foreign-body airway obstruction.
3. Identify need and perform use of the automated external defibrillator.
Basis for Final Grade
Course Requirements/Evaluation & Assessment Methods:
Attendance Policy:
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
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Regular and punctual attendance is required at all lecture and laboratory sessions.
Class roll will be taken.
Absences must be explained to the instructor on the day of the absence by telephone or personal visit.
If an absence is anticipated, the student is to make a scheduling arrangement in advance with the instructor.
A student will be allowed a total of two (2) absences.
The student will be dropped from the program on the third (3th) absence.
A student who is fifteen (15) minutes late or who leaves early will be charged with one absence.
It is the student’s responsibility to keep track of his/her attendance record and for all assignments, materials,
examinations, etc. missed.
Important announcements are made at the beginning of class and may not be repeated.
Clinical: Students must notify the supervising instructor and the destination facility within one (1) hour prior to the
scheduled arrival time if they are going to be late or absent.
Students will be dropped from the program if more that two scheduled clinical days are missed.
One hundred twenty (120) hours of clinical must be completed.
Student Evaluation:
1. Measurement, Written

Unit test will be given after each.

Four (4) written examinations will be given over lecture material.

The final exam score must be within 10 points of the student’s major exam grade average.

Set points will be awarded for completion of additional assignments.
2.
Measurement, Skills Lab

Points are awarded for the successful completion of laboratory exercises.

Points are awarded for proper response to study questions/written assignments for each laboratory
exercise.

Points are awarded for the laboratory practical at the end of the course. The practical is the
comprehensive final exam for the laboratory component of the course.
3.
Measurement, Clinical

The Clinical Externship portion of the grade is determined by evaluation.
o
Evaluations are completed by the faculty and preceptors on a weekly basis.
o
A student failing the Clinical Externship component of this course, but passing the lecture and
laboratory portion, will not pass the course.

Passing the clinical component is based on successful completion of clinical objectives,
and weekly evaluation during clinical.

Students must complete and provide documentation for a minimum of 120 hours and
must achieve a minimum rating of at least “average” in all areas on the final clinical
evaluation.

Students must perform and provide documentation of a minimum of

100 successful veni-punctures

20 capillary procedures.
4.
Grade - Lecture/Lab

Lecture 1/2 of final grade
1.
Quizzes = 5%
2. Participation in Discussion Forum = 5%
3. Examinations = 50%
4. Final Exam = 40%

Laboratory 1/2 of Final Grade
1. Laboratory exercise and Study Questions = 75%
2. Laboratory practical Exam = 25%
5.
Grade - Clinical
The grade for the Clinical Externship component of this course will be determined as follows:
8
a)
b)
Weekly evaluations = 25%
Final Clinical Evaluation = 75%
*Liability insurance is not a requirement but is encouraged.
6.
Determination of Final Grade
The final grade from the lecture/lab portion of the course and the final grade from the clinical portion will be
averaged to obtain the final overall course grade.
7.
Grading

A = 90-100%

B = 80-89%

C = 70-79%

D = 60-69%
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F = 59% or below
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Students must complete the required number of hours, required number of procedures, and successfully
complete all objectives required in the clinical component.
Students must complete the classroom and clinical components to receive a certificate of completion.
A student may be withdrawn from the program for excessive absences and/or consistently failing to
meet class assignments, disruptive conduct during lecture or laboratory, or for displaying conduct
detrimental to the ethics of phlebotomy, and/or failure to meet minimum competency levels in the clinical
component.
Grade Dissemination
You can access your assignment grades online by logging in to this myANC course and clicking on Coursework
(http://myanc.anc.edu). Midterm and final grades can be accessed using Campus Connect on my-ANC. Please note that
scores returned mid-term are unofficial grades. If you need help accessing my-ANC contact the ANC Helpdesk by email:
[email protected]
Course Policies: Grades
Late wok:
Late work will be accepted on a case by case basis, but will result in a grade penalty depending upon the length of lateness
and the circumstances.
Make-up Test Policy:
Students will be allowed one make up examination excluding the final.
Extra Credit Policy:
5 point quizzes will contain one bonus question worth one extra point towards the mid-term exam. No more than 5 points will
be added to mid-term grade and grade cannot exceed 100%.
Grades of "Incomplete":
The current College policy concerning incomplete grades will be followed in this course. Incomplete grades are given only in
situations where unexpected emergencies prevent a student from completing the course and the remaining work can be
completed the next semester. Your instructor is the final authority on whether you qualify for an incomplete. Incomplete
work must be finished by mid-term of the subsequent semester or the “I” will automatically be recorded as an “F” on your
transcript.
Rewrite Policy:
None.
Essay Commentary Policy:
None.
Group Work Policy:
Group collaboration is encouraged in any technical, hands on learning environment. Students are encouraged to study and
practice together.
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Liability insurance is recommended.
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