2015 Panthers Training - Nation Ford High School Band

Today’s Agenda
1. Review Game Day Information and procedures
2. Review Key Unit Policies
3. Review General Unit Information
4. NPO Mandatory Compliance Training
Game Day Information
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Stand Staff Sheet
Name tags and uniforms
What can you bring in
Hold List (extra people not on staff sheet)
Tour of Check-in/Elevator/Laundry
Game Day Parking
•
•
•
•
Carpool-only lot. It is located in the
old Freedom Mall parking lot.
From Freedom Drive, turn south
onto Ashley Road. Turn left into the
Valerie Woodard Parking for
DSS/Meck offices. The DNC carpool
lot will be towards the far back right
(look for DNC parking signs).
Staff shuttle buses are available
prior to gates opening and starting
again at half-time.
DO NOT PARK AT THE PENMAN
STREET LOT.
Volunteer Conduct


Our conduct is part of the guest experience!
In order to provide excellent guest service, the following actions are not
allowed:
 Improper language toward volunteers, DN managers, DN staff and guests or
clients
 False or malicious statements
 Removing company records or items from property
 Mischief, wrestling, pushing, throwing items, rough-housing or other types of
horseplay
 Possession of firearms, explosives, weapons
 Physical violence
 Willful neglect or misuse of company property
 Insubordination
 Entering any area where you do not have a legitimate work-related purpose for
being (THE FIELD, home or visiting team locker rooms, luxury suites, offices,
concessions areas not run by your organization, etc)
 Violation of this policy can be cause for immediate termination of your
fundraising contract.
Volunteer Conduct Cont…
Autographs, Fraternization and Solicitation
Associates may not socialize, elicit services (including autographs or pictures)
or ask for special treatment from players, player’s family, other celebrities,
front office associates, suite holders, club seat holders. Deviations from this
regulation will be considered a violation of company policy, subject to
corrective action.
Patriotism
All staff within view of the flagpole in center field should face the American
Flag and stand at attention whenever the “Star Spangled Banner” or another
country’s national anthem is played. Any volunteer whose uniform requires a
hat or visor must remove it at this time and place their right hand over their
heart.
Smoking
Smoking and/or the use of tobacco products is not permitted while on Bank of
America Stadium property. Bank of America Stadium is a NON Smoking
facility. This includes e-cigarettes.
Volunteer Appearance
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Uniforms- Must be dressed and ready for work
Jewelry- May not be excessive (NO earrings on men in club level)
Gum Chewing- Not allowed at anytime
Hair Color- Must be natural/ NOT extreme in color
Personal Electronic Devices – Leave at home
Tattoos- May not be visible in club level
Personal Hygiene – Grooming time is not accounted for when
we determine clock in times. No overbearing cologne or perfumes.
Do not wear or bring anything into the stadium
advertising another NFL team.
Attendance
 We expect you to be here on game day – on time & ready to
work
 On game day, if you are running late, please call check in at
704.358.7190 –
Questions?
Preventing Workplace Violence
• PREVENTING WORKPLACE
VIOLENCE
Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
IN THE NEWS…
Workplace Violence Huge Drain
•
Incidents Have Both Financial and Emotional Costs
•The U.S. Department of Justice found that workplace
violence typically causes lost days of work. The National
Safe Workplace Institute estimates that costs of those
missed days, along with legal costs associated with the
violence, exceed $4 billion a year. Research also shows
that those who witness violence in the workplace report
increased stress and depleted morale, which could lead
to lower productivity and more absenteeism and
turnover.
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• WHAT IS WORKPLACE VIOLENCE?
•
Workplace violence includes —
•
Intentionally shoving or pushing
•
Brandishing Weapons
•
Stalking – intentionally engaging in a course of conduct for no
legitimate purpose which is likely to cause fear of harm to the
physical health, safety or property or another person
•
Conduct that threatens or causes intentional bodily injury,
property damage and/or business interruption
•
Talking or joking about engaging in any of the above
•
Behavior may consist of verbal or written statements,
gestures or other means of communicating threat of harm
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• TYPES OF VIOLENCE
•
•
•
•
•
•
Types of workplace violence:
Criminal intent: Intruder commits violent act while
committing crime
Customer/client: Someone with legitimate relationship to
organization becomes violent while being served by
organization
Worker on worker: Employee or former employee attacks or
threatens another employee in workplace
Personal relationship: Someone with personal relationship
attacks/threatens someone in workplace
Criminal-intent violence accounts for 85% of workplace
homicides
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• RISK FACTORS
•
•
•
•
•
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Risk of workplace violence is higher where the work involves
—
Interaction with the public
Working alone or in small numbers
Doing deliveries or guarding valuables
Working with unstable populations
Working late at night, early in the morning or in high-crime
locations
•
Employees working under these conditions should be
aware of risks
•
Supervisors should provide extra prevention measures if
needed
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
IN THE NEWS…
Work Stress, Violence Linked
•One of every ten U.S. workers claims to work in an
office where stress has led to physical violence,
according to a recent survey. Higher stress levels are
blamed on longer work hours, more pressure from
bosses, rude clients and co-workers, and — last but not
least — excess caffeine.
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• PREVENTION METHODS
•
•
•
•
•
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Methods to help prevent workplace violence:
Providing increased visibility in high-risk areas
Installing adequate external lighting
Minimizing available cash
Providing training in conflict resolution
Establishing reporting systems for incidents of aggressive
behavior
•
Supervisors should ensure that these methods are carried
through
•
Employees should report non-compliance to supervisor or
HR
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• SECURITY MEASURES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Department heads/supervisors are responsible for putting
security measures in place, which may include —
Security alarms — some employees may need special
systems to enable them to summon help quickly
Security guards/monitoring — full-time/after-hours guards
or monitoring systems may be needed
Limited-access key cards
Visitor sign-in policies — visitors should log time, location
and purpose of all visits
Safety training
Please contact the Corporate Security Department for
assistance
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• ZERO TOLERANCE
•
We are committed to zero tolerance of workplace violence,
including —
•
Hitting or shoving
•
Threatening to do harm to people or property
•
Stalking
•
"Joking" about violent acts you may take
•
Possessing or inappropriately using firearms or other
dangerous devices on our property
•
Any other acts of workplace violence
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• RED FLAGS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Some behaviors present red flags of potentially violent
incident:
History of emotional or mental disturbance, or
threatening/violent behavior
Alienation from other employees
Disdain for authority or sympathy for perpetrator in accounts
of violence
Sudden decrease in productivity or decline in personal
hygiene
Extreme stress from a life crisis
Obsession with weapons
If co-worker presents red flags, report it to your supervisor
or HR
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
IN THE NEWS…
•
Violence Runs Gamut
Risk Exists across a Variety of Professions
•The Bureau of Justice Statistics found that the occupations
with the highest workplace violence are police officers,
corrections officers, taxi drivers, bartenders, mental-health
custodians, special-education teachers, gas-station
attendants, mental-health professionals, junior high school
teachers, convenience-store workers, bus drivers, high
school teachers, nurses and physicians, which had more
incidents of violence than all other occupations combined.
The number of employees killed in proportion to the
number in the field determined the risk. The perpetrator in
about 11% of the homicides was a co-worker, former coworker or a customer. A firearm was the weapon of choice
in more than 80% of the workplace homicides.
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• DEALING WITH A VOLATILE SITUATION
•
Be prepared to respond appropriately
•
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Guidelines:
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Situate yourself near a door or exit space
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Stay calm, speak in low voice, don't argue
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Treat the other person with respect
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Listen with empathy without being defensive
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Monitor non-verbal clues
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Avoid invasion of another's personal space
•
•
If person is out of control, call 911
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• WEAPONS
•
Employees may not wear, transport, store or display
firearms or other dangerous weapons on work premises
•
•
Employees who violate rules face disciplinary action,
including termination
•
•
Dangerous weapons include —
•
Firearms — loaded/unloaded, assembled/disassembled
•
Knives
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Explosive materials
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Toxic agents
•
Spray irritants
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• WEAPONS (C
•
ONT’D)
The ban on weapons applies to all associates including
associates employed in a security capacity
•
•
Carrying a weapon onto Company property will be
considered an act of criminal trespass and will be grounds
for immediate removal
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• POP QUIZ!
•
According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety
and Health, how many workers are murdered on the job
each week in the U.S.?
A. 1
B.
5
C.
10
D. 15
E.
20
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Preventing Workplace Violence
• REPORTING PROCEDURES
•
If you suspect a violation, report it in writing unless there is
an immediate threat or danger
•
If violent situation is imminent, contact your stand manager
immediately or stadium security 7788
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Copyright © 2014 WeComply, Inc. All rights reserved.
Questions?
Food Safety
Session Objectives
• You will be able to:
– Understand what foodborne illness is and how
food workers can prevent food contamination
– Receive, store, cook, thaw, and clean to prevent
contamination
Foodborne Illness
• Potentially
hazardous foods
• Bacteria, such
as salmonella
• Virus, such
as hepatitis A
• Parasites in meat
Wash Hands and Arms
1. Wet hands with
warm water
2. Use soap
3. Rub hands
briskly together
4. Rinse hands under
running water
5. Dry hands on
paper towel
When to Wash
• Before touching anything used to prepare
food
• After touching bare human body
• After using the restroom
• After coughing or sneezing
• After eating, drinking, smoking
• After handling trash or dirty utensils
• After touching a dirty apron/clothing
• After cleaning or using chemicals After
working with raw meat
• Before putting on disposable gloves
Prevent Contamination by Food Handlers
• Wash your hands
• Use utensils to handle
ready-to-eat food
• Minimize bare hand
contact with exposed food
• Use utensil only once
when taste testing
Good Hygiene Practices
• Eat, drink, and smoke
only in designated areas
• Wear hair restraints or hats
• Keep fingernails clean
and trimmed
• Don’t wear jewelry
on hands
• Keep clothing and
aprons clean
• Apron must remain in the kitchen
when using the restroom
If Sick, Do Not Work
• Cold, flu, runny
nose, sore throat
• Diarrhea
• Vomiting
• Hepatitis A
• Infected cut, burn,
or sore
Equipment, Utensils, and Linens
• Utensils stored to
prevent contamination
• Linens replaced each time
• Wiping cloths cleaned
and sanitized
• Gloves used for one task
• Clean equipment and
cutting boards
• New plates for second portions
Prevent Contamination by Consumers
• Packaging, salad bar
guard, or display cases
• Dispensers or individually
packaged condiments
• Ladles, tongs, and spoons
• Trained food associate
at buffets and salad bars
Prevent Food and Ingredient Contamination
• Keep raw meat away
from ready-to-eat foods or store
on bottom shelf
• Separate different types
of raw meat
• Store food in clean,
covered containers
• Label food containers
• Wash raw fruit and vegetables
Food Storage
• Clean, dry location
• Not exposed to splash, dust,
contaminants
• 6 inches above the floor
• Away from chemicals
• Stock rotation
Cooking to Destroy Bacteria
• Temperature “Danger Zone”:
41oF (5oC) and 135oF (57oC)
• Thermometer
• Poultry, stuffing: 165°F (74oC)
• Hamburger: 155°F (68oC)
• Pork: 145°F (63oC)
• Eggs (for immediate
consumption): 145°F (63oC)
• Beef, lamb, fish, seafood: 145°F
(63oC)
Thawing Foods
•
•
•
•
•
Keep frozen foods frozen
Thaw in a refrigerator
Thaw under running water
Thaw in a microwave
Never thaw food at room temperature
Hot and Cold Holding
• Hot foods: > 135°F (57oC)
• Cold foods: < 41°F (5oC)
Disposal of Food
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•
•
•
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Not heated or cooled in a timely manner
Container without a date
Adulterated food
Contaminated by a sick associate
Contaminated by contact with hands,
nasal discharge, etc.
Manual Dishwashing
1. Scrape off leftover food
2. Wash in solution
at >110°F (43oC)
3. Rinse in clean
warm water
4. Immerse in sanitizing
solution
5. Air dry
Key Points to Remember
• Wash hands often
• Do not work when you are sick
• Keep food out of the “danger
zone”
• Prevent contamination of food
and utensils
• Store food properly
• Use your thermometer
Questions?
Welcome to GuestPath®
The 4 Key Elements of Service Delivery
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Types of Guests
External Guests
Internal Guests
Its important to show the same
courtesy and respect to both.
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
What is a Service Promise?
A service promise is a commitment made by a
company to its guests that, if delivered as
expected, helps differentiate the company from
its competitors and creates guest loyalty.
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Our GuestPath®
Service Promise
Creating special experiences
one guest at a time.®
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
What is a Standard?
Standard: a benchmark that states the approved
way to perform a task.
• Outlines the minimum expectation
• Describes a clear outcome or end result
• Is specific and measureable
• Standards apply across our business to
ensure a quality guest experience
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
GuestPath® Standards
Service Delivery & Recovery
Operational Procedures
Cleanliness
Condition
Product Standards
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
10 Universal Service
Standards
10
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Professional Appearance
& Grooming
1
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Attentive Posture
2
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
How may I help you?
Good Morning!
We hope to see
you again!
Universal
Service
Standard
3
Please
Gracious & Friendly Service
Would you like…
Thank You
Welcome
I would be happy to!
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Guest Name
4
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Greeting Guests
5
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Thanking the Guest
6
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Teamwork
7
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Pride in Facility Maintenance
& Appearance
8
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Product Knowledge
& Associate Skills
9
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal
Service
Standard
Telephone Courtesy
10
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Universal Service Standards
The 4 Key Elements of Service Delivery
Being
Prepared
to work
Greeting
Using
Name
Thanking
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
Thank You for…
Creating Special Experiences
One Guest at a Time.®
© 2013 Delaware North Companies, Inc.
PCI Compliance at Delaware North
NPO Training
Awareness. Accountability.
Compliance.
What is PCI?
• Payment Card Industry
• PCI Security Standards Council
– Founded by American Express, Master Card, Visa,
Discover and JCB International
• PCI Data Security Standard
What does it mean to be PCI Compliant?
• Achieving and maintaining the requirements of the
PCI Security Standards Council
Protect Credit Card Information
What does it mean to be PCI Compliant?
• Continuous process
• Business Process will change
• Requirements will change
• No guarantee breaches won’t occur
Why being PCI Compliant is critical
• It’s the right thing to do
– Between 2004 and 2008, 285 million records breached*
– Retail and F&B large percentage
• Maintain Delaware North’s reputation of integrity
• We are all responsible for PCI compliance
*2009 Data Breach Investigations Report, Verizon Business RISK Team
Why being PCI Compliant is critical
• Mandated by major credit card companies or we lose
our privileges
Delaware North’s PCI Compliance Efforts
• PCI Compliance Committee
• Hired consultant to identify risks/course of action
• Working on a new IT Infrastructure
• PCI awareness communication/education
PCI Compliance and You
• Credit card handling procedures
• Handling lost credit cards
• What you should do in response to a
card breach
credit
General Handling Procedures
1. Obtain signature for transactions over $25.00
2. Ask guest if they want a copy of receipt
3. Secure merchant copy of receipt in cash drawer
until end of shift.
Manual Credit Card Transactions
• Any handheld or portable devise used to process a
credit card transaction through use of imprinting
hardware
• Only to be used when no electronic means exists
• Customer signatures required on all manual
transactions
Manual Credit Card Transactions
1. Check for valid expiration date
2. If valid, place card & slip in device and process.
Include all necessary totals.
3. Obtain signature for all transactions.
4. Give guest copy of receipt.
5. Secure merchant copy of receipt in cash drawer
until end of shift.
Lost Credit Cards
• Give to your Stand Manager
• If your Stand Manager is not available:
– Place in sealed envelope
– Write name on the card on the envelope
– Place in locked drawer or cabinet until you can
give to Stand Manager
Lost Credit Cards
• If guest returns within 24 hours
– Unit Management can return
– Guest must present valid photo ID
– Guest sign Retained Credit Card Log
• If guest doesn’t return or does not have valid ID
– Must destroy card
Lost Credit Cards
• Card destruction
– Only done by unit management
– Must have a witness present
– Cut into 4 pieces- numbers & mag strip
– Unit manager & witness sign Retained Credit Card
Log
Field Incident Response Plan
What constitutes a credit card breach or “incident”?


Physical theft or loss of processing device
Physical theft of loss of hard copy/paper record
information
 Unauthorized access, tampering or suspicious activities in
“sensitive areas”
 Failure to account for proper disposal of hard copy/paper
records with full cc information
 Third party service provider breaches
Field Incident Response Plan
• Responsibility of every volunteers to report any
potential incidents
• To report the incident to your Stand Manager
immediately.
Questions?
ALCOHOL AWARENESS
Training Program
Penalties
• If you are convicted of selling alcohol to someone
under 21,
– You will have a criminal record. (It’s a misdemeanor.)
– You can not work in any place that sells alcohol for 2
years.
• If you sell to an underage or intoxicated person and
injury or death results,
– You can be sued for up to $500,000!
Your Rights
You can refuse to sell
alcohol to anyone!
When should you ask for an ID?
Rule of thumb:
Ask for ID
if the person looks
under 40.
Activity: Determining Age
How old
is this
person?
She is
16!
Activity: Determining Age
How old
is this
person?
She is
14!
Activity: Identifying Acceptable IDs
• Valid US Driver’s license
– If you’re not sure, check book of licenses
– NC licenses have three colors around the photo
• Go: Green means over 21
• Caution: Yellow means under 21 when issued
• Stop: Red means under 18 when issued
• Valid North Carolina Special Identification Card
• Valid Passport foreign or domestic
• Valid Military Identification Card
Activity: Identifying Acceptable IDs
Is this an
acceptable form
of identification?
NO!
Activity: Identifying Acceptable IDs
Is this an
acceptable form of
identification?
YES!
PAUSE: Steps in checking ID’s
P—Photo:
A—Age:
U—Under Age:
S—Seal:
E—Examine:
Look at the photo to see if
it matches the person
Compute the age
Is the person under age?
Check the seal or
hologram
Examine the ID for
irregularities
Signs of Intoxication
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Swaying or staggering
Stumbling or bumping into things
Leaning on objects for support
Glassy eyes
Slurred speech
Annoying other customers
Difficulty handling money
Overlooking ID in wallet
Situation 1
A patron is trying to buy wine and you
suspect the ID she has given you is
altered.
What do you say and do?
Situation 2
A person walks in showing several of
the signs of intoxication. He orders beer
at your counter.
What do you say and do?
Situation 3
You are serving and notice
that a patron has had several drinks
in a relatively short period of time--less
than 2 hours.
She orders another drink.
What do you say and do?
How to Refuse a Service
• State in a calm and business-like way that
you cannot sell them alcohol.
• If challenged, tell them
– You are unable to legally serve them
another drink.
– Offer a non alcoholic alternative.
– Get assistance from Stand Manager if the
situation escalates.
Dealing with Problem Situations
• Make sure you know the stadium and company policies,
but always remember that YOU are responsible if you
sell alcohol.
• State in a calm and business-like way what the problem
is and repeat what you are going to do (or not do).
• Do not argue with anyone. If possible, step away from
the counter.
• Call your Stand Manager to handle the customer.
• Call the police if the situation becomes heated or if you
feel threatened.
Key Points to Remember
• You can refuse to sell alcohol to anyone.
• Do not sell to anyone who is under 21 or visibly
intoxicated.
• Ask for ID from anyone who looks under 40.
• No more than 2 drinks per person per sale at one
time. If guest already has a drink in one hand then
only 1 can be sold to patron.
• All Alcohol service end at the end of the 3rd Quarter
ALCOHOL SERVICE TRAINING CERTIFICATION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM - 2015 Season
I hereby certify that on the date indicated below, I have completed the Company’s alcohol service
training, which included instruction regarding the legal responsibility that both individuals and the
Company have when serving alcohol, acceptable forms of identification, signs of intoxication, and
refusing or discontinuing the service of alcohol. I was given the opportunity to ask questions, had my
questions answered and I understood the training content. I understand that the following violations of
the Company’s Alcohol Service Policy will result in immediate termination, even for a single infraction:
• Serving a visibly intoxicated person;
• Serving a minor – MUST ID EVERYONE WHO APPEARS 40 OR YOUNGER;
• Any other violation of law; or
• Violation of the following unit service rules:
o # of drinks allowed per patron: 2 per person per ID
o Alcohol sales time: from when gates open to the end of the 3rd quarter (or otherwise
deemed by management)
o Caps must be removed from bottled beers
I understand that the following violations will result in counseling and retraining or, where an associate
has a previous history of disciplinary action, may result in termination:
• Failure to ask for proper proof of age from everyone (not resulting in the service of a minor).
• Any other violation of the Company’s Alcohol Service Policy or unit service rules.
By signing below, I hereby certify that I: (a) understand and agreed to abide by the Company’s Alcohol
Service Policy; and (b) understand I will be disciplined according to the company’s Alcohol Service
Discipline Policy for failing to comply with the Alcohol Service Policy as indicated above, up to and
including termination
_______________________________________
Signature
_______________________________________
Print Name
_____________________________
Date