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Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
INTRODUCTION:
The primary objective of this Project Readiness Package (PRP) is to describe the proposed project by documenting
requirements (customer needs and expectations, specifications, deliverables, anticipated budget, skills and resources needed,
and people/ organizations affiliated with the project. This PRP will be utilized by faculty to evaluate project suitability in
terms of challenge, depth, scope, skills, budget, and student / faculty resources needed. It will also serve as an important
source of information for students during the planning phase to develop a project plan and schedule.
In this document, italicized text provides explanatory information regarding the desired content. If a particular item or aspect
of a section is not applicable for a given project, enter N/A (not applicable). For questions, contact Mark Smith at 475-7102,
mark.smith@rit.edu.
ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION:

Project Name (tentative):

Project Number, if known:

Preferred Start/End Quarter in Senior Design:
Fall/Winter
Fall/Spring
Winter/Spring

Faculty Champion: (technical mentor: supports proposal development, anticipated technical mentor during project
Motorcycle Airflow Turbine System
P13265
execution; may also be Sponsor)
Name
Dept.
Email
Phone
For assistance identifying a Champion: B. Debartolo (ME), G. Slack (EE), J. Kaemmerlen (ISE), R. Melton (CE)

Other Support, if known: (faculty or others willing to provide expertise in areas outside the domain of the Faculty
Champion)
Name

Dept.
Email
Phone
Project “Guide” if known: (project mentor: guides team through Senior Design process and grades students; may
also be Faculty Champion)

Primary Customer, if known (name, phone, email): (actual or representative user of project output; articulates
needs/requirements)

Sponsor(s): (provider(s) of financial support)
Name/Organization
Contact Info.
Page 1 of 10
Type & Amount of Support
Committed
Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
PROJECT OVERVIEW: 2-3 paragraphs that provide a general description of the project – background, motivation,
customers, problem you’re trying to solve, project objectives.
There is now an ever increasing need to make vehicles more efficient and less reliant on nonrenewable fuels. This move to “go green” is already making a big surge in the car industry with the
growing number of hybrid and now fully electric vehicles. One vehicle industry that hasn’t yet caught up
is the motorcycle industry. While there are a handful of electric motorcycles making their way into the
market, the large majority of riders do not have clean energy options.
A second issue motorcycle riders face is increasingly dangerous riding conditions due to distracted
drivers. Night-time safety is particularly a concern, due to the much smaller frontal and rear areas that
motorcycles have compared to automobiles. In addition, most motorcycle’s lights are less bright than
automobiles, and they also lack a higher and more visible dedicated brake light.
The goal of this project will be to design, build and test a working prototype system that harnesses
the energy of airflow that is usually lost or contributes to drag on motorcycle riders. This harnessed
energy will then be converted to electricity to power or charge small electronics used by the rider.
Currently, few riders have a method of charging electronics while riding, which can become a problem on
long trips when a GPS or cell phone is required. This system will also feature an integrated supplementary
LED safety lighting system. The lighting system will be designed in such a way that only basic
installation is required to integrate with the vehicle’s lighting controls, after which the supplementary
lights will function wirelessly. This addresses customer needs for a visual safety device that requires no
major modification to their vehicles and does not alter the appearance of the vehicle. The end product will
be a clean energy source available for any rider and a system that greatly enhances rider visibility.
DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The goal of this section is provide enough detail for faculty to assess whether the proposed project scope and required skills
are appropriate for 5th year engineering students working over two quarters. The sequence of the steps listed below may
depend on your project, and the process is usually iterative, so feel free to customize. Emphasis is on the “whats” (qualitative
and quantitative), not the “hows” (solutions), except for the section on “potential concepts,” which is necessary to assess the
appropriateness of required skills and project scope. Not all of the information in this section may be shared with students.
(Attach extra documentation as needed).

Customer Needs and Objectives: Comprehensive list of what the customer/user wants or needs to be able to do in
the “voice of the customer,” not in terms of how it might be done; desired attributes of the solution.
Page 2 of 10
Project Readiness Package
Customer
Affinity Group
Need
CN1
Size Constraints
CN2
CN3
Durability
CN4
CN5
CN6
CN7
Safety
CN8
CN9
CN10
CN12
CN13
Performance
CN14
CN15
CN16
CN17
Customer
CN18
Interaction/
CN19
Ergonomics
CN20
Aesthetics
CN21
CN22
Cost
Rev 7/22/11
Objective Description (The product should…)
Be sized within the range of a common backpack
Store a laptop and one additional small electronic device
Retain functionality at temperatures typical of spring, summer, and fall riding
Retain functionality during wet conditions
Provide water resistence to contents stored inside compartments
Optimize visibility to other motorists through a safety lighting system
Include running, brake, and turn-signal lights that are visible during the day and night
Should not create risk of electrical shock to rider, during intended use
Should not create risk of injury from rotating components, during intended use
At minimum, be capable of charging one cellphone or similarly sized electronic device
Energy generated by device should power the safety lighting system
Provide means of powering safety lighting system for 30 minutes without electricity generation
Function at air speeds associated with highway riding
Require little/no modification to the vehicle and integrate wirelessly with the vehicle's lighting system
The lighting system should be syncronized with the vehicle's lighting system
Feature compatibility with standard USB devices
Should not interfere with riding dynamics at speeds up to highway speeds
Should not create any additional fatigue compared to tradition backpack
Be visually appealing
Should not distract from the appearance of the vehicle
Should be priced competitively as a niche product compared to other backpacks, when manufactured
Relative
Importance
9
9
9
3
3
3
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
3
3
3
1
3
Figure 1: Customer Needs
Functional Decomposition: Functions and sub-functions (verb-noun pairs) that are associated with a system/solution
that will satisfy customer needs and objectives. Focus on “what” has to be achieved and not on “how”it is to be achieved
– decompose the system only as far as the (sub) functions are solution independent. This can be a simple function list or a
diagram (functional diagram, FAST (why-how) diagram, function tree).
Create a device that will harvest the energy from air flow past riders of motorcycles,
scooters, or similar vehicles in an efficient and economical manner that can be used to
charge electronic devices. In addition, this energy generation device will provide power
to a wireless safety lighting system.
Figure 2: Function Tree
Page 3 of 10
Regulate Power
Output
Integrate lighting
system with vehicle
Power (W)
Connection Type
Current, voltage
(Amps, Volts)
Transfer to electrical
device(s).
Current, Voltage
(Amps, Volts)
Power lighting
system
Luminal Intensity
(Candela)
Monitor Battery
Charge
Transfer Energy
Batter Charge
(mAh)
Store Energy In
Battery
Battery Type
Rotational
velocity (rpm’s)
Power (Watts)
Convert mechanical
energy to electrical
energy
Generator
Efficiency (%)
Area( m^2)
Pressure (Pa)
Mechanical
Energy (J)
Mechanical
Efficiency (%)
Convert wind energy to mechanical energy
Store Energy
Battery Size
(m^3)
Collect energy
Air speed (m/s)

Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
Figure 3: Interface Diagram

Potential Concepts: Generate a short list of potential concepts (solutions) to realize the system and associated
functions. This may involve benchmarking or reverse engineering of existing solutions. For each concept and its
associated function(s), generate a list of key tasks or skills needed to design and realize the function(s), and identify which
disciplines (ME, EE, CE, ISE, …) are likely to be involved in the design and realization of the function(s). See the
“PRP_Checklist” document for a list of student skills by department. Potential concepts, skills, and tasks should not be
shared with students.
Electricity Generation:
Figure 4: Small-scale Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine
The green energy company MINIWIZ has developed a micro-wind powered generator, called the
HYmini, for consumer use to charge small electronics such as cellphones and iPods. This product uses
a traditional horizontal axis wind turbine coupled to a mini generator to charge a 1200mAh lithium
rechargeable battery. This product is only 3.4 inches wide, begins generating energy at 9mph and is
designed to take advantage of wind-speeds up to 40mph. For safety, the turbine is designed of a soft
PE material.
Page 4 of 10
Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
There is strong potential that this design could be modified to integrate with a backpack, where the
turbine is either external or air is channeled through intake piping and fed into an internal turbine.
Additionally, a higher capacity battery could be implemented to take advantage of the higher wind
speeds associated with motorcycle riding.
Source: http://hymini.com/html/HYmini.html
Figure 5: Mechanical Resonance Wind Powered Generator
The windbelt wind generator, engineered by Shawn Frayne takes a new approach to harnessing wind
energy. Frayne’s device does not follow the traditional path of rotary power, but instead uses a taut
Mylar membrane fitted with two Neodymium magnets that oscillate in and out of coils due to the
phenomena of mechanical resonance. At 10mph wind speeds, the magnets oscillate at 90-100Hz.
Advantages of the system are higher efficiency for small scale power applications than similarly rated
wind turbines. Additionally, the system functions at high attack angles (up to 60 degrees). However, it
generates a relatively low amount of power (40mW at 10mph), and requires a dynamic tensioner to
increase tautness of the membrane for high-speed applications.
Source: http://www.reuk.co.uk/Windbelt-Cheap-Micro-Wind-Generator.htm
Safety Lighting System:
Figure 6: Wireless Helmet Indicator Lights
A prototype developed by the company Quirky, dubbed Signal, is an “adjustable attachment that
incorporates wireless brake lights and turn signals into any helmet.” The product syncs with a
motorcycle’s lighting system via an RFID system. Instead of using traditional incandescent lighting,
Signal’s indicators are made from a fiber optic material called Lumigram. Benefits from this material
are bright light output while remaining flexible and lightweight.
Page 5 of 10
Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
There is strong potential to use a similar RFID system to wirelessly control the lighting system for this
design project. Customers indicate that they prefer little or no modification to their vehicles; RFID
satisfies this requirement as it requires only simple installation. While fiber optic fabric has many
potential advantages, it may be difficult to obtain, unless it is hand-woven.
Source: http://www.quirky.com/products/249-Signal-led-brake-light-helmet
Figure 7: Wireless Backpack LED Indicator Lights
A motorcycle enthusiast developed a custom motorcycle backpack with integrated turn signals,
through the use of two radio transceivers, LEDs, and a small battery. The backpack system functions
wirelessly from the motorcycle and is programmed using an Arduino microprocessor. This system is
similar to the helmet lighting system, but uses LEDs instead of fiber optics.
Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXaEo5TCT1M

Specifications (or Engineering/Functional Requirements): Translates “voice of the customer” into “voice of
the engineer.” Specifications describe what the system should (shall) do in language that has engineering formality.
Specifications are quantitative and measureable because they must be testable/ verifiable, so they consist of a metric
(dimension with units) and a value. We recommend utilizing the aforementioned functional decomposition to identify
specifications at the function/ sub-function levels. Target values are adequate at this point – final values will likely be set
after students develop concepts and make tradeoffs on the basis of chosen concepts. Consider the following types of
specifications:geometry (dimensions, space), kinematics (type & direction of motion), forces, material, signals, safety,
ergonomics (comfort, human interface issues), quality, production (waste, factory limitations), assembly,
transport/packaging, operations (environmental/noise), maintenance, regulatory (UL, IEEE, FDA, FCC, RIT).
Page 6 of 10
Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
Unit of
Measure
Marginal
Value
Ideal Value
m^3
0.05
0.02
Weight
kg
<5
< 2.5
System cost
Drop Impact
Resistance
$
300
200
m
1
2
Wear time without user
discomfort
hrs
>3
>6
System
Installation Time
min
<60
<30
CN14
System
Wind speed
Km/hr
>100
>130
S8
CN1
Power Device
Size
m^3
TBD
TBD
S9
CN10
Power Device
Power Output
Watts
10
15
S10
CN10
Power Device
Efficiency
%
50
70
S11
CN17
Power Device
Output connection
NA
USB
USB
S12
CN3
Power Device
deg C
4< T<27
(-7)<T< 38
S13
CN4
Power Device
%
TBD
TBD
S14
CN3
deg C
4 <T<27
(-7)<T< 38
S15
CN4
%
TBD
TBD
S16
Source
Function
Specification (metric)
S1
CN1
System
Size
S2
CN19
System
S3
CN22
System
S4
CN8, 9
System
S5
CN19
System
S6
CN15
S7
Turbine
Generator
Turbine
Generator
Operating conditions:
Temperature
Operating conditions:
relative humidity
Operating conditions:
temperature
Operating conditions:
relative humidity
CN19
Turbine
Generator
Noise generated by
device
db
< 80
< 60
S17
CN10
Turbine
Generator
Efficiency
%
10
20
S18
CN10
Turbine
Generator
Output
Watts
>10
>15
S19
CN10
Turbine
Generator
Rotor Diameter (s)
cm
<15
<9
S20
CN6
Lighting System
Luminous Intensity
Candela
TBD
TBD
S21
CN12
Lighting System
Power required
Watts
<2
<1
S22
CN13
Lighting System
Operation time
without energy
generation
min
20
30
Page 7 of 10
Comments/Status
Size of an average
backpack
Weigh no more than
average backpack when
full
Cost of prototype
No greater discomfort
than that caused by
average backpack
Time to integrate with
vehicle lights
System must function at
wind speeds typical of
highway riding
conditions
Must fit discretely in
product
Power/charge small
electronic device
Universal Connection
Year Round
Year Round; All Riding
Conditions
Year Round
Year Round; All Riding
Conditions
Doesn’t create
additional noise higher
than typical wind noise
levels
Based from real-world
turbine efficiencies
Must take into account
power device efficiency
and meet those output
requirements
Limited by packaging
constraints
Night and day
visibility equivalent or
surpassing that of OEM
vehicles
Should use small
proportion of energy
output by system
Light system must not
be solely dependent on
energy generation
Project Readiness Package

Rev 7/22/11
Constraints: External factors that, in some way, limit the selection of solution alternatives. They are usually imposed on
the design and are not directly related to the functional objectives of the system but apply across the system (eg. cost and
schedule constraints). Constraints are often included in the specifications list but they often violate the abstractness
property by specifying “how”.








Design limited by manufacturing methods available within budget.
Electricity generation limited by micro DC motors or generators available to consumers.
Overall system size must fit within space constraints of an average backpack.
Vehicle must have enough space for installation of lighting system integration components.
Components should be easily installed on vehicle with commonly available hardware.
Functional prototype must be created within time constraints of MSD1 and 2.
Prototype must be developed within available budget.
Project Deliverables: Expected output, what will be “delivered” – be as specific and thorough as possible.
Expected outcome is a functional prototype that satisfies aforementioned requirements in the Project
Description and Customer Needs statement. Specifically, the following core functions are required:
 Product is able to generate electrical energy from air flow
 Product is able to store electrical energy
 Product is able to charge a cell phone or similar small electronic device
 Product features lighting system that enhances rider visibility, and includes:
o Running lights
o Brake lights
o Left and right turn lights
 Product is able to integrate into the vehicle’s lighting system
 Product provides power to lighting system, including during periods of no energy generation
Required Documentation:
 Concept Sketches/Drawings and explanation of selection process
 Bill of Materials
 Detailed customer needs
 Detailed engineering specifications
 Test plan
 Test results
 Estimated manufacturing costs
 Technical Paper with appropriate application of engineering principles
Page 8 of 10
Project Readiness Package

Budget Estimate: Major cost items anticipated.





Rev 7/22/11
Wireless System ~$150
Generator ~$40
Turbine rotor ~$70
Battery ~$50
Intellectual Property (IP) considerations: Describe any IP concerns or limitations associated with the project. Is
there patent potential? Will confidentiality of any data or information be required?
Some of the components and final product may have patent potential. Anything that can threaten the
future commercialization of this product is to be avoided.

Other Information: Describe potential benefits and liabilities, known project risks, etc.

Continuation Project Information, if appropriate: Include prior project(s) information, and how prior project(s)
relate to the proposed project.
Not applicable for this project.
STUDENT STAFFING:

Skills Checklist: Complete the “PRP_Checklist” document and include with your submission.

Anticipated Staffing Levels by Discipline:
Discipline
How
Many?
2
EE
3
ME
Anticipated Skills Needed (concise descriptions)
Circuit design: AC/DC converters, regulators, amplifier ckts, analog filter
design, FPGA Logic design, sensor bias/support circuitry; Power systems:
selection, analysis, power budget determination; Electromagnetics
(shielding, interference); Wireless protocol, component selection;
Embedded software design/ implementation
3D CAD, Machining (basic), Statics/dynamic analysis (2D), Fluid
dynamics (CV), Modeling of electromechanical & fluid systems, Fatigue
& static failure criteria (DME), Specifying machine elements,
Aerodynamics, CFD. Helpful: Vibrations
CE
ISE
Other
(ID)
1
Limited/Part-time help of an industrial design student for
ergonomics/aesthetics design
Page 9 of 10
Project Readiness Package
Rev 7/22/11
OTHER RESOURCES ANTICIPATED:
Describe resources needed to support successful development, implementation, and utilization of the project. This could
include specific faculty expertise, laboratory space and equipment, outside services, customer facilities, etc. Indicate if
resources are available, to your knowledge.
Category
Resource
Available?
Description
Faculty
TBD
Environment
Machine Shop
24 HR Access to CFD Lab and other Computer Labs
EE Labs
Equipment
RIT Wind Tunnel
Materials
Other
Prepared by:
Mike Baer and Tyler Davis
Page 10 of 10
Date:
11/06/12
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