RCC English 1B Syllabus Spring 2014

advertisement
Riverside City College: Spring 2014
English 1B: Critical Thinking and Writing
Instructor: Rebecca Coleman
Department: English & Media Studies
E-mail: Rebecca.Coleman@rccd.edu
Turnitin.com Course ID: 7675751
Turnitin.com Course Password: 1B43223
Room: QD 115
Times: Friday 8:10-12:40
Section: 43223
Final Exam: June 6, 2014: 8:00-10:30
Web Page: http://websites.rcc.edu/coleman/
Required Textbooks, Software, and Materials
 Schilb, John and John Clifford, eds. Making Literature Matter: An Anthology for Readers and Writers.
5th Ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012. (ISBN-13: 978-0-312-65354-5)
 One two-pocketed folder (as shown on the first day of class)
 Two Blue Books (for exams)
 Approximately 300 sheets (possibly more) of computer paper and the corresponding amount ink for printing
various materials, including essay drafts, DLAs, and course readings
 Access to the Internet and Microsoft Word
 An active Riverside Community College email account (check it regularly)
Course Description and Prerequisites
Prerequisite(s): ENG 1A: English Composition or ENG 1AH: Honors English Composition
Building on the rhetorical skills learned in ENG 1A, students will analyze, interpret, and synthesize diverse texts in order
to construct well-supported academic arguments and literary analyses. Composition totaling a minimum of 10,000 words
serves to correlate writing and reading activities. Classroom activities integrate with Writing and Reading Center
activities. Student may not receive credit for both ENG-1B and 1BH. 72 hours lecture and 18 hours laboratory.
Course Student Learning Objectives
Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
Recognize and explain the principles of critical thinking and formal argument
·
Critical Thinking - Construct sound arguments and evaluate arguments of others
·
Critical Thinking - Identify one's own and others' assumptions, biases, and their consequences
Read and discuss literary works from a variety of genres (fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction prose), as well as
from diverse authorial voices and cultural contexts, with understanding and insight.
·
Communication Skills - Read college-level materials with understanding and insight
·
Communication Skills - Listen thoughtfully and respectfully to the ideas of others
·
Global Awareness - Demonstrate understanding of alternative political, historical and cultural viewpoints
Analyze and interpret literary works using the formal components of literary analysis toward gaining an
appreciation of how principles of critical thinking and formal argument can inform discussions of literature.
·
Critical Thinking - Construct sound arguments and evaluate arguments of others
·
Critical Thinking - Consider and evaluate rival hypotheses
·
Critical Thinking - Identify one's own and others' assumptions, biases, and their consequences
Synthesize diverse interpretive alternatives gained through formal and informal research activities, and
demonstrate an ability to assess those alternatives, both in writing and orally.
·
Critical Thinking - Consider and evaluate rival hypotheses
·
Critical Thinking - Recognize and assess evidence from a variety of sources
·
Critical Thinking - Generalize appropriately from specific contexts
·
Information Skills - Locate, evaluate and use information effectively
·
Global Awareness - Demonstrate understanding of alternative political, historical and cultural viewpoints
Support premises about literary works by effectively integrating sufficient, relevant, thoughtful evidence drawn
(as appropriate) from primary and secondary sources.
·
Critical Thinking - Recognize and assess evidence from a variety of sources
·
Communication Skills - Write with precision and clarity to express complex thought
·
Breadth of Knowledge - Respond to and evaluate artistic expression
Plan, write, and revise formal essays totaling 10,000 words--using analytic, interpretive, and persuasive strategies
to present and support a considered position.
·
Critical Thinking - Construct sound arguments and evaluate arguments of others
·
Critical Thinking - Identify one's own and others' assumptions, biases, and their consequences
·
Communication Skills - Write with precision and clarity to express complex thought
·
Breadth of Knowledge - Respond to and evaluate artistic expression
Evaluate the relevance, validity and authority of information, and use and cite this information ethically.
·
Critical Thinking - Consider and evaluate rival hypotheses
·
Information Skills - Locate, evaluate and use information effectively
·
Communication Skills - Read college-level materials with understanding and insight
·
Communication Skills - Listen thoughtfully and respectfully to the ideas of others
WRC Requirement:
The Writing and Reading Center (WRC) is a vital component of this class. Students are required to complete a
scheduled 55-minute* weekly time slot of specific instructional activities, which may include Directed
Learning Activities (DLAs), grammar tutorials/worksheets, and/or instructor conferences that augment and
complement the weekly learning activities occurring in the lecture part of the course.
The WRC hours of operation are Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. and Friday 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.,
and it is located in MLK 119 basement. I will record weekly WRC attendance along with class attendance.
**Your attendance in the lab section of this course is mandatory. This resource provides opportunities to seek
individualized help from an instructor or peer tutor and the use of vital writing/reading resources. Students
need to schedule their 55-minute time block through Web Advisor when registering for the course.
STUDENTS MUST ATTEND THE WRC DURING THEIR SCHEDULED LAB TIME. IF THEY DO
NOT ATTEND BY CENSUS, THEY MAY BE DROPPED FROM THE COURSE.
You are required to keep track of your WRC visits, including date, time-in and time-out, and what activities
you completed while in the WRC; when indicated, you must have this log signed by an instructor or tutor. A
log of your time in the WRC will be collected every Friday. I will provide a handout for you to track your
visits.
The WRC requirement will be graded at two points in the semester: on 2/28/14 and at the end of the semester. If you do
not meet the cumulative weekly-hour requirements by each point, you will forfeit all points awarded at that time
Course Work
WRC Writing Activities (WAs) and Lab Log
Each student is required to complete 14 writing activities throughout the semester. As indicated by the name, these
activities need to be done in the WRC, although some activities might be started in the WRC and completed at home or
vice versa. Each week you must provide a lab log indicating WRC attendance (I will provide the handout); I will cross
check this with your hours in WebAdvisor. Each writing activity has a specific prompt that must be carefully followed.
The instructions and due dates for all writing activities are on the course schedule. All writing activities must be typed
according to MLA standards, including citations, and submitted to Turnitin.com prior to the class in which said
assignment is due. A hard (paper) copy of your writing assignments is not required unless indicated on the course
schedule; however, your signed lab log is due each week. Late writing activities will not be accepted.
NOTE: If you have a Monday WRC appointment, read this!! Otherwise, disregard.
If your weekly WRC appointment falls on a holiday (which is only possible for students who have Monday appointments
and only applicable in Weeks 7 and 15), you still need to complete the assignment by the due date. There are a few ways
to accomplish this: for week 7, a) have your Week 7 consultation with an instructor during your scheduled Week 6 WRC
meeting [you still need to complete the Week 6 assignment by the due date, but it can be done more easily at home], or b)
schedule a tutoring appointment to go over your assignment on an alternate day prior to the due date; for week 15,
complete the assignment at home and turn it in on time. On your lab log, indicate that the WRC was closed for a holiday.
Formal Essays, Drafts, and Peer-Reviews
Each student will write four formal, out-of-class essays during the course of the semester. Essay length, topic, and focus
will vary according to the individual assignment's requirements. All essays must be left justified, single sided and doublespaced, using 12-point Times New Roman font and 1-inch margins on the top, bottom, and sides. Additionally, all essays
must properly cite sources using MLA format.
All formal essays must be submitted to Turnitin.com prior to class on the scheduled due date; all papers must also be
submitted in printed form in your two pocketed folder. Papers will not be graded if they are not submitted to
Turnitin.com and as a printed hard copy.
Sharing your work with your peers via peer-review is a useful way to learn effective, as well as ineffective, writing
practices. For Essays 3 & 4, failure to participate in the scheduled peer-review activities will result in a deduction
from the final essay grade. Peer reviews cannot be made up. On days when we conduct peer-review activities, multiple
copies of a draft may be required (the exact number of copies TBD later in the semester).
Midterm
Each student will need to bring a Blue Book to class for this exam. For this assignment, you will be writing an engaging,
fully developed essay. You will be required to answer one of a few provided questions which are directly related to
specific poems, theories, and the “Pitfalls” of critical thinking. This assignment will be discussed in more detail later in
the semester.
Final
The final for this course is an in-class essay. Each student will need to bring a Blue Book to class for this exam. You will
be writing an essay on the film Momento and the corresponding short story,“Momento Mori.” You will be required to
answer one of a few provided questions which are directly related to the film and story. This assignment will be discussed
in more detail later in the semester.
In-Class Essay (non-exam)
Each student will write an in-class essay on the first day of class. This is your first graded assignment.
Quizzes
There will be 3 scheduled quizzes in this course. These quizzes will cover material from the course readings and lectures.
Course Readings and In-Class Activities:
Keeping up with the assigned readings is crucial your success in this class. The majority of the readings for this class will
come from the required textbook. You must bring your textbook to class every day. The course readings coincide with
particular writing assignments, providing possible ideas and guidance for your essays. Falling behind on readings will
affect your grade. Furthermore, discussion is an integral part of this course, and the assigned readings will often fuel our
discussions. Thus, you are responsible for completing all assigned readings before class on the day assigned; your
quizzes and WRC writing assignments are based on these readings.
Late Work and Make-Up Work
Because I have structured this course to build upon itself throughout the semester, repeatedly turning in assignments late
interrupts the flow and progress of the class. Thus, turning in late work is detrimental to student success and disrupts the
course’s momentum. In general, I will not accept any late work, with the exception of one late paper (Essay 1, 2, or 3
only) up to one week late at a 10 % reduction. The following late work policy applies:



WRC WAs will not be accepted late and cannot be made up; absence is not an excuse for not turning in
work. It is your responsibility to turn in said assignment on time.
Exams, quizzes, and in-class activities cannot be made up nor turned in late.
You have the option to turn in one (and only one) essay late (no more than one week late) at a 10 %
reduction. This only applies to Essays 1-3; Essay 4 cannot be turned in late. I will note when you turn in
a late essay; you will only get this opportunity once.
This late policy stands. I will not deviate from it.
Participation and Attendance
This course is a discussion/workshop—not lecture—intensive course. To participate in class discussions and workshops,
you must attend class, keep up with the reading assignments, and participate in the writing community, which means you
will read and respond to peer-writing during class. It is not possible to make up missed class work; if you are not in class,
you obviously cannot participate in class discussions or workshops.
Because this is a one day per week, short-term class, students who exceed a total of two absences may be dropped from
the course. Note: missed WRC hours count as absences. I will count each early departure or late arrival as half of an
absence. Remember, missed work cannot be made up, so absences will affect a student’s grade. If a student is absent, it is
his/her responsibility to contact me and/or fellow classmate for notes/class information. I will not reteach a class to an
absent student. I will, however, give a brief explanation of what was missed via email if I am asked to do so. It is the
absentee’s responsibility to ask, however. NOTE: if you are certain that you want to drop the course, it is your
responsibility to do so; do not count on me to drop you.
You will regularly have in-class exercises, some of which I will collect, some of which you will keep for practice/notes.
Again, in-class activities cannot be made up, as they are indicators of participation and you cannot participate if you are
not present. Each and every class session, I will track student participation.
Participation will be assessed as follows:
Unsatisfactory: 0 %
 Student does not participate, is engaged with non-course related activities (such as texting, going online, sleeping,
or chatting about non-course related issues), demonstrates unpreparedness (does not attempt to answer questions
related to course readings or discussions, does not have a textbook or other required materials, and/or does not
follow along with course discussion and activities, etc.), or is otherwise disruptive. Please note that you will lose
your participation points for the day if you are using your cell phone or other electronic devices without expressed
prior permission. It is your responsibility to ask for permission; if you do not, expect to lose points. Also note: a
student cannot participate if not present.
Satisfactory: 70 %
 Student demonstrates average participation. Student is prepared with required materials and shows evidence of
keeping up with readings and discussions; student participates in group and individual assignments; student does
not use electronic devices without permission and/or does not carry on side conversations; student is not
disruptive; student is awake; student can answer questions when asked but does not offer insights, questions, or
comments without prompting; student may have arrived moderately late or left moderately early, but does so
without disrupting class and immediately engages in course discussion/work.
Outstanding: 100 %
 Student demonstrates above average participation. Student asks questions, provides insights and comments, and
pushes discussion beyond the surface level without prompting; student actively engages in all discussions and
activities. Student arrives on-time and stays for the entire class session; student is prepared, demonstrates
familiarity with readings, and keeps up with discussions. Student goes beyond the minimum when engaging with
in-class course work.
Etiquette and Expectations
In this critical thinking and writing class, we will be discussing many social issues that will likely produce varied
reactions from different students. We will also be examining and questioning our own thinking habits .We are a diverse
discourse community comprised of various faith-based, cultural, ethical, economic, political, linguistic, and ethnic
perspectives. It is my goal to cultivate a learning environment wherein students can openly discuss and question issues in
a non-threatening, professional manner. I expect all members of this class to treat each other with respect and civility. It is
unacceptable to treat me or your fellow classmates in an aggressive, disrespectful, and/or disruptive way.
As a courtesy to me as well as your fellow students, students will not be permitted to use electronic devices (iPads, cell
phones, laptops, etc.) in class without prior instructor approval. The distraction caused by the interruptions of cell phones
and other electronic devices, including both vibrations and sound, is not cohesive with the learning goals for this class and
will not be tolerated.
Disruptive behavior, including but not limited to cell phone use and talking while other students or the instructor is
talking, will not be permitted and may result in the student being reported for violation of district student code of conduct
policies and the violator’s removal from class.
English & Media Studies Department Electronic Device Policy:
Electronic communication devices must remain off during class time. Exceptions may be considered by faculty
consultation (i.e. family emergency). First offense may result in the student being suspended from the class for
one meeting. Repeated offenses may result in up to a 3-day suspension from the class pending a conference with
the Dean of Student Services.
Plagiarism and Cheating
All ideas and words, including but not limited to quotes, paraphrases, images, and data, that derive from an external
source must be properly cited and referenced. This policy holds true for all assignments, including drafts, homework, inclass, and formal essays. Whenever one uses somebody else’s ideas or words as his/her own, whether it is accidental or
intentional, he/she is plagiarizing. If you are unsure whether or not something is plagiarism, please feel free to ask me
about your concerns prior to turning in said assignment. Any form of cheating or academic dishonesty will result in the
offender receiving a grade of "F" on the assignment without the opportunity for revision or the opportunity to make-up the
lost points/work. Plagiarism may also be reported to the Dean’s office.
(Board Policy 6080 Section III.C. 1&2) For instances of academic dishonesty a faculty member may reduce the score on tests or
assignments(s), reduce the grade in the course, fail the student in the course. If course suspension is recommended, the administrative
officer will review the information regarding the instance of academic dishonesty, notify the student, and will prescribe appropriate
due process procedures. The administrative officer will make note of the offense in the student’s educational records. A second
instance of academic dishonesty may result in expulsion proceedings. Any tuition and applicable fees will not be refunded as a result
of disciplinary action for academic misconduct.
Turnitin.com
All essays will be submitted by students to Turnitin.com to check for similarities between student submissions and the
internet, various research databases, and the Turnitin.com database of previous student submissions. Furthermore, I may
also submit essays to other instructors seeking plagiarism matches. Students will be required to electronically submit their
written work to Turnitin.com, and by taking this course, students agree that all assignments are subject to plagiarism
detection processes and plagiarism penalties.
Assignments submitted to Turnitin.com by the student or instructor will become part of their database and will be used for
plagiarism prevention and detection. Student papers, however, will remain the intellectual property of the author.
Disability Statement and Student Accommodations
If you have a physical, psychiatric/emotional, medical, or learning disability that may impact your ability to carry out
assigned course work, you are urged to contact the staff in Disabled Student Services, in Administration #121 on the
Riverside Campus, phone 222-8060 (City Campus), 222-8062 (TDD), 372-7070 (Norco), or 485-6138 (Moreno Valley).
DSP&S will review your concerns and determine, with you, what accommodations are necessary and appropriate. All
information and documentation is confidential.
What to do if you need extra help:





E-mail me: rebecca.coleman@rccd.edu. I will usually respond within 24 hours during business hours (9-5 M-F).
Visit the Writing Center. You can get help not only with your writing but with a wide variety of different subjects.
Attend campus study skills and grammar workshops.
Try to organize a study group with some of your classmates or friends who are also taking this course. Studying in a group is
not only more effective but more efficient. Research shows that studying in a group for an hour equals 2.5 hours of individual
study.
Get organized and manage your time more effectively. Much of success in college is measured simply by getting all of your
tasks completed efficiently
Grades
Your final course grade will be calculated by totaling all of your scores on all class assignments and activities. There are
1000 points possible in this course. I use a standard point system grade scale: 1000-900 A, 899-800 B, 799-700 C, 699600D, 599 and below F.
Points Possible
25
50
100
150
150
50
100
60
140
75
Breakdown of Course Assignments
In-Class Essay: Taking a Subjective Stance
Essay # 1: Personal Assumptions and Objectivity
Essay # 2: Short Fiction: Argument, Characterization & the Pitfalls of Critical Thinking
Essay # 3: Drama: Irony & Character Assumptions
Essay # 4: Fiction and Theory: Researched Argument
Midterm: Essay
Final: Essay
Quizzes (3 @ 20 points each)
WRC Writing Activities (14 @ 10 points each)
WRC Hours
(20 points @ the end of week 2 and 55 points @ the end of the semester)
Participation
100
Total: 1000 Points Possible
General Criteria for a Successful Formal Essay

Content and Focus: The paper has a clear central purpose which is stated in a specific and arguable thesis
statement. The paper addresses all aspects of the assignment prompt. The focus of the paper is narrow and
concise, avoiding ambiguous and broad observations. The paper uses relevant and insightful details and moves
beyond clichés, generalities, and platitudes. The paper demonstrates an awareness of audience and appeals to an
intelligent reader. The paper demonstrates maturity of thought and judgment. The paper analyzes the subject/text
as logically, accurately, intelligently, and thoroughly as possible. The paper is original and insightful.

Organization: The paper is constructed in a fluid manner and utilizes appropriate transitions. The paper
introduces the topic, texts, and authors being discussed in the introduction. The paper avoids repeating ideas by
forming each paragraph around a topic sentence and supporting details. The paper’s topic sentences relate
directly to the thesis statement and push the development of the central purpose. The paragraphs are structured in
a logically sound manner that builds a clear and unified essay (if the paragraphs can be moved around in any
order, they probably are not building a unified essay). The paper has a distinct and intriguing introduction, fully
constructed paragraphs, and a conclusion that moves beyond summary.

Development and Support: The paper demonstrates the writer’s critical thinking skills, judgment, and maturity.
The paper demonstrates the writer’s ability to process and discuss arguments in an accurate, relevant, and
engaging manner. The paper considers opposing viewpoints. The argument proposed in the thesis statement
develops throughout the essay and is supported with thoughtful and logical examples and support. When
secondary sources are used, they are used as the name implies—secondarily. This means that secondary sources
are used to inform and support an argument rather than making the argument for the writer. A successful paper
will weave secondary information into the student’s original non-fiction prose. The paper demonstrates the
student’s ability to evaluate sources by including only good quality, reputable sources. The paper avoids sumary.

Mechanics and Citation: The paper is free of gross grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. The paper
demonstrates the student’s ability to proof-read. The paper adheres to MLA documentation, properly citing all
sources. The “Works Cited” page is done correctly with matching internal citations. The paper is free of
plagiarism.
Email
It is your responsibility to check your rcc.edu email regularly. I will often send information about assignments via email.
If you fail to check your email, you may miss important information and thus points. I may also send extra credit
opportunities via email. Additionally, some assignments must be submitted via email, so it is imperative that your account
is active. I suggest that you check your email every Sunday night, and before each class.
Coleman’s College Survival Tips:






Whenever emailing a professor or school administrator, do so from your student email account, include a specific
subject line, address the recipient by name with a polite greeting (ex. Hi, Professor Coleman or Hello, Mrs.
Coleman, etc), and be sure to end the email with a salutation and your name (ex. Thanks, John Student or Best,
Jane Pupil). Unless otherwise previously discussed, I will not open emails that are not from an rcc.edu address
and/or do not have a subject line.
Whenever emailing an attachment to a teacher, make sure that you have named it appropriately and that your
name is included in the attachment title (ex. Essay 1 Revision John Doe).
Do not wait until the last minute to submit work online or to print hardcopies. Technology is notoriously
unreliable when deadlines approach. Do things early; if a problem arises, email your professor immediately to
explain the issue. Also, should your printer break or Turnitin.com malfunction, it is wise to email your professor a
copy of any work that is due, as it is the only way for a professor to gauge the time the assignment was completed.
Remember, it is your responsibility to get your work done, printed, and/or submitted on time.
Before emailing a professor a question about an assignment/course policy, be sure to check and double check all
available resources (your syllabus, assignment prompts, course website, etc.) for an answer. BUT, if an answer is
unavailable, or if you need more clarification, do not hesitate to contact your professor. I will always do my best
to answer all questions in a timely manner. It is my priority to help my students succeed; I hope to see all of you
grow into self-sufficient researchers and learners. Please be in contact with me early and often with questions and
concerns that are not covered in our course resources.
PROOFREAD, PROOFREAD, PROOFREAD! Did I mention proofreading? Many points are unnecessarily lost
due to skipping this fundamental step in the writing process.
Follow directions. This requires students to read closely, carefully, and actively. If a prompt asks you to quote
twice or to use different types of commas, be sure to do so. These seemingly small bits of missed information can
often make the difference between a passing and non-passing grade.
*Cham, Jorge. “It’s in the Syllabus.” www.phdcomics.com. 2013. Web. 17 Jan. 2014.
Tentative Schedule:
 All assignments and readings must be completed before class on the date listed;
 All formal papers and WRC Writing Activities must be submitted to turnitin.com before class on the
date listed;
 Hard (printed) copies of all formal papers with all prewriting must be submitted in your two pocketed
folder at the beginning of class on the date listed;
 Your WRC Lab Log must be submitted at the beginning of class on the due date listed; when indicated,
it must include an instructor/tutor signature. It is your responsibility to attend your scheduled 55 minutes
in the WRC every week and to get all assignments completed by the scheduled due date;
 You must bring your textbook to class each and every session
Week 1
February 21: In class: Introductions, Syllabus, WRC, Turnitin.com, What is Critical Thinking?, MLA,
Research Databases, In-Class Essay
Week 2
February 28: WRC WA # 1 Due: Using the RCC library databases, find 4 reputable sources on the topic you
explored in the In-Class Essay—two in support and two in opposition of the statement—and write a Works
Cited page in MLA format for these sources. You may want to see a WRC tutor/instructor for assistance with
MLA citations. Then, following your Works Cited write a 250 word synopsis of how these sources relate to
your argument (again, use MLA format). NOTE: sources must be full length articles from peer-reviewed
academic journals to be accepted; this assignment must be submitted to turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read1: MLM Chapter 9 (210-243) & Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (1116-1129)
Bring: Making Literature Matter (MLM)
In class: Discuss Readings; Introduce Essay # 1; Influences and arguments activity; Audience &
Purpose; Rhetorical Appeals; Stanley Fish and Interpretive Communities; Grouping Sources; Thesis
Statements and Essay Maps; more on MLA
Week 3
March 7: WRC WA # 2 Due: Complete the English 1B DLA “Facts, Opinions, and Reasoned Judgments” and
meet with an instructor as directed on the DLA (I will collect the signed DLA along with the lab log). Then,
write a 250 word analysis of the argument you made in the In-Class Essay considering the following questions:
Is your response based on facts, opinions, or reasoned judgments? How so? How can you revise your response
to make your judgments more reasonable? Your response must be submitted to Turnitin.com before class to
earn credit.
Read: MLM from Chapter 4 “Strategies for Planning” and “Strategies for Composing” (78-90) & from
Chapter 10 (533-549)
Bring: MLM
In class: Quiz 1: MLA, Audience, Purpose, Thesis Statement, & Essay Maps; The Writing Process;
Outlining and Organization; Assumptions; Facts, Opinions, and Reasoned Judgments; Subjective to
Objective Reasoning
1
All reading must be completed before class on the scheduled date
Week 4
March 14: Essay # 1 Due: Must be submitted to Turnitin.com before class and submitted as a staple hardcopy with all prewriting in your two-pocketed folder at the beginning of class to earn credit.
WRC WA # 3 Due: For this assignment, you must conference with a WRC instructor or tutor. Take a rough
draft of your essay to the WRC along with three specific questions that you would like to ask an instructor or
tutor (these questions could be about MLA, narrowing your thesis, organization, etc.—whatever you need help
with individually). Have the instructor/tutor sign off your consultation on your lab log. After your consultation,
type up the three questions you asked and explain how you applied what you learned in your conference to the
final draft of your essay. These questions and answers should total about 250 word, and you must submit this
assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: MLM (49-75) & “Desiree’s Baby” (705-711)
Bring: MLM
In class: Issues and Claims; Logical Fallacies; Biases & Unwarranted Assumptions; Assumptions
Activity (Chopin); Making Arguments about Literature; Introduce Essay # 2
Week 5
March 21: WRC WA # 4 Due: In a 250-300 word response, identify (by name) and analyze at least 3 logical
fallacies or unwarranted assumptions made by one character in either “Desiree’s Baby” or “Two Kinds” and
present an argument on why the author depicts said character in this manner. Include in this response a specific,
arguable thesis statement that indicates why the author has this specific character commit these logical fallacies
and/or unwarranted assumptions. Use textual evidence to support the claim you make in the thesis. You may
want to bring this response to a WRC tutor/instructor and consult with him/her on the strength of your thesis
statement. Submit this assignment to turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: MLM (108-141) & “Two Kinds” (305-313)
Bring: MLM
In class: Writing about Stories; Elements of Fiction; More on Fallacies and Assumptions; Discuss
Readings
Week 6
March 28: WRC WA # 5 Due: In a 350-400 word analytic essay, analyze how the narrator in either “Sonny’s
Blues” or “A Rose for Emily” provides a limited point of view of the story’s reality, making sure to identify (by
name) if/when fallacies or assumptions reveal this limitation. Use textual evidence to prove your point. Submit
this short essay to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: “Sonny’s Blues” (336-359) & “A Rose for Emily” (713-721)
Bring: MLM
In class: More on Writing about Stories, Close Reading Activities, Discuss Stories
Week 7 {IF YOU HAVE A MONDAY WRC APPT., SEE NOTE IN SYLLABUS}
April 4: Essay # 2 Due : Must be submitted to Turnitin.com before class and submitted as a staple hard-copy
with all prewriting in your two-pocketed folder at the beginning of class to earn credit.
WRC WA # 6 Due: For this assignment, you must conference with a WRC instructor or tutor. Take a rough
draft of your essay to the WRC along with three specific questions that you would like to ask an instructor or
tutor (these questions could be about MLA, narrowing your thesis, organization, etc.—whatever you need help
with individually). Have the instructor/tutor sign off your consultation on your lab log. After your consultation,
type up the three questions you asked and explain how you applied what you learned in your conference to the
final draft of your essay. These questions and answers should total about 250 words, and you must submit this
assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: MLM “My Papa’s Waltz” (273) & “Daddy” (279),
Bring: MLM
In class: Quiz 2: Pitfalls (Fallacies and Assumptions) & the Elements of Fiction; Introduction to Poetry;
In-class group activities (Assumptions and Poetry); Issues and Claims Cont.
Week 8
April 11: WRC WA # 7 Due: After reading “Prufrock,” write a 250 word argument response that identifies an
issue at work in the poem and asserts a specific claim, supporting the claim with textual evidence. Then, write
an additional 100 word self-reflection that identifies what assumptions you made (as the reader) to come to the
conclusions that you did. Submit this assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: MLM (22-31), (157-162), & “My Last Duchess” (1206-1209), “My Ex-Husband” (1209-1211), &
“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (693-697)
Bring: MLM
In class: Elements of Poetry; Writing about Poems; Close Reading Activity; Discuss Poems; Revisit
Stanley Fish; Prep for Midterm
Week 9
April 18: Spring Break
Week 10
April 25: WRC WA # 8 Due: Complete the English 1B DLA “Poetry: Word Choice and Levels of Usage” and
meet with an instructor as directed on the DLA (I will collect the signed DLA along with the lab log). You will
not have a supplemental assignment to submit to Turnitin.com this week.
Read: MLM Erdrich’s “Dear John Wayne” (998-99) & all Langston Hughes’ poems (1047-1055)
Bring: MLM
In class: Poetry Continued; Discuss Readings; Midterm Exam; Introduction to Irony; Introduce Essay #
3
Week 11
May 2: WRC WA # 9: In a 300 word response, analyze how Shakespeare uses irony (situational, verbal, and/or
dramatic) to characterize one character. Be specific when discussing how the character is presented—do not just
say Othello is good and Iago is bad—and indicate by name what types of irony are being used. Furthermore,
explain how you know it is a specific form of irony by using textual evidence to prove your point. Submit your
response to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: MLM (168-183) & Shakespeare’s Othello Acts 1-3
Bring: MLM
In class: Elizabethan Drama; Elements of Drama; Value and Descriptive Assumptions & Activity;
Characterization; More on Irony
Week 12
May 9: WRC WA # 10: In the WRC, finish typing your 4 page draft of Essay # 3. If you need assistance with
drafting, see a WRC tutor/instructor. Submit this assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: Finish Shakespeare’s Othello Acts 4-5
Bring: MLM & 2 Copies of your 4 Page Draft of Essay 3 for peer review
In class: More on Othello; Peer-Review of Essay 3
Week 13
May 16: Essay # 3 Due: Must be submitted to Turnitin.com before class and submitted as a staple hard-copy
with all prewriting in your two-pocketed folder at the beginning of class to earn credit.
WRC WA # 11 Due: For this assignment, you must conference with a WRC instructor or tutor. Take a rough
draft of your essay to the WRC along with three specific questions that you would like to ask an instructor or
tutor (these questions could be about MLA, narrowing your thesis, organization, etc.—whatever you need help
with individually). Have the instructor/tutor sign off your consultation on your lab log. After your consultation,
type up the three questions you asked and explain how you applied what you learned in your conference to the
final draft of your essay. These questions and answers should total about 250 words, and you must submit this
assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: MLM (621-626) & Review the Elements of Poetry and Drama for the Quiz
Bring: MLM
In class: Quiz # 3: Elements of Poetry and Drama; Introduce Essay 4; Induction and Deduction;
Literary Theories
Week 14
May 23: WRC WA # 12 Due: Topic Proposal for Essay # 4: In a 300 word topic proposal for Essay # 4, include
your issue, thesis [claim], theorist/theoretical approach, and brief overview your argument. This assignment
must be submitted to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit. If needed, see a WRC tutor/instructor for
assistance.
Read: MLM Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “Yellow Wallpaper” and related essays (954-979) & Student
Sample Essays (224-236) & ALL theory handouts
Bring: MLM
In class: Discuss Readings; Discuss Theory Application;
Week 15 {If you have a Monday WRC appt., see the note in the syllabus}
May 30: WRC WA # 13 Due: In the WRC, type a 4 page draft of Essay # 3 with a Works Cited for all your
sources. If you need assistance with drafting, research, or your Works Cited page, see a WRC tutor/instructor.
Submit this assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Read: HANDOUT- “Momento Mori”
Bring: MLM & 2 Copies of a 4 page Draft of Essay 4 for peer review
In class: Peer-Review, Discuss “Momento Mori;” Watch Film
Week 16
June 6: Essay # 4 Due: Must be submitted to Turnitin.com before class and submitted as a staple hard-copy
with all prewriting in your two-pocketed folder at the beginning of class to earn credit.
WRC WA # 14 Due: Considering the material we have covered over the semester, write a 250 word reflection
that discusses whether or not the way you read fiction and non-fiction has changed. What is different now? Be
specific [you are not required to use textual evidence for this assignment, though you can if you’d like]. Submit
this assignment to Turnitin.com before class to earn credit.
Bring: MLM & Blue Book
In class: FINAL 8-10:30 A.M
Student Information Sheet: English 1B (Friday 8:10-12:40)
Section # 43223: Spring 2014: Coleman
Please legibly print all the information requested below:
Last Name: __________________________________________
First Name: _____________________________________ Preferred Name: ______________________________
Student ID Number: ______________________________ RCC Email Address: ___________________________________
Scheduled WRC Day/Time: ________________________ How many semesters of college have you completed? ______________
Attendance and Participation (for instructor use):
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
2/21) A P T
2/28) A P T
3/7) A P T
3/14) A P T
O
O
O
O
S
U
S
U
S
U
S
U
Lab:
Week 5
Lab:
Week 6
Lab:
Week 7
Lab:
Week 8
3/21) A P T
3/28) A P T
4/4) A P T
4/11) A P T
O
O
O
O
S
U
Lab:
Week 9
4/18) Spring Break
S
U
S
U
S
U
Lab:
Week 10
Lab:
Week 11
Lab:
Week 12
4/25) A P T
5/2) A P T
5/9) A P T
O
O
O
S
U
S
U
S
U
Week 13
Lab:
Week 14
Lab:
Week 15
Lab:
Week 16
5/16) A P T
5/23) A P T
5/30) A P T
6/6) A P T
O
O
O
O
Lab:
S
U
Lab:
S
U
Lab:
S
U
Lab:
S
U
Download