Service Provider Self Assessment Evidence Guide

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Service Provider Self Assessment
Evidence Guide
.
August 2015
Purpose
FACS’ monitoring system for funded programs includes an annual review of the
extent to which service providers comply with relevant NSW legislation and meet the
requirements of their contract with FACS. This review takes place formally in
November each year. It draws on information submitted to FACS by service
providers, including a ‘self assessment’ by the service provider.
FACS has developed this ‘evidence guide’ to assist service providers in the task of
completing the annual self assessment. The Guide describes FACS’ performance
expectations and suggests possible sources of evidence that service providers can
draw on when demonstrating that they have achieved these expectations.
Service Provider Performance
In the context of FACS’ funded programs, the term ‘performance’ is used to refer
broadly to all of the outcomes/achievements that FACS expects the organisations it
funds to be able to demonstrate, if requested.
FACS’ performance expectations for service providers cover:
Specific reporting requirements, such as the submission of audited financial
statements and information on assets purchased with FACS funds, that oblige
funded organisations to provide FACS with copies of particular documents;
Requirements arising out of particular NSW legislation, for example the ‘working
with children check’; and
Requirements that reflect FACS’ interest in the ‘good governance’ and financial
‘health’ of the organisations it funds, as well as their capabilities as deliverers of
government-funded services.
As an agency of the NSW Government, FACS is directly accountable for the way that
funded organisations use and manage public funds. As the primary funder of NGOs
operating in the NSW child and family sector, FACS has a responsibility to ensure
that the organisations it funds deliver these services effectively and efficiently, to a
high standard, and with a minimum of disruption and waste (ie. mismanagement,
fraud, avoidable inefficiency).
Service Provider Self Assessment
The opportunity for self assessment is a practical recognition by FACS that the
service provider is a partner in the delivery of services. The service provider self
assessment is completed online through the Contracting Portal, using template
documents.
The annual Service Provider Self Assessment is focussed on three key aspects of
performance:
Corporate Governance - ‘Corporate Governance’ is the system of rules and
practices by which the service providing organisation is directed and controlled
in order that the organisation achieves its objectives.
Financial Management - ‘Financial Management’ covers the activities involved
in planning, directing, monitoring, organising and controlling the financial (ie.
money) resources of an organisation. FACS has a direct interest in the overall
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financial ‘health’ of the organisations it funds because FACS is accountable for
the public funds that it makes available to service providers.
Service Delivery - ‘Service Delivery’ performance refers to the results/outcomes
that a funded organisation achieves through the services it provides using the
funds it receives through a FACS funding program. These results are described
in detail in the different Program Guideline documents and in the contract that a
funded organisation enters into with FACS.
Self assessment is undertaken at two ‘levels’, for different purposes:
Corporate level – meaning the service provider organisation as a whole –
involves assessment of high-level corporate governance and financial
management arrangements, requirements primarily set out in the Funding
Deed.
Program Level Agreement (PLA) level – meaning that part of the contract that
governs each separate ‘package’ of funding the organisation receives from a
FACS funding program – involves assessment of financial and service
delivery arrangements particular to the service that is funded.
FACS’ contracting staff are available to support service providers through the
process of completing Self Assessments, and can be approached to comment on a
draft Self Assessment before this is formally submitted through the Contracting
Portal.
The annual self assessment is submitted to the same timeline as the annual acquittal
process for funded programs – 31 October.
The Self Assessment Evidence Guide (The Guide)
The Evidence Guide is in two parts, corresponding to the two levels at which service
provider self assessment is undertaken. Part A of this document provides guidance
on completing the ‘corporate-level’ self assessment; and part B deals with the ‘PLAlevel’ self assessment.
Information in the Guide is presented in table form:
In the first column of the table are listed the aspects of performance and the
performance results that are identified in the two Self Assessment templates.
In column two the Evidence Guide describes FACS’ performance
expectations for service providers. These expectations reflect a combination
of specific reporting requirements, requirements derived from legislation, and
requirements arising from FACS’ interest in service provider governance,
financial management and service delivery capacity.
The third column of the Guide lists possible sources of the evidence that
service providers could draw on when demonstrating compliance.
The Evidence Guide is not intended to be exhaustive; a service provider can draw on
other sources of evidence in order to demonstrate compliance. FACS may also
identify additional or supplementary sources of evidence that it believes would assist
a service provider to demonstrate compliance and may ask the service provider for
copies of that evidence.
The Evidence Guide will be used by FACS District contract managers when
assessing the information provided by service providers as part of the annual
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accountability process. This assessment by FACS is known as the annual Desktop
Review.
Queries about the Evidence Guide should be directed to the service provider’s
nominated FACS contract manager.
A note on Terms
This service provider self assessment is focused on the standard Australian financial
year (ie. 1 July to 30 June). For convenience, this is generally referred to here as ‘the
reporting year’. When service providers submit their self assessments in October
each year, they are reporting on the FY that ends on the preceding 30 June.
Where a reporting issue refers to a ‘current’ status, this generally means ‘the date of
submission’ of the self assessment (ie. 31 October each year). In some
circumstances, however, there may be an expectation that currency be demonstrated
for the whole of the reporting year and/or for the whole of the subsequent FY (ie. the
FY within which the reporting date of 31 October falls).
In this document, the term ‘board’ is used to refer to the highest decision-making
forum of the organisation. In some organisations, this body is known as ‘the
committee’.
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Corporate-level Service Provider Self Assessment
Part A – Governance
1
Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement
Leadership and vision
building:
Demonstrates
appropriate corporate
governance
arrangements, including
the capacity to recognise
and manage risks

Corporate Governance:
 Rules or standing procedures for the
working of the organisation’s Board.
 Induction material used for briefing new
members of the Board.
 Information used by the organisation for
identifying and addressing the training and
skills needs of board members.
 The organisation’s constitution, terms of
reference or its ‘founding document’.
 Minutes and other records of the Board’s
meetings.
 Minutes/reports of the organisation’s
Annual General meeting.
 A document (or set of documents) that
sets out the organisation’s mission, values
and high-level goals.
 A document that sets out an analysis of
the organisation’s planned future actions
and the resources (capital, staff, budget,
facilities, equipment, etc) it will devote to
the task.
 The organisation’s annual report.


The organisation has a system of written rules,
practices and procedures that support the Board to
direct the organisation’s activities. Typical roles for the
governing body of a non-government organisation
include:1. Providing leadership for the organisation
2. Setting the organisation’s strategic directions
3. Deciding the organisation’s policies
4. Allocating the organisations major resources
5. Taking responsibility for the organisation’s finances
and its reputation
6. Considering the major risks that the organisation is
exposed to.
7. Monitoring the organisation’s progress against its
goals
The organisation’s corporate governance
arrangements are appropriate to its size (measured in
staff numbers, budget, or client numbers, etc).
The written rules/procedures of the organisation’s
board should provide clearly for the following as a
minimum:1. The different roles and responsibilities of the
organisation’s governing body and its executive
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Performance Outcomes
2
Legislative/regulatory
and funding
responsibilities:
Demonstrates
appropriate accreditation
and/or quality
Performance Expectations

officer are stated clearly.
2. There is provision for identifying and managing
conflicts of interest involving members of the
Board.
3. There is provision for managing allegations of
fraud, corruption or mismanagement by a board
member.
4. The organisation’s governing body meets at least 6
times each year, in quorum, with the Treasurer or
an alternative source of financial expertise.
5. The organisation’s governance arrangements are
reviewed periodically – minimum 24 month
intervals.
6. A plan (or other document) that sets out the
strategies the organisation will pursue in order to
sustain itself and achieve its ‘mission’ or the
objectives it has set for itself.
7. The organisation has a formal system for
identifying, assessing, and responding to typical
organisational risks. The organisation may
demonstrate compliance with this requirement by
using any modern, comprehensive riskassessment/management tool of its choice that is
consistent with AUS/NZ ISO 31000:2009.
Organisations that provide OOHC are required by law
to be accredited or registered by the Children’s
Guardian, depending on whether they provide statutory
or voluntary OOHC. If the organisation is funded by
FACS to provide OOHC services it will be able to
demonstrate that it is currently accredited and/or
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement


Reports or correspondence prepared for
the organisation’s regulator.
Information generated by the
organisation’s processes for managing
conflicts of interest, breach of legislation,
handling of fraud allegations, complaints,
etc. involving board members.
Risk:
 Risk assessments carried out by the
organisation to identify risks and
information on actions/ strategies to
address these identified risks.
 Minutes and other records of the Board’s
meetings.
 Minutes/reports of the organisation’s
Annual General meeting.
 The organisation’s annual report.
 Report on the results of a formal review of
the organisation’s governance
arrangements.


The service provider’s annual report.
Board papers that confirm the
organisation’s accreditation status or its
achievement of certificates issued under
third party quality assurance schemes.
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Performance Outcomes
management system,
which meets funding
requirements
Performance Expectations


registered as required by law.
There is now a Quality Assurance System for services
funded through the Specialist Homelessness Services
(SHS) program. Providers are required to:
- Familiarise themselves with the QAS, prioritise
the implementation of a complaints mechanism
and client charter, and discuss progress of selfassessment with contract managers in their
annual review;
- Have completed the QAS workbook and have a
Quality Improvement Plan in place by
December 2015; and
- Achieve full compliance with the SHS
Standards by June 2017.
FACS-funded programs that do not require that service
providers be accredited by an external body in order to
lawfully provide services may have voluntarily chosen
to participate in external accreditation or quality
improvement schemes for their own reasons. FACS
encourages organisations that do participate in
external accreditation/quality improvement schemes to
share information about their accreditation/quality
improvement activities with FACS.
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement

Certificates issued by an external
accreditation/ quality improvement scheme
that provides proof of the organisation’s
compliance with the requirements of that
scheme.
 Documents that provide evidence that the
organisation has established an internal
quality improvement system.
Organisations that provide OOHC services in
NSW: Certificate of current accreditation or
registration issued by the Office of the
Children’s Guardian.
 Correspondence with the Office of the
Children’s Guardian that qualifies or
confirms the organisation’s accreditation/
registration status.
Note:The ‘Good Practice Guidelines for Community
Services-funded NGOs’ is not an external/third-party
accreditation scheme.
Leadership and vision
building:
Demonstrates
compliance with all

The organisation complies with all of the laws and
regulations that (1) govern its operation as an
organisation and that (2) impact on its work with
clients/the community. If the organisation is not


Report to the Board confirming compliance
with relevant legislation and NSW
Government policies.
The organisation’s annual report.
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Performance Outcomes
relevant legislation,
regulations, policies and
procedures outlined in
FACS funding
agreements
Performance Expectations


Leadership and vision
building:
Demonstrates current
and appropriate level
and type of insurances


compliant with a law or regulation, it will be able to
explain this non-compliance.
The organisation complies with all of the relevant NSW
Government policies. Some of these policies are listed
in contracting documents (particularly the Funding
Deed and the relevant Program Guidelines). FACS
policies that service providers are expected to comply
with are available through the Community Services
website at [insert URL]
The organisation has a system for monitoring its
compliance with all relevant laws and NSW
Government policies, including provision for reporting
compliance/non-compliance to the Board. A formal
report on compliance will be made to the Board at least
annually.
The organisation has insurance that is:1. Current (ie. covers the whole of the reporting year
as well as the term of any current PLA);
2. Appropriate to the activities funded by FACS under
the Funding Deed and any PLAs, that covers any
liability that might arise in connection with the
service (ie. all of the relevant types of insurance);
and
3. Provides cover at the appropriate financial
amounts.
The organisation is able to provide information about
all of the insurances it holds in connection with the
service that FACS funds, together with the amounts
associated with this cover.
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement


Relevant insurance certificates.
Information about any claims that have
been made against these insurances
during the reporting year. This information
could take the form of an extract from a
register or copies of correspondence.
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Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
Note: FACS does not specify either the types of insurance a
funded organisation must hold or the appropriate level of
cover. These are issues on which the service provider
should seek independent professional advice.
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement
Leadership and vision
building:
Demonstrates
organisation has met
reporting responsibilities
as required by the
ACNC, Office of Fair
Trading, ASIC or ORIC


Leadership and vision
building:
Demonstrates
organisation is child safe,
where required
FACS endorses the approach to childsafe organisations
developed by the Office of the Children’s Guardian (OCG)
and described at www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au/working-with-

The organisation has current registration under one of
the regulatory mechanisms in effect in Australia
appropriate to its activities.
The organisation is able to provide proof of registration
during the current FY and for the ‘life’ of all of the PLAs
through which it is funded.

Current registration certificate (eg.
certificate of incorporation).
Correspondence between the organisation
and its regulator (eg. the Office of Fair
Trading) that relates to its compliance with
that regulator’s requirements.
Note: Some NGOs are set up under a special Act of
Parliament and are exempt from further regulation.
children/become-a-childsafe-organisation

Copies of the organisation’s policy and
procedures for each of the elements listed
eg. child safety code of conduct .
The OCG approach identifies eight elements that
contribute to child safety and provides guidance on
implementing child safe practices for each element:1. develops Child Safe policies
2. has a Child Safe code of conduct
3. ensures effective staff recruitment and training
4. understands privacy considerations
5. has a plan for managing risk
6. encourages children and young people to
participate
7. effectively deals with concerns or complaints about
behaviours towards a child
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Performance Outcomes
3
Organisational and
service delivery
operations:
Demonstrates
appropriate policy
framework, including
effective implementation
and review processes, is
in place for delivery of
services under FACS
Funding Deed
Performance Expectations



8. attends Child Safe Organisation training
The organisation has written policies on all relevant
aspects of its internal processes and its servicedelivery system so that the organisation’s governing
board, its staff and volunteers are aware of their
responsibilities. These policies are in writing; and in a
format that makes them easily accessible to the
relevant staff and volunteers.
The organisation has a strategy for training its staff and
volunteers in the policies that are relevant to their
functions/roles, and is able to demonstrate the extent
to which these staff have been trained.
FACS does not prescribe an exhaustive list of topics
that should be covered by this policy framework. FACS
considers that the policy framework should provide for
the following issues as a minimum:9. Financial controls and delegations
10. Fraud prevention and responses to fraud
11. Asset management
12. Service provider complaints
13. Board processes and operating procedures
14. Probity checks applicable to staff and volunteer
recruitment
15. Staff and volunteer conduct
16. Workplace health and safety
17. Client and staff/volunteer safety
18. Staff/volunteer cultural competence
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement





Formal policies covering the twelve points
listed at left.
Information on the organisation’s strategy
for training staff/volunteers in these
policies. Information on the extent to which
staff/volunteers have been trained.
The organisation’s annual report.
Board minutes or reports that contain
information on significant instances/cases
where these policies have failed, and
information on steps the organisation has
taken to deal with these failures.
Board papers that demonstrate that the
results of this periodic review have been
reported to, and approved by, the Board.
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Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations


4
Performance
monitoring and
measurement:
Demonstrates Board and
management have
reviewed performance
for all PLA’s to ensure
performance issues are
being addressed


Performance
monitoring and
measurement:
Demonstrates
complaints
documentation and
handling practices are in
place and number of

19. Anti-discrimination (client services, staff
appointment)
20. Service delivery
The organisation has a formal process for reporting
instances of serious policy failure to the Board and for
responding to these failures.
The organisation regularly reviews/audits the
organisation-wide policies and associated procedures
it maintains for the guidance of its board, its staff and
volunteers. This formal review takes at a minimum
interval of 24 months.
The organisation has a formal process for reviewing its
performance on each of the PLAs that it is funded
under. The scope of this review matches the scope of
the PLA(s) ie. all of the performance issues covered by
the PLA(s) should be covered by this formal review
process. These reviews are carried out under the
supervision of the Board, and the results of the review
are formally reported to, and approved by, the
organisation’s board.
The organisation develops a plan for responding to
performance issues identified in these reviews.
Service providers are autonomous organisations and
have primary responsibility for responding to
complaints about the services they provide using
FACS funding. The Funding Deed establishes the
requirement that the service provider will have an
effective complaints mechanism. FACS considers that
an effective complaints mechanism should provide for
the following:-
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement







Formal report to the Board of the results of
a review of performance against the
organisation’s services funded from FACS
PLAs.
A series of documents reporting to the
Board the results of a review of
performance against single PLAs.
The organisation’s annual report.
Minutes and reports for the Annual
General meeting.
The organisation’s complaints handling
policy. The policy/description must provide
information on the eight points listed at left.
Information for service users on the
organisation’s complaints-handling
arrangements.
The organisation’s complaints register –
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Performance Outcomes
complaints is low
Performance Expectations
1. A formal statement describing arrangements for
recording and handling complaints about the
service. The statement is clear about the steps
involved in this process and timeframes for
responding to the complainant.
2. Information for service users and the public about
the organisation’s complaint-handling mechanism.
3. A system for recording complaints when they are
received that also holds information on the
organisation’s handling of each complaint received.
4. Provision for the identity of complainants to be
protected.
5. Clearly identified staff responsibility for handling
complaints.
6. A process for handling complaints that allege fraud,
corruption, or other serious misconduct by a
member of the organisation’s board.
7. A system for reporting back to the complainant.
8. Training in complaint-handling for the
organisation’s staff
9. A system for reporting to FACS about complaints
involving a FACS-funded service.
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement





complaints relevant to services funded by
FACS only.
Reports submitted to FACS about
individual complaints handled during the
reporting year.
A statement summarising actions taken to
train the organisation’s staff in complaintshandling during the reporting year.
Ombudsman reports on that body’s
investigation of complaints involving a
service provided by the organisation and
funded by FACS.
The organisation’s annual report.
Minutes and reports for the Annual
General meeting.
Note: As an organisation providing community services in
NSW, the organisation also has legal responsibilities - under
the Community Services (Complaints, Reviews and
Monitoring) Act 1993 – for the way that it handles complaints.
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Part B – Financial Management
5
Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
Possible Sources for Evidence of
Achievement
Financial
Health/Management:
Demonstrates
appropriate policy
framework for sound
financial management is
in place




The organisation has written policies on all relevant aspects
of its internal financial practices. These policies and the
procedural guidelines that support them are in a format that
makes them easily accessible to the relevant staff and
volunteers.
The organisation has a strategy for training the relevant
staff/volunteers in the application of these
policies/procedures, and is able to demonstrate the extent to
which these staff have been trained.
FACS does not prescribe an exhaustive list of financial
policies. FACS considers that the following issues/topics
should be provided for as a minimum:1. Financials controls and delegations including:
1.1 Policies and procedures on Accounts Receivables,
Accounts Payable, Cash Receipting and Payroll;
1.2 Segregation of duties so no one person is
responsible for one complete financial transaction,
i.e., requesting officer is not the approving officer;
1.3 Procedures on preparing appropriate and timely
financial reporting;
1.4 Conflict of interest policies.
2. Fraud prevention and responses to fraud - including
proper role definition to ensure clear boundaries are set
especially when the same person is fulfilling range of
duties.
3. Asset management including policy on safeguarding
physical, intellectual and monetary assets from theft,




Policies covering the three points
listed at left.
Information on the organisation’s
strategy for training staff/volunteers in
these policies. Information on the
extent to which staff/volunteers have
been trained.
The organisation’s annual report.
Papers and reports prepared for the
organisation’s Annual General
Meeting.
Board minutes or reports that contain
information on significant instances/
cases where these policies have
failed, and information on steps the
organisation has taken to deal with
these failures.
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Performance Outcomes
Financial
Health/Management:
Demonstrates sound
financial health
Performance Expectations




6
Prevention of fraud

and mismanagement:
Demonstrates
appropriate policy

framework for
prevention and
management of fraud for
the board, management,
fraud and recording errors.
The Funding Deed provides that organisations that are
required by law to prepare audited financial statements must
make a copy of these statements available to FACS. The
statements must be prepared in accordance with the
accounting principles set by the Australian Accounting
Standards Board.
The audited annual financial statements must be
accompanied by an audit certificate signed by an
independent and appropriately-qualified auditor.
Organisations that are not required by law to prepare
audited financial statements must provide FACS with the
following financial statements:1. A balance sheet or statement of financial position
2. An income and expenditure statement
3. A statement of changes in equity for the reporting year
The Funding Deed also requires the organisation to provide
FACS with a copy of its assets register, showing assets
purchased using FACS funds.
The organisation takes steps to prevent fraud from
occurring, and when fraud is discovered (or suspected) the
organisation takes appropriate steps to report this to FACS
and the NSW Police.
The organisation has a formal policy on fraud. FACS
considers that an effective fraud policy is one that has the
following features:1. Regular risk assessment by the organisation. FACS
expects that organisations will undertake a formal fraud
Possible Sources for Evidence of
Achievement











The annual audited financial
statements for the organisation.
The three financial statements listed at
left.
The organisation’s assets register.
Documents/information about disposal
of assets.
Documents/information about asset
depreciation.
Minutes and reports for the
organisation’s Annual General
Meeting.
Annual report - financial pages.
The independent auditor’s certificate.
Information the organisation makes
available to FACS to assist
interpretation of its financial
statements.
Fraud policy and procedures.
Fraud risk assessment. (Community
Services’ ‘Fraud Risk Assessment for
Service Providers’, contains a
template for fraud risk assessment).
This assessment must have been
undertaken not more than 12 months
before the date of submission.
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Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
staff and volunteers, is
in place
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Possible Sources for Evidence of
Achievement
risk assessment at a minimum of 24 month intervals.

FACS-funded organisations can implement the fraud risk
assessment contained in the Community Services
document, ‘Fraud Risk Assessment for Service

Providers’.
A formal statement describing arrangements for
recording and handling allegations of fraud.
A system for recording fraud allegations when they are
received that also holds information on the
organisation’s handling of each fraud allegation.
Clearly identified staff responsibility for handling fraud
issues.
A process for handling allegations of fraud, corruption, or
other serious misconduct by a member of the
organisation’s board.
A system for reporting to FACS about fraud allegations
involving a FACS-funded service.
A statement on training of the
organisation’s staff/volunteers on fraud
issues.
Reports on incident(s) of fraud
occurring during the reporting year.
Note: FACS recognises that the funding agencies of
Commonwealth and State governments have a common interest
in the fraud control practices of the organisations they both fund.
FACS therefore reserves the right to share information about fraud
incidents with other government funding agencies.
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Program Level Agreement Service Provider Self Assessment
Part A – Financial Reporting
1
Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
Possible Sources for Evidence of
Achievement
Financial reporting:
Demonstrates appropriate
financial accountability reports
have been submitted for this PLA
in accordance with FACS
requirements



Under the Funding Deed, FACS requires
organisations to submit an income and
expenditure statement for each PLA valued above
$25,000 (annual). If the PLA ‘value’ is at or below
$25,000 per annum, no such statement is
required.
FACS has developed a template Income and
Expenditure statement for this purpose - available
through the Contracting Portal.
The income and expenditure statement
for this PLA, using the template
available through the Contracting
Portal.
Part B – Service Delivery
2
Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement
Service data collection:
Demonstrates provision of
accurate and timely data
submitted to FACS / AIHW or
other reporting portals




Where there is a service provider data
reporting system in place for a FACS funded
program, the organisation participates fully in
that system, providing complete and accurate
data as required by the reporting timetable.
The organisation has a process for analysing
performance data and drawing conclusions
about changes that should be made to its
systems and practices.
The organisation has a process for
implementing the appropriate changes to its


Acknowledgement email from FACS or
receipt of service provider report with
complete data provided by the
administrator of the existing FACSsponsored reporting system.
A Service Delivery Schedule that confirms
any variation in the data requirements for
this service as initially set out in the PLA.
Board minutes and reports.
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Performance Outcomes
Performance Expectations
Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement
systems and practices.
Note: Some current FACS program data reporting
systems involve a third party (ie. an organisation
other than FACS).
3
Client groups/Target groups:
Demonstrates services defined in
Program Level Agreement are
delivered to the agreed client
groups/target groups

The organisation makes the FACS-funded
service available to the target client-group
described in the PLA and Service Delivery
Schedule (SDS), where relevant.





4
Geographic coverage:
Demonstrates service has been
delivered or communities have
been targeted in the
geographical areas agreed to in
the PLA

The organisation makes the FACS-funded
service available to persons resident in the
geographic location – typically one or more
local government areas (LGAs) - as described
in the PLA and Service Delivery Schedule
(SDS), where relevant.





Existing FACS-sponsored data systems
which may include data reports produced
stating the number of clients in agreed
target groups who have been provided
with a service.
Information available to the public – eg.
factsheets – in which the target group for
the service is described.
The service provider’s annual report.
Board papers in which the target group is
described/confirmed.
A Service Delivery Schedule that confirms
any variation in the target group for this
service as initially set out in the PLA.
Existing FACS-sponsored data systems,
which may include data reports produced
stating locations where the service has
been delivered.
Information available to the public – eg.
factsheets – in which the geographic area
covered by the service is described.
The service provider’s annual report.
Board papers in which the geographic
area is described/confirmed.
A Service Delivery Schedule that confirms
17 |
Performance Outcomes
5
6
Service levels agreed to in the
Program Level Agreement:
Demonstrates service levels
agreed to in the PLA have been
achieved
Performance targets for
service results agreed to in the
Program Guidelines:
Demonstrates results for service
activities in program area were
achieved as below
Performance Expectations


Possible Sources for Evidence of Achievement
The organisation delivers the agreed number of
units of service as specified in the PLA and
Service Delivery Schedule (SDS), where
relevant.

Note: The FACS-sponsored reporting system for
each program will be the primary source of data that
stands as evidence of achieving the required
service levels.


The organisation delivers services that have
the effect of achieving the agreed results (or
outcomes) as specified in the PLA and Service
Delivery Schedule (SDS), where relevant.
Note: The FACS-sponsored reporting system for
each program will be the primary source of data that
stands as evidence of achieving the required
service results.






any variation in the geographic areas to be
served by this service as initially set out in
the PLA.
Existing FACS-sponsored data systems,
which may include data reports produced
stating number of units of service
delivered.
The service provider’s annual report.
Board papers in which the service levels
for this service are confirmed.
A Service Delivery Schedule that confirms
any variation in the service levels for this
service as initially set out in the PLA.
Reports generated by existing FACSsponsored data systems.
The service provider’s annual report.
Board papers in which the service results
for the service are described/confirmed.
A Service Delivery Schedule that confirms
any variation in the service results for this
service as initially set out in the PLA.
Information about service results/
outcomes that is generated outside the
service (eg. an evaluators report, a
research study involving the service’s
clients).
18 |
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