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Leading Cornell
Service Project Presentation
BLG Integrated Model
The Skills of
Mobilization
The Skills of Sustaining
Momentum
Anticipate
Engage
• Identify stakeholders
• Understand resistance
Coalesce
• Get the buy in
• Mobilize a coalition
• Negotiate and persuade
Political Competence
Bacharach Leadership Group ©2013
• Manage teams for commitment
and forward movement
• Create team cohesion
Enhance
• Listen, deliver, help set goals,
and overcome blocks
Managerial Competence
PROJECT GOAL
•Staff excellence
• How best develop, engage, and retain staff?
•Role of senior leadership
• What is your role?
Project Recommendations Based on:
•Identified needs from the employee survey
•Principles from the Leading Cornell class
•Social science and organizational behavior
research
•Empirical data collected by three teams
One Leading Cornell Program
Three Teams
•Supervisory Feedback
•Stretch Opportunities
•Talent Management
Supervisory
Feedback
Stretch
Opportunities
Talent
Management
Principles and Cross-cutting Themes
•Based on Employee Survey
•Leading Cornell experience
•Builds on momentum
•Research based
•Fosters a culture of staff
development, retention, and
engagement
•“One Cornell”
Supervisory
Feedback
Stretch
Opportunities
Talent
Management
Supervisory Feedback
Kim Babuka
Rob Bandler
Anita Brenner
Susan Brown
Glenn Evans
Cindy Jefferson
Todd Pfeiffer
Celia Szczepura
Background
•
65% of respondents did not agree that they have the
opportunity to provide feedback to their supervisor
•
Employee Survey Team Subcommittee formed to
research and recommend design, mechanisms and
technology
•
Leading Cornell charged with developing
recommendations for implementation
Process
•Approach
• Employee Survey Results
• IvyPlus Institutions
• Industry
• Ford, Bank of America
• Cornell Leaders
•Discoveries
• It’s happening now
• It’s the right thing to do
• The opportunity to provide feedback is valued
• Some fear retaliation
What We Learned…
•Overwhelming support from Senior Leadership
•Guidance from current participants is “Keep it
simple!”
•Focus on development, natural integration with
performance will follow
•Communicate benefits and provide training
What We Learned (con’t)…
•Anonymity is preferred; especially in small work
groups
•Supervisors need time to take action based on
feedback
•One size doesn’t fit all
•Acting on feedback builds credibility
Future State
Giving and Receiving (two-way) feedback
• Will help enhance a culture:
o of openness
o of continuous improvement
o where employees do not fear retaliation
o where staff can be the best at what they do
• Is an expectation
• Is an ongoing process, not only during the performance dialogue
• Is an orientation activity introduced during onboarding
• Will provide multiple tools for training, harvesting, and delivering
feedback to serve the Cornell community
http//blogs.cornell.edu/leadingcornell
• Leading Cornell Project website
• Prototype for supervisory feedback resources on:
o
o
o
Communication
Training
Tools
Challenges & Countermeasures for a
Successful Implementation
Listen and respond
communicate
to staff
Lack of Action,
hold individuals
Discussion
and
accountable
A skip-level feedback
Lack
of anonymity,
format
or seek
especially from
in small
assistance
HR
departments
Follow-up
Option of
anonymous
Retaliation,
or a
feedback; focused
perception
of
training on
constructive
retaliation
communication
Perceived
High
Make
it positive,
boost
Costand
morale
productivity
Just
one more
Priceless!
thing
to do…
An overly complex
process
discourage
Makewill
it SIMPLE!
use
In your own words…
Respect
Effective Listening
Behavioral, Not Personal
Enhances Supervisor/Employee Relationship
Promotes a High-Functioning Work Environment
Flexibility in Implementation
Enriched with Time
Ongoing Communication
Safety and Trust
Recommendations: What’s next?
•
•
•
•
•
•
Communicate the benefits
Offer training on how to give and receive
constructive feedback
Select the most appropriate tool
Partner with HR
Keep program flexible as needed
Take advantage of “best practice” resources
assembled on the Leading Cornell website
Take the plunge!
Staff Excellence
Fostering Stretch Opportunities
in a “Stretched Thin” Climate
Nancy Abbott
Lorraine Barry
Miyoko Chu
Jason Kahabka
Joe Lyons
Boaz Nadav-Manes
Yasamin Miller
Staff Excellence
Stretch Opportunities
at Cornell
•
•
•
•
Exemplary employer
Job skills training
Flexible workforce
Retain staff
Interviews
• 42 senior leaders
• 12 “stretch” participants
Stretch Opportunity Survey
• 432 respondents
(89% non-academic staff)
Stretch Opportunity Spectrum
CrossTraining
38%
Stretch
Assignments
28%
Job
Shadowing
6%
Job
Rotations
6%
86%
of knowledge;
managers willing
to consider
job rotations
Skills,
workforce
flexibility,
synergy
Job Rotation in Action
Joshua Whitmore
• Apprentice  Senior Electrical Designer
• Six-month rotation
“It’s huge that Cornell offers these opportunities,
showing a willingness to put effort forward and
invest in current employees.”
Job Rotations in Action
Lori Barry
• Zone Facilities Director, Student & Academic
Services
• >15 staff, 7 units in job shadowing & rotations
“They felt a stronger stewardship to the university. They
had the opportunity to get to know people. It increased a
sense of pride in their work and they came back with
better energy.”
Job Rotations in Action
Managers See Benefits
100%
98%
96%
95%
84%
80%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Skills,
knowledge
New ideas
Identify
talent
Motivation
Retain at
Cornell
Managers See Benefits
“An awesome networking opportunity
and efficiency builder for the
university...The staff member came back
invigorated. It was like having a new
eager employee in the office.”
Managers See Benefits
for Cornell
100
80
60
%
Cornell
Unit
40
Cornell
Unit
20
0
Improve retention
Save long-term costs
“You have to have the concept that it’s good
for Cornell, that the worst thing is people
leave the university, not that they leave the
group.”
Perceived Barriers
100%
88%
87%
79%
80%
66%
65%
Lack of
support from
top
Financial cost
60%
40%
20%
0%
Lack of time
Lack of
information
Loss of
productivity
Perceived Barriers
“These sound like great opportunities,
but given the significant decrease in
staffing and resources, everyone is simply
‘stretched’ beyond what they can do in a
day, week, or month.”
“While all of these are barriers, none of
them should prevent us from
moving forward…”
Better Information
•
•
•
•
Online posting system (89%)
Network for managers (80%)
HR support (77%)
How to get started: best practices & processes (76%)
Less than half of respondents were aware that employees may be able to
participate in growth opportunities such as job shadowing or rotations.
Support from the Top
• Encourage managers
• Be willing to adjust expectations
• Recognize value in dialogues, awards, and
stories
Flexible Opportunities for Strategic Purposes
Talent Management
Shorna Allred
Kathi Dantley-Warren
Davina Desnoes
Erik Eshelman
Tammy Gardner
Sara Xayarath Hernández
Sheri Notaro
Elisa Springer
Talent Management
“Talent Management is simply a
matter of anticipating the need
for human capital and then
setting out a plan to meet it.”
(Harvard Business Review, Talent Management for the Twenty-First Century by Peter Cappelli)
The Case for Talent Management
Administrative Staff Retirement Eligibility
19%
42%
11%
8%
20%
Eligible Now
Eligible in 3 Years
Eligible in 5 Years
Eligible in 10 Years
Eligible in 10+ Years
Balanced Approach to Talent Management
Time
External
Career
Pathing
Internal
The Talent Gap
• In FY12, Career Development and Succession
Management had evaluated 17% (1,005) Unit
positions
• 25% (251) positions were designated “critical”
• Only 10% (26) positions had potential successors
identified
• Pools of successors are confined to individual units
Cornell Talent Management Model
Consultations
Succession
Management
Alignment
Critical Position
Identification
Talent
Identification
Potential
Talent Management Matrix
Workers
Contributors
Stars
Blockers
Transitionals
Emergers
Detractors
Placeholders
Latents
Performance
Cornell Talent Management Model
Consultations
Succession
Management
Alignment
Critical Position
Identification
Talent
Identification
Talent Management Tools
• Benefits
• Current HR System
• Highly Flexible
• Integration of
Performance and
Planning Data
• Conducted at Every
Level
Talent Management Tools
Risks
• Potential for Poaching
• Concern for Rating
Manipulation
• Cultural Acceptance
Opportunity Focused Talent Management
College/Division
Confidential
Succession Plan
Risk Assessment
University -Wide
Succession Plan
Forum
Maintains Unit Identity within “One Cornell”
“One Cornell”
College of Agriculture
and Life Sciences
Facilities Services
CALS Facilities
Director
Facilities Engineering
Department Manager
Successor
A
“Balanced Talent Management
Approach – Internal Mobility, Cross
Unit Mobility, External Hiring”
Successor
C
Successor
External
Hire
B
Facilitating Organizational
Culture Change
Change
Management
Strategies
Supervisor
Buy-In
Utilize
Opinion
Leaders
Implementation Plan
Capacity Building
• Build awareness
• Identify interested
stakeholders
• Develop and refine
model
• Tool Development
Piloting
• Pilot implementation
• Evaluate
• Communicate and
celebrate success
Implementing
• Adapt to University
scale
• University roll-out
Our Recommendation
• What? Senior leaders should explore an
Opportunity-Based Talent Management
Strategy
• Why? Address the impending Talent Gap
and findings from the employee survey
• How? Implement pilot with at least 2 job
families using the Workday tools
Closing
Supervisory
Feedback
Stretch
Opportunities
Talent
Management
Summary
• Staff excellence is a strategic imperative
• Key role of Senior leaders at Cornell in leading change and
taking active role
• Staff development is worth investment and requires a two-way
dialogue between managers and employees
• Staff cannot develop if they are not given new and challenging
opportunities
• Managers will have difficulty identifying opportunities for
career growth if there is not communication and information
sharing
Recommendation #1
Promote an environment of two-way
communication between supervisors
and employees
Recommendation #2
Encourage managers to offer
stretch opportunities for
employees that are tailored to the
specific needs of the unit and the
employee
Recommendation #3
Adopt an Opportunity-Based
Talent Management Strategy
through Workday that promotes a
safe and balanced approach to
Talent Management
THANK YOU!
We welcome your questions
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