Detailed Donor Profiles - United Nations in Pakistan

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Pakistan Donor Profiles
UNITED NATIONS IN PAKISTAN
April , 2014
Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 3
Summary of Donor Profiles .......................................................................................................................... 4
Detailed Donor Profiles: ............................................................................................................................... 7
Asian Development Bank ......................................................................................................................... 7
Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) .................................................................. 9
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) ........................................................................... 12
UK Department for International Development (DFID) ........................................................................ 14
The Netherlands ...................................................................................................................................... 18
The European Union (EU) ...................................................................................................................... 21
Norway.................................................................................................................................................... 23
Germany.................................................................................................................................................. 26
Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) .................................................................................... 31
Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC)................................................................................................. 34
US Agency for International Development (USAID) ............................................................................. 37
The World Bank...................................................................................................................................... 44
Page 2 of 47
Introduction
In order to gain a better understanding of the programmatic focus of the donor community and funding
trends in Pakistan, a comprehensive mapping of donor activities and the development of donor profiles
was undertaken. This compendium will support the donor community to promote overall donor
coordination efforts in accordance with OECD DAC aid effectiveness and good donorship principles. It is
hoped that improved knowledge of which donors are active in which sectors and parts of the country
will help avoid duplication of efforts and allow potential synergies to be highlighted. The donor profiles
will also serve to inform the UN’s resource mobilization efforts.
In order to gain a holistic picture of the donor landscape, both development and humanitarian support
is included in the profile. Information on loans as well as grants is included wherever possible. However,
funding channeled through public diplomacy or political departments of embassies is not included.
Where possible, the donor profiles include the sectors of engagement, geographical focus, type of
funding, projects, implementing partners and over all investments. Not all donors have provided the
same level of information, hence information disparities do exist.
It should be noted that this is a dynamic document. The donor profiles will be reviewed and updated on
a regular basis in order to provide as up-to-date information as possible.
Methodology: A two-pronged methodology was adopted to gather the information on donor activities.
In the first instance, a desk review of the existing information available on donor websites and donor
profiles compiled by different UN agencies, funds and programmes was carried out. This information
was then expanded upon and revised through conducting individual interviews and meetings with the
donor organizations. The collaboration of all donors included in this compendium has been much
appreciated. Based on the information collected, two categories of information are being compiled and
documented:
1. A profile of each donor summarizing key programmatic focus as per their country programmes,
sector focus, geographical presence, and funding priorities and allocations.
2. A complete compendium of donors’ programmes and funding (which is being compiled
separately).
The mapping and profiles was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the study focused on major
traditional donors like the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Australian Aid for International Development
(AusAID), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union (EU), the United
Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DfID), the Japan International Cooperation
Agency (JICA), Norway, the Netherlands, the Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC), the United States
Agency for International Development (USAID) and the World Bank, which are presented in this
document. In the second phase, other non-traditional donors, including, for example, the Gulf States,
nonresident donors, INGOs, and leading private sector entities providing resources to Pakistan directly
or through corporate social responsibility, will be covered.
This is a living document and will be updated over time. Information presented in this document is
shared with donors for their feedback and revalidation, and the document will be revised based on the
information update available.
Page 3 of 47
Summary of Donor Profiles
Donor
Sectors /Thematic Areas
Funding Details
Asian Development
Bank (ADB)
1. Investment and Reforms in Energy and
Infrastructure
2. Reforms to Strengthen Governance and
Promote Structural Transformation
3. Development of Urban Services
4. Effective Implementation of Projects
and Programs and Capacity Building
ADB’s indicative
resources; including
US$ 720 million Asian
Development Fund
(ADF) and US$ 1,460
million Ordinary
Capital resource
(OCR).
Australian Agency for
International
Development
(AusAID)
1. Education and Health
2. Humanitarian and disaster preparedness
and response
3. Economic development
4. Governance
5. General development support
Australian Aid
Program $87.9M, OGD
$4.2M
$92.1
2013-2014
Nation-wide specifically
under-privileged and
remote areas
Canadian
International
Development Agency
(CIDA)
UK Department for
International
Development (DfID)
1. Education
2. Economic Growth
Development and
Humanitarian
$69.10
2011-2012
Nation-wide
1. Building peace and stability
2. Making democracy work
3. Promoting macroeconomic stability,
growth and jobs
4. Effective delivery of public services
1. Human security, rule of law and human
rights
2. Promotion of trade and investment
under the slogan: from aid to trade
DfID has a planned
allocation of £355
million for 2013-14
$557.84
2013-14
Nation-wide
Development and
Humanitarian
$62.26
2012
The Netherlands
(Dutch)
Total
Budget
(US$)*
$2,180
Timeframe
Two year period,
2013–2014
Geographical Focus
Nation-wide
Malakand Division of
Khyber PakhtunKhwa
province
European Union (EU)
1. Livelihood
2. Formal & vocational Education
Development
Cooperation
$544.50
2007-2013
Nation- wide especially
areas affected by natural
and manmade disasters
Norway
1. Fight poverty and bring about social
justice
2. Governance
3. Education
4. Rural development, women and gender
equality and human rights
5. Culture, peace and reconciliation,
disaster prevention and preparedness
Annual development
budget NOK 100
million
$16.38
2013
Nation-wide specifically
neglected Areas
Germany
1. Good governance
2. energy
3. education/vocational training
4. health
Development
324.22
2009-2015
Japan International
Cooperation Agency
(JICA)
1. Ensuring human security and human
development
2. Development of sound market
economy
3. Achievement of balanced regional
socio-economic development
Technical Cooperation
Expenses
$18,927
2011
Swiss Development
Cooperation (SDC)
1. Promotion of micro enterprises
through finance and vocational education
2. Support to sustainable practices
regarding the use of natural resources.
3. Promotion of human rights and
education, specifically the education of
women and girls
Development and
Humanitarian
$16.24
Annual
Nation-wide with a focus
on Khyber PakhtunKhwa,
FATA and Northern areas
US Agency for
International
Development (USAID)
1.
Increasing the capacity and efficiency
of power and energy sector
2. Fostering private sector-led economic
growth and agriculture
3. Supporting stabilization efforts in regions
susceptible to activity by violent extremists,
particularly on the border with Afghanistan
4. Increasing access to and the quality of
Civilian Assistance $
2,670 Million and
Emergency Flood
Response 1,157
Million
$3,827.30
2009 -2013
Nation-wide especially
underrepresented
geographic areas, like
Balochistan, the Northern
Areas, Gilgit-Baltistan and
AJK
Page 5 of 47
Nation-wide
Nation-wide specifically
neglected Areas
education
5. Health care
The World Bank
1. Economic governance
2. Human development and social
protection
3. Infrastructure to support growth
4. Security and reducing the risk of conflict
$4.0 billion in new
IDA/IBRD lending over
FY 2012-14,
Multi-Donor Trust
Fund: $140 million for
conflict-affected areas
4140
*Note: Donor contributions have been converted into US$ million for data standardization purposes.
Page 6 of 47
FY 2012-14
Nation-wide (including
Khyber PakhtunKhwa,
FATA and Balochistan)
Detailed Donor Profiles:
Asian Development Bank
Since its founding in 1966, ADB has been working in Pakistan for improving people’s lives. By targeting
potential investments in partnership with developing member countries and other stakeholders, ADB
strives to alleviate poverty and help create an environment in which people can share in the benefits of
sustained and inclusive growth. ADB assists developing member countries evolve into thriving modern
economies that are well integrated with each other and the world.
Thematic focus: ADB is working with the government and the private sector to improve Pakistan’s
economy and inclusive growth. Aligned with national development objectives, ADB’s partnership
priorities aim to attract investment, create industries and jobs, and improve the quality of life of citizens
while focusing on the following areas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Investment and Reforms in Energy and Infrastructure
Reforms to Strengthen Governance and Promote Structural Transformation
Development of Urban Services
Effective Implementation of Projects and Programs and Capacity Building
Geographical Focus: ADB programs have a nation-wide outreach in Pakistan.
Country Programme Strategy: The Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Pakistan defines ADB's
strategic approach in the country for 2009-2013, aligned with Pakistan’s own Development Strategy
2020. The ADB's comparative strengths complement efforts of other development partners. Based on
the aforementioned thematic area, the Strategy provides the framework for ADB's partnership priorities
and the future direction of its assistance to the country.
The country operations business plan (COBP 2013-2014OBP) for Pakistan describes the consistency of
the business plan with the country partnership strategy (CPS 2009-2013). The CPS 2009–2013 is in
accordance with ADB’s Strategy 2020, and the COBP retains this focus.
Programs and Projects: ADP has 144 approved technical assistance projects in Pakistan, which are at
different stages of implementation, and 18 new public and private sector projects are proposed for
approval.
ADB support for reforms and investments in key infrastructure sector programmes include power and
energy, transport and the National Trade Corridor, and water resources. This assistance will reduce the
cost of doing business in Pakistan and strengthen the underlying competitiveness of the economy.
Support for a new generation of economic reforms will be provided by reducing distortions, accelerating
market creation, and addressing governance and institutional bottlenecks.
Pakistan is one of the largest recipients of ADB’s private sector development assistance with over $ 1
billion approved equity investments, loans (including co financing), and guarantees. In line with ADB’s
country partnership strategy, power and energy infrastructure projects are among the key priority
sectors for ADB’s private sector operations in Pakistan. The ongoing portfolio comprises three domestic
gas-based thermal independent power projects, including Pakistan's first private sector hydropower
project, the first privately owned wind power project, a privatized electricity utility, and an equity fund.
Implementing Partners: As a multilateral development bank, ADB collaborates with the Government of
Pakistan and the State Bank of Pakistan. Through the implementation of its microfinance lending and
technical assistance, ADB has also entered into partnerships with the Khushhali Bank, the Bank of
Khyber, and a number of NGOs involved in microfinance in the country.
Funding Allocation: ADB’s indicative resources for the two year period, 2013–2014, are US$ 2,180
million, including US$ 720 million Asian Development Fund (ADF) and US$ 1,460 million Ordinary Capital
resource (OCR).
The total firm lending program proposed for Pakistan in 2013–2014 amounts to US$ 2,468 million (US$
1,108 million ADF, US$ 1,360 million OCR) for 17 loans in the priority sectors, an annual average of
$1,234 million a year. About 55% of this (and 90% of OCR) lending will be provided through multi
tranche financing facilities (MFFs). The non-lending technical assistance program for 2013–2014
currently stands at about US$ 10.05 million for 14 projects, mainly project preparatory technical
assistance. Efforts will be made to mobilize co financing for technical assistance projects.
Total ADB’s lending facility to Pakistan, as of December 2012, amounted to US$ 22,571.89 million as per
following sectoral distribution:
ADB Lending to Pakistan
As of December 2012
10%
16%
4%
2%
10%
13%
23%
Agriculture
Education
Energy
Finance
Health and Social Protection
Industry and Trade
Public Sector
Transport and ICT
Water Supply
Multisector
5%
3%
14%
Funding Mechanism: ADB provides funding to Pakistan by using lending, non-lending and cost-sharing
arrangements. The main devices for assistance are, however, loans, grants, policy dialogue, technical
assistance and equity investments.
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Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID)
The AusAID works with the governments of developing countries to help them improve the way they
deliver economic and community services. The aid is delivered to support the delivery of goods and
services (e.g. humanitarian relief, building health clinics and schools, immunizing children), building
national institutions and capacities, and initiating policy dialogue and reform by engaging local
counterparts in government, civil society and business.
Thematic Focus: AusAID programme support is primarily focused on the following sectors:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Education and Health
Humanitarian and disaster preparedness and response
Economic development
Governance and
General development support
Geographical Focus: AusAID works in all geographical areas of Pakistan with a more focused approach
towards under-privileged and remote areas of the country.
Country Programme Strategy: The Governments of Australia and Pakistan signed the Partnership in
October 2011. Aid to Pakistan supports efforts to maintain stability and democratic governance, and
achieve economic development and poverty reduction in line with the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs). It focuses on three primary sectors: health, education, and economic development (agriculture
and rural development). Issues of related to governance and emergency management response are
secondary in its priorities. However, underpinning Australia’s aid program in Pakistan is support to
gender equality.
Programmes and Projects: The AusAID has invested US$ 297.4 million in Pakistan over the previous
three years. Its investment has contributed to important development results such as:
Training of 8,966 community midwives in rural areas of Khyber PakhtunKhwa since 2008. Over
4,800 of these women have already been deployed to serve the community
2. Providing free textbooks for 1.56 million children and stipends for 146,560 girls in middle and
high school
3. Performing over 13,000 cataract surgeries and treating more than 52,700 people for eye-related
diseases.
1.
During 2012-13, the AusAID has provided US$ 85.7 million in development assistance to Pakistan for:
a. Screening up to 200,000 children for malnutrition and provide nutrition support for up to
180,000 women.
b. Improving the quality of education in 584 schools in Balochistan, Gilgit-Baltistan and Khyber
PakhtunKhwa covering more than 145,000 children.
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c. Basic work skills training (such as carpentry and plumbing) for more than 1,600 people and
support 150 new community organizations to implement community infrastructure projects
such as road and bridge repair, irrigation and drinking water supply.
Province /
Region
Project Name
National
Australian Development
Scholarships
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Education Capacity
Development Plan
Early Childhood Care and
Education in Khyber
Pakhtunkhwa
Communication for
Effective Social Service
Delivery (CESSD)
Agriculture Sector Linkages
Program (ASLP) Phase II
Support to Maternal and
Child Health in the Border
Areas
KP
KP
KP
Balochistan
and KP
Balochistan
Project Budget
USD
Project Start Date
Project End date
$ 9.00
2014
2014
$7.90
2011
2015
$14
2011
2014
$3.67
2011
2016
$12.90
2010
2015
$13.60
2012
2015
Implementing Partners: The AusAID programs are mutually agreed upon by the governments of
Australia and Pakistan. These programs are implemented in partnership with government
organizations, multi-lateral development organizations, donors, non-governmental organizations
(NGOs), academia, media, volunteers, and the private sector.
Funding Allocation: The AusAID allocated US$ 96 million for Pakistan in 2012-13. Out of this funding,
US$ 74 million were allocated for emergency assistance and reconstruction, US$ 6.6 million were
earmarked for agriculture sector linkages programme, and US$ 10 million were allocated for human
rights projects. A separate allocation of US$ 120 million was made for IDPs.
The AusAID has an estimated budget of US$ 87.9 million for 2013-14, which will be spent on priority
sectors as per following allocations:
AusAID Funding Allocation for 2013-14
10%
1%
13%
36%
14%
26%
Education
Humanitarian response
Governance
Health
Economic development
General development support
Page 10 of 47
An overview of AusAID development assistance to Pakistan from 2001-02 to 2013-14 as follows:
Funding Mechanism: The AusAID provides funding to Government of Pakistan mostly in the form of
development grants.
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Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
Canada has provided socio-economic development assistance to Pakistan for more than forty years. It
pursues a broad range of interests in the context of bilateral relations with Pakistan, including
development cooperation; people-to-people links; regional security and defense; governance and
human rights; and trade and investment. The Canadian International Development Agency’s (CIDA)
programming in Pakistan is focused on education (teacher training) and Women’s Economic
Empowerment.
Thematic Focus: The Canadian development support in Pakistan is geared towards improving quality
and delivery of teacher training programs to male and female teachers with new knowledge, skills, and
competencies at the primary, middle, and secondary school levels. In terms of economic growth, the
focus is on improvement in labour conditions—policies, legislation, and creating an enabling
environment—for women's formal and informal employment.
Geographical Focus: CIDA works in all geographical areas of Pakistan.
Country Programme Strategy: As part of Canada's new aid effectiveness agenda, Pakistan is selected as
a country of focus for international development.
Programmes and Projects: Canada focuses on supporting efforts to improve the ability of teachers'
colleges to deliver their programs effectively and to build the capacities of district education managers.
Primary and middle school teacher training programs will benefit from instruction on improved teaching
practices and the physical repair and upgrade of training facilities. Canada is deepening its involvement
in teacher training and professional development, especially continuous professional development.
Canada also works for strengthening the foundations for long-term economic growth by providing skills
for employment training and enhancing employment conditions for women.
A large component of Canada's support is focused on increasing women's economic empowerment.
Beyond providing women with skills for employment, Canada's programs also raise awareness and
respect for women's economic rights through public campaigns, social mobilization and training.
More specifically, Canada continues to support the implementation of legislation to improve women's
working conditions and to protect workers' rights. National and provincial level data collection and
monitoring are being strengthened to track women's contribution to the economy for use in planning on
how to better integrate women into Pakistan's workforce at all levels.
In humanitarian assistance, the Government of Canada, through CIDA, has funded eight projects aimed
at providing urgent life-saving assistance in response to the 2011 flooding. For the 2010 disaster, the
Government of Canada contributed $25 million and established the Pakistan Flood Relief Fund.
Canadians responded generously and between August 2 and October 3 donated $46.8 million to help
those affected by the floods in Pakistan. The Government of Canada put an equivalent amount into its
Pakistan Flood Relief Fund. This money has been disbursed to established Canadian and international
humanitarian organizations for humanitarian assistance and early recovery efforts in Pakistan.
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The Government of Canada allocated $79.8 million in response to the 2010 floods. Of this amount,
$71.8 million was provided by CIDA for humanitarian assistance and early recovery and $8 million by the
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.
Implementing Partners: The CIDA programs are mutually agreed upon by the governments of the
Canada and Pakistan. These programs are implemented in partnership with government organizations,
multi-lateral development organizations, donors, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), academia,
media, volunteers, and the private sector. CARE International in Pakistan, Agha Khan Foundation, Save
the Children, and Kashaf Foundation, inter alia, are some the active partners of CIDA.
Funding Allocation: CIDA provided US$ 69.10 million to Pakistan in development and humanitarian
assistance over a period of two years (2011-2012). Of this money, US$ 42.92 million were provided for
long term development while US$26.18 was contributed to address humanitarian crisis caused by 2010
and 2011 floods.
CIDA Assistance to Pakistn
(2011-2012)
38%
62%
Development Assistance
Humanitarian Assistance
Funding Modalities: CIDA provides grant funding in development assistance. In humanitarian crisis, it
provides cash donations to established humanitarian agencies, instead of donating clothing, food, or
other items.
Page 13 of 47
UK Department for International Development (DFID)
DFID aims at securing a constructive Pakistani engagement with the international and regional security
agendas, to support sustainable development, democracy and human rights in Pakistan, to improve UK
economic interests and to provide high-quality public services.
Thematic Focus: To achieve this objective, DFID Pakistan focuses its programme interventions on the
following areas in collaboration with the Government of Pakistan:
Building peace and stability
2. Making democracy work
3. Promoting macroeconomic stability, growth and jobs
4. Effective delivery of public services
1.
Geographical Focus: DFID has programmes and projects all over Pakistan.
Country Programme Strategy: DFID’s priorities in Pakistan from 2011 to 2015 include education, women
and children’s health, creating jobs and supporting economic growth, strengthening democracy and
governance, and building peace and stability in conflict-affected areas. Between 2011 and 2015, UK
strives to achieve the following results:
1. Education: 4 million children in primary education benefitting from DFID support; train 45,000
teachers; contribute to 2.4m additional children enrolling in primary and secondary school; and
construct more than 20,000 classrooms.
2. Health: increase the number of additional births delivered with the help of nurses, midwives or
doctors by one million; prevent half a million children from becoming undernourished; and help
500,000 couples chose when and how many children to have.
3. Economy: help 1.23 million people, more than half of them women, access microfinance loans to
enable them to set up their own small business and lift themselves out of poverty; expand
branchless banking so that three million people can access financial services from their mobile
phones; and provide job and skills training for 40,000 people.
4. Democracy and governance: help 2 million more people vote in the next general election; work with
government to improve delivery of essential services to the public including education and health;
improve security and access to justice; and help rebuild schools and roads in the regions bordering
Afghanistan to replace those destroyed by conflict or floods.
5. Women and girls: Women and girls are at the centre of everything UK aid does. The UK’s support
will benefit some 2 million girls in school; increase the number of births delivered with the help of
nurses, midwives and doctors by 1 million; help 500,000 couples choose when and how many
children they have; help around 700,000 women access financial services such as micro-loans; and
support women’s rights in Pakistan including tackling domestic violence, empowering women to get
involved in local politics, and strengthening legislation.
Page 14 of 47
6. Humanitarian assistance: the DFID will continue to provide lifesaving humanitarian assistance when
needed, as it did in response to the devastating floods in 2010 and 2011, and the earthquake in
2005.
Programmes and Projects: Currently DFID has 27 major programmes in Pakistan operational in different
parts of the country, which will be completed during the period of next five years. The estimated cost of
these programmes is £ 1.455 billion including humanitarian assistance programme of £24.5 million for
2013.
Province /
Region
National
Project Name
Project Budget
USD
Pakistan Financial Inclusion Programme
Project
Start Date
2008
Project End
date
2015
69,344,906.16
National
Maternal and Newborn Health
2008
2015
2009
2014
2010
2015
2010
2015
2011
2014
2010
2014
2011
2016
2011
2014
2012
2020
2013
2015
2012
2014
2013
2016
2013
2021
2010
2014
2011
2016
2012
2017
125,580,000.00
National
Pakistan Education Task Force
National
Education Sector Voice and Accountability
Project
Innovation Fund for Education
3,888,017.52
National
6,900,001.38
4,140,000.00
National
National
National
Citizen Damage Compensation
Programme
Supporting Transparency, Accountability
and Electoral Processes in Pakistan
(STAEP)
Transforming Education in Pakistan
89,838,000.00
16,422,000.00
27,600,000.00
National
National
National
National
Humanitarian Assistance to floods
2011/2012 in Pakistan
Pakistan National Cash Transfers
Programme
Predictable Humanitarian Emergencies in
Pakistan During 2013
Supporting Electoral Reform in Pakistan
44,022,000.00
414,414,000.00
44,160,000.00
7,838,400.00
National
Portfolio Risk Assurance Programme
2,070,000.00
National
Poverty and Growth Programme
KP
Immediate Bilateral Support for Vital
Transport and Education Infrastructure in
Border Areas
Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Education Sector
Programme
Sub National Governance - Khyber
Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab
6,210,000.00
KP
KP
Page 15 of 47
31,755,456.00
280,830,000.00
52,616,805.60
Province /
Region
KP
Project Name
Project Budget
USD
KP, FATA
Emergency Assistance to Internally
Displaced Persons in Conflicted Affected
Areas of Pakistan
Pakistan: Support to Multi-Donor Trust
Fund (MDTF) for Northwest Frontier
Region
AAWAZ Voice and Accountability
Programme
Provincial Health & Nutrition Programme
Peacebuilding Support to PCNA (PSP)
Project
Start Date
2012
Project End
date
2016
41,676,000.00
KP, FATA,
Balochistan
KP, Punjab
KP, Punjab
2012
2014
2010
2016
2009
2017
2013
2018
2008
2015
2009
2014
2013
2019
2012
2016
2012
2018
18,630,000.00
57,270,000.00
47,610,000.00
220,824,398.40
Punjab
Punjab Economic Opportunities
Programme (PEOP)
Punjab School Education Programme I
Punjab
41,400,000.00
110,400,000.00
Punjab
Punjab Education Support Programme II
483,690,000.00
Punjab, Sindh,
KP, FATA
Sindh
Delivering Reproductive Health Results
Programme
Education Fund for Sindh
41,402,070.00
54,924,001.38
Implementing Partners: DFID has a wide range of partnership with government entities at national,
provincial/ regional and district levels. Also, it involves private sector, academia, media and local civil
society organizations in programme implementation besides strategic partnership with the World Bank
in Pakistan.
Funding Allocation: DFID has a planned allocation of £355 million for 2013-14, while 2012-13, £203.1
million were spent on eight priority areas as cited below:
DfID Funding Allocation in Pakistan
(2009-2013)
350
300
250
2009
200
2010
150
2011
100
2012
50
2013
0
2009
2010
2011
Page 16 of 47
2012
2013
DfID 2012-13 Expenditure by Sector
5%
13%
31%
Education
Global partnership
21%
2%
Governance and
Security
Humanitarian
9%
5%
14%
Funding Mechanism DFID provides funding through development grants and trust fund modalities. It
also provides technical assistance in priority areas mutually agreed upon by the Governments of UK and
Pakistan. DFID also provide direct budgetary support to the Government of Pakistan on a limited scale.
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The Netherlands
The Dutch policy priorities for development cooperation have undergone fundamental changes in 2011
based on the findings of a study commissioned by the Dutch government, entitled: more ambition and
less pretention. According to this study, the Netherlands should reduce the number of its ‘partner
countries’ and focus much more on sectors where it has a comparative advantage and value added:
water management, food security, rule of law and reproductive health. The study also recommends
putting more emphasis on investments and trade as engines for economic growth, employment and
human development.
Thematic Focus: The Dutch government also decided to refocus its support and services in the coming
years in Pakistan on the following two sectors:
1.
2.
Human security, rule of law and human rights and
Promotion of trade and investment under the slogan: from aid to trade.
Geographical Focus: Currently, the Dutch Embassy has projects in Malakand Division of Khyber
PakhtunKhwa province only.
Country Programme Strategy: For Pakistan changes in Dutch development cooperation have resulted in
the decision of the Dutch government to end its current bilateral development cooperation program.
Therefore, all projects in education, water & environment, and governance will be completed before
2015. This also implies that no new funding requests will be accepted by the Dutch government in the
afore-mentioned sectors.
The focus of the current bilateral development cooperation program is on basic education, water &
environment, and governance.
Programmes and Projects: The current focus of the Dutch funded projects is on education, water and
environment and governance. The education portfolio consists of 8 projects, covering pre-primary,
primary, secondary and technical/vocational education and training. Most projects started in response
to both natural disasters (earthquake and floods) and human emergencies in conflict affected districts,
in particular in Khyber PakhtunKhwa and Balochistan. Construction and rehabilitation of (girls) schools
and classrooms, improvement of sanitary facilities, provision of textbooks and complementary learning
materials, teacher training and school based planning and management are part and parcel of most of
the projects. Specific attention is paid to learning outcomes, safety and creating a child friendly learning
environment.
The current water and environment portfolio consist of 13 projects and programs. Collaboration in the
water and environment sectors are based on the priorities defined in the National Environmental Policy
of the Government of Pakistan.
The Governance portfolio consists of 7 projects and covers electoral reforms, strengthening the
functioning of Parliament, supporting community and public institutions for improved governance and
protecting basic human rights, enhancing peace and security through integration of women’s human
rights. The support also includes training of young diplomats in international relations and diplomatic
practice, and training of judges in international criminal law.
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Province /
Region
Project Name
Budget in USD
National
Human Rights Fund III (The Asia
Foundation)
TVET Reform support program (GIZ)
Project End Date
3,425,000.00
2015
20,550,000.00
2015
2,192,000.00
2014
National
ISL Bank-Netherlands WSPP-Phase II
(World Bank)
REVIP (IWMI)
3,973,000.00
2014
National
National Impact Assessment Prog.-(IUCN)
3,288,000.00
2014
National
Pakistan Domestic Biogas Prog. (RSPN)
4,247,000.00
2014
National
Re-integrating Street Children (LettuceBee
Kids)
Snow Leopard Conservation (Snow
Leopard Foundation)
Human Capacity Development for
Minorities (Caritas)
Youth Empowerment regarding SRHR
(Idrak)
Women Mentoring Women in Business
(LUMS)
Prince Claus Laureate Naiza Khan
Exhibtion (Kuch Khaas)
Safe the Children – Service Delivery
(Pakistan en Afghanistan)
The Citizen First (Oxfam Novib)
33,873,250.00
2014
34,250,000.00
2014
33,414,300.00
2014
33,988,330.00
2014
9,970,860.00
2014
4,896,380.00
2014
4,110,000.00
2015
5,480,000.00
2015
Partnership for Peace (International
Rescue Committee UK)
UNICEF Peace building Social Cohesion
and Resilience Program
Global Human Rights Defence (Pakistan,
India, Bangladesh)
IMPACT Alliance Oxfam Novib
7,946,000.00
2015
3,425,000.00
2015
2,329,000.00
2015
8,083,000.00
2015
Multi-Donor Trust Fund KP, FATA and
Balochistan (World Bank)
Strengthening Rule of Law in Malakand
(UNDP)
Support Public Safety and Justice in
Malakand Division (DTCE)
Battagram Education program (Save the
Children)
Criminal Justice in Balochistan (UNODC)
4,795,000.00
2015
1,918,000.00
2015
2,877,000.00
2015
19,180,000.00
2015
2,466,000.00
2015
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
National
KP, FATA,
Balochistan
KP
KP
KP
Balochistan
Funding Allocation: As of 2012, the Dutch government has contributed € 110.2 million to various
programmes and projects in Pakistan in the following sectors:
Page 19 of 47
Dutch Funding Allocation in Pakistan
Governance
and Human
Rights
11%
(as of 2012)
Education
50%
Water and
Environment
39%
Funding Modalities: The Dutch has a limited budget for small scale and short term projects in Pakistan.
This budget is available for projects that concern development, poverty reduction, health, gender,
education, environment, etc. (ODA) and other projects that concern the strengthening of ties between
Pakistan and the Netherlands, for example cultural projects (Non-ODA).
Implementing Partners: The Dutch were implementing projects with a number of government and non
government entities, as well as with UN agencies. A brief account of these partnerships is as under:
Education: The programs are implemented by international agencies such as UNICEF, Save the
Children, World Vision and GIZ in close collaboration and coordination with the Provincial and
District Education government officials and the other development partners.
2. Water & Environment : Current programs undertaken with the government, NGOs, private sector
include: the Asian Development Bank, World Bank and IWMI wetlands, mangroves, groundwater,
biodiversity, Indus River, livelihoods with local government, communities, UNDP, IUCN and WWF
with RSPN & SNV with UNDP and provincial governments.
3. Governance: These programs are implemented by international agencies like The Asia Foundation,
UNDP, UNWOMEN, and The Netherlands Institute for International Relations Clingendael, The
Hague Forum for Judicial Expertise, and also by local NGOs like Strengthening Participatory
Organization (SPO).
1.
Page 20 of 47
The European Union (EU)
Cooperation between the European Union (EU) and Pakistan dates back to 1974, but the 2004
cooperation agreement paved the way for closer relations. The EU’s humanitarian aid and Civil
Protection department (ECHO) has been working in Pakistan for a number of years, responding to
people affected by natural disasters and conflict. Humanitarian aid to Pakistan has totaled almost € 313
million since 2009. Various relief items were channeled and assistance provided to flood victims
through the EU Civil Protection Mechanism.
As part of the EU’s response to the devastating floods that hit Pakistan, the European Parliament and
the Council signed the measures giving emergency autonomous trade preferences for Pakistan on 25
October. This means that certain goods from Pakistan can enter the EU duty free or will be subject to
certain ceilings (tariff rate quotas). The measures enter into force in November 2012 following their
publication in the EU's Official Journal and was in place until 31 December 2013.
Thematic Focus: The current thematic focus of the EU is on two main priorities:
1. Rural development and natural resources management – the main concern here is the
deteriorating state of the environment and declining water resources. The objective is to
improve livelihoods and spur income generation and employment in rural communities,
including those with big refugee populations.
2. Education and human resources development – the aim is to increase access to basic education
and improve vocational training to prepare the growing number of young people for the job
market.
Geographical Focus: EU programme and project assistance has a county wide coverage with a focused
approached towards areas affected by natural and manmade disasters.
Country Programme Strategy: In line with Pakistan’s policy priorities, the EU’s programme strategy for
Pakistan (2007-2013) aims at reducing poverty. The first focal area for assistance is rural development
and natural resources management in Khyber PakhtunKhwa and Baluchistan with a view to reducing
regional disparities and promoting stability in Pakistan’s sensitive provinces bordering Afghanistan. The
second focal area will be education and human resources development which is a critical ingredient for
developing a well-trained work force and creating a moderate and stable Pakistan.
Activities carried out in the field of higher education will be financed within the context of the regional
programming for Asia. Other areas of assistance are trade development, democratization and human
rights and anti-money laundering.
To maximize the impact of EC assistance, key cross-cutting issues, in particular the environment, conflict
prevention, gender, HIV/AIDS, human rights and governance are mainstreamed in this CSP.
Programmes and Projects: The EU support goes to programmes in the areas of human rights,
democratization and trade development. There are two major initiatives currently being implemented in
Pakistan:
Page 21 of 47
1. Support for track2 dialogue between India and Pakistan (implemented through the Jinnah
Institute in Islamabad and the Centre for Dialogue and Reconciliation in Delhi): this project
includes the organization of conferences both in Delhi and Islamabad gathering civil society, think
tanks and media but also government officials. The objective is to discuss sensitive issues in order to
create mutual understanding and goodwill on both sides. This project lasted for 18 months and will
soon be prolonged for another 18 months. Kashmir was the main focus of the initial contracting
period and will remain one of the main angles for the next 18 months (together with other issues
such as water issues, Afghanistan post-2014 or media).
2. Peace-building in Kashmir (implemented through Conciliation Resources): the overall objective of
the project is to contribute to a more productive and inclusive peace process between India and
Pakistan by facilitating the participation of people from all regions of Kashmir and creating
constituencies for peace on both sides of the Line of Control (LoC). The project focus includes cross
LoC dialogue and advocacy training workshop for civil society, engagement of women ‘mentors’
with women on respective sides of the LoC, advocacy activities and meetings with parliamentarians
from both sides of Kashmir, joint university activities or support the development of a
Memorandum of Understanding between cross LoC Chambers and Traders Associations.
Implementing Partners: EU has been engaged with a wide range of implementing partners including
Democracy Reporting International, WB, UNDP, Internews, International Alert, Search for Common
Ground, Community Appraisal and Motivation Programme Society – CAMP, PAIMAN Alumni Trust,
International Foundation for Electoral Systems, Trust for Democratic Education and Accountability
(TDEA) / Free and Fair Elections Network
Funding Allocation: Under the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI), an indicative allocation of €
398 million has been earmarked for Pakistan for the period 2007-2013. These resources may be
supplemented by projects and programmes financed under the regional programmes for Asia and under
various thematic programmes. An overview of the past seven years (2000-2007) EU’s grant cooperation
with Pakistan as follows:
Total EU Grants to Pakistan 2000-2006 (in €)
15%
0.3%
53%
23%
0 .7%
5%
1%
3%
Asia- LA Allocation
NGOs
HR
Health
Food Security
Humanitarian Aid
Earthquake Reconstruction
Small Projects Facility
`
Funding Mechanism: EU provides funding through development grants and technical assistance in
priority areas agreed upon by the member states.
Page 22 of 47
Norway
The Government of Pakistan and Norway has long standing relations. Norway established diplomatic
relations with Pakistan when Pakistan gained its independence in 1947, and there’s been a Norwegian
Embassy in Islamabad since the 1970s. A cornerstone in the bilateral relations is the development
cooperation, with an emphasis on education, health, good governance and culture. Norway is also a
major humanitarian donor to Pakistan.
Thematic Focus: The overall objective of Norway’s development policy is to fight poverty and bring
about social justice. Norway’s development priorities for Pakistan in 2014 will include good governance,
education, rural development, women and gender equality and human rights. In addition, the embassy
supports projects related to culture, peace and reconciliation, and building local capacities for disaster
prevention, preparedness and response.
Geographical Focus: Norway’s development programme and project has a county wide coverage with a
focused approached towards neglected areas of the country.
Country Programme Strategy: Norwegian development policy is strongly aligned with the country’s
foreign policy and national interest in international stability and in “safeguarding global public good”.
The human-rights-approach and the focus on poverty reduction lost some importance in Norwegian
cooperation in the last years, while the orientation to growth became more important. Norway’s focus on
global poverty reduction is driven by a combination of moral responsibility and national interests. Its
development policy is based on a commitment to solidarity and the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs), the belief in a strong United Nations and a human-Rights-based-approach. Development policy
aims at challenging structural sources of inequality, injustice, oppression and discrimination. The
government is a strong supporter of multilateral development system, aid effectiveness, policy coherence
and innovative financing mechanisms.
Programmes and Projects: Norway has a number of new and on-going development initiatives in
Pakistan. UNODC and Norway signed a project agreement on 6 June 2013 with a grant of NOK 1.75
million. The project will support improved institutional capacities for police training and crime scene
investigation skills and processes, as well as improved training in prosecutor career development and
police-prosecutor cooperation. NOK 15 million is also being provided to a 3-year programme (20122014) for home based workers managed by UN Women. A total of NOK 20 million is expected to be
spent in 2014 on the phasing out of the Norwegian-Pakistan Partnership Initiative managed by UNFPA,
UNICEF and WHO.
On the humanitarian front, Norway contributed NOK 10 million (approx. US$ 1.6 million) to the
Emergency Response Fund Pakistan, while providing a combined total of NOK 50 million to
organizations such as Save the Children, UNHCR, NRC and the Norwegian Red Cross/IFRC/ICRC.
Page 23 of 47
Province
/ Region
National
Project Name
National
National
Responsive Education and Awareness for
Child Protection (REAP)
Institutional Cooperation Programme, Phase
II
OCHA Capacity Building Project
National
Coalition for the rights of minorities
National,
Punjab
National,
Punjab
GB
GB
Garamchashma Hospital
GB
National
GB
KP, GB
KP
KP
KP, FATA
Realization of human rights in Pakistan
Project Budget
Project
Project
USD
Start Date End date
1,373,917.88
2012
2014
837,754.80
2012
2014
4,188,774.02
2009
2014
931,750.89
2013
2014
50,265.29
2014
2014
Access Justice for Marginalized
1,591,734.13
2012
2014
Women's Economic Empowerment: Home
Based Workers
Chitral Integrated Development Programme
2,513,264.41
2013
2015
7,204,691.32
2009
2014
393,744.76
2013
2014
Harnessing capacities in DRR in hazardous
areas of Pakistan
Women Economic Empowerment: Phase-II
1,340,407.69
2011
2014
1,022,060.86
2013
2014
Culture Cooperation with Aga Khan Cultural
Service Pakistan
Sport & Play for Development and Peace,
Mardan
Reducing vulnerability through DRM in KPK
1,725,774.90
2012
2014
820,999.71
2012
2015
2,871,497.08
2011
2014
113,594.86
2013
2015
753,979.32
2012
2014
1,233,175.07
2012
2014
24,361,909.70
2008
2014
Punjab
Communities waging peace through youth
and mother's peace groups
Cultural Diversification Programme (CDP)
Punjab
House of Peace - Dar ul Aman
Sindh
Norway Pakistan Partnership Initiative
Implementing Partners: Norway works in collaboration with national and local level development
partners throughout the country besides the UN system. Some of these partners include UNODC, OCHA,
NDMA, and non Government Organizations.
Funding Allocation: The annual development budget managed by the Norwegian Embassy in Pakistan is
targeted at NOK 100 million. Norway is the third largest contributor to the ERF having contributed NOK
45 million in total (approx. US$ 7.5 million) since 2010. Norway is also the fund’s most consistent
Page 24 of 47
contributor having allocated funding every year since its establishment. In 2013 Norway also allocated
NOK 5.5 million to support a capacity building project with the NDMA, coordinated by UN OCHA, which
is still ongoing.
2013 total annual budget 100 Million NOK
Budget bifurcation
Contribution to the ERF
Capacity building project with NDMA
45%
55%
Funding Mechanism: The Embassy of Norway does not issue calls for applications though accepts and
evaluates project applications throughout the year. While the embassy mainly grants project and
programme support, funding for small scale grants may also be allocated. As most grants are offered for
multi-year projects, every year only a limited portion of the total development budget may be
allocated for new projects. All grants are made public online at the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign
Affairs’ Grants Portal, available at URL: http://udtilskudd.regjeringen.no
All grant applicants are expected to be aware of and demonstrate measures in the fight against
corruption, a clear gender perspective, and considerations of project impacts on the environment and
the vulnerability to climate change. Grant recipients are expected to be familiar with UN Security
Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security.
All disbursements committed by the Norwegian Embassy, beyond the budget year of the grant letter,
are subject to parliamentary appropriations.
Page 25 of 47
Germany
Development cooperation between Pakistan and Germany goes back to 1961, with the funding volume
to date totalling some 2.5 billion Euros. Pakistan was thus one of Germany's first partner countries. The
regional focus of this cooperation has traditionally been the north-western part of the country. Germany
is one of the few donors to have its own implementing structures. It is active in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa
Province (KP) and is one of a few of Pakistan's partners to be implementing measures in the Federally
Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) along the border with Afghanistan. Individual measures are also
carried out in Gilgit-Baltistan, Azad Jammu Kashmir, Sindh and the Punjab.
Thematic Focus: The following areas are priority areas of cooperation:
 Governance
 energy
 education incl. vocational education and training
 health
Geographical Focus: Traditionally, German development cooperation focused on Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
province and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). At the request of the Government of
Pakistan, selected programmes have been expanded to the most populous and economically important
province of Punjab and to the Karachi metropolitan area.
Country Programme Strategy: Country Strategy 2015 to 2020 is under development.
Programmes and Projects: German Development Cooperation has a number of new and on-going
development initiatives i.e. Education, Energy, Health and Governance in Pakistan.
Province /
Region
National
Project Name
National
Safe Blood Transfusion
National
Microfinance Programme
Project Budget
USD
Tuberculosis Control Programme
Project
Project
Start Date End date
2010
2014
5,680,000.00
2009
2014
2010
2020
yet to be
defined
2009
yet to be
defined
2015
2013
2015
2010
2016
2009
2015
2010
2016
17,750,000.00
7,810,000.00
National
Glacier Monitoring Project
4,260,000.00
National
National
Strengthening the Gender Crime Center of
PPB
Health Sector Support
31,950,000.00
12,070,000.00
National
Support to TVET Reform
76,680,000.00
National
RAHA Capacity Development
24,850,000.00
National,
Support to Good Governance
Page 26 of 47
Province /
Region
KP, FATA
National,
KP
AJK
Project Name
FATA
FATA Development Program
FATA
FATA Health Programme
GB
Harpo Hydropower Project
GB
Health Programme GB
KP
KP
Livelihood and Community Infrastructure
Program
Support to Infrastructure Development in
KP
Support to Development Planning in KP
KP
Hydropower Keyal Khwar
KP
Hydropower and Renewable Energy
Programme
Basic Health KP
KP
KP
KP
Geohazard Assessment Northern PAK
Health Infrastructure Programme AJK
KP
Education Sector Development Programme
KP
RAHA
KP
Promotion of Biodiversity
KP
Edu Swap II: School-Infrastructure KP
KP
Dev Swap III: Housing Reconstruction KP
KP
Dev Swap IV: Rehabilitation of Schools KP
KP
Dev Swap V: Health Infrastructure
KP, FATA
Rural Family Planning
KP, FATA
Reproductive Health in Rural Areas
and ICT
KP, FATA,
Multi-Donor Trust Fund
Balochistan
KP, GB
Hydropower Development Programme
Page 27 of 47
Project Budget
Project
Project
USD
Start Date End date
190,280,000.00
2008
2015
1,420,000.00
2006
2014
195,960,000.00
2009
2015
75,260,000.00
2009
2014
38,340,000.00
2009
2014
152,650,000.00
2004
2014
53,250,000.00
2009
2014
224,360,000.00
2014
2016
7,100,000.00
2011
2014
4,260,000.00
2009
2017
689,410,000.00
2013
2016
7,100,000.00
2000
2014
44,730,000.00
2008
2015
3,550,000.00
2013
2016
124,250,000.00
2012
2015
3,550,000.00
ongoing
ongoing
181,760,000.00
ongoing
ongoing
21,300,000.00
ongoing
ongoing
17,750,000.00
ongoing
ongoing
14,200,000.00
2010
2014
8,520,000.00
2010
2015
96,560,000.00
2010
2015
14,200,000.00
yet to be
yet to be
Province /
Region
Project Name
KP, GB
Social Health Protection
Punjab
Grid Station Ghazi Road
Punjab
Promotion of Basic Education in Punjab
Punjab
Water Efficiency Programme PAK
Punjab
Support to Punjab Prosecution Service
Punjab, KP
Renewable Energy and Energy Effiency
Project
Strengthening Civil Law Enforcement in
Sindh
SME Support
Sindh
to be
defined
Project Budget
Project
Project
USD
Start Date End date
443,040,000.00
defined
defined
yet to be
yet to be
124,250,000.00
defined
defined
2008
2016
80,230,000.00
2009
2015
31,950,000.00
yet to be
yet to be
2,130,000.00
defined
defined
2011
2014
16,330,000.00
2011
2014
6,390,000.00
2013
2015
2,130,000.00
yet to be
yet to be
7,100,000.00
defined
defined
Implementing Partners: Following departments and implementing partners are implementing projects
funded by German Development Cooperation under the respective thematic areas.
Education:
 Departments of Education in KP, ICT, AJK, Balochistan, Punjab, FATA
 NAVTTC, Departments of Technical Education (TEVTA) in all provinces and regions
Energy:
 Ministry of Water and Power
 WAPDA
 AEDB
 SMEDA
 PPAF
Health:
 Department of Health in KP, AJK, Gilgit-Baltistan and FATA
 National Planning Commission and national Ministry for Health
 Social Security Stakeholders
 Civil Society Organizations
 BISP
Governance:
• provincial government and selected district authorities in KP
• FATA Secretariat
• Federal Board of Revenue
• Federal Statistics Office
• Geological Survey of Pakistan
Page 28 of 47
Others:
 NRSP
 World Bank
 SAARC Secretariat
Funding Allocation: German Development Cooperation has been allocating the funding on the Energy
sector, health, Governance, Debt Swaps and Education respectively.
Gilgit Baltistan - GB
4%
AJK
4%
Dept Swaps
24%
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa - KP
41%
Punjab
3%
country-wide
13%
KP & FATA
9%
Provincial and Administrative Areas wise Focus - GDC
Page 29 of 47
Federally Administered Tribal
Areas - FATA
2%
Funding Mechanism: German Development Cooperation is mainly implementing through German
Implementing Agencies GIZ and KfW. In addition funding is provided to INGO and NGO partners:
1. Technical Cooperation: GIZ - the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH is
the largest implementer of Technical Cooperation. GIZ has been engaged in Pakistan on behalf of
the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). GIZ further subgrants different projects to the different organizations and institutions as per the required
implementing expertise.
2. Financial Cooperation: KfW - As a development bank, KfW works on behalf of the German
Government to reduce poverty, protect the climate, ensure peace and organise globalisation in such
a way that those living in the world's poorer regions will benefit. In practice, this means: food
security and basic education for all, healthy economic growth that does not occur at the expense of
the environment, reliable energy supply that helps preserve the climate, and financial services that
are available to all and enable people to escape from poverty.
Page 30 of 47
Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
JICA Pakistan Office was established in 1983 under the Exchange of Notes signed between the
Government of Pakistan and Government of Japan. Since then JICA Pakistan office has been working as
one of the more than 90 JICA worldwide offices. An agreement on technical cooperation was signed
between the two governments in April 30, 2005; this agreement will facilitate technical Cooperation
through JICA in Pakistan more effectively under a solid umbrella framework.
Thematic Focus: JICA has defined the following three priority areas for development assistance to
Pakistan:
1.
2.
3.
Ensuring human security and human development
Development of sound market economy
Achievement of balanced regional socio-economic development
In constant with the above direction, JICA is actively implementing various sector specific programs
agreed upon by both, Governments of Japan and Pakistan. The sectors which Government of Japan has
focused mainly are Health/Sanitation, Education, Irrigation/Water resource Development, Agriculture,
Industrial Development, Governance & Environment.
Geographical Focus: JICA’s development programme and project has a county wide coverage with a
focused approached towards neglected areas of the country.
Country Programme Strategy: JICA follows the country assistance Program of the Government of Japan
which defines medium and long term goals for the country that are aimed at "building a sustainable
society" under this specific goal JICA is strengthening polio eradication and immunization measures, and
providing water and sewer infrastructure and institutional arrangements to respond to rapid
urbanization. JICA is also providing assistance for building power transmission and road networks
primarily through ODA loans, and strengthening domestic industries through technical cooperation.
Other assistance JICA is providing includes technical assistance for disaster preparedness at the national
level, utilizing Japan's expertise that comes from being affected often by natural disasters.
Programmes and Projects: In constant with the above direction, JICA is actively implementing various
sector specific programs agreed upon by both, Governments of Japan and Pakistan. The sectors which
Government of Japan have focused mainly are Health/Sanitation, Education, Irrigation/Water resource
Development, Agriculture, Industrial Development, Governance & Environment.
Technical Cooperation
Province /
Region
Project Name
National
The Project for Improvement of Training Capacity
on Grid System Operation and Maintenance
The Project for Promotion of Value Added Fruit
Products in Gilgit-Baltistan
Project for Capacity Development of Technical and
GB
KP
Project Start
Date
Page 31 of 47
Project End
date
2011
2014
2012
2016
to be decided
to be decided
Province /
Region
KP
Project Name
Project Start
Date
Vocational Centers in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Project for Strengthening of Routine Immunization
Project End
date
to be decided
to be decided
Strengthening Irrigation Management System
Including Agriculture Extension through Farmers'
Participation in the Punjab Province
Non-Formal Education Promotion Project
2009
2014
2011
2014
Punjab
Project for Integrated Solid Waste Management
Master Plan in Gujranwala
2014
2016
Balochistan
Project on In Country Training and Provision of
Equipment for Baluchistan University of
Information Technology Engineering and
Management Sciences (BUITEMS)
Livestock Farmers Entrepreneurship Development
Project
to be decided
to be decided
2014
2019
Punjab
Punjab
Sindh
JICA - Grant Aid for Pakistan
Province /
Region
National
National
Punjab
Sindh
Sindh, Punjab
and ICT
Project Name
Project
Budget
The Project for the Improvement of Audio
Visual Equipment of the National Institute
of Folk and Traditional Heritage
Project for Rehabilitation of Pakistan
Medium Wave Radio Broadcasting
Network
Project for Retrieval of Sewerage and
Drainage System in Faisalabad
Project for the Improvement of Child
Health Institute in Karachi
Project for Airport Security Improvement
Project
Start Date
2012
Project End
date
2014
13,327,855.00
2010
2016
2012
2015
2012
2015
2013
2016
13,327,855.00
6,572,509.00
13,693,529.00
18,726,358.00
JICA - Loan Aid for Pakistan
Province /
Region
National
National
National
National
Project Name
PK-P55 (Indus Highway III)
PK-P56 (Dadu-Khuzdar Transmission
System)
PK-P57 (East-West Road Improvement (N70))
PK-P58 ( Punjab Transmission and Grid
Page 32 of 47
Project
Project
Budget
Start Date
35,624,346
2006
149,079,516
2006
Project End
date
2017
2015
114,927,489
2008
2017
109,528,986
2008
2015
National
National
KP
Punjab
Sindh
Station Project)
PK-P61 (National Transmission Lines and
Grid Stations Strengthening Project)
PK-P63(Polio Eradication Project)
PK-P62(Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Emergency
Rural Road Rehabilitation Project)
PK-P59 (Punjab Irrigation System
Improvement Project)
PK-P60 (Rural Road Construction Project II
(Sindh))
141,458,100
2010
2017
48,035,192
48,047,639
2011
2011
2015
2020
87,819,498
2008
2017
224,215,900
2008
2015
Implementing Partners: JICA has a diverse group of national and provincial implementing partners in
public sector, which include National Transmission and Dispatch Company Limited, Water And Power
Development Authority, Karachi Electric Supply Corporation Ltd, Ministry Of Railways (Railway Board),
National Highway Authority, Ministry Of Local Government And Rural Development, Ports And Shipping
Wing , Ministry Of Communication, Communication and Works Department, Government of Khyber
PakhtunKhwa Province, Works And Services Department, The Government Of Sindh, Irrigation And
Power Department, The Government Of Punjab, Agricultural Development Bank Of Pakistan, PakAmerican Fertilizers Ltd, Education Department, Government Of Balochistan
Funding Allocation: JICA has made the following disbursement for financial year 2011:
1.
2.
3.
ODA Loans: 13.1 Billion ¥
Grants Aid: 3.358 Billion ¥
Technical Cooperation Expenses: 1.928 Billion ¥ billion
JICA Assistance to Pakistan
FY 2011
11%
18%
71%
ODA Loan
Grant Aid
Technical Cooperation Expenses
Funding Mechanism: The ODA has two aid categories; bilateral and the multi-lateral. Bilateral aid is
given directly to developing countries, while multilateral aid is provided through international
organizations. JICA provides bilateral aid in the form of technical Cooperation, Japanese ODA Loans and
grant aid.
Page 33 of 47
Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC)
The office of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) is part of the Embassy of
Switzerland and has been operating in Pakistan since 1966. Switzerland and Pakistan have had a longstanding relationship and the Swiss government has supported the Government of Pakistan in its
development strategy for more than 40 years. Switzerland aims at contributing to the development in
the region and peaceful coexistence of the people through improving the lives of the most vulnerable
population and enhances local governance and human rights.
Thematic Focus: In Pakistan, SDC concentrates on three basic tenants of development:
1. Promotion of micro enterprises through finance and vocational education.
2. Support to sustainable practices regarding the use of natural resources.
3. Promotion of human rights and education, with emphasis placed upon the education of women
and girls.
SDC Humanitarian Aid (SDC-HA) is assisting the Government of Pakistan in emergencies with relief and
reconstruction programmes.
Geographical Focus: SDC operates nationwide with a strong focus on Khyber PakhtunKhwa, FATA and
Northern areas.
Country Programme Strategy: SDC’s long term development strategy for Pakistan is focused on
reducing poverty, fighting discrimination and supporting disadvantaged population groups. The SDC is
aiming to achieve this by empowering the population through strengthening local governance;
increasing incomes by teaching the local people how to better manage their natural resources and
supporting the vulnerable populations, such as women and children.
Programmes and Projects: The SDC as part of the Embassy of Switzerland has focused on alleviating
poverty, empowering people by improving good governance and livelihoods and supporting
disadvantaged population groups. The SDC has also provided extensive humanitarian assistance in the
form of emergency relief, reconstruction / rehabilitation and prevention / preparedness activities.
Development Cooperation: Switzerland’s long-term commitment in Pakistan focuses on reducing
poverty, fighting discrimination and supporting disadvantaged population groups.
The SDC’s activities in Pakistan under the current “Pakistan Hindukush Programme” (PHP) are built on
two main pillars:
Improving the living conditions of the rural population by contributing to enhance livelihoods and
strengthen resilience of population.
Swiss Humanitarian Aid (SHA): The SDC humanitarian aid activities focus on reconstruction and
rehabilitation along with prevention and preparedness for the benefit of victims of natural disasters as
well as on the measures to improve living conditions of refugees and internally displaced persons by:
 Reconstructing / rehabilitating infrastructure, particularly schools.
 Providing water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) facilities to the communities.
 Community based Disaster Risk Reduction (CBDRR) activities.
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
Secondments and financial contribution to international organizations.
Province /
Region
Project Name
KP, FATA
Livelihoods Programme Hindukush Pakistan
KP, FATA
KP, FATA
KP, FATA
KP
KP
KP
FATA
Project Budget
USD
Project Start
Date
Project End
date
17,091,941
2012
2015
Water and Sanitation (WSP South Asia),
Global Programme
Water for Livelihoods Project
2,546,812
2012
2015
4,788,007
2011
2013
Rehabilitation of Drinking Water Supply in
KPK after the Floods 2010
Water and Energy Security through
Microhydels in the Hindukush (MHP)
Reconstruction of Schools
5,206,816
2011
2014
1,765,790
2011
2013
5,206,816
2011
2014
Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction
Project
FATA Development Programme
470,000
2013
2015
3,239,815
2013
2015
Implementing Partners: SDC works with a wide range of public and private sector partners. These
include the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Local and national non-governmental organizations and public institutions;
United Nations agencies such as the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the United
Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the International Labor Organization (ILO) and the
International Union for Conservation of Nature (UICN);
International financial institutions such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank;
The government of Khyber PakhtunKhwa Province and to some extent the national government
as well the State Bank of Pakistan.
Commercial banks and leasing companies. In the recent past, SDC has supported the First
Women Bank and the Bank of Khyber. Partnerships are currently implemented with Network
Leasing and Orix Leasing.
Other donors: SDC has reactivated a MSE Donor dialogue focusing on microfinance
and improving coordination among donors.
Funding Allocation: SDC’s funding commitments to Pakistan equal 14.5 CHF million a year.
Funding Mechanism: The SDC provides support by either directly implementing its projects or by
working with the Government of Pakistan (GoP) or local non-governmental organizations that act as the
SDC’s implementing partners. Furthermore, the SDC financially contributes to programmes of other
organizations, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Office of the United Nations
High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the World Food Programme (WFP) and other organizations
providing aid the SDC deems effective and worthwhile investing in.
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After natural disasters, such as the 2010 floods, the SDC supported multilateral partners with various
experts from the Swiss Humanitarian Aid Unit. The beneficiaries of this secondment were the United
Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA), the World Food Programme
(WFP) and the World Bank.
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US Agency for International Development (USAID)
For more than 60 years, the United States and Pakistan have worked together to forge a relationship
that benefits the people of both countries. This cooperation produced transformative ideas and
institutions that are still being considered landmark accomplishments to this day. This cooperation is
fostering Pakistan’s economic and social progress as well as reinforcing the country’s role in the world.
The historic Enhanced Partnership with Pakistan Act of 2009, by now Secretary of State John Kerry,
launched a robust new era of cooperation with Pakistan on development. The infusion of new resources
provided for integrated, longer-term development programs in key sectors that are priorities for both
Pakistan and the United States.
Thematic Focus: The United States has a deep interest in a stable, democratic, and prosperous Pakistan,
as well as long-term constructive bilateral partnership. The USAID assistance program focuses on five
priority sectors with crosscutting themes of civic participation, accountability and women’s
empowerment:
1. Increased sustainable energy supplied to the economy;
2. Improved economic status of focus populations;
3. Increased stability in focus areas;
4. Improved opportunities for learning and work;
Improved maternal and child health outcomes in focus areas;
Geographical Focus: USAID programs are implemented in all areas of Pakistan, with a focus on underrepresented geographic areas, including:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Federally Administered Tribal Areas
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Southern Punjab
Sindh
Balochistan
Gilgit-Baltistan
Azad Jammu Kashmir
Country Programme Strategy: USAID program strategies are based on the national development
priorities identified by the Government of Pakistan (GOP) in various sector development strategies. In
addition, the program strategies also take into account priorities expressed by the Pakistani public in
polling, media, and civil society discussions.
Programmes and Projects: Working with the GOP, other U.S. Government agencies, as well as
multilateral and bilateral donors, USAID Pakistan has focused its program over the last year on five areas
essential to Pakistan’s stability and long-term development and reflective of the GOP’s development
priorities. Over the last year, USAID has streamlined the number of projects to less than 70 and has also
chosen to implement over half of all funding through local government and non-government
organizations in Pakistan. Supporting the civilian government’s capacity to meet the needs of its citizens
Page 37 of 47
is a vital element of USAID’s program, as is working with non-governmental organizations and the
private sector.
Province /
Region
Project Name
Project
Budget USD
National
Agribusiness Project
National
Anti-Fraud Hotline Program
National
Assessment and Strengthening Program
National
National
Emergency Food Security Program in
Pakistan
Field Epidemiology Laboratory and
Training Program
Gender Equity Program
National
Maternal and Child Health Program
National
Pakistan Grain Storage Program
National
Pakistan Private Investment Initiative
National
Pakistan Reading Project
National
Project
Start Date
Project End
date
39,947,381
2011
2015
2,964,668
2010
2015
44,407,228
2010
2015
889,705
2013
2014
6,783,498
2005
2014
40,000,000
2010
2015
387,000,000
2013
2019
2,500,000
2011
2014
24,000,000
2013
2023
159,738,358
2013
2018
Pakistan Strategy Support Program
22,713,134
2011
2015
National
Political Parties Development Program
21,500,000
2011
2016
National
Prevention of Election Related Violence
2,500,000
2013
2015
National
Small Grants and Ambassador's Fund
Program
Strengthening Citizen Voice and Public
Accountability Program
Training for Pakistan Project
49,988,052
2010
2015
45,000,000
2011
2016
33,927,813
2013
2017
U.S. Pakistan Science & Technology
Cooperative Program
Mangla Dam Rehabilitation Project
12,402,034
2005
2018
150,000,000
2013
2017
Repair and Rehabilitation of the
Muzaffargarh Thermal Power Station
Guddu Power Station Project
15,778,195
2010
2014
19,123,730
2010
2014
Repair and Rehabilitation of the
Jamshoro Thermal Power Station
19,329,150
2010
2014
National
National
National
National
National, AJK
National, Punjab
National, Sindh
National, Sindh
Page 38 of 47
Province /
Region
Project Name
Project
Budget USD
GB
Satpara Development Project
FATA
FATA Infrastructure Project
FATA
FATA Institutional Strengthening Project
KP
KP Reconstruction Program
KP
Project
Start Date
Project End
date
19,753,163
2012
2017
611,500,000
2010
2014
17,959,598
2011
2016
149,900,000
2010
2014
Municipal Services Program – KP
84,750,000
2012
2016
KP
Tarbela Dam Repair & Maintenance
16,500,000
2010
2014
KP, FATA
25,000,000
2012
2015
KP, FATA
Conflict Victims Support Program in KP
& FATA
FATA-KP Health Program
30,499,998
2012
2017
KP, FATA
Gomal Zam Irrigation Project
52,000,000
2011
2014
KP, FATA
Peshawar - Torkham Road Rehabilitation
67,000,000
2012
2014
KP, Sindh
Water and Sanitation Program
5,736,576
2011
2016
KP, Balochistan,
FATA
Punjab
NWFP/FATA/Balochistan Multi-Donor
Trust Fund
Dairy Project
25,000,000
2010
2015
14,018,777
2011
2014
Punjab
USAID Power Distribution Program
230,000,000
2010
2015
Punjab
Women's Hostel Project
6,000,000
2011
2014
Punjab, Sindh
Pakistan Trade Project
37,118,147
2009
2014
Punjab, Sindh, KP USAID Pakistan Entrepreneurs
29,999,830
2009
2014
Punjab, Sindh, KP
and Balochistan
Punjab, Sindh,
KP, FATA,
Balochistan, GB
and ICT
Punjab, Sindh,
KP, FATA, GB,
and KP
Sindh
Agriculture Innovation Project
30,000,000
2013
2016
Pakistan Firms Project
92,255,031
2009
2014
Merit and Needs Based Scholarship
Program
37,400,000
2004
2016
Health Infrastructure Improvement
21,734,087
2011
2015
Page 39 of 47
Province /
Region
Project Name
Sindh
Municipal Services Program - Sindh
22,000,000
2012
2016
Sindh
Sindh Basic Education Project
81,000,000
2011
2016
Sindh, KP,
Balochistan,
FATA, GB and ICT
Balochistan
USAID Energy Policy Program
80,283,410
2011
2015
Balochistan Agriculture Project
25,400,000
2009
2015
Balochistan
Construction of 6 University Faculties
and Rehabilitation/Reconstruction of
Flood Damaged Schools
Kalat-Quetta-Chaman Highway
Construction
40,000,000
2010
2015
90,000,000
2013
2015
Balochistan
Project
Budget USD
Project
Start Date
Project End
date
Implementing Partners: USAID programs are mutually agreed upon by the governments of the United
States and Pakistan. These programs are implemented in partnership with government organizations,
non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector;
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
Abraaj Capital Limited
Aga Khan Foundation
Agribusiness Support Fund
Associates in Development Pvt. Ltd.
Aurat Foundation
Benazir Income Support Program
CDM Constructors, Inc.
Center for Disease Control
Chemonics International, Inc.
Creative Associates International
Dairy and Rural Development Foundation
Deloitte Consulting LLP
Education and Literacy Department, Government of Sindh
FATA Secretariat
Food and Agriculture Organization
Forman Christian College
Government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Halcrow Pakistan Pvt. Ltd
Higher Education Commission
Information Management & Mine Action Program
International Finance Corporation
Page 40 of 47
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
International Food Policy Research Institute
International Organization for Migration
International Relief and Development
International Rescue Committee
Internews
Jhpiego
John Snow, Incorporated
KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation
Lahore University of Management Sciences
Macro International, Inc.
Management System International
Marie Stopes Society
Mennonite Economic Development Associates
Mercy Corp
Ministry of Water and Power, Govt. of Pakistan
National Academy of Sciences, Washington
National Democratic Institute
National Development Consultants
National Engineering Services of Pakistan (Pvt.) Limited
National Rural Support Program
Provincial Reconstruction, Rehabilitation and Settlement Authority, Govt. of KP
Population Services International
Public Health Institute
Rural Support Program Network
The World Bank
Transparency International - Pakistan
Trust for Democratic Education & Accountability
United Nations Children's Fund
United Nations Development Program
United State Department of Agriculture
United States Institute of Peace
World Food Program
World Health Organization
World Learning, Inc.
Page 41 of 47
Funding Allocation: From October 2009 to December 2013, USAID Pakistan disbursed:
KLB Disbursement from October 01, 2009 - December 31, 2013
Sectors
Amount $ in Million
266.648
Energy
Economic Growth & Agriculture
230.784
Stabilization
765.121
Education
276.499
Health
216.316
1,092.009
Humanitarian/Flood Assistance
549.000
Cash Transfer
TOTAL
3,396.377
Disbursement : 10/01/2009 - 12/31/2013
16%
32%
23%
6%
8%
7%
8%
Cash Transfer
Economic Growth & Agriculture
Energy
Stabilization
Education
Health
Funding Mechanism: The U.S assistance is directed through GOP, local, international NGOs and private
sector companies. In programs where USAID Pakistan partners directly with the GOP, USAID Pakistan
signs activity agreements with the implementing Pakistani government agency. Before any award is
signed, USAID Pakistan also conducts pre-award surveys of all government and non-government
institutions with which USAID Pakistan is considering signing a direct award. Currently, funding
mechanisms include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Direct funding for federal government projects and programs
Direct funding for provincial government projects and programs
Direct funding to Pakistani NGOs
Direct funding to Pakistani private sector companies
Direct funding to international NGOs
Page 42 of 47
f.
g.
h.
i.
Direct funding to non-Pakistan private sector companies
Multi-donor trust funds
Direct grants to multilateral organizations
Public-private partnerships with private sector companies
Page 43 of 47
The World Bank
The World Bank’s support to Pakistan is directly linked to country’s own development vision. The World
Bank, Pakistan is helping the Federal and Provincial Governments in implementing various reform
programs aimed at encouraging growth, investment, and employment generation. Reforms at the
provincial level are specifically aimed at improving delivery of social services like education, health, clean
drinking water, and sanitation. These efforts have yielded impressive results in many areas.
Thematic Focus: More precisely, the World Bank has been supporting the Government of Pakistan in the
following four strategic pillars emanating from the current country partnership strategy:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Economic governance
Human development and social protection
Infrastructure to support growth
Security and reducing the risk of conflict
Geographical Focus: The World Bank has been working in all provinces including Federally Administered
Tribal Areas (FATA)
Country Programme Strategy: The World Bank Country Partnership Strategy was updated with a
Progress Report in 2012 which in consultation with the Government of Pakistan now covers the period
up to 2014. The overall focus of the strategy is to help Pakistan's economy get back onto a path of high,
sustained growth. The partnership remains centered on the existing strategic pillars of the strategy and
evolving federal and provincial priorities as validated by the government and other stakeholders during
various consultation sessions. In consultation with the Government, the strategy period was extended to
include FY 2014 to synchronize it with the national political cycle and the IDA cycle.
The World Bank Group Pakistan is currently preparing its new Country Partnership Strategy for the next
five years, covering Fiscal Years 2015-2019. It will be designed to focus on the twin goals of ending
extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity.
Programmes and Projects: The World Bank uses lending and analytical work to help Pakistan achieve its
goals. Pakistan’s portfolio (IDA/IBRD/MDTF) consists of 34 projects with a total commitment of $4.4
billion. In addition, the Bank maintains an extensive and ongoing analytic work program on a wide range
of economic and sector specific topics.
The Regional agenda will continue to be a Bank focus. South Asia remains one of the least integrated
regions in the world, and this undermines growth efforts. Many of the Bank’s country-specific Pakistan
projects in trade and transportation, ports, and power will help regional cooperation. Beyond this, the
Bank expects to support increased trade cooperation between Pakistan and its neighbors. This will be
particularly important in strengthening the trade corridor with Afghanistan during its transition period. A
regional power line (CASA-1000) is also being supported that would connect Central Asia, Afghanistan
and Pakistan.
Page 44 of 47
Province /
Region
Project Name
Project
Project
Budget – USD Start Date
(Millions)
108.5
2005
Project End
date
National
National
Second Improvement to Financial
Reporting and Auditing Project (PIFRA II)
Third Poverty Alleviation Fund
250
2009
2015
National
Electricity Distribution and Transmission
196.8
2008
2014
National
National
Water Sector Capacity Building and
Advisory Services Project
Karachi Port Improvement
38
2008
2014
115.8
2011
2015
National
Tertiary Education Support Project
300
2011
2015
National
Partnership for Polio Eradication III
139.7
2009
2014
National
Flood Emergency Cash Transfer
125
2011
2014
National
Social Safety Net TA
210
2009
2016
National
Tarbela 4th Extension Hydropower
Project
Natural Gas Efficiency Project
840
2012
2018
200
2012
2017
8.8
2011
2015
FATA
KP/FATA/Balochistan Governance Project
(MDTF)
KP/FATA Economic Revitalization Project
(MDTF)
FATA Rural Livelihoods & Infrastructure
(MDTF)
FATA Urban Centers Project (MDTF)
FATA
National
KP/ FATA/
Balochistan
KP/FATA
2014
20
2011
2015
12
2012
2015
7
2012
2015
FATA Rural Roads Project (MDTF)
16
2012
2015
KP
Revitalizing Health in KP (MDTF)
16
2012
2015
KP
KP Emergency Roads Recovery (MDTF)
17.1
2011
2014
KP
KP Southern Area Development
18
2013
2015
KP
Competitive Industries Project in KP
(MDTF)
Land Record Management
Punjab Barrages Improvement Phase II
Project
Punjab Irrigated Agriculture Production
9
2013
2015
115.7
145.6
2007
2010
2014
2016
250
2012
2018
FATA
Punjab
Punjab
Punjab
Page 45 of 47
Province /
Region
Project Name
Project
Start Date
Project End
date
Punjab
Punjab Education Sector II
2012
2015
Punjab
Punjab Cities Governance Improvement
150
2012
2017
Punjab
Punjab Health Sector Reform Project
100
2013
2017
Punjab
50
2013
2018
Sindh
Punjab Public Management Reform
Program
Sindh Water Sector Improvement
150.2
2007
2015
Sindh
Sindh Skills Development
21
2011
2014
Sindh
Sindh Education Sector II
400
2012
2017
Balochistan
Balochistan Small Scale Irrigation
25
2008
2014
Balochistan
Balochistan Education Support
22
2006
2014
Balochistan
Promoting Girls Education in Balochistan
(MDTF)
Balochistan Disaster Management Project
(MDTF)
Second Improvement to Financial
Reporting and Auditing Project (PIFRA II)
10
2012
2015
5
2012
2015
108.5
2005
2014
Balochistan
National
Project
Budget – USD
(Millions)
350
Implementing Partners: The World Bank works in collaboration with federal ministries, autonomous
bodies, and provincial/ regional departments throughout the country. The Bank has programs having
partnership with local civil society organizations and private sector.
Funding Allocation: To support the aforementioned thematic areas, the Bank will remain engaged with
a robust program projected at up to $4.0 billion in new IDA/IBRD lending over FY 2012-14. An increasing
portion of the Bank’s portfolio is being managed at the province level, consistent with the recent 18th
Constitutional Amendment. The Bank also manages a Multi-Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) of about $140
million for conflict-affected areas, which provides grants to Khyber PakhtunKhwa, FATA and Balochistan.
Page 46 of 47
An overview of the Bank’s fiscal commitments to Pakistan over the period from FY 2009 to FY 2013 is
given in the following table.
Commitments by Fiscal Year (in millions of dollars)
FY 2009
1,610
FY 2010
300
FY 2011
1,553
FY 2012
1,790
FY 2013
744
Total
6,136
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
Funding Mechanism: The World Bank has rolled out an innovative lending instrument that ties funding
directly to the delivery of results. The newly introduced Program-for-Results (PforR) modality does not
provide financing to cover a program’s expense. Instead, it disburses money upon the delivery and
verification of predefined results. PforR is designed to help improve the capacity, transparency and
performance of a recipient country’s government systems and institutions focused on improving
national systems such as those for the health and education sector. It is to complement two existing
World Bank lending instruments: policy-based loans that fund policy changes and project-support loans
that finance project expenditures or inputs. PforR is used in combination with any or both of the two.
Page 47 of 47
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